18.11.2021 Aufrufe

HANSA 02-2021

Kooperation HANSA & MRP · DNV GL · Hafen Hamburg · Port Hub · MPP-Marktbericht · 3D-Druck in der Schifffahrt · Interview IMO-Chef Lim · Maritime Future Summit · SMM Digital 2021

Kooperation HANSA & MRP · DNV GL · Hafen Hamburg · Port Hub · MPP-Marktbericht · 3D-Druck in der Schifffahrt · Interview IMO-Chef Lim · Maritime Future Summit · SMM Digital 2021

MEHR ANZEIGEN
WENIGER ANZEIGEN

Sie wollen auch ein ePaper? Erhöhen Sie die Reichweite Ihrer Titel.

YUMPU macht aus Druck-PDFs automatisch weboptimierte ePaper, die Google liebt.

INTERNATIONAL MARITIME JOURNAL<br />

SMM 2<strong>02</strong>1 in Corona-Zeiten<br />

IMO-Chef Kitack Lim<br />

fordert im Exklusiv-Interview<br />

mehr Zusammenarbeit<br />

Maritimer 3D-Druck<br />

Intelligente Bauteile können<br />

die Effizienz im<br />

Flottenbetrieb verbessern<br />

MPP-Modernisierung?<br />

Est. 1864<strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

International<br />

Maritime<br />

Journal<br />

25% der weltweiten Mehrzweckund<br />

Heavylift-Flotte sind<br />

mittlerweile älter als 15 Jahre<br />

ISSN 0017750-4<br />

<strong>02</strong><br />

9 770017 750007<br />

INTERNATIONAL MARITIME JOURNAL<br />

BUILDING A SUSTAINABLE<br />

FUTURE TOGETHER<br />

LET US ASSIST YOU TODAY<br />

www.eagle.org/sustainability<br />

SAFETY LEADERSHIP<br />

IN A CHANGING WORLD<br />

© Ase/posscriptum/Andrey Suslov/Liu zishan/Shutterstock


Editorial<br />

Krischan Förster<br />

Editor in chief<br />

Decarbonization – shipping’s greatest challenge<br />

Last year was tough, no doubt about it.<br />

The global spread of Covid-19 still has a<br />

massive impact on all maritime industries.<br />

In addition, the shipping sector faces<br />

the unsolved humanitarian crisis of crew<br />

changes. Although some may see light at<br />

the end of the tunnel with the vaccination<br />

programmes being rolled out in many<br />

countries, it seems to be quite obvious<br />

that the rough times will last through this<br />

year. Nevertheless, even while struggling<br />

at all fronts, the focus today has to be shifted<br />

towards what happens next.<br />

The SMM used to be the most attended<br />

trade show, one of the most important<br />

events for the maritime world after all –<br />

a market place for companies to present<br />

and sell their most advanced products and<br />

technologies. As we all know, this won’t<br />

happen this year. No meet and greet, no<br />

exchange of those many ideas and inspirations<br />

to take back home. That’s a real<br />

shame, so let’s hope for the better in 2<strong>02</strong>2.<br />

Besides that, the SMM has always been<br />

a place to discuss the way into the future.<br />

Well, at least to a certain extent, this is<br />

going to happen during this year’s purely<br />

digital conference programme. Make<br />

sure you don’t miss the Maritime Future<br />

Summit, co-organized by <strong>HANSA</strong> together<br />

with the SMM team, on digitization and<br />

artificial intelligence coming to shipping.<br />

Two sessions featuring high-ranking international<br />

speakers will be streamed for<br />

free on Tuesday, 2nd of February.<br />

Digitization and automation, including<br />

AI, are certainly among the most pressing<br />

issues for the maritime industry. The<br />

ambitious climate targets which have to be<br />

met by 2030 and 2050 will become an even<br />

greater challenge though, bearing in mind<br />

that the clock is already ticking and – until<br />

today – the maritime industry is not<br />

known for being the fastest to transform<br />

and adapt to changes.<br />

While political and regulatory pressure<br />

ist building up, shipping and suppliers<br />

remain in limbo, despite quite a lot of<br />

promising projects and futuristic ship designs,<br />

be it sails, LNG, bio-fuels, methanol<br />

or ammonia. In a recent report, the<br />

International Chamber of Shipping (ICS)<br />

has called the industry’s decarbonization<br />

goals the »fourth propulsion revolution« –<br />

no more and no less than this.<br />

The report also pointed out very clearly<br />

that all efforts to reduce greenhouse gas<br />

emissions require a huge amount of R&D<br />

before they can become viable solutions.<br />

The amount of money needed represents<br />

a huge financial burden for the industry<br />

and there exists a significant risk of failure<br />

if governments refuse to support the<br />

industry properly.<br />

»Collaboration, cooperation and communication<br />

has never been more important,«<br />

said the IMO’s Secretary General<br />

Kitack Lim in an interview with <strong>HANSA</strong>.<br />

Global concerted action is required, commitment<br />

from all stakeholders is needed,<br />

not only in the context of the SMM. So<br />

let’s go.<br />

Enjoy reading!<br />

#WeSeaGreen with DNV GL<br />

AUF KURS IN RICHTUNG<br />

DEKARBONISIERUNG<br />

Die Schifffahrt steht unter Druck, die Treibhausgasemissionen zu reduzieren. Bei der Suche nach dem passenden<br />

Weg für Sie, brauchen Sie den richtigen Partner. Beginnend mit regulativen Vorschriften, der richtigen Wahl<br />

eines für Sie passenden Brennstoffes der nächsten Generation, über Schiffs- und Betriebsoptimierung bis hin zur<br />

umfassenden Beratung- entdecken Sie die Dekarbonisierungs-Lösungen von DNV GL. Lassen Sie uns zusammen<br />

herausfinden, wie wir gemeinsam eine saubere Zukunft <strong>HANSA</strong> verwirklichen – International Maritime können. Journal www.dnvgl.com/decarbonization<br />

<strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

3


Inhalt | Contents<br />

<strong>02</strong> 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

3 EDITORIAL<br />

3 – Decarbonization – shipping’s greatest challenge<br />

5 SPOTLIGHT ON NEW SHIPS<br />

5 – LNG-Cruiser für Post-Covid-Welt<br />

6 PEOPLE<br />

8 MÄRKTE | MARKETS<br />

8 – Market rally picks up a notch<br />

8 – Viewpoint Justin Archard: Renewables carry<br />

MPP business through Covid crisis<br />

12 VERSICHERUNGEN | INSURANCE<br />

12 – Stabile Bilanz im VHT-Markt<br />

52 GREEN & EFFICIENT<br />

52 – German suppliers – against all odds<br />

54 – LNG at the heart of the transition<br />

56 – Remote and in-person<br />

58 – Navigating towards decarbonisation<br />

60 – Alles aus einer Hand<br />

62 SMM TECH-HUB<br />

72 SCHIFFFAHRT | SHIPPING<br />

72 – Ende einer Ära – DNV trennt sich von GL<br />

74 – 25% der MPP-Tonnage sind älter als 15 Jahre<br />

73 DIE <strong>HANSA</strong> IM BLICKPUNKT<br />

16 MOMENTAUFNAHME<br />

18 FINANZIERUNG | FINANCING<br />

18 – Ship financing goes digital<br />

19 – MRP and <strong>HANSA</strong> bundle their expertise<br />

20 SMM DIGITAL<br />

20 – SMM 2<strong>02</strong>1 in digital spheres<br />

24 – IMO: »Global concerted action is required«<br />

26 SMART & DIGITAL<br />

26 – Maritime Future Summit to explore AI<br />

30 – AI – an idiot?<br />

32 – Machine Learning – just a buzzword?<br />

36 – Open user interface for Augmented Reality<br />

38 – Remote surveys have kept shipping moving<br />

40 – Transformative IoT:<br />

A call for care and attention<br />

42 – Ship data analysis: Benefits and realities<br />

44 SHIPBUILDING & DESIGN<br />

44 – Smart ship design through Industry 4.0<br />

46 – A crisis with lasting effects<br />

50 – Shipowners better stick to the rules<br />

78 SCHIFFSTECHNIK | SHIP TECHNOLOGY<br />

78 – Sensordatengestützte Wartung –<br />

intelligente Bauteile<br />

80 – 3D-Druck in der Praxis<br />

82 HÄFEN | PORTS<br />

82 – Dämpfer für den Hamburger Hafen<br />

84 – Green Ports<br />

86 <strong>HANSA</strong> PORT-HUB<br />

88 HTG-INFO<br />

92 BUYER’S GUIDE<br />

96 TERMINE<br />

97 IMPRESSUM<br />

98 LETZTE SEITE<br />

98 – Partikuliere – Nomaden auf dem Wasser<br />

24<br />

Interview with KITACK LIM,<br />

IMO Secretary General:<br />

»Global concerted action is required«<br />

4 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Spotlight on new Ships<br />

LNG-Cruiser für Post-Covid-Welt<br />

Ein Neubau im Zeichen de Covid-<br />

19-Krise oder rechtzeitig zum Neustart<br />

der Branche? Das mit LNG betriebene,<br />

185.010 GT große Kreuzfahrtschiff<br />

»Costa Toscana« wurde Mitte Januar auf<br />

der Werft Meyer Turku vom Stapel gelassen<br />

und an die Ausrüstungspier verlegt.<br />

»Zu Beginn des Jahres und zu diesem<br />

besonderen Anlass möchte ich nach<br />

vorne schauen: Ich glaube, dass die ›Costa<br />

Toscana‹ in einer Welt in Dienst gestellt<br />

wird, in der die Passagiere die Wunder<br />

der Meere und des Schiffes bei einem<br />

Kreuzfahrturlaub wieder in vollen Zügen<br />

genießen können«, erklärte Werft-CEO<br />

Tim Meyer.<br />

Die »Costa Toscana« ist ein Schwesterschiff<br />

der »Costa Smeralda« – die 2019 in<br />

Turku abgeliefert wurde – und bietet Platz<br />

für 6.554 Passagiere in 2.612 Kabinen. Der<br />

Helios/XL-Klasse-Neubau für die Reederei<br />

Costa Crociere aus der US-Gruppe<br />

Carnival wird mit Flüssigerdgas betrieben.<br />

Durch den Einsatz von LNG werden<br />

alle Schwefeldioxid-Emissionen und fast<br />

alle Partikelemissionen (95-100% Reduktion)<br />

eliminiert, während gleichzeitig die<br />

Emissionen von Stickoxiden (direkte Reduktion<br />

um 85%) und CO2 (bis zu 20%)<br />

deutlich gesenkt werden.<br />

Die gesamte Maschinenleistung des<br />

Schiffs beträgt 64 MW, für den Antrieb<br />

stehen davon 37 MW zur Verfügung. Damit<br />

kommt es auf eine Geschwindigkeit<br />

von bis zu 17 kn, angetrieben von ABB-<br />

Azipods.<br />

Die Sektion mit dem mit LNG-Motoren<br />

und Tanks ausgestatteten Maschinenraum<br />

wurde nicht in Finnland,<br />

sondern auf der Neptun Werft in Rostock-Warnemünde<br />

gebaut. Im Dezember<br />

2019 brachten zwei Schlepper die 140 m<br />

lange und 42 m breite »Floating Engine<br />

Room Unit« (FERU) nach Turku.<br />

Das Schiff verfügt außerdem über ein<br />

intelligentes Energieeffizienzsystem und<br />

100% der Recyclingmaterialien,<br />

die<br />

an Bord anfallen, wie Plastik,<br />

Papier, Glas und Aluminium,sollen<br />

auch wieder der Kreislaufwirtschaft zugeführt<br />

werden. So sieht es ein eigens<br />

entworfenes Recycling-Konzept vor. Wie<br />

bei der »Costa Smeralda« zeichnet Adam<br />

D. Tihany für das Design des Interieurs<br />

verantwortlich.fs<br />

Details »Costa Toscana«<br />

Spotlight on<br />

new ships<br />

Vermessung: . . . . . . . . . . . . . 185.010 GT<br />

Länge: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .337 m<br />

Breite auf Spanten: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 m<br />

Tiefgang: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8,6 m<br />

Maschinenleistung ges.: . . . .64 MW<br />

Antriebsleistung: . . . . . . . . . . . . .37 MW<br />

Hauptmaschinen: . . 4x Caterpillar<br />

MaK M46DF<br />

Geschwindigkeit: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .17 kn<br />

Passagiere: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.554<br />

Passagierkabinen: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2.612<br />

Besatzung: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.646<br />

Klassifikation: . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rina<br />

Baureihe: .Helios / Costa XL-Klasse<br />

© Meyer Turku<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

5


People<br />

Für mehr News scannen Sie einfach den QR-Code<br />

oder besuchen Sie www.hansa-online.de<br />

◼ IDWAL: Jan Hagemann soll dem<br />

in Wales ansässigen Marktführer für<br />

Schiffsbesichtigungen<br />

als Deutschland-<br />

Repräsentant helfen,<br />

Aufträge auf hiesigen<br />

Markt einzuholen.<br />

Erverfügt über<br />

30 Jahre Erfahrung<br />

in der Schifffahrt,<br />

u.a. war er für die Reederei Oldendorff<br />

und Lloyd Fonds tätig. Er ist Direktor<br />

und Gründer der Finanzboutique Five<br />

Oceans Maritime Asset Management.<br />

◼ TRITON MARINE: Nadine Kornblum<br />

leitet die neue Hamburg-Niederlassung<br />

des Bremer<br />

Sachverständigenbüros.<br />

Die Nautikerin<br />

war nach ihrer Seefahrtszeit<br />

als Besichtigerin<br />

aktiv, unter<br />

anderem bei Kähler<br />

& Prinz, Alberts &<br />

Fabel und zuletzt selbstständig. Die auf<br />

Yacht- und Industrietransporte spezialisierte<br />

Firma begründet die Eröffnung<br />

mit der großen Nachfrage.<br />

News des Monats: V.Group holt Sprotte von OSM<br />

◼ V.GROUP: Björn Sprotte übernimmt als CEO die Shipmanagement-Sparte<br />

in Hamburg. Er löst Franck Kayser ab, der künftig die Aktivitäten der Gruppe<br />

in Dänemark leitet, und berichtet direkt an Group-CEO René Kofod-Olsen,<br />

der vor kurzem Graham Westgarth beerbt hat. Sprotte kommt von OSM<br />

Shipmanagement, wo er COO, President und zuletzt CEO war. Seine Karriere<br />

begann bei der Rickmers Group, wo er zum CEO Maritime Services aufstieg.<br />

Von dort wechselte als VP Fleet Cruise Execution zur Carnival Group.<br />

◼ ONE WORLD SHIPBROKERS: Justin<br />

Archard und Simon Guthrie waren<br />

zuvor bei der<br />

Hamburger Reederei<br />

SAL Heavy Lift<br />

beschäftigt, der eine<br />

als Chief Commercial<br />

Director und<br />

COO, der andere als<br />

Manager Chartering<br />

Projects. Mit ihrer<br />

neuen Firma One<br />

World Shipbrokers<br />

wechseln sie jetzt<br />

auf die Maklerseite,<br />

um künftig Makler-<br />

und Beratungsdienstleistungen für<br />

Breakbulk-, Heavylift- und Projekt-Ladung<br />

anzubieten (mehr auf S. 8.-9.).<br />

◼ ZEABORN: Jan-Hendrik Többe hat<br />

bei der Consultancy Bain & Company<br />

angeheuert. Der<br />

Co-Gründer und geschäftsführende<br />

Gesellschafter<br />

von Zeaborn<br />

war Ende<br />

2019 abberufen worden,<br />

nachdem der<br />

MPP-Carrier Zeamarine<br />

in finanzielle Schwierigkeiten geraten<br />

war und später die Insolvenz folgte. Többe<br />

war 2013 nach Stationen bei Roland Berger<br />

und PwC zu Zeaborn gekommen.<br />

◼ ZIM: Sören Frank ist neuer Geschäftsführer<br />

der ZIM Germany GmbH<br />

& Co. KG, Tochterunternehmen<br />

der israelischen<br />

Container-Reederei<br />

ZIM.<br />

Frank arbeitet bereits<br />

seit 25 Jahren in<br />

der Branche und hat<br />

Erfahrungen in den<br />

Bereichen Linienschifffahrt, RoRo sowie<br />

im Schiffsmanagement (Tanker und Bulker).<br />

2011 startete Frank bei ZIM Germany<br />

als Kaufmännischer Leiter.<br />

◼ LEBUHN & PUCHTA: Sarah Gahlen<br />

wurde zur Equity Partnerin der<br />

Hamburger Wirtschaftsrechtskanzlei<br />

ernannt. Gahlen begann<br />

ihre Tätigkeit<br />

als Rechtsanwältin<br />

2015 bei Lebuhn &<br />

Puchta. Ihr Schwerpunkt<br />

liegt im maritimen<br />

Wirtschaftsrecht, einschließlich<br />

Schiffsfinanzierungen und -transaktionen<br />

(Sale & Purchase) und des klassischen<br />

Schifffahrtsrechts.<br />

◼ WALLEM: Frank Coles gibt überraschend<br />

nach nur zweieinhalb Jahren den<br />

Posten des CEOs bei<br />

einem der größten<br />

Shipmanager der<br />

Welt ab. Er möchte<br />

sich nun stärker<br />

für das Wohlergehen<br />

von Seeleuten engagieren.<br />

Bis auf Weiteres<br />

übernimmt John Kaare Aune, seit<br />

April 2019 Geschäftsführer der Wallem<br />

Shipmangement Limited, Coles’ Rolle als<br />

CEO der Gruppe.<br />

6 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


People<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> PODCAST<br />

Prominente Gäste<br />

im maritimen Talk<br />

Die <strong>HANSA</strong> erweitert mit dem Format<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> PODCAST ihr Angebot. Im maritimen<br />

Talk erwarten wir regelmäßig interessante<br />

Gäste und sprechen mit ihnen<br />

über das, was sie und die<br />

Branche bewegt. Hören<br />

Sie doch einfach mal rein<br />

oder abonnieren Sie den<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> PODCAST!<br />

