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Selwyn Times: May 02, 2018

10 Fix those minor

10 Fix those minor defects Start out front, cleaning, clearing and decluttering the yard to make a good impression on buyers. It’s a rare house that doesn’t have defects. Even newly renovated ones can have features that detract for buyers. But there are ways for sellers to deflect attention from them without pretending they’re not there. The three main ways of dealing with defects are: 1. Fix them. 2. Draw the eye away from them. 3. Use them as a selling point. Simple defects can be fixed easily. Start out front. Overgrown bushes can be trimmed, or replaced with a few matching plants, old fences and front doors can be painted or stained, and the paths cleaned. Do this even if a property is a do-up. You want to give the impression that buyers can move into the house and chip away at the work in their own time If you have time and money, paint sills and eaves using accents. Inside, the first thing buyers see is the hallway, which can be brightened up with a lick of paint. The neutral paint trick can also be used to paint over dated wallpaper, completely changing the look and feel of a tired house. Bathrooms and kitchens are important to buyers, and the eye settles on vanities and benches. These can be resurfaced relatively quickly to give a modern look. If the seller can’t repaint or tile the bathroom bring in high quality matching towels, which become a feature in the room and draw the eye from the less than desirable walls and features. Nice vases and flowers will do the same. Replacing handles and knobs to draw attention away from the units themselves. This reduces the number of “I have to do this” thoughts in potential buyers’ minds. Drawing the eye away from a multitude of sins is exactly the thing to do. If you see an empty house the eye always goes to marks on the carpet and walls and this will lower the price expectation.” Drawing the eye to the furniture and furnishings, creates better flow, and de cluttering makes buyers feel the home would be a nice place to live in. The other way to handle the property’s defects is to raise them with the buyer before they see them. If the carpet is bad, for example, you can say: “Hey, they were going to replace the carpet but they decided to leave it to you to choose a new carpet and priced it accordingly.” Finally, good old fashioned elbow grease is essential in all properties to remove those sins that are simply cleanable.

2 [Edition datE] 11 Your guide to Show Homes & New Sections in the Selwyn District Selling your house in winter The perception seems to be that it is harder to sell your home during the winter months than the summer ones. While statistics may not necessarily bear that out, it is true that selling your home in winter presents a specific set of challenges that may not apply in the busier and warmer months of October, February or March. It is also reassuring to know that people buy houses year round, including June and July, when sale numbers do appear to drop, but not as much as you might think. There may be some advantages to selling or buying a house during winter. There is less competition, which may mean a quicker sale (but not necessarily) and, as Real Estate blogger Andrew Duncan writes, when you view a house, “if you like it on a freezing cold day, with a howling southerly, getting pelted by hail as you run to the front door, chances are high you will like it in the middle of January, too”. Many of the steps required to make your house presentable for sale apply whatever time of year it goes on the market. Decluttering, clearing away the knickknacks, books, papers and other things that make your home yours but may distract from what potential buyers want and need to see. Cleaning may be an obvious thing to do, or have done, but it is an important step to take. If it can be cleaned, clean it – carpets, upholstery, floors, drapes, cupboards and corners, even those hard to reach or see places. Tidy outdoor spaces, keep the lawns mowed and leaves raked and cleared away. There will always be some painting and fixing to do. Viewing and buying a house is an emotional experience. Appealing to buyer’s emotions is not cheating, it is doing the best to enable them to see themselves living in your home. The extra challenges of presenting your home in winter relate to the colder, wetter weather and poorer light. Maximising natural light, and enhancing it by turning on all the lamps and lights gives a bright, spacious feel to your house, especially on grey days. Scheduling open homes and showings during the brightest part of the day is best. Make sure the house is warm. Cold homes are not inviting. Turn on the heat pump, or light the fire if you have one. Street appeal is always important. In addition to the summer basics, make sure the gutters and down pipes are cleared and are not leaking. Make sure the entrance way is clean and welcoming and the paths are free of moss and slime. Hopefully mould and condensation are not issues, but if they are they should be fixed long before showings begin. Efficient heating systems, including insulation, and adequate ventilation will be a good investment at any time, and will add value to your house. Sometimes the little things make a big difference. Some candles and light music can create a calming ambience. Have a couple of umbrellas available if it is raining. Hopefully, it won’t be a howling southerly on showing/open home day, but if you are selling in winter it may be more likely. Being prepared means inclement weather does not have to make showing your home more difficult. The extra challenges of presenting your home in winter relate to the colder, wetter weather and poorer light. Artisan Homes Builders of superior homes. Built to last. Winners in Registered Master Builders House of the Year Awards Visit our new show home - Faringdon South Show Home Village East Maddisons Road | Phone: 03 374 9172 Phone 03 374 9172 Rob 021 324 876 email rob@artisanhomes.co.nz www.artisanhomes.co.nz