CLEMENS TOEPFER<br />

Der Geschäftsführer des Hamburger<br />

Schiffsmaklers Toepfer Transport erwartet<br />

trotz des<br />

Aufschwungs in<br />

der Container- und<br />

Mehrzweck-Schifffahrt<br />

(MPP) keine<br />

größeren Neubau-<br />

Aktivitäten. Außerdem<br />

spricht er über<br />

seine Markteinschätzungen,<br />

Pläne für Toepfer Transport, Vorund<br />

Nachteile eines traditionsreichen Familiennamens<br />

und den Reedereistandort<br />

Deutschland.<br />

ANDRE WORTMANN<br />

Der neue Chef des maritimen Kompetenzzentrums<br />

des Wirtschaftsberatungsunternehmens<br />

PwC gibt<br />

Einblicke in seine<br />

Einschätzungen zur<br />

Lage der deutschen<br />

maritimen Industrie.<br />

Er spricht über die<br />

ausbaufähige Zusammenarbeit<br />

zwischen<br />

Segmenten wie<br />

Schifffahrt, Häfen und Werften und innerhalb<br />

der Branchen, Shareholder Value und<br />

das Interesse von Investoren.<br />

CERTIFIED<br />

ACTUATOR<br />

SOLUTIONS<br />

Ensuring reliable, long-term operation<br />

AUMA offers a complete range of<br />

electric actuators for automating<br />

valves in on-board management<br />

systems.<br />

Q Compact design<br />

Q High vibration resistance<br />

Q Integral actuator controls<br />

Q Easy installation and<br />

commissioning<br />

Q Fieldbus interfaces<br />

Q Certified according to<br />

DNV GL<br />

Q References around the<br />

globe<br />

www.auma.com<br />

anzeige_halbe_Seite_hansa_en.indd 1 15.01.2<strong>02</strong>1 13:41:28<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

7


MÄrkte | Markets<br />

Market rally picks up a notch<br />

Container and dry cargo shipping continue to gather momentum as seasonal patterns are<br />

suspended. By Michael Hollmann<br />

Although corona retains a stranglehold<br />

over western economies with<br />

lockdowns getting extended or even intensified,<br />

neither the container nor the<br />

dry cargo trades suffered any slowdown<br />

in the opening weeks of 2<strong>02</strong>1. While expectations<br />

in the container sector were<br />

bullish anyway, the strength in the dry<br />

bulk spot market – including breakbulk/<br />

project shipping and shortsea trades –<br />

took many by surprise.<br />

Looking at our market compass on<br />

the righthand page, nearly all segments<br />

are firmly trading in the green. Twelve<br />

months ago it was the exact opposite,<br />

with all indices and assessments on a<br />

downward slope (most of them by double-digit<br />

percentages) except container<br />

spot rates.<br />

This time continued strong consumer<br />

appetite for merchandise coupled with<br />

inventory replenishment across retailing<br />

and manufacturing keeps pushing container<br />

markets over the fever pitch. At the<br />

same time, commodity demand in China<br />

set the stage for a market opening in<br />

dry cargo shipping unlike anything seen<br />

over the past years.<br />

Full orderbooks<br />

The backlog in transport demand coupled<br />

with a growing export rush ex China<br />

ahead of the Lunar New Year has kept<br />

utilisation levels in container shipping<br />

at maximum levels. Sailings continue to<br />

be fully booked several weeks ahead – at<br />

least in the US and Europe import trades<br />

– with more and more market participants<br />

taking the view that the situation<br />

will not relax until the end of the first<br />

quarter.<br />

Spot freight rates started the year at<br />

multiples compared with a year ago<br />

and the first week saw another substantial<br />

push upwards. More than ever,<br />

the primary limiting factor and driver<br />

for freight rates is shortage of ocean<br />

containers. Lack of equipment is even<br />

preventing carriers from launching<br />

planned new services, brokers report.<br />

Yet, liner operators have no vessels to<br />

spare – quite the opposite. Round-trip<br />

times on many routes are delayed due to<br />

severe port congestion in key locations,<br />

so they require more ships to maintain<br />

the same weekly schedules as before.<br />

However, with the charter market pretty<br />

much sold out and spot availability<br />

down to »less than a handful of ships«,<br />

as one major broking house kept pointing<br />

out, additional tonnage, especially<br />

large and very large, remains elusive. As<br />

a result, a number of sailings simply had<br />

to be blanked by carriers during January,<br />

according to Alphaliner.<br />

Visit our data hub on www.hansa-online.de<br />

for more rates and indizes: container,<br />

tanker, bulk carrier, mpp, shortsea,<br />

ports, bunker & oil … and much more<br />

More and more carriers are gaining<br />

enough faith in the market again to initiate<br />

newbuilding programmes. MSC,<br />

Hapag-Lloyd and Ocean Network Express<br />

(ONE) already stepped up to the<br />

plate while others are biding their time.<br />

At least 20 more 15,000-16,000 TEU<br />

ships are currently being negotiated by<br />

operating owners, plus a few projects<br />

for 13,000-16,000 TEU by non-operating<br />

owners, market sources say. Further,<br />

a few Asian operators are said to<br />

be discussing midsize tonnage between<br />

1,700 and 2,800 TEU with yards in the<br />

region.<br />

Bulkers waiting off China<br />

For dry bulk shipping, the start of the<br />

first quarter saw rates stage a rally just<br />

when most were bracing themselves for<br />

the typical seasonal lull. Key factors<br />

underpinning the market were much<br />

higher iron ore volumes into China in<br />

the first half of January combined with<br />

a spike in thermal coal demand related<br />

to extreme cold weather. China’s power<br />

to move the markets only seems to have<br />

grown.<br />

As in the container markets, the tonnage<br />

tightness is much exacerbated<br />

by port congestion. According to IHS<br />

Markit, the number of bulkers anchored<br />

off norther Chinese ports reached an average<br />

of 372 in week 3 compared with an<br />

average of just 130 a year ago. As a result,<br />

fewer ships are able to ballast back<br />

or make the backhaul, causing tonnage<br />

supply across the Atlantic to get worse<br />

and worse. The capesize and panamax<br />

segments were affected the most but even<br />

the less volatile supramax and handysize<br />

sectors began to show notable gains in<br />

loading regions west of Suez from the<br />

middle of January. Rate levels may not<br />

stay at these levels but looking at the FFA<br />

market, expectations for February and<br />

for March are still reasonably good. n<br />

VIEWPOINT<br />

Renewables carry<br />

MPP business<br />

through Covid crisis<br />

Multipurpose/heavy-lift shipping<br />

is coping relatively well during the<br />

pandemic thanks to robust cargo volumes<br />

in the wind energy sector, says<br />

Justin Archard, co-founder and managing<br />

partner of One World Shipbrokers<br />

and former COO of SAL Heavy<br />

Lift. Meanwhile the case for fleet renewal<br />

gets more and more urgent, he<br />

warns.<br />

The past year was quite a roller coaster<br />

for MPP/heavy lift shipping. What<br />

were the biggest surprises for you?<br />

Justin Archard: The biggest surprise<br />

was that the MPP sector wasn’t hit as<br />

badly as we feared it would be. The<br />

pandemic brought its complications –<br />

especially early on – as it did across all<br />

8 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


MÄrkte | Markets<br />

Orders & Sales<br />

New Orders Container<br />

Independent shipowners continue to hold<br />

back on orders despite the improved market<br />

situation. The risk in the choice of fuel system<br />

seems too big as it is unclear how costly<br />

alternative systems can be amortised through<br />

charter revenues. Orders in recent weeks<br />

have come mainly from liners (Hapag-Lloyd,<br />

6 x 23,500 TEU), players with strong financial<br />

backgrounds in cooperation with liners (Shoei<br />

Kisen/ONE, 6 x 24,000 TEU) or Asian feeder<br />

carriers (SITC, 10 x 2,500 TEU or TCCL,<br />

3 x 1,100 TEU).<br />

Secondhand Sales<br />

The second-hand carrousel continues to spin<br />

briskly with many sales - too many to list<br />

here. Given the continued positive rate levels<br />

in several size segments and the accompanying<br />

price increases, observers expect further<br />

sales by banks and lenders, not least in<br />

Germany.<br />

Demolition Sales<br />

While global market participants discuss the<br />

effects of Chinas move to lift import bans for<br />

scrap steel, it seems not to be the time of significant<br />

container ship demolition activities.<br />

With »Span Asia 27« and »Tian Rong«, two<br />

vessels have been sold for scrap, said to be the<br />

first since October.MM<br />

Container ship t / c market<br />

800<br />

700<br />

600<br />

500<br />

400<br />

300<br />

21.07.20<br />

Container freight market<br />

WCI Shanghai-Rotterdam 9,066 $/FEU + 38.4 %<br />

WCI Shanghai-Los Angeles 4,178 $/FEU + 1.6 %<br />

Dry cargo / Bulk<br />

21.01.21<br />

Month on Month 749 • + 6.7 %<br />

Baltic Dry Index 1828 + 33.8 %<br />

Time charter averages / spot: $/d<br />

Capesize 5TC average 25,515 + 53.4 %<br />

Panamax 4TC average (82k) 14,749 + 23.7 %<br />

Supramax 10TC average (58k) 12,464 + 9.1 %<br />

Handysize 7TC average (38k 11,992 – 1.5 %<br />

Forward / ffa front month (Feb 21): $/d<br />

Capesize 180k 15,590 + 33.8 %<br />

Panamax 82k 13,200 + 17.8 %<br />

MPP<br />

January ’20<br />

$ 7,393<br />

TMI<br />

Toepfer’s<br />

Multipurpose Index<br />

January ’21<br />

$ 7,005<br />

12,500 tdw MPP/HL »F-Type« vessel for a 6-12 months TC<br />

Tankers<br />

Shortsea / Coaster<br />

Norbroker 3,500 dwt earnings est. € 3,500 + 0 %<br />

HC Shortsea Index 20.05 + 6.5 %<br />

ISTFIX Shortsea Index 694 + 4.2 %<br />

Norbroker: spot t/c equivalent assessment basis round<br />

voyage North Sea/Baltic; HC Shipping & Chartering index<br />

tracking spot freights on 5 intra-European routes; Istfix<br />

Istanbul Freight Index covering spot freight ex Black Sea<br />

Bunkers<br />

COMPASS<br />

Baltic Dirty Tanker Index 498 + 6.9 %<br />

Baltic Clean Tanker Index 485 + 26.0 %<br />

VLSFO 0.5 Rotterdam $/t 410 + 10.8 %<br />

MGO Rotterdam $/t 454 + 8.9 %<br />

Forward / Swap price Q2 / 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

VLSFO 0.5 Rotterdam $/t 403 + 9.0 %<br />

Data per 21.01.2<strong>02</strong>1, month-on-month<br />

© private<br />

Justin Archard,<br />

Co-founder One World Shipbrokers<br />

sectors but where demand weakened because<br />

of business interruption caused by<br />

covid, it was more than made up for by the<br />

still growing volumes in the wind energy<br />

and renewables sector, the low bunker<br />

price and to a degree the strengthening<br />

container market which meant container<br />

operators got less interested in break bulk.<br />

Balance sheet repair in the last 2 years –<br />

following nearly 10 years of recession –<br />

has stabilised the industry somewhat, so<br />

when this pandemic came along the sector<br />

was able to show a stronger face. This<br />

was a test but the sector is coming through<br />

it pretty well.<br />

What are the latest indications from the<br />

project cargo side? What’s the pulse of<br />

trade?<br />

Archard: Wind, onshore and offshore,<br />

are the buzz words. Commitments to<br />

zero emission-economies by the developed<br />

world are accelerating the need for<br />

green energy and in the northern countries<br />

wind is the dominant power resource<br />

of choice. Shipping volumes are<br />

increasing and have reached the point<br />

where this single segment is materially affecting<br />

worldwide fleet supply and charter<br />

rates are moving up.<br />

Petrochemical projects have largely<br />

fallen victim to the historically low oil<br />

price with delays or even cancellations<br />

widespread. There are early Å of recovery<br />

but the MPP sector will have to wait<br />

beyond 2<strong>02</strong>1 for any consistent contribution<br />

by the oil and gas community.<br />

What are the most urgent issues that<br />

must be addressed once the pandemic<br />

situation eases?<br />

Archard: Although seemingly not urgent<br />

today fleet renewal will become<br />

more and more pressing in the medium<br />

term. The average age of the MPP<br />

world fleet has crept up as the sector<br />

has been fighting one headwind after<br />

another. The second-hand market is<br />

extremely limited, newbuilding orders<br />

are very low and capital is scarce. These<br />

are tricky problems.<br />

What are your own goals as One World<br />

Shipbrokers for this year?<br />

Archard: Well, first and foremost as we<br />

are a new company, we want to survive!<br />

Beyond that, we hope to grow and develop<br />

a reputation for reliable, honest,<br />

and knowledgeable consultancy that<br />

adds real value to our clients‘ business.<br />

If we can achieve this, we will be on the<br />

right path.<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

9


MÄrkte | Markets<br />

Container Time Charter Rates<br />

CONTAINER<br />

30k<br />

25k<br />

20k<br />

725 TEU 1000 TEU 1700 TEU 2000 TEU 2500 TEU<br />

2750 TEU 3500 TEU 4400 TEU<br />

$/day<br />

15k<br />

10k<br />

5k<br />

0<br />

31.12.2019<br />

31.01.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

29.<strong>02</strong>.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

31.03.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

30.04.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

31.05.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

30.06.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

31.07.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

31.08.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

30.09.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

31.10.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

30.11.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

31.12.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

22.01.2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

Clarksons<br />

Container Secondhand Prices<br />

Container - Newbuilding Prices<br />

15<br />

725 TEU 1000 TEU 1700 TEU 2000 TEU 2750 TEU<br />

3500 TEU<br />

80<br />

725 TEU 1000 TEU 1700 TEU 2000 TEU 2750 TEU<br />

6600 TEU<br />

10<br />

60<br />

$ mill<br />

$ mill<br />

40<br />

5<br />

20<br />

0<br />

31.01.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

29.<strong>02</strong>.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

31.03.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

30.04.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

31.05.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

30.06.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

31.07.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

31.08.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

30.09.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

31.10.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

30.11.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

31.12.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

22.01.2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

Clarksons<br />

0<br />

31.01.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

29.<strong>02</strong>.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

31.03.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

30.04.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

31.05.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

30.06.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

31.07.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

31.08.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

30.09.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

31.10.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

30.11.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

31.12.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

22.01.2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

Clarksons<br />

Containerships (Period)<br />

Vessel Year TEU Reefer Design Gear Period Region Charterer $/d<br />

POST-PANAMAX<br />

Tokyo Bay 2013 6,622 600 Hanjin 6900 N 34-38 m Far East Hapag-Lloyd 33,800<br />

RDO Endeavour 2006 5,624 550 Hyundai 5600 N 28-30 m Far East Wan Hai 32,000<br />

Suez Canal 20<strong>02</strong> 5,610 500 Golden Gate Bdg N 24-28 m Far East TS Lines 30,000<br />

Seasmile 2013 5,071 770 Hyundai 5000W N 18-20 m Far East Cosco 29,750<br />

PANAMAX / WIDEBEAM<br />

Navios Dorado 2010 4,253 698 Jiangsu 4250 N 23-25 m MED Hapag-Lloyd 22,000<br />

Argos 2012 4,249 698 Jiangsu 4250 N 12 m AG MSC 27,500<br />

Kota Layang 2009 4,250 400 CS 4250 N 11-13 m Far East OOCL 25,000<br />

Pohorje 2006 4,043 700 CSBC 4000 N 2 y UKC MSC 22,500<br />

Hansa Granite 2014 3,649 550 Shanghai 3600 Y 12 m Far East Maersk Line 22,000<br />

SUB-PANAMAX<br />

Aldebaran 2008 2,785 432 B178 (short) Y 12 m Caribs Hapag-Lloyd 16,800<br />

Bellatrix I 2003 2,762 300 Imabari 2700 N 10-12 m Middle East Maersk 19,250<br />

ST Island 2010 2,535 250 Naikai 2500 N 2-4 m Far East Hapag-Lloyd 26,500<br />

Areopolis 2000 2,474 320 VW 2500 N 12-14 m Far East Cosco 17,300<br />

FEEDER / HANDY<br />

San Alfonso 2007 1,841 462 Hyundai 1800 Y 8-10 m Far East Transworld 13,500<br />

Tzini 2013 1,756 350 SPP 1700 Y 9-12 m Far East OOCL 17,000<br />

AS Svenja 2010 1,713 377 CSBC 1700 Y 8.5-10 m MED CMA CGM 13,000<br />

Warnow Master 2009 1,496 368 CV Neptun 1500 N 1.5-2 m Far East Samudera 12,500<br />

Trader 2008 1,300 390 Zhejiang 1300 N 10-12 m Far East Cosco 12,000<br />

Vega Vela 2005 1,118 220 CV 1100 Plus N 5-7 m MED Seacon 9,250<br />

Contship Med 2004 1,118 220 CV 1100 Y 12-13 m S MSC 9,000<br />

Boston Trader 2004 1,083 200 Stadt 1100 Y 8-10 m MED CMA CGM 10,000<br />

Contship Ivy 2007 925 200 Gijon N 12-13 m MED MSC 8,500<br />

10 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


MÄrkte | Markets<br />

Tanker - Time Charter Rates<br />

TANKER<br />

100k<br />

75k<br />

VLCC (310k dwt)<br />

Aframax (110-115k dwt)<br />

Suezmax (150k dwt)<br />

Panamax (74k dwt, products)<br />

$/day<br />

50k<br />

25k<br />

0<br />

<strong>02</strong>.08.2019<br />

07.<strong>02</strong>.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

28.<strong>02</strong>.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

20.03.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

10.04.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

01.05.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

22.05.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

12.06.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

03.07.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

24.07.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

14.08.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

04.09.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

25.09.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

16.10.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

06.11.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

27.11.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

18.12.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

08.01.2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

Clarksons<br />

Tanker - Newbuilding Prices<br />

VLCC (320k dwt) Suezmax (157k dwt) Aframax (115k dwt)<br />

Panamax (73-75k dwt)<br />

Tanker - Secondhand Prices<br />

VLCC (300k dwt) Suezmax (150k dwt) Aframax (105k dwt)<br />

Panamax (70k dwt)<br />

100<br />

60<br />

50<br />

$ mill<br />

80<br />

60<br />

40<br />

24.01.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

20k<br />

14.<strong>02</strong>.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

06.03.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

27.03.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

17.04.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

07.05.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

29.05.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

19.06.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

10.07.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

31.07.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

21.08.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

11.09.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

<strong>02</strong>.10.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

Bulker - Time Charter Rates<br />

23.10.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

13.11.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

04.12.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

25.12.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

Capesize (modern) Panamax (modern) Supramax (58k dwt)<br />

Handysize (modern)<br />

15.01.2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

Clarksons<br />

$ mill / 10 years old<br />

40<br />

30<br />

20<br />

10<br />

24.01.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

07.<strong>02</strong>.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

21.<strong>02</strong>.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

06.03.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

20.03.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

03.04.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

17.04.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

01.05.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

15.05.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

29.05.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

12.06.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

26.06.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

10.07.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

24.07.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

07.08.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

21.08.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

04.09.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

18.09.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

<strong>02</strong>.10.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

16.10.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

BULKER<br />

30.10.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

13.11.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

27.11.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

11.12.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

25.12.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

08.01.2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

22.01.2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

Clarksons<br />

15k<br />

$/day<br />

10k<br />

5k<br />

24.01.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

14.<strong>02</strong>.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

06.03.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

27.03.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

17.04.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

07.05.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

29.05.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

19.06.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

10.07.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

31.07.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

21.08.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

11.09.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

<strong>02</strong>.10.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

23.10.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

13.11.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

04.12.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

25.12.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

15.01.2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

Clarksons<br />

Bulker - Newbuilding Prices<br />

Bulker - Secondhand Prices<br />

Capesize (176-180k dwt)<br />

Ultramax (61-63k dwt)<br />

Panamax (75-77k dwt)<br />

Handysize (32-35k dwt)<br />

Capesize (170k dwt) Panamax (75k dwt) Handymax (52k dwt)<br />

Handysize (32k dwt)<br />

$ mill<br />

60<br />

50<br />

40<br />

30<br />

20<br />

24.01.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

07.<strong>02</strong>.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

21.<strong>02</strong>.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

06.03.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

20.03.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

03.04.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

17.04.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

01.05.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

15.05.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

29.05.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

12.06.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

26.06.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

10.07.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

24.07.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

07.08.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

21.08.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

04.09.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

18.09.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

<strong>02</strong>.10.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

16.10.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

30.10.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

13.11.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

27.11.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

11.12.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

25.12.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

08.01.2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

22.01.2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

Clarksons<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

$ mill<br />

25<br />

20<br />

15<br />

10<br />

5<br />

24.01.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

07.<strong>02</strong>.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

21.<strong>02</strong>.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

06.03.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

20.03.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

03.04.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

17.04.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

01.05.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

15.05.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

29.05.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

12.06.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

26.06.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

10.07.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

24.07.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

07.08.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

21.08.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

04.09.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

18.09.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

<strong>02</strong>.10.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

16.10.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

30.10.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

13.11.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

27.11.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

11.12.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

25.12.2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

08.01.2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

22.01.2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

Clarksons<br />

11


Versicherungen | Insurance<br />

Stabile Bilanz im VHT-Markt<br />

2<strong>02</strong>0 stand für die hanseatischen Transportversicherer<br />

im Zeichen der Kontinuität – trotz Corona. Bei Schäden<br />

und Objektzahlen gab es nur wenig Schwankungen.<br />

Von Michael Hollmann<br />

Die deutschen Seekaskoversicherer<br />

sind in ihrem Führungsgeschäft im<br />

vergangenen Jahr erneut ohne Großschäden<br />

davongekommen. Das lässt die aktuelle<br />

Jahresstatistik des Vereins Hanseatischer<br />

Transportversicherer (VHT)<br />

erkennen, der zentral die Schadenbearbeitung<br />

für die deutschen Gesellschaften<br />

und Assekuradeure erledigt.<br />

Zwar stieg die Anzahl der bearbeiteten<br />

Schäden 2<strong>02</strong>0 gegenüber dem Vorjahr<br />

leicht von 519 auf 537 (Stand: Mitte Januar)<br />

an. Doch die Gesamtschadensumme<br />

einschließlich Reservierungen lag<br />

den Angaben zufolge zu Jahresende etwa<br />

auf Vorjahresniveau bei rund 70 Mio. €.<br />

»Man kann sagen, dass das Jahr noch<br />

glimpflich verlaufen ist. Der Markt musste<br />

keine Totalschäden verkraften«, sagt<br />

der VHT-Vorsitzende Robert Mahn vom<br />

Bremer Assekuradeur Drewes & Runge<br />

mit seiner Schiffsversicherungssparte<br />

Minerva. Größter Einzelschaden soll<br />

der Brand einer RoRo-Fähre im Umfang<br />

von 3,6 Mio. € gewesen sein. Die Zahl<br />

der durch VHT-Mitgliedsfirmen führend<br />

versicherten Objekte – in erster Linie<br />

Seeschiffe inklusive Nebeninteressen,<br />

Loss of Hire, Krieg sowie Binnenschiffe<br />

– lag Ende 2<strong>02</strong>0 bei 2.230. Ein Jahr zuvor<br />

hatte sich der Bestand noch auf 2.252 belaufen.<br />

Für Mahn sind die Objektzahlen<br />

damit aber im Großen und Ganzen stabil,<br />

nachdem es im Vorjahr einen ordentlichen<br />

Zuwachs von 10% gegeben hatte.<br />

Mehr Beteiligungsgeschäft<br />

Der VHT-Vorsitzende bestreitet jedoch<br />

nicht, dass angesichts des Rückzugs von<br />

Seekaskoversicherern in anderen Teilen<br />

der Welt – vor allem in London – sogar<br />

ein Zuwachs der führend versicherten<br />

Schiffe in Deutschland zu erwarten gewesen<br />

wäre. »Dafür hat es bestimmt deutlich<br />

mehr Beteiligungsgeschäft gegeben«,<br />

meint Mahn, auch aus eigener Erfahrung<br />

bei der Minerva. Wenn die im VHT vertretenen<br />

Versicherer mehr Folgeanteile<br />

an Seekaskodeckungen im Ausland<br />

zeichnen, spiegelt sich dies nicht in den<br />

VHT-Bestandszahlen wider. Die Schadenbearbeitung<br />

obliegt in solchen Fällen<br />

den Führungsversicherern beziehungsweise<br />

ihren vertraglichen Claims Handlern<br />

im Ausland.<br />

Diesen Trend bestätigt auch Hans<br />

Christoph Enge, geschäftsführender Gesellschafter<br />

des Assekuradeurs Lampe<br />

& Schwartze und ebenfalls Mitglied des<br />

VHT-Vorstands: »Beim Beteiligungsgeschäft<br />

haben wir richtig zulegen können.<br />

Da ist aus allen möglichen Ländern Geschäft<br />

zu uns herübergeschwappt.« Enge<br />

bezeichnet das Jahr als »nicht schlecht«,<br />

vor allem vor dem Hintergrund der Pandemie.<br />

»Die Unsicherheit war zu Jahresanfang<br />

sehr groß. Aber im Schadensbereich<br />

zeigte sich dann, dass Corona nur<br />

ganz selten eine Ursache für Schäden war.<br />

Bei der Begutachtung gab es natürlich<br />

schon hier und da Hindernisse zu bewältigen«,<br />

blickt Enge zurück. Als »einzige<br />

wirklich sichtbare Reaktion« bezeichnet<br />

er die Einführung einer Zeitklausel für<br />

Loss of Hire-Deckungen (Betriebsausfall<br />

infolge eines Kaskoschadens). Dabei<br />

geht es den Versicherern darum, Verzögerungen<br />

bei Reparaturen aufgrund der<br />

Pandemie (Beispiel: Längere Lieferfristen<br />

für Ersatzteile) in den Deckungen auszuschließen.<br />

Der Ausblick für das kommende<br />

Jahr sei auf jeden Fall viel besser<br />

als nach der letzten große Krise 2008/09,<br />

Schäden und versicherte Objekte beim VHT<br />

2277<br />

2208<br />

2086<br />

2<strong>02</strong>6<br />

2252 2230<br />

Schäden<br />

Objekte<br />

568<br />

477 515 471 519 537<br />

© VHT<br />

2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 220<br />

12 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Versicherungen | Insurance<br />

Abstract: A stable year for the<br />

German hull market<br />

German hull & machinery underwriters<br />

recorded claims in the same range<br />

as 2019 on insured vessels under their<br />

lead last year, with no total losses reported.<br />

The number of insured ships<br />

was also stable, according to figures<br />

from central claims handler VHT.<br />

als massenhaft Schiffe aufgelegt wurden,<br />

Schiffswerte einbrachen und auch die<br />

Prämien der Versicherer ins Rutschen<br />

gerieten. »Das war auch diesmal unsere<br />

Sorge, ist aber zum Glück nicht eingetreten«,<br />

so Enge.<br />

Etwas vorsichtigere Töne schlägt der<br />

stellvertretender VHT-Vorsitzende Florian<br />

Krampitz, Head of Marine Complex<br />

Claims für Zentral- und Osteuropa bei Allianz<br />

Global Corporate & Specialty (AGCS)<br />

an. »Nach wie vor hat die Ocean Hull-Sparte<br />

mit hochwertigen Frequenzschäden zu<br />

kämpfen, die das Ergebnis belasten.« Zudem<br />

seien die Erstversicherer, die im VHT<br />

vertreten sind, mit einem immer härteren<br />

Rückversicherungsmarkt konfrontiert, was<br />

die Kosten nach oben treibe.<br />

n<br />

Als die Welt noch in Ordnung war: VHT-Vorstand beim Neujahrsempfang 2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

vor der Bremer Handelskammer. Von links: Florian Krampitz (AGCS),<br />

Robert Mahn (Minerva), Arne Linke (Ergo), Hans Christoph Enge<br />

(Lampe & Schwartze), Tim de Bruyne-Ludwig (VHT-Geschäftsführer)<br />

© Hollmann<br />

Aon bietet Police für Treibstoffrisiken an<br />

Der globale Versicherungsmakler Aon bietet ab sofort eine eigene<br />

Deckung für Preisrisiken bei Treibstoffen an. Zielkunden dafür<br />

sind unter anderem Reedereien/Carrier, Airlines und Bergbauunternehmen.<br />

Sie können sich dadurch gegen Preissteigerungen<br />

über ein definiertes Limit hinaus versichern und bekommen die<br />

Zusatzkosten für ihre Liefermengen monatlich erstattet. »Die Bedarfe<br />

müssen bei mindestens 100 t pro Monat liegen. Nach oben<br />

gibt es kein Limit«, erklärte eine Firmensprecherin. Bei den Sicherheitengebern<br />

handele es sich um triple-A-geratete Firmen.<br />

Genauere Angaben wurden nicht gemacht.<br />

Ein Finanzexperte aus der Bunkerindustrie erklärte gegenüber<br />

der <strong>HANSA</strong>, dass Aon die Deckung wahrscheinlich durch<br />

doppelte Optionsgeschäfte im Öl- und Ölproduktenmarkt unterlegt.<br />

Die Spanne zwischen Kapitalmarktkosten und der Versicherungsprämie<br />

bilde den Gewinn. »Keine schlechtes Konzept«, so<br />

der Experte.mph<br />

+++ Telegramm +++ Telegramm +++ Telegramm +++ Telegramm +++ Telegramm +++ Telegramm +++ Telegramm<br />

Schwierige Bergung: Entladen beschädigter Container von »ONE Apus« dauert länger. Mitte Januar – über einen Monat nach Einlaufen<br />

in Kobe – erst 277 Boxen von Bord geholt. Viele Hundert noch durcheinandergewürfelt an Bord. +++ W E Cox expandiert in<br />

Europa: Britischer Schaden- und Regressdienstleister seit Jahresanfang auch am Kontinent mit Stützpunkten in Marseille und Lille<br />

aktiv. Bislang beschränkten sich europäische Aktivitäten auf Besichtigungen der Tochterfirma CWH Johnsons. +++ AqualisBraemar<br />

übernimmt LOC Group: Zusammenschluss vollzogen. Unternehmen verfügt über 880 Mitarbeiter in 67 Büros. Gemeinsamer Umsatz:<br />

139 Mio. $. Nach Schifffahrt und Öl/Gas soll Wachstum im Offshore-Renewables-Geschäft vorangetrieben werden. +++ Lloyd’s will<br />

Zugang für Investoren erleichtern: Neues Special Purpose Vehicle für Kapital (mISPV) erhält grünes Licht von britischer Finanzaufsicht.<br />

Kapazitätszufuhr für Lloyd’s-Versicherer von außen soll erleichtert werden. Plattform steht allen Sparten offen.<br />

Leute Leute…AGCS: Justus Heinrich (bislang Global Hull Product Leader) folgt auf Volker Dierks als regionaler Leiter für Schiffsund<br />

Transportversicherung für Zentral- und Osteuropa. +++ TT Club: Marcus Kuling (Ex-Amlin, Ex-Generali) als Underwriter<br />

für die Beneluxregion angeworben. +++ Concirrus: Mike Davies (Ex-AXA XL) und Oliver Miloschewsky (Ex-AXA XL) als Client<br />

Development Directors eingestellt.<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

13


Versicherungen | Insurance<br />

1<br />

5<br />

8<br />

4<br />

2 3<br />

6<br />

Havariechronik<br />

7<br />

Datum Ereignis Ort Schiff Typ tdw Flagge Haftpflicht Reise<br />

1 27.12. Manövrierunfähig vor Island Lagarfoss Containerschiff 11.811 Färöer Standard P&I Reykjavik | Halifax<br />

2 29.12. Ruder-/Propellerschaden (LOF) Suezkanal Christos Theo Bulker 56.838 Marshall I. American P&I Kaohsiung | Italien<br />

3 30.12. 36 Container über Bord südlich v. Kyushu Ever Liberal Containerschiff 104.103 UK Gard Busan | Los Angeles<br />

4 07.01. Auf Grund Agaeta Bentago Express RoPax 787 Spanien UK P&I Santa Cruz | Agaeta<br />

5 10.01. Ladungsverlust/ Rundholz Cabo Vilan Daroja General Cargo 4.155 Zypern k.A. Ferrol | Figueira<br />

6 13.01. Stabilitätsverlust/ Evakuierung südlich Okinawa Yong Feng Bulker 23.386 Panama k.A.<br />

Papua New Guinea |<br />

Changjiang Kou<br />

7 16.01. Auf Grund San Lorenzo Athina III Bulker 73.305 Malta Britannia San Lorenzo | Tarragona<br />

8 16.01. 750 Container über Bord Pazifik Maersk Essen Containerschiff 141.716 Dänemark Britannia Xiamen | Los Angeles<br />

Der komplette Überblick zu allen aktuellen Havarien unter www.hansa-online.de/havariechronik/<br />

Containerverluste: Kommerz vor Sicherheit?<br />

Die Serie der schweren Containerverluste<br />

auf See wird kaum abreißen, solange<br />

die Ladungssicherungsbestimmungen<br />

für Containerschiffe nicht nachgeschärft<br />

werden. Davor warnt die Bremer Sachverständigenfirma<br />

Battermann & Tillery<br />

in einer aktuellen Untersuchung.<br />

Die internationalen Regelwerke entsprächen<br />

nicht mehr dem Stand der<br />

Technik. Sie trügen vor allem nicht dem<br />

Größen- und Längenwachstum der Containerschiffe<br />

Rechnung, kritisiert der<br />

Kaskoversicherer MUW setzt sich hohe Ziele<br />

Der italienische Assekuradeur Mediterranean<br />

Underwriting (MUW) sieht sich<br />

drei Jahre nach seiner Gründung auf solidem<br />

Wachstumskurs. Das Unternehmen<br />

mit Sitz in Genua, das zum Spezialversicherer<br />

Satec Underwriting (Cattolica<br />

Group) gehört, habe sich in einer schwierigen<br />

Marktphase der Seeversicherung<br />

erfolgreich etabliert.<br />

In den kommenden Jahren gehe es darum,<br />

eine Führungsposition im italienischen<br />

Markt zu erringen und das internationale<br />

Geschäft durch Agenturverträge<br />

nautisch-technische Sachverständige<br />

der Firma, Marc Sommerfeld. So seien<br />

die Vorgaben des CSS-Codes der IMO<br />

für das Stauen der Container an Bord nur<br />

für Schiffe bis maximal 300 m Länge anwendbar,<br />

obwohl seit 2006 Megacontainerschiffe<br />

von 400 m Länge auf den Weltmeeren<br />

unterwegs sind.<br />

Die Regeln erlaubten es den Carriern,<br />

die durch Schiffsbeschleunigungen und<br />

Bewegungen gesetzten Grenzen beim<br />

Stauen der Ladung an Bord zu überreizen.<br />

Dabei stünden Kostenersparnisse<br />

im Vordergrund, die zu Lasten der Sicherheit<br />

gehen. Sommerfeld schlägt vor,<br />

dass wichtige europäische Hafenstaaten<br />

wie Frankreich, Belgien, die Niederlande<br />

und Deutschland eine bessere Ausrüstung<br />

von Containerschiffen für die Ladungssicherung<br />

zur Anlaufbedingung<br />

machen. Dank ihren wichtigen Häfen<br />

könnten die Staaten enormen Druck auf<br />

die Containerschifffahrt ausüben, die Ladungssicherung<br />

zu erhöhen.mph<br />

mit weiteren Versicherungen außerhalb der<br />

Cattolica Group stark auszubauen, erklärt<br />

Chief Executive Officer Francesco Dubbioso.<br />

Bislang arbeitet MUW vornehmlich mit<br />

Sicherheiten der Gruppenfirmen Cattolica<br />

Assicurazioni und Tua Assicurazioni und<br />

zählt eigenen Angaben zufolge zu den Top<br />

5 in der Seeversicherung in Italien.<br />

»Wir sind offen für andere Vollmachtgeber<br />

und bereits mit mehreren interessierten<br />

Versicherern im Gespräch«, so<br />

Dubbioso. Weltweit kooperiere MUW<br />

heute bereits mit 90 Maklern im Seekasko-<br />

und Warentransportgeschäft.<br />

Produktsegmente, die noch stärker abgedeckt<br />

werden sollen, sind Bau- und<br />

Werftrisiken sowie Luxusyachten.<br />

In den kommenden Wochen bezieht<br />

MUW neue größere Räumlichkeiten am<br />

bestehenden Standort in Genua. Außerdem<br />

meldet das Unternehmen einen prominenten<br />

Neuzugang mit Angelo Ansaldo<br />

(Ex-Head of Hull beim italienischen<br />

Wettbewerber Siat) als Head of Commercial.<br />

Das Team wächst damit auf zwölf<br />

Mitarbeiter an.mph<br />

14 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Versicherungen | Insurance<br />

Mehr wissen.<br />

Besser entscheiden.<br />

Zugang zu allen Online-Inhalten<br />

Volltextsuche im <strong>HANSA</strong>-Archiv<br />

E-Paper zum Download<br />

Print-Ausgaben im Postversand<br />

inklusive Sonderbeilagen<br />

Ermäßigter Eintritt<br />

zu <strong>HANSA</strong>-Veranstaltungen<br />

€ 21,–<br />

im Monat<br />

Direkt buchen auf:<br />

www.hansa-online.de/abo<br />

Hier geht es<br />

zu Ihrem<br />

Probe-Abo:<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

15


Momentaufnahme<br />

Schwere Kost<br />

Ein halbtauchender Falke, ein ganzes Schiff in seinen Fängen.<br />

Klingt komisch, ist aber so, zumindest mit Blick auf<br />

die »Falcon«. Das Dockschiff hat sich der »Barkly Pearl«<br />

angenommen. Der mit einem Loch im Rumpf havarierte<br />

Viehtransporter liegt seit rund drei Monaten im Indischen<br />

Ozean, die australischen Behörden haben ihn für zwei Jahre<br />

aus ihren Gewässern verbannt. Nun soll es nach Asien gehen,<br />

mit der »Falcon«, wie unsere Momentaufnahme zeigt.<br />

<br />

Foto: AMSA<br />

16 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Momentaufnahme<br />

Liebe Leser,<br />

wenn auch Sie eine maritime Moment aufnahme eingefangen haben, schicken Sie uns<br />

gern das Foto mit ein paar persönlichen oder erklärenden Zeilen dazu. Wir freuen uns<br />

über Ihre Einsendungen an: redaktion@hansa-online.de sowie Schiffahrts-Verlag<br />

»Hansa«, Stadthausbrücke 4, 20355 Hamburg. Hinweis: Der Verlag behält sich das<br />

Recht vor, eingegangene Fotografien für redaktionelle Zwecke weiterzuverwenden.<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

17


Finanzierung | Financing<br />

Ship financing goes digital<br />

Whilst the current market volume is still very low, both shipowners and lenders see<br />

great potential for digital finance market places in shipping. This is the result of the<br />

first »Maritime Snapshot« presented by the Hamburg-based survey company MRP<br />

Some weeks ago, MRP surveyed around<br />

30 small and medium-sized European<br />

shipping companies and more than 30 international<br />

maritime financial institutions.<br />

The participants, all of whom were<br />

company executives, were approached<br />

personally, but the answers were anonymised.<br />

»However, the use of online platforms<br />

for financing new ships, refinancing or<br />

retrofits is still very low,« says MRP managing<br />

partner Ingmar Loges: »Only about<br />

12 % of shipowners and lenders each stated<br />

that they currently use digital financing<br />

instruments.« The direct approach<br />

has clear priorty with 100 % of shipowners<br />

and 96.8 % of lenders. In the future,<br />

however, more than half of the respondents,<br />

both shipowners and lenders, can<br />

imagine using online platforms.<br />

62.5 % of the shipowners and as many<br />

as 77.4 % of the lenders assume that significantly<br />

more transactions will be processed<br />

via such platforms in the future.<br />

»Among the reasons that currently speak<br />

against the use of digital platforms, both<br />

sides agree on the possible loss of personal<br />

contacts,« adds MRP managing partner<br />

Behrend Oldenburg.<br />

There are, however, greater differences<br />

in the assessment of other arguments:<br />

While exactly half of the shipowners surveyed<br />

consider digital business to be too<br />

complex, only a third of the lenders see<br />

this specific risk.<br />

The situation is similar with confidentiality<br />

issues, which are viewed much<br />

more critically by shipowners (50 %) than<br />

by lenders (26.7 %). Likewise, shipowners<br />

rate the possible lack of trust (33.3 %) significantly<br />

higher than lenders (6.7 %).<br />

In terms of possible added value services,<br />

both sides see cash flow modelling<br />

as very important, giving an arithmetic<br />

mean value of around 4 (rating from 1,<br />

not at all important, to 6, very important).<br />

»We got the impression that lenders,<br />

unlike shipowners, see digital finance<br />

market places as a tool that can significantly<br />

simplify their processes«, Loges<br />

concludes.<br />

n<br />

How do you currently approach new financing transactions,<br />

be it a new vessel, the refinancing or retrofits? (multiple answers possible)<br />

2. lf you use intermediaries in sourcing new transactions - do you think there are<br />

enough intermediaries in the market place?<br />

lf you use intermediaries in sourcing new transactions –<br />

do you think there are enough intermediaries in the market place?<br />

Shipowners<br />

■ yes ■ no ■ not applicable<br />

Lenders<br />

■ yes ■ no ■ not applicable<br />

MARITIME RESEARCH<br />

PARTNERS<br />

lf you use intermediaries in sourcing new transactions –<br />

do you think there are enough intermediaries in the market place?<br />

lf you use intermediaries in sourcing new transactions –<br />

do you think there are enough intermediaries in the market place?<br />

© MRP<br />

18 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Finanzierung | Financing<br />

SURVEYS FOR THE MARITIME INDUSTRY<br />

MRP and <strong>HANSA</strong> bundle their expertise<br />

The Hamburg based market research<br />

institute Maritime Research Partners<br />

(MRP), which specialises in maritime<br />

and logistics topics, and <strong>HANSA</strong> have<br />

agreed on an exclusive cooperation.<br />

In the future, both partners will jointly<br />

conduct and publish surveys (»Maritime<br />

Snapshots«) to reflect the current<br />

sentiment in the maritime industry on<br />

specific topics. »We have extensive and<br />

high-profile contacts in the international<br />

shipping industry for market research,<br />

which we are now putting on<br />

an even broader basis with <strong>HANSA</strong>,«<br />

explains Ingmar Loges, co-founder<br />

of MRP. For <strong>HANSA</strong> editor-in-chief<br />

Krischan Förster, the cooperation now<br />

signed is »an ideal win-win situation to<br />

the benefit of our subscribers.«<br />

The topics of next »Maritime Snapshots«<br />

will be developed jointly by MRP<br />

and the <strong>HANSA</strong> editorial team, transferred<br />

to an online questionnaire and<br />

sent to the respective target group. The<br />

participants always answer anonymously<br />

and in compliance with the strictest data<br />

protection regulations. In addition, supplementary<br />

individual interviews with<br />

relevant stakeholders are also planned.<br />

»The spectrum of topics includes environmental<br />

protection requirements as<br />

well as ship financing, digitalisation and<br />

the market development of individual<br />

ship types or ports in the North Range,«<br />

Loges announces. »We expressly call on<br />

our readers to bring in own suggestions<br />

and comments,« adds Förster.<br />

The first »Maritime Snapshot« is on<br />

the acceptance of digital financial marketplaces<br />

in the maritime industry which<br />

can be read on the opposite page. »We<br />

have separately surveyed international<br />

medium-sized shipowners and lenders<br />

and contrasted the highly exciting results,«<br />

Loges explains.<br />

Loges founded MRP (www.maritime-research-partners.com)<br />

in Hamburg<br />

in the summer of 2019 together with<br />

his business partner Behrend Oldenburg.<br />

MRP produces confidential market studies<br />

and decision-making analyses for clients<br />

from the entire maritime industry.<br />

Both of them combine decades of industry<br />

experience. Loges is an economist and<br />

previously worked in leading positions at<br />

various financial institutions in Hamburg,<br />

Amsterdam and Singapore. As a<br />

graduate industrial engineer for transportation<br />

and logistics, Oldenburg has been<br />

specialised in the fields of communication<br />

and market research for many years. n<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

19


SMM<br />

THE MOST<br />

INTELLIGENT<br />

DOOR IN THE<br />

WORLD<br />

E hinge<br />

The revolutionary<br />

e-hinge is an<br />

invisible ethernet<br />

cable system at sea.<br />

SMM 2<strong>02</strong>1 in<br />

digital spheres<br />

The leading international maritime<br />

trade fair, SMM, is opening doors<br />

from 2 to 5 February – 2<strong>02</strong>1 for<br />

the first time entirely digital<br />

Due to the current situation caused by the coronavirus<br />

pandemic, the conference programme<br />

will for the first time be an online event, transmitted<br />

digitally – again with <strong>HANSA</strong> INTERNA-<br />

TIONAL MARITIME JOURNAL as an official media<br />

partner. And it’s free of charge – »this is how the<br />

leading international maritime trade fair demonstrates<br />

its commitment to the maritime sector in<br />

these challenging times,« the organizers said upfront<br />

the event.<br />

During four days, »SMM Digital« will deliver a<br />

programme streamed on two channels featuring<br />

high-ranking international speakers. All conferences<br />

will be streamed live to participants’ computer<br />

screens.<br />

Furthermore, a number of discussion panels and<br />

interviews have been pre-recorded in the dedicated<br />

SMM studio at the Hamburg exhibition complex,<br />

all in strict compliance with all current safety and<br />

hygiene regulations. This recorded content will be<br />

broadcast on the second »Open Stream«. The conferences<br />

will be moderated by the digitalisation expert<br />

Carmen Hentschel and the American journalist<br />

David Patrician.<br />

»In challenging times such as these,<br />

industry event should not be a<br />

luxury experience for the industry.«<br />

Claus Ulrich Selbach, Business Unit Director –<br />

Maritime and Technology Fairs & Exhibitions,<br />

Hamburg Messe und Congress GmbH<br />

It looks like an ordinary hinge but comes equipped with<br />

online access and data transfer. This opens a variety of<br />

smart options for remote control. Everything you<br />

need in ship doors, we’ll handle it.<br />

The entire programme will be free of charge for<br />

all participants. »We have made this decision to<br />

make all the expert knowledge available to a wider<br />

industry audience this year – from industry insiders<br />

and SMM enthusiasts through to interested<br />

first-time participants. In challenging times such<br />

as these, an industry event should not be a luxury<br />

experience for the industry,« said Claus Ulrich<br />

You’ll<br />

see the<br />

difference<br />

Watch the video:<br />

antti.fi/ehinge<br />

20 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


SMM<br />

Complex contractual relationships,<br />

the enormous dimensions of ships,<br />

longhaul routes, and exceptional logistical<br />

challenges are all aspects of the<br />

modern shipping industry, and digital<br />

technologies are opening up many<br />

new opportunities to drive automation,<br />

agility and profitability. This applies<br />

to the entire life-cycle of a vessel,<br />

from the planning stages to operation,<br />

and through to recycling. SMM intends<br />

to be the platform, where maritime<br />

companies see how they can position<br />

themselves advantageously in this<br />

environment.<br />

A picture of the Maritime Future Summit in pre-corona times. In 2<strong>02</strong>1 it will be held digitally<br />

Selbach, Business Unit Director – Maritime<br />

and Technology Fairs & Exhibitions<br />

at Hamburg Messe und Congress<br />

GmbH.<br />

Digitalisation is the maritime game<br />

changer. This is why the digital transformation<br />

will be in focus at SMM.<br />

© <strong>HANSA</strong><br />

Conference programme<br />

The conference programme of SMM<br />

2<strong>02</strong>1 will cover the leading topics of<br />

the maritime sector.<br />

The programme will start off with<br />

the Maritime Future Summit, again,<br />

co-hosted by »<strong>HANSA</strong> International<br />

Maritime Journal«. The focal topics<br />

include artificial intelligence, digitalisation<br />

and big data. (2 February,<br />

10:30 AM to 2:45 PM). For more information<br />

on the Maritime Future Summit,<br />

please see our dedicated preview<br />

on the following pages.<br />

From autonomous shipping to Big<br />

Data, and through to blockchain, the<br />

top-flight MFS will take place under the<br />

heading »Aye, aye A.I.«.<br />

Hempaguard MaX<br />

The new peak for<br />

effi ciency in dry<br />

dock and at sea<br />

Our new, most advanced hull coating system is applied in<br />

just three coats: Hempaguard X8 with patented Actiguard ®<br />

technology for extraordinary antifouling performance, Nexus II<br />

and Hempaprime Immerse 900 for less time in the dry dock.<br />

Together with SHAPE (Systems for Hull and Propeller Effi ciency),<br />

it offers outstanding fuel effi ciency at sea. With 2<strong>02</strong>0 SOx<br />

restrictions now imminent, there’s never been a better<br />

time to upgrade.<br />

hempaguardmax.hempel.com<br />

Typ <strong>02</strong> - Hempaguard MaX - 210x107.indd 1 2<strong>02</strong>0-12-11 07:31:07<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

21


SMM<br />

About SMM<br />

SMM, the leading international maritime trade fair, normally takes place at<br />

the Hamburg Messe und Congress (HMC) exhibition complex every two<br />

years. Due to the Covid-19 pandemic, the 29 th edition of the trade fair will<br />

be held as a purely digital event from 2 to 5 February 2<strong>02</strong>1. With the leitmotif<br />

»Driving The Maritime Transition«, SMM Digital will bring together the<br />

maritime community. Its participants will be able to watch conferences<br />

featuring top-flight speakers on an online streaming platform. At SMM,<br />

international experts will discuss current challenges and innovative solutions<br />

for the maritime industry. The next SMM will take place from 6 to 9 September<br />

2<strong>02</strong>2. For further Information please visit: www.smm-hamburg.com<br />

© HMC<br />

»If we can better analyse, share and utilise<br />

the ever-growing catalogue of data captured<br />

in the industry we create a win-win.<br />

We can optimise performance to reduce<br />

fuel consumption – still the lion’s share of<br />

OPEX for owners – and help reduce emissions<br />

in line with IMO ambitions and society’s<br />

needs. That is a real opportunity,« said<br />

Esben Poulsson, Chairman of the International<br />

Chamber of Shipping (ICS).<br />

Following the Maritime Future Summit,<br />

the Offshore Dialogue will explore<br />

how the power of the wind and the oceans<br />

can be converted to energy for mankind.<br />

Furthermore, it will highlight technologies<br />

for ocean monitoring and eco-friendly dismantling<br />

of offshore equipment (2 February,<br />

3:00 PM to 6:05 PM).<br />

Economic aspects will be the centre of<br />

attention at the Tradewinds Digital Forum:<br />

The situation in the containership market<br />

and the importance of sustainability criteria<br />

for future ship financing will be discussed<br />

(2 February, 1:00 PM to 3:55 PM).<br />

At the gmec – global maritime environmental<br />

congress – industry experts will exchange<br />

views about the role of shipping in<br />

dealing with the climate crisis. The guest<br />

appearances of representatives of Fridays<br />

For Future and NABU, the German nature<br />

conservation society, are expected with<br />

great anticipation (3 February, 9:30 AM to<br />

3:40 PM).<br />

To complete the programme, MS&D,<br />

the international conference on maritime<br />

security and defence, will feature experts<br />

investigating current and future threats<br />

at sea, including cybercrime (4 February,<br />

9:30 AM to 5:00 PM & 5 February, 9:30 AM<br />

to 4:00 PM).ED<br />

made by<br />

Schaffran<br />

VERSTELLPROPELLER<br />

FESTPROPELLER<br />

®<br />

SCHAFFRAN Propeller + Service GmbH<br />

Bei der Gasanstalt 6-8 I D-23560 Lübeck<br />

Tel: +49 (0) 451-58323-0 I info@schaffran-propeller.de<br />

www.schaffran-propeller.de<br />

Präzision ist unser<br />

Schlüssel zum Erfolg<br />

22 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


THE SCRUBBER MAKER<br />

PureteQ scrubber systems feature the lowest OPEX in the business and are easy to<br />

install. We have now simplified the installation further in our Generation II scrubber,<br />

which potentially will reduce the shipyard installation cost by double-digit percentage.<br />

All scrubber systems come with state-of-the-art intuitive control systems with full<br />

remote accessibility. In times like these it is very convenient to get 24/7 remote on-line<br />

support/guidance to ship crews from our professional marine engineers. We strive<br />

towards further innovation every single day. At present, we are particularly focused<br />

on CO2 Carbon Capture and reutilization and Power to X in the same process.<br />

We are happy to elaborate on our Generation II scrubber and CO2 project at SMM<br />

2<strong>02</strong>1.<br />

WWW.PURETEQ.COM


SMM<br />

»Global concerted action is required«<br />

In an exclusive interview with <strong>HANSA</strong>, IMO Secretary General Kitack Lim reports on the<br />

work of the organization in times of the Covid-19 pandemic and what needs to be done in<br />

the near future for the industry and member states<br />

What is your message for the maritime<br />

sector on the occasion of SMM 2<strong>02</strong>1,<br />

which will take place under special circumstances?<br />

Kitack Lim: As the SMM audience knows,<br />

maritime trade is vital to the world’s economy.<br />

We must all work together to enable<br />

a sustainable post-pandemic recovery and<br />

to ensure that shipping has a truly sustainable,<br />

decarbonized future. Collaboration,<br />

cooperation and communication<br />

has never been more important. Also, we<br />

Kitack Lim<br />

have to thank the more than one million<br />

seafarers on board the world’s merchant<br />

ships. Their dedication and professionalism<br />

in the face of mounting challenges is<br />

worthy of our great admiration and gratitude.<br />

We still have a huge task ahead to<br />

resolve the crew change crisis. The World<br />

Maritime theme for 2<strong>02</strong>1 is »Seafarers: at<br />

the core of shipping’s future«. Let’s all put<br />

seafarers at the heart of our conversations<br />

and actions this year.<br />

In our last interview in September 2018,<br />

you said: »Shipping cannot just sit back«<br />

when it comes to the adoption of new regulations<br />

and environmental patterns.<br />

What is your assessment of the last two<br />

years in this respect?<br />

Lim: We have seen great commitment<br />

from many stakeholders and a willingness<br />

to step up. Of course, the pandemic<br />

has impacted everyone but at IMO we<br />

have got the regulatory agenda back on<br />

track. We have also stepped up our capacity<br />

building work, partnerships and<br />

collaborations with industry and financial<br />

institutions. Considering the need for<br />

scaling-up our partnerships efforts, IMO<br />

established a new Department of Partnerships<br />

and Projects (DPP) in March<br />

2<strong>02</strong>0 which will focus on developing innovative<br />

partnerships with both public<br />

and private sector and mobilise resources<br />

to support such partnerships, in addition<br />

to implementing long-term projects and<br />

advocating innovation. All of our initiatives<br />

provide opportunities for the maritime<br />

industry to get involved and contribute.<br />

As IMO Secretary-General, you normally<br />

travel a lot. How do you manage this<br />

programme in times of severe travel restrictions?<br />

Lim: From our side, we have adapted<br />

to virtual and online working. We have<br />

rebuilt the IMO meetings programme<br />

and we have been delivering webinars<br />

and online training sessions as part of<br />

our capacity building work. Of course,<br />

remote working has its challenges. We<br />

are all in the same boat. However, I was<br />

© IMO<br />

impressed with the cooperation and support<br />

of all IMO Member States, IGOs<br />

and NGOs that enabled us to deliver<br />

very successful meetings. With regard<br />

to me personally, I was in the fortunate<br />

position, while not being able to travel as<br />

usual, to be able to attend many events,<br />

meetings, and webinars virtually, many<br />

more than I would have been able to attend<br />

in person.<br />

Can the IMO still work effectively in such<br />

times?<br />

Lim: I believe we have shown adaptability<br />

and flexibility, with the support<br />

of Member States. Following extraordinary<br />

session of the Council, our governing<br />

body, by correspondence in the first<br />

half of 2<strong>02</strong>0, we held the first ever »AL-<br />

COM« meeting of all five Committees<br />

in September 2<strong>02</strong>0, which adopted interim<br />

guidance to facilitate remote sessions<br />

of the IMO Committees during the<br />

Covid-19 pandemic. This set the process<br />

for allowing IMO’s important technical<br />

work to continue through the pandemic,<br />

until its Headquarters can be reopened<br />

for physical meetings. Importantly, the<br />

Committees agreed on a procedure for<br />

decision-making in remote sessions. We<br />

then saw all Committees meet in virtual<br />

session and make significant progress<br />

on their agendas, including adoption of<br />

amendments to mandatory instruments,<br />

including SOLAS and MARPOL.<br />

What is, in your view, the most urgent<br />

homework to be done by politicians on<br />

the one hand and the maritime industry<br />

on the other?<br />

Lim: It is clear that there is much work<br />

to be done. The focus must be on finding<br />

solutions and preparing for the post-Covid<br />

world. The ability for shipping services<br />

and seafarers to deliver world trade is<br />

central to responding to, and eventually<br />

overcoming this pandemic. Governments<br />

which have not already done so<br />

must designate seafarers as key workers.<br />

They must also look at the national maritime<br />

transport policies, and their commitments<br />

to meeting the United Nations<br />

24 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


SMM<br />

Sustainable Development Goals. We also need to ensure digitalization<br />

is embraced. Standards under IMO’s Facilitation Convention<br />

to make electronic data exchange mandatory came into effect<br />

in April 2019. The pandemic has shown just how vital this is.<br />

The wider endorsement of the maritime single window concept is<br />

needed, to strengthen efficiencies, by allowing submission of all<br />

information required by various Government agencies through<br />

one single portal and to streamline port activities to the benefit<br />

of the supply chain. The maritime industry needs to ensure implementation<br />

of the relevant standards and look ahead to a future<br />

which is going to have to be greener and more sustainable.<br />

What is your opinion on regional policy initiatives, such as the<br />

European Union’s plan to include shipping in emissions trading<br />

schemes?<br />

Lim: In order to have a positive impact on climate change and the<br />

environment, global concerted action is required. Pollution is not<br />

confined by boundaries. It is only by working together that we can<br />

make the necessary impact. IMO, with 174 Member States, is the<br />

platform for global consideration of international shipping issues.<br />

Unilateral or regional measures might result in unintended consequences<br />

for shipping, world trade and economies.<br />

After being re-elected you will hold the post of Secretary General<br />

until the end of 2<strong>02</strong>3. Where do you hope the shipping industry<br />

will be when your second term expires?<br />

Lim: The year 2<strong>02</strong>0 showed us that we must always be prepared<br />

for the unexpected. First, from my perspective, and in line with<br />

the IMO’s strategic directions, I would like to see shipping continue<br />

to move forward on its path towards decarbonisation. Second,<br />

I would say that digital disruption has already arrived in<br />

the shipping world. Advancements in technologies such as robotics,<br />

automation and big data will usher in structural changes.<br />

Fully autonomous ports and semi-autonomous ships are already<br />

close to becoming a reality in some countries. And a key strategic<br />

direction for IMO is the integration of new and advancing<br />

technologies in the regulatory framework - balancing the benefits<br />

derived from these technologies against safety and security<br />

concerns, the impact on the environment and on international<br />

trade facilitation, the potential costs to the industry, and<br />

their impact on personnel, both on board and ashore. Third, I<br />

am sure that progress will be made to enhance the efficiency of<br />

shipping. I hope to see a big roll out of the maritime single window.<br />

And most importantly, I want IMO to ensure that no one<br />

in left behind. I have put a focus on strengthening the Organization’s<br />

capacity building initiatives by increasing the financial<br />

sustainability of our programmes. Apart from ensuring the financial<br />

sustainability, our focus is to support the implementation<br />

of IMO regulations with targeted capacity building activities, in<br />

particular with IMO projects that support R&D and technology<br />

transfer, assisting our Member States in overcoming barriers<br />

to the uptake of energy-efficiency technologies and operational<br />

measures in the shipping sector. I am committed to redoubling<br />

efforts to provide assistance towards the capacity development<br />

of Member States, in particular Least Developed Countries and<br />

Small Islands Developing States. Above all, the next three years<br />

have to be about the seafarers.<br />

What do you think will be the most important and significant<br />

measures the industry will take to achieve the environmental<br />

targets for 2030 and 2050?<br />

Lim: IMO’s Initial GHG Strategy has sent a clear signal that now<br />

is the time to start developing the vessels, the fuels and all the<br />

other necessary infrastructure to support zero-emission of shipping.<br />

Decarbonization will only be possible with targeted investment<br />

and strategic partnerships, which also address the needs of<br />

developing countries. Achieving the targets set will require both<br />

investment in zero-carbon marine fuels – renewable hydrogen<br />

or ammonia for example – and action by shipowners to embrace<br />

the transition.<br />

<br />

Interview: Michael Meyer<br />

With RINA certification it’s all plain sailing<br />

Biosafe Ship & Biosafety Trust Certification.<br />

Innovative solutions to prevent and control the<br />

spread of infections.<br />

Make it sure, make it simple.<br />

rina.org<br />

© IMO<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

25


Smart & Digital<br />

Maritime Future Summit to explore AI<br />

Artificial Intelligence (AI) is a game changer that goes far beyond Big Data and autonomous<br />

ships. Now it’s up to companies to use it to create competitive advantages.<br />

At the Maritime Future Summit, the latest trends will be discussed<br />

The ongoing process of digitization of<br />

shipping can no longer be stopped.<br />

Many companies are specializing in<br />

smart technologies. This year’s SMM also<br />

focuses on this topic. »Driving the maritime<br />

transition« is the leitmotif of this<br />

year’s edition of the leading trade fair for<br />

the maritime industry, which takes place<br />

every two years in Hamburg. Due to the<br />

Corona pandemic, the trade show will<br />

be held in digital format from February<br />

2 to 5. Not least the conferences with high<br />

Pierre Sames, DNV GL - Maritime<br />

© DNV GL<br />

ranking industry experts will to supply<br />

crucial impulses for the technological<br />

change to the industry.<br />

The Maritime Future Summit<br />

(MFS), organized by the trade<br />

fair together with <strong>HANSA</strong>, traditionally<br />

kicks off SMM’s conference<br />

programme and artificial<br />

intelligence will be one of<br />

the defining topics of this event<br />

too. Under the leadership of<br />

Volker Bertram of World Maritime<br />

University (WMU), industry<br />

experts will discuss how self-learning<br />

systems will influence ship operation,<br />

ship design and shipbuilding in<br />

the future.<br />

On the topic of »Utilizing leading-edge<br />

technology to build new<br />

solutions,« Pierre Sames, a proven<br />

innovation expert, will speak. The<br />

Group Technology and Research<br />

Director of classification society<br />

DNV GL - Maritime had already<br />

predicted at the MFS 2018 under<br />

the title »Technical Assurance<br />

2030« how Digital Twins and Artificial<br />

Intelligence will be widely<br />

used, not only with better support,<br />

but also with »completely new<br />

services« as a result. Sames had also<br />

touched on a thorny issue in 2018: Who<br />

will pay for the Digital Twin if different<br />

Oskar Levander, Kongsberg<br />

©<br />

© Kongsberg<br />

players own different pieces of the puzzle<br />

that they don’t want to share? To this end,<br />

DNV GL had launched an open simulation<br />

platform with partners to build a secure<br />

common ecosystem, share relevant<br />

data, and advance the Digital Twin. We<br />

can probably look forward to exciting updates<br />

on this programme this year.<br />

Oskar Levander, Senior Vice President<br />

Business Concepts at Kongsberg Maritime,<br />

will speak on the subject of »Intelligent<br />

Shipping Solutions«. The notorious<br />

autonomous shipping guru, well-known<br />

26 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Log<br />

Smart & Digital<br />

© <strong>HANSA</strong><br />

from his former role at Rolls-Royce, will<br />

bring some inspiring views to the table.<br />

Sean Fernback, President of Wärtsilä<br />

Voyage and Executive Vice President<br />

of the Finnish technology group Wärtsilä,<br />

will also talk about the role artificial<br />

intelligence can play in real ship operations<br />

in »From unconnected ships to<br />

smart transport platforms – the role of AI<br />

in future(istic) ship operations«.<br />

Jilin Ma, senior engineer of electrical<br />

and electronic engineering, at MFS sponsor<br />

China Classification Society (CCS)<br />

will address the topic »With the coming<br />

of the Maritime Revolution, is unmanned-bridge<br />

available?« Back in 2018,<br />

his CCS colleague Wu Sun predicted there<br />

would certainly be no future<br />

without autonomous ships. None<br />

of this, however, without the appropriate<br />

legal framework. First,<br />

legislation and liability in the field<br />

of autonomous shipping must be<br />

clarified. »Who is liable in the event<br />

of an autonomous ship accident – the<br />

manufacturer of the systems the owner,<br />

the operator? And don’t forget that cyber<br />

risks also need new insurance products,«<br />

Wu said in 2018.<br />

From the technical side, Tom H. Evensen,<br />

regional category manager, Hull Performance,<br />

at coating specialist Jotun, will<br />

look at things in »Call it AI, we call it fuel<br />

saving.«<br />

Sean Fernback, Wärtsilä<br />

© Wärtsilä<br />

And, as in previous years, shipbuilding<br />

itself will also be a topic at the Maritime<br />

Future Summit. How does digitali-<br />

Anstriche- und Beschichtungsstoffe<br />

Ihr Experte für die Binnenschifffahrt in Deutschland und Europa:<br />

Anstriche- Marc Cordes, und Tel.: Beschichtungsstoffe<br />

040 / 72003-126,<br />

E-Mail: marc.cordes@akzonobel.com<br />

Ihr Ansprechpartner in Hamburg für die Schifffahrt<br />

Carsten Most<br />

Tel. 040/72003-120 | E-Mail: carsten.most@akzonobel.com<br />

Anstriche- und Beschichtungsstoffe<br />

Ihr Experte für die Binnenschifffahrt in Deutschland und Europa:<br />

Marc Cordes, Tel.: 040 / 72003-126,<br />

E-Mail: marc.cordes@akzonobel.com<br />

Logo margin right<br />

Logo margin bottom<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

27<br />

Logo margin bottom


Smart & Digital<br />

Jilin Ma, China Classification Society<br />

zation fit into the heavy industry sector?<br />

»From Iron Age to Digital Age – A.I.<br />

from ship design to production« is the<br />

title of the presentation held by Rodrigo<br />

Pérez Fernández from Spanish ship<br />

designer Sener.<br />

The presentation by Annie Bekker,<br />

Professor at South Africa’s Stellenbosch<br />

University, is also related to<br />

shipbuilding and ship design. We<br />

are curious to see what food for<br />

thought she has in store for the industry<br />

in »Artificial Intelligence<br />

or Human Intelligence – where<br />

should you place your bets?«<br />

Is past future now reality?<br />

© CCS<br />

Nick Danese, CEO of NDAR, had already<br />

spoken on this topic at the Maritime<br />

Future Summit 2018. He had called on<br />

the shipbuilding industry to wake up and<br />

share information to realize the full potential<br />

of swarm intelligence. »To be effective,<br />

efficient and productive, people need<br />

to know what they’re doing,« Danese said.<br />

»Things will change when everyone can<br />

take ownership and request the data they<br />

need to do their jobs.« That, he said, is the<br />

key to ensuring that today’s investments<br />

are still right ten years later. Perhaps AI<br />

will soon be deciding on the optimal flow<br />

of data for greater efficiency?<br />

As always, it is worth taking a look<br />

back at the tenor of the debates at the<br />

last Maritime Future Summit before<br />

the SMM starts. »Mind the gap – bridging<br />

disruptive technologies« was the title<br />

of the summit back then. Is what was<br />

the future two years ago now reality?<br />

At what pace is the industry<br />

changing? While 2<strong>02</strong>1 is<br />

about Artificial Intelligence,<br />

in the fall of 2018 the focus<br />

was still on human intelligence:<br />

how processes<br />

can be digitized and in<br />

such a way that this also<br />

results in real efficiency<br />

gains, new opportunities<br />

and business models. »The<br />

solution is not to shift B2B processes<br />

to digital channels, but to<br />

decouple information exchange<br />

and business processes from business<br />

partners, e.g., via a cloud architecture.<br />

Without that, even the autonomous<br />

ship offers nothing new,« Hubert<br />

Hoffmann, CIO and CDO, MSC Germany,<br />

summed it up.<br />

Tom H. Evensen, Jotun<br />

© Jotun<br />

Rodrigo Pérez Fernández, Sener<br />

© Sener<br />

Christian Roeloffs, CEO of the<br />

startup xChange, predicted business<br />

collaboration via central<br />

platforms, cloud solutions or<br />

blockchain as the defining elements<br />

of the future in maritime<br />

businesses. The way forward,<br />

he said, must be specialization,<br />

focusing on core competencies<br />

and moving away from peripheral<br />

business areas. »On the losing<br />

side, there will be conglomerates<br />

that can play in all fields but are not<br />

experts anywhere,« Roeloffs said at the<br />

time. For Mark O’Neil, CEO of Columbia<br />

Marlow Holding, it was about the intersection<br />

of technology, innovation and<br />

processes: »Because time is of the essence,<br />

making the right move at the wrong time<br />

is better than making the wrong move.<br />

Nothing is more disruptive than implementing<br />

the wrong IT solution.«<br />

Artificial intelligence won’t take it away<br />

from humans to think up smart solutions<br />

in the digitization process. But<br />

it can be part of the solutions. Thus,<br />

MFS presenter Volker Bertram noted<br />

already in 2019 in an article for<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong>: »Don’t expect AI to be<br />

intelligent in the human sense,<br />

to have a smart idea for once, or<br />

even to have common sense. AI<br />

is a (technical) idiot, but a useful<br />

one. We’d be stupid not to take<br />

advantage of that or use AI where<br />

it makes sense.« And where that<br />

may be will surely be shown by the<br />

Maritime Future Summit panel. fs<br />

Annie Bekker, Stellenbosch University<br />

© Stellenbosch University<br />

28 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


SISHIP BlueDrive PlusC –<br />

electrical power system<br />

The synchronous generators operate in the same speed and power range as<br />

the connected diesel engine. The power electronics of the SISHIP BlueDrive PlusC<br />

main drive unit are designed as a stand-alone unit that integrates the generator,<br />

the bus-tie panel, and the frequency converter controls for all thrusters and auxiliary<br />

drives. The unit also supplies clean power to all auxiliary consumers and reduces<br />

footprint, weight and volume by at least 30 percent. Learn more about our ideas<br />

for tomorrow’s marine industry – from digitalization to hydrogen as an energy<br />

supplier and new service offerings – at our Expert Talks.<br />

Siemens Energy is a registered trademark licensed by Siemens AG.<br />

siemens-energy.com/marine<br />

Join our Expert Talks<br />

program:<br />

siemens-energy.com/<br />

marineworld


Smart & Digital<br />

AI – an idiot?<br />

You’ve heard of it, and it is powerful – some even perceive it as threatening. Artificial<br />

Intelligence or AI is a term often used, yet little understood. By Volker Bertram<br />

The engineering truth behind the<br />

term »Artificial Intelligence« is a set<br />

of tools that may do jobs better or handle<br />

tasks we could not handle at all in the<br />

past. Key techniques of AI are machine<br />

learning, knowledge-based systems,<br />

natural language and gesture processing,<br />

and generally robotics. The following<br />

gives a short extract from a Hiper<br />

2<strong>02</strong>0 paper (www.hiper-conf.info).<br />

Machine Learning<br />

Machine learning and data mining<br />

are closely related to computational<br />

statistics. In essence, we have glorified<br />

statistics here with new, catchy<br />

labels attached to it. Most semi-empirical<br />

methods in maritime applications,<br />

such as ship design, have approximated<br />

data points by a constant or at best very<br />

simple function. Wouldn’t it be nice to<br />

have some mathematical way of mimicking<br />

the curve we would instinctively<br />

draw through such data sets, ignoring<br />

implausible outliers and following<br />

the trends our eye sees; something flexible<br />

yet smooth and free of inappropriate<br />

oscillations?<br />

For the naval architect, this is old hat.<br />

We have approximated arbitrary point<br />

sets for centuries, first using flexible<br />

thin beams (splines), and later using<br />

aptly named spline curves, which do<br />

not oscillate and form smooth curves<br />

and surfaces. The machine learning<br />

community prefers other functions,<br />

such as sigmoid functions. Combining<br />

many of these, we have similar basic<br />

qualities of flexible approximation<br />

and avoid oscillations.<br />

The fitting process is performed most<br />

often by Artificial neural networks<br />

(ANNs). These represent functions by<br />

»layers«, and coefficients by »nodes«.<br />

More nodes and more layers offer more<br />

flexibility in fitting. And if you have more<br />

layers, you use the term »Deep Learning«.<br />

Take away the glamorous terms and you<br />

end up with a plain, but useful statistical<br />

tool. There are countless applications<br />

for ANNs, as pattern matching or trending<br />

is needed in many fields: fingerprint<br />

matching, facial recognition, speech recognition,<br />

automatic reading of licence<br />

plates, playing chess or Go. Useful maritime<br />

applications include empirical models<br />

for ship design, performance monitoring<br />

or pattern recognition, e.g. automatic<br />

ship identification or spotting deficiencies<br />

in drone inspections.<br />

Not magic<br />

But ANNs are not magic. They can’t predict<br />

the unpredictable, such as random events<br />

(including the effect of random events on<br />

ships). And they aren’t good at predicting<br />

highly nonlinear events, as we have random<br />

errors in the initial conditions which<br />

lead to a large scatter in the results, e.g. for<br />

crash-stop manoeuvres. They are also data<br />

greedy and if you have only a few data sets<br />

and not thousands or millions, as is typical<br />

in many maritime applications or for a rare<br />

event, we should use natural intelligence,<br />

e.g. reducing the number of free variables<br />

using physical insight.<br />

30 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Smart & Digital<br />

Most maritime KBS applications are<br />

found for ship operation. This is not surprising;<br />

ship design is a creative and complex<br />

process in a rapidly changing economic<br />

and regulatory environment.<br />

In contrast, collision avoidance follows<br />

rules (COLREGs) that have hardly<br />

changed in the last 100 years and rules<br />

for emergency response are conveniently<br />

documented in emergency response<br />

plans and handbooks. DNV GL works<br />

on combining machine vision and<br />

case-based reasoning for next-generation<br />

plan approval. The idea is to identify<br />

similar plans to the one submitted<br />

for approval, retrieve the corresponding<br />

cases, and derive recommendations<br />

based on these.<br />

Speech Recognition<br />

Speech recognition and its shortcomings<br />

are widely known. Just google<br />

»speech recognition gone wrong«. But<br />

the advantages of hands-free operation<br />

and handling simple user interaction<br />

by voice are too compelling to ignore.<br />

Speech recognition is generally built<br />

upon machine learning, both for individual<br />

words and commonly used word<br />

combinations.<br />

Applications of speech recognitions<br />

range widely, including control of secondary<br />

equipment in airplanes and cars,<br />

mobile email, etc. These are ubiquitous<br />

in all our lives.<br />

As a maritime application, the voice-operated<br />

Super Bridge-X system of Mitsubishi<br />

allows in principle »no-touch« operation<br />

of the ship.<br />

Useful or dumb?<br />

Like other computer tools, AI can be<br />

very useful, but also incredibly dumb<br />

and stubborn. We should use AI more;<br />

we would be dumb not to exploit its capabilities.<br />

But we should also be aware<br />

of its limitations and use the tools<br />

wisely.<br />

n<br />

Knowledge-based systems<br />

Knowledge-based Systems (KBS) or expert<br />

systems reason within narrow<br />

knowledge domains. Most KBS use IF-<br />

THEN rules to represent knowledge.<br />

Rules may be taken from regulations or<br />

from experience, e.g. interviewing experts.<br />

KBS become powerful when you<br />

have many, many rules which become too<br />

complex for humans to handle, or when<br />

quick response is needed.<br />

KBS incorporating uncertainty or<br />

probability are labeled as ‘Bayesian networks’.<br />

Case-based reasoning (CBR) systems<br />

are special KBS using an approach<br />

similar to that of lawyers or doctors: Find<br />

related cases and study them to derive the<br />

best strategy for the current case. (Intelligent)<br />

agents are swarms of simple expert<br />

systems working (communicating)<br />

together.<br />

The challenge<br />

The challenge lies in getting all relevant<br />

rules together. This task can get (prohibitively)<br />

daunting if expert knowledge acquisition<br />

takes too long or costs too much<br />

money, if rules change rapidly or if there<br />

are no agreed rules, such as in creative<br />

fields like (aesthetic) ship design. If the<br />

KBS does not contain enough rules or cases,<br />

it is often useless for practical purposes.<br />

LEHREN – FORSCHEN – NEU ENTDECKEN<br />

KOMMEN SIE AN DIE JADE HOCHSCHULE<br />

Die Jade Hochschule in Wilhelmshaven, Oldenburg und Elsfleth<br />

zeichnet sich durch innovative Ansätze, kooperative Zusammenarbeit<br />

und eine zugewandte Haltung aus. In allen Bereichen fördert die<br />

Hochschule Kompetenz und Vielfalt.<br />

Fachbereich Seefahrt und Logistik am Campus Elsfleth:<br />

Professur (m/w/d) für das Gebiet<br />

Mensch-Maschine-Interaktion in<br />

autonomen Schiffsführungssystemen<br />

Bes.-Gr. W2 | Kennziffer SL 15-<strong>HANSA</strong><br />

Zu Ihren Aufgaben gehören die Lehre in den einschlägigen Modulen aller<br />

Studiengänge des Fachbereichs und die angewandte Forschung zu den<br />

Themen Maritime Digitalisierung, Maritime Verkehrssicherung und Autonome<br />

Schiffsführungssysteme einschließlich der Akquise von Drittmittelprojekten.<br />

Sie verfügen über ein einschlägiges wissenschaftliches Studium,<br />

fachlich ausgewiesene Kenntnisse über Methoden der Mensch-<br />

Maschine-Interaktion sowie einen maritim-nautischen Bezug im<br />

bisherigen Forschungsfeld.<br />

Bewerbungsschluss: 20. Februar 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

E-Mail: berufungen@jade-hs.de<br />

Die Stellenausschreibung finden Sie<br />

unter jade-hs.de/professuren.<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

31


Smart & Digital<br />

Machine Learning – just a buzzword?<br />

Hamburg-based Fraunhofer Center for Maritime Logistics and Services CML has<br />

published a new White Paper »Machine Learning in Maritime Logistics« analyzing<br />

potentials and use cases<br />

Digitalization initiatives by ports and<br />

shipping companies in recent years<br />

– driven by the obligation to equip AIS<br />

transmitters or through better maritime<br />

connectivity - have created a unique<br />

maritime, continuously growing database.<br />

In order to make smart use of this<br />

data and maintain competitive advantages<br />

in all segments of the maritime<br />

industry, machine learning (ML) is seen<br />

as an important means, allowing companies<br />

e.g. to:<br />

• Reduce costs through optimized operations<br />

and data-driven decision making,<br />

• Improve quality control and safety<br />

through digital monitoring solutions,<br />

• Capture knowledge hidden in past<br />

business records,<br />

• Identify decision-relevant information<br />

in large data sets,<br />

• Automatize processes using intelligent<br />

assistants, and<br />

• Establish new business models and<br />

products.<br />

But what exactly is ML and why is it still<br />

not utilized widely in the marine world,<br />

even though everyone is talking about it?<br />

Not a magic bullet<br />

Machine Learning is a subset of artificial<br />

intelligence, a wide field in computer science<br />

concerned with equipping machines<br />

with human intelligence. With ML, rules<br />

for obtaining answers from data are not<br />

manually programmed (as done in traditional<br />

planning algorithms, e.g. for<br />

assigning port equipment to waiting<br />

containers) but the outcome of the ML<br />

algorithm itself.<br />

These rules are automatically generated<br />

in a training phase and then applied<br />

to new data to derive answers for a<br />

specific, clearly defined problem. Therefore,<br />

ML can be interpreted as an advanced<br />

form of classical statistics, in<br />

which knowledge is also inferred from<br />

data examples. That being said, ML can<br />

only learn based on the information actually<br />

hidden in data available in a given<br />

use case. Unfortunately this means,<br />

if data is not substantial enough, ML is<br />

not going to offer a solution for a problem<br />

at hand.<br />

Powerful but not universal<br />

There are three main types of ML, supervised,<br />

unsupervised and reinforcement<br />

learning, each with a broad variety<br />

of algorithms, application areas,<br />

strengths and weaknesses. While supervised<br />

ML is trained with data where<br />

inputs and corresponding outputs are<br />

known, unsupervised ML works on<br />

unlabelled data to identify patterns<br />

within a data set. Alternatively, reinforcement<br />

learning discovers an optimized<br />

strategy for decisions problems<br />

via a sequence of trial and error experiments.<br />

What all of these algorithms have in<br />

common is that they require a certain<br />

minimum of high-quality data, and usually<br />

involve a careful pre-processing of<br />

this data. Also, the scope of the problem<br />

to be solved, i.e. the use case, has to be<br />

manageable and suitable for the given database.<br />

Thus, defining the use case is an<br />

important and challenging first step in all<br />

ML projects<br />

Not necessarily disruptive<br />

With ML you can »start big or small«, but<br />

based on our experience it is recommended<br />

to start with proof-of-concept applications<br />

instead of going straight for the<br />

big all-embracing leap. ML can be a complement<br />

to methods already in use. As a<br />

rule, it makes sense to start with a proof<br />

of concept get it working and then expand<br />

the scope step by step to other areas<br />

over time.<br />

Far from exhausted its potential<br />

ML has shown great success in many areas<br />

such as image or text recognition,<br />

healthcare applications, recommender<br />

systems, or robotics. In the maritime sector,<br />

ML has been e.g. used to estimate arrival<br />

times or for autonomous navigation,<br />

condition-based monitoring and route<br />

optimization. But although data-driven<br />

decision-making is recognized as a key<br />

to success, a majority of companies has<br />

not yet started exploiting ML in its different<br />

forms. According to a recent study,<br />

only 20% of German logistics companies<br />

are using big data analytics and merely<br />

6% already take advantage of AI technologies.<br />

Meanwhile, 90% regard AI as<br />

© Fraunhofer CML<br />

32 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Smart & Digital<br />

Figure 1: Use Case Identification<br />

very important to simplify business processes<br />

and increase productivity in the<br />

transport and logistics sector.<br />

What is the reason for this discrepancy<br />

between perceived importance and actual<br />

use? Especially for small and midsized<br />

companies the implementation of<br />

ML projects can strain available personnel,<br />

time, or financial resources. However,<br />

more often the shear amount of possible<br />

applications, algorithms and data<br />

sources can be difficult to navigate for ML<br />

beginners. Each algorithm has individual<br />

strengths, fits certain fields of application<br />

and requires careful tuning of parameters<br />

during training, all of which requires<br />

specific knowledge and sufficient experience.<br />

Thus, success in the field is by no<br />

means a sure thing but requires careful<br />

selection of suitable use cases and pooling<br />

of necessary expertise either inhouse<br />

or by involving external partners.<br />

Nonetheless, our answer to the question<br />

»Machine Learning – just a buzzword?«<br />

is a clear no. Without being a<br />

panacea, ML carries the potential to impact<br />

many business processes, increase<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

33


Smart & Digital<br />

Figure 2: Proof of Concept<br />

for Machine Learning<br />

Solutions<br />

© Fraunhofer CML<br />

efficiency and reduce workloads. How early adaptions of ML look<br />

like in the maritime sector, e.g. to provide reliable ETA predictions<br />

or fuel consumptions forecasts, is shown in the white paper.<br />

And once the first hurdle has been cleared, ML will find many<br />

more successful applications in everyday operations of maritime<br />

companies and SMEs.<br />

Authors: Miriam Zacharias, Steffen Klöver, Lutz Kretschmann<br />

Fraunhofer Center for Maritime logistics and Services CML<br />

White Paper »Machine Learning in Maritime Logistics« Available<br />

for download at www.cml.fraunhofer.de<br />

WATER AS<br />

A TOOL.<br />

High-pressure pumps<br />

Ultra-high-pressure units<br />

Water tools<br />

34 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

WOMA GmbH Werthauser Str. 77–79, 47226 Duisburg | +49 2065 3040 | info@woma.kaercher.com<br />

www.woma-group.com


peking<br />

Die ganze Geschichte<br />

Hardcover<br />

mit Schutzumschlag<br />

24 x 28 cm I 176 Seiten<br />

zahlr. Farb- und S/W-Fotos<br />

€ 29,95<br />

ISBN 978-3-7822-<br />

1384-4<br />

Die Viermastbark Peking ist einer der letzten der schnellen Frachtsegler, die bewundernd<br />

Flying-P-Liner genannt wurden. Nachdem ihr Schicksal schon besiegelt schien, konnte sie gerettet<br />

werden. Wie es dazu kam, erzählt Matthias Gretzschel, indem er die Geschichte des Schiffes nachzeichnet.<br />

Der spannende Text wird von zahlreichen historischen und aktuellen Bildern begleitet.<br />

koehler-books.de


Smart & Digital<br />

Open user interface for Augmented Reality<br />

It is challenging for navigators to constantly translate data from equipment to the world<br />

outside while engaged in maritime operations. Augmented Reality (AR) is a promising new<br />

technology that might improve this situation by directly overlaying the users’ field of vision<br />

with digital content related to the world outside<br />

Research suggests AR may improve<br />

operator performance and situation<br />

awareness by supporting navigation focus,<br />

reducing information overload and<br />

linking real and digital information.<br />

There exist early examples of AR in maritime<br />

operations, but it has not yet been<br />

widely applied.<br />

At a first glance it would seem like AR<br />

would be beneficial in maritime operations.<br />

Yet, there are multiple barriers that<br />

make safe and efficient implementation a<br />

challenge for maritime operations. Issues<br />

like ergonomics, contrast and the ability<br />

to compensate for ship motions are<br />

well known issues that need to be solved.<br />

As the hardware gradually improves we<br />

expect that AR will be feasible in an increasing<br />

number of operational scenarios.<br />

However, even in the case of improved<br />

AR hardware there is still a need to adapt<br />

AR systems to maritime user needs and<br />

their environmental and technological<br />

context. Our work addresses three challenges<br />

that the industry should overcome<br />

in order to make AR more useful and safer<br />

in maritime operations.<br />

Three challenges<br />

First, a ship bridge is commonly made<br />

up of many different systems delivered<br />

by multiple actors. Since this is unlikely<br />

to change in the imminent future, there<br />

is a need to address AR as a user interface<br />

platform that multiple independent<br />

systems can share. Second, since AR applications<br />

in effect use the entire world<br />

as a canvas to display information, there<br />

is a need to define rules for how AR applications<br />

may be superimposed over<br />

the real world without interfering with<br />

each other, or with important objects in<br />

the real world. Third, since the operations<br />

of a ship and the tasks the crew is<br />

engaging with are dynamic and related<br />

to what is happening inside and outside<br />

the ship, there is a need for rules that<br />

enable AR to adapt to the context where<br />

it is used.<br />

This article is a short version of an<br />

article presented at the COMPIT<br />

2<strong>02</strong>0 conference. For the full version,<br />

please go to http://data.hiperconf.info/compit2<strong>02</strong>0_pontignano.<br />

pdf and look for the article »Augmenting<br />

OpenBridge: An Open<br />

User Interface Architecture for<br />

Augmented Reality Applications<br />

on Ship Bridges« by Kjetil Nordby,<br />

Etienne Gernez, Synne Frydenberg<br />

and Jon Olav Eikenes.<br />

Set of rules<br />

Overall, there is a need for developing a<br />

system architecture that enables an efficient<br />

use of multiple AR applications in<br />

ship bridges. This article shows a proposal<br />

for how to meet this need, based<br />

upon research carried out in the SED-<br />

NA project funded by EU. The core of<br />

our proposal is a set of rules for designing<br />

user interfaces (UIs) for AR applications<br />

based upon the OpenBridge open<br />

source design system currently being<br />

collaboratively developed and implemented<br />

by a large user community in<br />

the maritime industry.<br />

The AR UI architecture proposal is<br />

built upon three main sets of rules that<br />

guide:<br />

1. What type of information may be displayed<br />

in AR,<br />

2. How to specifically display and cluster<br />

the information based upon its content,<br />

and<br />

3. How to make the information reactive<br />

to the position of the user on the ship<br />

bridge.<br />

For the first set of rules governing the<br />

type of information to be displayed,<br />

we developed a number of predefined<br />

AR components. For example, an »App<br />

display« renders an existing application<br />

(ECDIS, radar, etc) in its entirety<br />

in AR. »AR Map« can be used to display<br />

location-based information on a<br />

2D or 3D map. »Annotation« shows a<br />

small piece of information connected<br />

to a physical object in the world -<br />

for example information about a vessel<br />

passing by. Together, the predefined<br />

AR components enable to display information<br />

in ways that are predictable<br />

for the users and well adapted to<br />

the specificities of the user’s work environment.<br />

Because there is a finite space around<br />

users, we developed a second set of rules<br />

to govern where to display information,<br />

and how to cluster it. For example, the<br />

water surface should have a limited<br />

overlay because it might occlude important<br />

objects like small boats. Other areas<br />

might be less critical for operation,<br />

such as the sky, or the bridge´s ceiling<br />

and walls.<br />

Information and masked areas<br />

To deal with this problem, we proposed<br />

that specific AR components should be<br />

displayed only in specific »information<br />

areas«. For example, we propose that the<br />

area located near the horizon should only<br />

contain annotation components, keeping<br />

the annotations close to the objects<br />

on the water while not overlapping them.<br />

The area located under the horizon band<br />

should contain only ocean overlay components.<br />

This is a critical area where there<br />

is a high probability that the graphics<br />

may occlude important objects in<br />

the water. We also proposed to define<br />

»masked areas« where no information<br />

may be displayed, and we defined rules<br />

for the free positioning of certain AR<br />

components.<br />

Finally, the proposal acknowledges the<br />

fact that the users of the bridge will need<br />

to have information follow them while<br />

they move around in the bridge to engage<br />

with different operational tasks.<br />

36 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Smart & Digital<br />

To deal with this challenge we proposed<br />

»AR zones« where the structure of the<br />

information areas as well as their informational<br />

content change as users enter<br />

and leave these zones. We created three<br />

zones implemented in a typical bridge<br />

shaped with a fore and aft part, and two<br />

wings. The »workplace zone« is centred<br />

on traditional workplaces in the bridge,<br />

such as the bridge wings or navigation<br />

stations.<br />

AR zones<br />

»AR« zones<br />

In this zone, we propose that specific AR<br />

components may be pinned to locations<br />

predefined by the user, thus creating a<br />

versatile and tailormade work station.<br />

The »by window zone« is any zone close<br />

to the windows. The »in-between zoneq<br />

is any other area inside the bridge. Since<br />

the physical, collaborative and operational<br />

conditions in these areas are hard to<br />

predict, we propose that these zones allow<br />

for a more flexible use of the digital<br />

space, still following a number of rules<br />

within each zone.<br />

Field tests<br />

Together, the design principles presented<br />

in our proposal make up an early example<br />

of UI system architecture for maritime<br />

AR. We are currently testing the AR principles<br />

with users in the field onboard ships<br />

and in realistic simulations of operations<br />

in our lab using virtual reality. Our objective<br />

is to improve the AR system architecture<br />

to make it part of the OpenBridge<br />

design guideline. In doing so, we hope to<br />

make AR an integrated part of maritime<br />

multivendor workplaces and fit seamlessly<br />

with screen-based systems. This is important<br />

requirement for making AR a safe<br />

and efficient part of maritime operations.<br />

Author: Kjetil Nordby<br />

Institute of Design,<br />

Oslo School of Architecture and Design<br />

Annotations simulated in<br />

the mixed reality<br />

platform: iceberg (left)<br />

and neighbouring vessel<br />

(right)<br />

AR map concept linking a point<br />

in the map with a position in the<br />

»real world«<br />

Widgets on board<br />

Free pinning of a<br />

container object<br />

Suggested information<br />

areas and types of<br />

application components<br />

Dividing the bridge into<br />

three types of zones<br />

Sky band<br />

Apps, map & widgets<br />

Horizon band<br />

Annotation<br />

Masked area<br />

Free pinning<br />

Apps, map & widgets<br />

Water surface<br />

Overlay<br />

© Oslo School of Architecture and Design<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

37


Smart & Digital<br />

Remote surveys have kept shipping moving<br />

In uncertain times and challenging conditions during the Corona pandemic, classification<br />

society DNV GL has embraced remote surveys<br />

The shipping industry is built on<br />

movement – keeping vessels<br />

on track, delivering around the<br />

world, and ensuring that global<br />

trade continues. When the<br />

Covid-19 crisis hit, however,<br />

movement of people had to<br />

stop. But vitally the movement<br />

of essential goods<br />

needed to continue, and<br />

as safely and efficiently<br />

as the world expects it<br />

to every day.<br />

Our focus is on safety<br />

– meaning that surveyors<br />

and surveys had to<br />

continue on as normally<br />

- as much as humanly<br />

possible. And we needed to<br />

ensure that we could do our<br />

part to keep the fleet in service<br />

running for our customers - by<br />

making sure that wherever possible<br />

surveys could continue to be delivered -<br />

even where, due to restrictions, a surveyor<br />

might not be able to attend the vessel.<br />

DATE service<br />

© DNV GL<br />

The new Machinery Maintenance Connect (MMC)<br />

gave customers a new way to carry out the machinery<br />

planned maintenance system (MPMS) survey<br />

We in the position, however, that rather<br />

than having to invent something new, we<br />

were able to ramp up an already existing<br />

service – remote surveys. With the first<br />

trials in 2018 and full fleet wide access<br />

from February 2019, DNV GL can truly<br />

say we have pioneered this service in<br />

ship classification. From their first introduction,<br />

remote surveys have resulted in<br />

considerable savings in operational downtime<br />

as well as travel time and expenses.<br />

The globally available 24/7 DATE (Direct<br />

Access to Technical Experts) centres<br />

were at the forefront of taking on<br />

the challenge of delivering the remote<br />

surveys and meeting the rapidly growing<br />

demand in 2<strong>02</strong>0. This unique service<br />

has proven to be of significant value<br />

to our customers and allowed us to ensure<br />

safety and regulatory compliance<br />

through the use of modern technology.<br />

With specialists in operational centres<br />

in Hamburg, Oslo, Houston, Piraeus<br />

and Singapore, coverage is ensured<br />

around the clock.<br />

The remote survey service has also expanded<br />

to trial the first remote periodic<br />

surveys, even though most remain for<br />

minor conditions of class. Not all surveys<br />

can be completed remotely, but DNV GL’s<br />

survey request system on Veracity can<br />

automatically indicate whether a survey<br />

can be executed remotely or not.<br />

Lessons learnt<br />

With the experience that comes from<br />

having delivered far more remote surveys<br />

than any other class, we have learned several<br />

lessons about what makes for a successful<br />

remote survey. First up is communication.<br />

There are many ways to<br />

successfully complete a remote survey –<br />

the crew can be in constant contact with<br />

the surveyor, transmitting live video, or<br />

through supplying photographic and<br />

documentary evidence of the completed<br />

work or issue.<br />

For direct video communication, 3G<br />

is generally the minimum, but 4G or<br />

even VSAT is the best option. Occasionally<br />

a poor connection<br />

will prevent using live video,<br />

but with creative solutions,<br />

even surveying from deep<br />

within the vessel is possible.<br />

In one instance, the<br />

crew suspended a router<br />

from a skylight to transmit<br />

live video from within<br />

the engine room.<br />

Even without a live<br />

link we can accept recorded<br />

videos of work<br />

being done that is relayed<br />

from an area with a<br />

stronger connection, so long<br />

as this is properly verified. As<br />

well as the crew assisting in remote<br />

surveys, third party contractors<br />

can also deliver specialized services<br />

to aid in performing some types<br />

of surveys by using, for example, trained<br />

drone and ROV operators. Recently DNV<br />

GL completed a series of ship surveys using<br />

remotely operated vehicles (ROVs)<br />

on three Wilson-managed vessels – the<br />

world’s first in-water remote ship surveys.<br />

In addition to the significant savings<br />

in operational downtime and travel costs,<br />

because all of the evidence from remote<br />

surveys are digital documents, for example<br />

the videos of work being done, photos<br />

and notes, the information can be much<br />

more easily archived and the key findings<br />

extracted and analysed. This store of information<br />

on the open Veracity platform<br />

could also prove extremely useful when<br />

surveying sister vessels, or for customers<br />

to supply to other stakeholders in the future.<br />

The accessibility and quality of data<br />

coming in from remote surveys could<br />

add even more value and interest in the<br />

service, especially as customers have embraced<br />

remote surveys. For some jobs, of<br />

course, inspections in person are preferable<br />

for periodic surveys, but remote surveys<br />

have more than proved their worth<br />

under this year’s difficult circumstances<br />

38 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Smart & Digital<br />

and are becoming the preferred method<br />

for handling occasional surveys.<br />

CMC services<br />

We also worked to provide component<br />

and material certification (CMC) services<br />

remotely, where needed, during the<br />

pandemic. Already, this unique DNV<br />

GL service has proven to be of significant<br />

value. More than 100 clients have been<br />

onboarded for DNV GL’s remote survey<br />

service for CMC in Germany since it was<br />

first introduced, and 1,160 in-country remote<br />

surveys have been carried out since<br />

March 2<strong>02</strong>0.<br />

In addition, the launch of the new Machinery<br />

Maintenance Connect (MMC)<br />

gave customers a new way to carry out the<br />

machinery planned maintenance system<br />

(MPMS) surveys. Instead of requiring<br />

surveyors to travel to each individual vessel<br />

and go onboard, machinery data can<br />

be processed via algorithms and presented<br />

to customers in a digital dashboard –<br />

Recently DNV GL completed a series of ship<br />

surveys using remotely operated vehicles<br />

(ROVs) on three Wilson-managed vessels<br />

enabling the survey of a complete fleet in<br />

one process and unlocking new insights<br />

into vessel and fleet performance.<br />

By using the data from the vessels,<br />

alongside a powerful learning algorithm,<br />

we can remotely perform the maintenance<br />

survey of a customer’s whole fleet<br />

in one process, saving time and reducing<br />

the disruption of daily operations. In one<br />

© DNV GL<br />

case we completed surveys on 49 vessels<br />

in roughly four hours, something that<br />

would normally take 50 separate onboard<br />

surveyor visits. And the data is all right<br />

there – easily and directly accessible by<br />

management in real time.<br />

The pandemic has also shown us how<br />

modern technology can overcome other<br />

obstacles created by the pandemic. Despite<br />

conventional shipping events and exhibitions<br />

having been cancelled or postponed,<br />

the dissemination of knowledge and ideas<br />

has not been choked off and may even have<br />

increased by way of webinars and online<br />

conferences and meetings – something<br />

that was unimaginable just last year. As<br />

this year’s SMM shows us – you don’t always<br />

need to be in the same room to connect.<br />

But for many things, personal connection<br />

can’t be beaten.<br />

Author: Stener Stenersen,<br />

Head of Department – Technical-<br />

Support, DNV GL Maritime<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

39


Smart & Digital<br />

Transformative IoT:<br />

A call for care and attention<br />

How the uptake of Internet of Things (IoT) technology by<br />

shipowners and operators is leading the industry towards<br />

consequential cyber-risk exposures<br />

Internet of Things (IoT) is rocking the<br />

boat. As a system of interconnected devices,<br />

mechanical and digital machines,<br />

it is enabling us to automate systems and<br />

processes and unlock efficiencies in a<br />

way we never would have thought possible.<br />

These developments that have been<br />

coined with the term, the »Fourth Industrial<br />

Revolution«, introduce a scale, scope<br />

and complexity that is removing the need<br />

for human-to-human or human-to-computer<br />

interaction; transforming not only<br />

the way we work but the way we operate<br />

as a global entity including both the public<br />

and private sectors, academia and civil<br />

society.<br />

Shipping as epicentre<br />

At the epicentre of globalisation, the shipping<br />

industry is crying out for ways to<br />

implement, through data-driven technologies,<br />

efficiencies in core processes such<br />

as real-time tracking of shipments, cargo<br />

optimisation, predictive asset maintenance,<br />

route optimisation and more.<br />

The problem? More data, more opportunity,<br />

more risk. Shipping infrastructure<br />

and on-board technology is developing<br />

in pace, scale and variety of devices,<br />

which naturally increases the risk that traditional<br />

computing presents. Add in the<br />

fact that these devices are all interconnected<br />

and you’re left with a minefield of possible<br />

malicious exploitations and data protection<br />

issues that are enough to sink even<br />

the strongest of shipping organisations.<br />

Given the scale of IoT implementations,<br />

we must now assume that risk<br />

could be systemic and the effects of an<br />

attack could propagate through the supply<br />

chain. This means the way maritime<br />

organisations approach risk also needs to<br />

change, and rapidly.<br />

Unlocking efficiencies with IoT?<br />

According to an Inmarsat Report on Industrial<br />

IoT, published in 2018, the maritime<br />

industry has adopted IoT solutions<br />

more than any other sector, with sources<br />

revealing that some of the leading maritime<br />

businesses plan to invest about<br />

2.5 mmill.$ per owner on IoT based solutions<br />

in the next few years, with an expectation<br />

of achieving around 14% cost-savings<br />

over the next 5-7 years. The same<br />

Inmarsat Report states that 25% of the<br />

maritime industry obtains health and<br />

safety benefits through IoT solutions,<br />

while 56% expect to do so in the future.<br />

This is in line with what Nettitude,<br />

a Lloyd’s Register company, is seeing.<br />

Many of our clients are automating operations,<br />

proactively planning the maintenance<br />

of the equipment on board and<br />

looking at improving their cyber security<br />

across the supply chain.<br />

The green agenda and restrictions on<br />

emissions are driving shipowners to monitor<br />

and optimise fuel consumption using<br />

IoT devices producing data that is then<br />

sent to the cloud for AI processing. In addition,<br />

predictive analytics have allowed<br />

for optimised transport by making more<br />

calculated route planning decisions.<br />

An example of how sector specific<br />

standalone applications can be efficiently<br />

integrated is offered by the i4- Insight<br />

Platform, that leverages the latest development<br />

in machine learning and artificial<br />

intelligence to generate completely new<br />

insights on chartering, fuel consumption,<br />

vessel performance and predictive maintenance.<br />

This relies heavily on increasingly<br />

interconnected networks between the<br />

ship and shore, and also the ship and supply<br />

chain.<br />

There are also faster and more reliable<br />

communications between components,<br />

where IoT is enabling new functionalities<br />

and interoperability. As an example,<br />

IoT enables shipowners and managers to<br />

deal proactively with maintenance, by<br />

monitoring components and machinery<br />

onboard and proactively planning in order<br />

to prevent potential failures and reduce<br />

downtime.<br />

© Wärtsilä<br />

Wärtsilä relies on its<br />

Translink solution<br />

Evolving risk landscape<br />

It’s impossible to underappreciate the<br />

benefits that IoT brings to the maritime<br />

sector; namely streamlined communications,<br />

emissions tracking and a more re-<br />

40 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Smart & Digital<br />

active and interconnected supply chain.<br />

However, the industry needs to prepare<br />

for this transformation. Traditional cyber<br />

security risks evolve and scale up as<br />

IoT advances, and yet as it does so, the<br />

risk could potentially be systemic due to<br />

the interconnectedness and the distributed<br />

nature of IoT architectures.<br />

As industrial systems and their supply<br />

chains become interconnected, risks<br />

will become increasingly shared by organisations,<br />

equipment manufacturers,<br />

shipowners, ship operators and the other<br />

various stakeholders in the supply chain.<br />

Maritime organisations are beginning<br />

to open up to these developments. However,<br />

without a thorough understanding<br />

of the security infrastructure required to<br />

cope with the sheer scale of IoT devices,<br />

existing risk assessment methodologies<br />

are unlikely to cope with the complexity<br />

and dynamism of IoT models, in which<br />

there is a need for more dynamic monitoring<br />

of risk through real-time data.<br />

Static snapshots will not be good enough<br />

to capture the rapidly changing network<br />

topographies and risk models of the IoT<br />

systems.<br />

Transformation needed<br />

To harden the resilience of the maritime<br />

sector towards cyber-attacks, owners<br />

and operators need to transform<br />

their approach to risk, leave behind preconceived<br />

ideas of systematic monitoring<br />

and change the very behaviours that<br />

govern the integrity of our organisations.<br />

How can we approach this mammoth<br />

task? After working with a number<br />

of maritime organisations, our cyber security<br />

experts recommend taking a glass<br />

half empty approach: Assume the worst.<br />

Expect a bad outcome. And plan to fail.<br />

The most effective approach is to drop<br />

all connotations of »business as usual«<br />

and disrupt the way we approach risk mitigation.<br />

A strategy for the future should<br />

»assume failure« as a basis for developing<br />

a cyber security strategy, »assume insider<br />

threat« within systems and supply<br />

chains, and assume the risk could be systemic<br />

and the effects of an attack could<br />

propagate through the supply chain. In<br />

this sense, recommendations are:<br />

Documented goals and objectives: Set<br />

out to the whole business what the end<br />

game looks like. As boundaries of IoT<br />

infrastructures become increasingly dynamic,<br />

owners and operators must think<br />

about what they are protecting, from<br />

what threats and its importance to the<br />

organisation. Define the services, assets<br />

and things that need protecting and in<br />

what way, and then describe the objectives<br />

from a business impact perspective.<br />

Well defined Governance Committee:<br />

Who will oversee and measure the progress<br />

and current state of security posture,<br />

in such an extended ecosystem? The<br />

organisation’s Governance Committee<br />

needs to be able to challenge, provide the<br />

checks and balances to the operational<br />

state and have the power to test contingency<br />

plans and verify outcomes.<br />

Clearly defined and communicated<br />

risk appetite & priority: Define a clear<br />

risk preference or appetite for the organisation.<br />

What level of risk is tolerable and<br />

what is unacceptable? And what needs to<br />

be transferred to the supply chain?<br />

Strong oversight & reporting: Define<br />

the dashboards, the metrics/KPIs and<br />

the measurements that test the goals and<br />

objectives. Defining the right things to<br />

measure can be one of the hardest tasks<br />

to get right. Ensure the technical output<br />

can be translated into business outcomes.<br />

Resources & budgets: Make budget and<br />

resource decisions based on the goals and<br />

objectives required.<br />

Education & commitments: Get buy<br />

in from the business, including managers<br />

and team members, in order to ensure<br />

ownership, accountability and belief.<br />

Author: Elisa Cassi<br />

Product Development Manager<br />

Nettitude / Lloyds Register<br />

<br />

<br />

MICRODATA DUE<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

41


Smart & Digital<br />

1<br />

2<br />

Ship data analysis: Benefits and realities<br />

In order to identify operational anomalies through data analysis, shipping company<br />

Canada Steamship Lines and the National Research Council of Canada joined forces.<br />

The setting was a bulk carrier<br />

Ship owners and operators are becoming<br />

ever more interested in data collection.<br />

However, the next step of analyzing<br />

the data is still in the early stages of being<br />

realized. The National Research Council<br />

of Canada (NRC) has been conducting<br />

vessel analytics in collaboration with<br />

Canada Steamship Lines (CSL). The data<br />

described here is collected and transferred<br />

daily aboard a 225.5 m bulk carrier operating<br />

the Great Lakes and St. Lawrence<br />

Seaway in southern Canada. Operational<br />

data from between 2017 and 2<strong>02</strong>0 was<br />

analyzed culminating in performance<br />

characteristics and operational metrics.<br />

The main goal of this work was to identify<br />

operational anomalies and report them<br />

in near real time to the vessel operator. To<br />

assess the operational performance of the<br />

vessel, the data was split into segments<br />

based on geofenced zones. The limits for<br />

each is defined on discrete operational<br />

areas such as lock transits, lake crossings,<br />

and constricted waterways. Figure 1 is an<br />

example of the vessel transiting through<br />

five zones within the northern section of<br />

the St. Lawrence River.<br />

Segmentation and statistics<br />

Statistics for each segment were calculated<br />

such as the distance, fuel consumed,<br />

fuel consumed over distance, and the total<br />

transit time. Multiple passes through<br />

the zone were then analyzed for consistency.<br />

To exemplify this, consider Figure<br />

3 which summarizes passages through<br />

Lake Superior.<br />

The transit that occurred in 2017 has a<br />

higher fuel consumed over distance and<br />

lower mean speed than the other transits.<br />

Upon further investigation, the wind<br />

speed during this transit was higher than<br />

typical, as can be seen in Figure 4, highlighting<br />

the wind for that transit overlaid<br />

against the wind for 3 weeks around<br />

this period. Thus, the likely culprit of this<br />

anomaly was environmental.<br />

Performance curves<br />

A set of performance curves were generated<br />

to characterize the baseline performance<br />

of the vessel. Historical data was<br />

used to create the baseline performance<br />

curves and these curves were used as a<br />

means to identify anomalies in near real<br />

4<br />

4: Shaft Power vs Speed Through Water<br />

5: Performance Curve with Percentiles<br />

6: Curve 1 - Anomaly Detected<br />

42 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Smart & Digital<br />

1: Geofenced Zones<br />

2: Lake Erie Transit Comparison<br />

3: Wind Speed During Lake<br />

Superior Transit<br />

3<br />

time from the operational data. The Shaft<br />

Power vs Speed Through Water performance<br />

curve is provided in Figure 5.<br />

While the data does somewhat follow<br />

a third order curve, there is significant<br />

spread, which is typical for operational<br />

data. The irregularity of the data results<br />

from both operational and environmental<br />

factors. Consider the 5 - 5.7 MW<br />

cluster of points, where 60% of all the<br />

data actually resides. The operators of<br />

the vessel typically set a cruising »power«<br />

rather than a cruising »speed« when<br />

in unrestricted waters since machinery is<br />

optimized to run at a specified power output.<br />

The variance of weather, current, and<br />

vessel loading tend to spread the data between<br />

10 - 14 knots. As such, a method<br />

beyond a simple polynomial fit was necessary<br />

to define the performance curves.<br />

Anomaly Detection Methodology<br />

A percentile bin method was used to determine<br />

outlying anomalies. First, the<br />

data in a performance curve was separated<br />

into bins. Each bin contained an equal<br />

number of data points and were separated<br />

based on vessel speed. The more time the<br />

ship operates in a given speed range, the<br />

higher resolution of that bin. The median,<br />

The St. Lawrence Seaway is a busy waterway<br />

60% and 70% of each bin was calculated<br />

in terms of the shaft power range within<br />

that bin. These data limits were added to<br />

the baseline performance curve for each<br />

bin as in Figure 6.<br />

© U.S. Department of Transport<br />

The data from the previous day was added<br />

to the curves to compare the near real<br />

time data to the historical performance.<br />

An anomaly was flagged if 5 minutes of<br />

consecutive data lay outside the 70% tolerance<br />

lines. Consider Figure 7 which illustrates<br />

a single anomaly (red markers)<br />

that occurred. This event resulted from<br />

a high acceleration where the power was<br />

brought up quickly and the vessel took<br />

several minutes to reach speed.<br />

Complexity<br />

The analysis of operational vessel data is<br />

challenging and complex. There are many<br />

factors that influence the data including<br />

external, operational, and vessel conditions.<br />

Insight from this type of analysis<br />

can lead to increased operational efficiency<br />

and decreases in fuel consumption.<br />

This can result in savings for vessel operators<br />

and result in an overall greener fleet.<br />

Authors: Trevor Harris<br />

Allison Kennedy,<br />

National Research Council of Canada<br />

5<br />

6<br />

© National Research Council of Canada<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

43


Shipbuilding & Design<br />

Smart ship design through Industry 4.0<br />

Industry 4.0 has favoured the expansion of many technologies with very diffuse application<br />

boundaries. Designing and building smart ships will require the use of many of those<br />

technologies and they must be used in a consistent way<br />

This consistency will be facilitated<br />

when technologies are integrated<br />

with Computer Aided Design, Manufacturing<br />

& Engineering (CAD/CAM/<br />

CAE) Systems. CAD tool stands at the<br />

beginning of the design, but it manages<br />

many data to be considered in advance<br />

for the further stages of the product lifecycle.<br />

These data must be used by technology<br />

as Augmented Reality, Virtual Reality<br />

and Mixed Reality, which are closely<br />

related to the Digital Twin.<br />

Using Internet of Things (IoT) and Digital<br />

Twin will generate a large amount of<br />

data that will require techniques of Big<br />

Data, cloud/edge/fog computing and the<br />

use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) to facilitate<br />

obtaining results for design, production<br />

and operation of smart ships.<br />

Connectivity<br />

Performing all these integrations in an<br />

agile manner requires a platform that<br />

supports multiple connections to assets<br />

allowing different applications the access<br />

to the data, and therefore creating<br />

and modifying them. Different application<br />

must work, in different layers, all of<br />

them supported by the basic information<br />

layer created by the CAD System in<br />

the shipyard. This platform should be secure,<br />

but also open to allow distributed<br />

work. Work must be tracked in order that<br />

all design or process modifications are recorded<br />

in an open, transparent, trusted<br />

and non-modifiable working method for<br />

all stakeholders.<br />

This article is an adapted version<br />

of the presentation that was the<br />

winning entry at the COMPIT<br />

2<strong>02</strong>0 conference - with <strong>HANSA</strong><br />

as exclusive media partner.<br />

The objective is to use this technological<br />

revolution in the design and production<br />

phases in order to build efficient, safe<br />

and sustainable vessels. The idea is to monitor<br />

all those parts in which early detection<br />

of events allows us to make the right<br />

decisions. In this sense, the available sensors<br />

during the early stages of construction<br />

of the ship, allow us to identify if the<br />

construction of the vessel is according to<br />

the design we have created with CAD.<br />

Integration of IoT platform sensors<br />

with the CAD product data model will<br />

reduce costs, avoid mistakes, and allow<br />

trusty decisions in real time from the<br />

shipyard, design or operations offices.<br />

Currently, CAD solutions can be used<br />

in pocket tools, making it the indispensable<br />

ally in this new technological revolution.<br />

Shipbuilding process generates a lot<br />

of information and data. A priori, it may<br />

seem impossible to have all this data in<br />

real time, but the new processors, simpler<br />

and smaller, with a good connection<br />

to the networks, will make this possible.<br />

Integration of all technologies for<br />

marine business is known as Internet of<br />

Ships. Data management is only one aspect<br />

of the Internet of Ships, but not the<br />

only one.<br />

Internet of Ships<br />

Internet of Ships not only covers design<br />

and production stages, but operation<br />

lifecycle. Equipment installed in<br />

the ship is connected to the Internet of<br />

Ships platform to share data during normal<br />

operation. This information is used<br />

to optimize operation and to anticipate<br />

maintenance throughout the entire life<br />

of the ship.<br />

Internet of Ships is presented as a solution<br />

capable of detecting when a component<br />

on a ship is close to fail and must be<br />

replaced, when corrosion has reached a<br />

certain limit, or when a new painting layer<br />

is needed, in short, when a new maintenance<br />

is necessary. Internet of Ships<br />

reaches this sector to ensure profitable<br />

production and safe, efficient and sustainable<br />

processes for all types of ships<br />

(fishing vessels, tugs, tankers, cargo vessels,<br />

ferries, dredgers, etc.).<br />

© Sener<br />

Industry 4.0 technologies<br />

44 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Shipbuilding & Design<br />

Idealistic representation of the use of<br />

IoT technology in the Maritime Industry<br />

The architecture of the solution must<br />

take into account different levels of connectivity.<br />

An internal network where the<br />

systems and components of the ship work<br />

together to get the best operation possible.<br />

Another level of connection is needed<br />

to the external world, providing the link<br />

from the smart ship to the control platform<br />

of the ownership.<br />

This connection will send and receive<br />

information necessary for the<br />

better operation of the ship. Information<br />

necessary for repairing or replacement<br />

of components will be transmitted<br />

from the components themselves.<br />

To enable this approach, the CAD product<br />

data model must be able to manage<br />

the amount of data generated, knowing<br />

the relationship between the components<br />

and the receivers of the information<br />

shared.<br />

industry, but digitalization is on hand<br />

and it is mature enough to start implementation<br />

and be part of our strategy<br />

for the future.<br />

Future smart ships or smart shipyards<br />

must be connected to IoT, or they will<br />

not be smart. New technologies provide<br />

affordable solutions for all the needs. On<br />

a final note, the envisioned ecosystem<br />

encounters some barriers to entry: initial<br />

study of requirements, investment<br />

and selection of software packages, evaluation<br />

of the benefit of the investment,<br />

workers with adequate skills, integrators<br />

and managers that know the traditional<br />

shipbuilding world and the new<br />

technologies of the Industry 4.0, among<br />

others.<br />

Authors: Rodrigo Pérez Fernández,<br />

Jesus A. Muñoz Herrero, Sener<br />

© Sener<br />

What to come?<br />

The core of Industry 4.0 relies in a 3D<br />

product data model, created with CAD<br />

tools. The importance of CAD will rather<br />

increase than diminish. Digital twins<br />

link this model (virtual world) with the<br />

real world. This link will exists during<br />

the design and manufacturing of<br />

the product and will extend to the entire<br />

lifecycle of the product. CAD tools,<br />

as an important part of this environment,<br />

should evolve to be easily linked<br />

to these technologies. Future CAD systems<br />

must be adapted to a new generation<br />

of users that demands a different<br />

interfaces and workflows. This will require<br />

an important effort.<br />

This big world is now opening. Shipbuilding<br />

is starting in it, but the potential<br />

is clear and to remain competitive,<br />

it is mandatory to study how these<br />

technologies can improve processes, resources,<br />

workflow, cooperation between<br />

stakeholders. The tools are here, now it<br />

is necessary to study and analyse our<br />

particular maritime case. There is no<br />

global solution for all industries, not<br />

even a global solution for a particular<br />

MENSCH UMWELT MASCHINE<br />

WIR ZEIGEN FLAGGE –<br />

INNOVATIVE MARITIME<br />

LÖSUNGEN FÜR DIE UMWELT:<br />

Abgasreinigungstechnik<br />

EU-Stage-V-ready Systeme<br />

IMO-Tier-III-Systeme<br />

SCR DeNOx-Systeme<br />

Thermomanagement<br />

Rußpartikelfilter<br />

Fischer Abgastechnik GmbH & Co. KG Spatzenweg 10 48282 Emsdetten<br />

Telefon: +49 (0) 25 72 / 967 49-00<br />

Fax: +49 (0) 25 72 / 967 49-50<br />

E-Mail:<br />

Internet:<br />

Sprechen Sie uns an...<br />

ÜBER<br />

DER UMWELT ZULIEBE:<br />

* *<br />

EMISSIONEN REDUZIEREN<br />

info@fischer-at.de<br />

www.fischer-at.de<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

45


Shipbuilding & Design<br />

A crisis with lasting effects<br />

2<strong>02</strong>0 was an unprecedented year due to Covid-19. The crisis has hit hard many sectors, also<br />

in Europe, not least Europe’s shipyards and maritime equipment industry, known as<br />

maritime technology sector<br />

Before Covid-19, Europe’s complex<br />

shipbuilding industry was in a better<br />

shape than global merchant shipbuilding<br />

markets, holding a global leadership<br />

in complex shipbuilding and maritime<br />

equipment manufacturing. With Covid-19,<br />

however, Europe’s maritime technology<br />

sector has been hit much harder<br />

than its global competitors. In the first half<br />

of 2<strong>02</strong>0, new orders for ships in Europe<br />

decreased by 62% in tonnage and 77% in<br />

value, compared to 2019. Furthermore,<br />

Covid-19 has forced maritime technology<br />

companies to reduce or stop their production<br />

and to implement costly health and<br />

safety measures. Several companies faced<br />

liquidity problems or experienced difficulties<br />

with foreign workforce not able to return<br />

to work due to border closures. Contrary<br />

to previous crises, shipowners have<br />

also been hit hard this time, especially<br />

those operating cruise ships.<br />

Forecasts predict that the full impact<br />

of Covid-19 for the maritime technology<br />

sector will mostly be felt as of 2<strong>02</strong>1, when<br />

new orders for ships will have dried up.<br />

The crisis is expected to last until 2<strong>02</strong>3 or<br />

even 2<strong>02</strong>4. Hence, many companies will<br />

be forced to lay off workforce, reorganize<br />

production and adjust capacity, resulting<br />

in increased costs and eroded margins<br />

and having negative consequences<br />

on sectoral know-how and skills. This<br />

situation occurs at a time that the sector<br />

was also suffering from the severe consequences<br />

of massive state aid and other<br />

trade protectionism and was coping<br />

with the challenges from the twin green/<br />

digital transition and the search for new<br />

skilled talents.<br />

A strategic sector at risk<br />

Asian maritime technology companies<br />

have been able to restart their economic<br />

activities earlier than in Europe, giving<br />

them a competitive advantage over European<br />

companies. This advantage has<br />

come on top of the other benefits that<br />

Asian companies had already been benefiting<br />

from, such as predatory pricing,<br />

Christophe Tytgat<br />

© SEA Europe<br />

massive state aid and trade protectionism.<br />

In addition to these existing benefits,<br />

many Asian companies are now also<br />

benefiting from specific Covid-19-related<br />

subsidization programmes, to enable<br />

them to cope with the consequences from<br />

the pandemic crisis.<br />

These (additional) state aid benefits and<br />

trade protectionism create huge competitive<br />

distortions to the detriment of Europe.<br />

Over the past decades, Europe’s<br />

shipyards have lost nearly all merchant<br />

shipbuilding markets and part of offshore<br />

building to Asia and, more recently, their<br />

leadership in complex shipbuilding has<br />

been challenged too. In addition, Europe’s<br />

maritime equipment industry has<br />

also been suffering from increased trade<br />

protectionism and trade wars. With Covid-19,<br />

competitive distortions have further<br />

aggravated whilst Europe maintains<br />

an “open-market” policy enabling foreign<br />

companies to continue to do easy business<br />

with or in Europe.<br />

Without any fast actions, there is a serious<br />

risk that Europe may lose the remainder<br />

of its strategic maritime technology<br />

sector to Asia. Under such worst-case<br />

scenario, Europe would become entirely<br />

dependent on Asia’s shipyards and maritime<br />

equipment industry for the building<br />

or retrofitting of (complex) ships or<br />

for the production and supply of maritime<br />

systems, equipment and technologies,<br />

able to guarantee Europe’s security,<br />

defence, access to seas, trades and Blue<br />

Economy, and to implement EU policies,<br />

including the »European Green Deal«.<br />

However, Covid-19 has taught Europe<br />

that there are big risks in being – or becoming<br />

– too dependent on foreign nations.<br />

This is also valid for the maritime<br />

technology sector, where a loss of this<br />

strategic sector to Asia would also mean<br />

a loss of Europe’s status as global maritime<br />

power and a loss of Europe’s global<br />

leadership in complex shipbuilding and<br />

(advanced) maritime equipment manufacturing.<br />

Such loss would have serious<br />

geo-political repercussions for Europe as<br />

well as adverse economic and social consequences,<br />

especially for Europe’s maritime<br />

regions.<br />

The time for EU action is now<br />

Instead of taking the risk to lose the remainder<br />

of its strategic maritime technology<br />

industry to Asia, Europe should<br />

take adequate political actions in support<br />

of its local maritime technology sector<br />

and invest in its naval and maritime capabilities.<br />

For these reasons, SEA Europe<br />

has called upon the European Commission<br />

to recognize the strategic dimension<br />

of the maritime technology sector and to<br />

adopt sectoral measures as opposed to<br />

»horizontal policies« that apply to any<br />

manufacturing industry regardless of an<br />

industry’s specific needs and challenges.<br />

Interestingly, the need for such approach<br />

was already recognised in October 2017,<br />

in a study conducted for the European<br />

Commission.<br />

Light at the end of the tunnel?<br />

For several years, the European Union<br />

had forgotten about the strategic dimension<br />

of the maritime technology sector<br />

and had failed to adopt adequate policies<br />

in support of the sector. This lack of political<br />

attention contributed to the loss of<br />

too many markets to Asia.<br />

46 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


SEIT 1903<br />

Emden Dockyard ist seit über 120 Jahren ein<br />

Schiffsreparaturstandort mit modernster<br />

Infrastruktur und einem hochqualifiziertem Team<br />

von ca. 130 Mitarbeitern auf einem Gesamtarenal<br />

von 550.000 m². Für die Reparatur und Umbau<br />

von Handels-, Research-, Offshore-Schiffen und<br />

Kreuzfahrtschiffen stehen zwei Schwimmdocks<br />

und ein Trockendock zur Verfügung.<br />

Ergänzt werden die Fazilitäten durch 1,5 km<br />

Kaianlagen mit ausreichenden Krankapazitäten,<br />

eine große und gut ausgerüstete mechanische<br />

Bearbeitungshalle und verschiedene Hallen mit<br />

weiteren Ausrüstungsgewerken. Flying Squads für<br />

Reise und Hafenreparaturen runden das gesamte<br />

Portfolio ab.<br />

Emder Werft und Dock GmbH<br />

Reparatur und Umbau<br />

Emden<br />

Hamburg<br />

Zum Zungenkai • 26725 Emden<br />

+49 4921 85 99<br />

info@emden-dockyard.com<br />

www.emden-dockyard.com<br />

Dover<br />

Calais<br />

Amsterdam<br />

Rotterdam<br />

Antwerp<br />

Emden<br />

Bremen<br />

Hamburg<br />

A COMPANY OF<br />

THE BENLI GROUP


Shipbuilding & Design<br />

2019 2<strong>02</strong>0 % +/-<br />

1. Contracting by Vessel Sector<br />

Tankers (m dwt) 26.1 24.0 -8.2%<br />

Bulkers (m dwt) 32.0 13.5 -57.7%<br />

Containerships (‹000 TEU) 767.3 892.9 16.4%<br />

Gas Carriers (m cu.m.) 12.1 10.9 -9.8%<br />

Offshore (No.) 65.0 37.0 -43.1%<br />

Other (No.) 300 120 -60.0%<br />

Total (m dwt) 76.0 53.9 -29.2%<br />

Total (No.) 1,245 738 -40.7%<br />

2. Contracting by Builder Country, m CGT<br />

China 9.8 7.9 -19.4%<br />

South Korea 9.8 8.2 -16.5%<br />

Japan 5.0 1.4 -72.7%<br />

Europe 3.6 1.3 -64.1%<br />

Global Total 29.1 19.2 -33.9%<br />

% Alternative Fuels (GT) 23% 31%<br />

3. Orderbook by Vessel Sector, m dwt, end year<br />

Tankers 55.0 54.7 -0.5%<br />

Bulkers 91.7 55.8 -39.1%<br />

Containerships 26.3 25.0 -4.7%<br />

Gas Carriers 15.7 17.2 9.7%<br />

Offshore 3.9 3.6 -8.0%<br />

Other 4.4 4.1 -8.2%<br />

Total 197.0 160.5 -18.5%<br />

% Alternative Fuels (GT) 21% 29%<br />

4. Output by Builder Country, m CGT<br />

China 11.7 10.7 -8.6%<br />

South Korea 9.6 8.8 -7.8%<br />

Japan 8.2 6.2 -24.1%<br />

Europe 2.6 1.9 -27.8%<br />

Global Total 33.6 28.7 -14.7%<br />

5. Number Of Yards To Take An Order<br />

Vessels of 1,000+ GT 223 125 -43.9%<br />

Vessels of 20,000+ dwt 79 56 -29.1%<br />

6. Number Of ‹Active› Yards, end year (at least one vessel on order)<br />

Vessels of 1,000+ GT 417 358 -14.1%<br />

Vessels of 20,000+ dwt 127 118 -7.1%<br />

© Clarksons<br />

Global orders dropped by a third<br />

Clarksons’ Stephen Gordon writes in a recent market analysis<br />

that shipbuilding orders dropped by a third over the<br />

course of 2<strong>02</strong>0. Nevertheless, »a flurry of orders« at the end<br />

of the year contributed to the »most active quarter since<br />

early 2018«. According to Clarksons data, global production<br />

slipped to its lowest levels in 15 years but, at still over 85%<br />

of 2019 levels, yards showed good resilience given Covid-19<br />

challenges and continued consolidation. Reflecting the<br />

Green Transition, alternative fuel orders increased to 29%<br />

of the orderbook.<br />

Overall output fell to 28.7 mill. CGT, down 15% y-o- y to its<br />

lowest level since 2005 and to 50% of the 2010 production<br />

peak. New orders fell by around a third by tonnage, as economic<br />

and eco technology uncertainty impacted, and 47%<br />

in value terms (the high value cruise market stalled), to<br />

19.2 mill. CGT, 53.9 mill. dwt and 42.4 bn $. According to<br />

More recently, the European Union has rediscovered this strategic<br />

dimension, as reflected in recent official documents, for<br />

instance with the recognition of the role of shipyards and maritime<br />

equipment industry in the twin green/digital transition<br />

or with an explicit reference to the sector in the context of the<br />

White Paper on levelling the playing field as regards foreign distortions<br />

in the EU.<br />

So far, this recognition has not yet led to the adoption of any sector-specific<br />

policies or instruments in support of local shipyards<br />

and maritime equipment manufacturers. But for the first time in<br />

many years, the potential for policy actions seems to be present<br />

now. This brings hope that there may be light at the end of the tunnel.<br />

At the same time – and with the support of adequate policies<br />

– there is still the perspective of a bright future for Europe, in particular<br />

with the decarbonization and digitalization of waterborne<br />

transport or the opportunities arising from the Blue Economy.<br />

Author: Christophe Tytgat,<br />

Secretary General, SEA Europe<br />

www.tsi.eu.com<br />

For all your turbocharger<br />

service and parts needs<br />

Please contact us<br />

24/7 Group Head Office<br />

+44 23 8086 1000<br />

Parts Enquiries<br />

sales@tsi.eu.com<br />

Service Enquiries<br />

service@tsi.eu.com<br />

48 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Shipbuilding & Design<br />

Gordon, the fourth quarter was the most active since Q1 2018,<br />

with a number of high profile large projects an- nounced, kept<br />

order levels well above the 2016 low of 14 mill. CGT /<br />

30 mill. dwt. Bulk carrier ordering fell by ~50% but tanker, gas<br />

and container activity held up much better, especially by tonnage<br />

rather than numbers, reflecting a focus on larger vessels<br />

and project business.<br />

Shipyards in China retained their output lead in 2<strong>02</strong>0 with a<br />

37% market share by CGT, followed by Korea (31%), Japan<br />

(22%, down from 25%) and Europe (7%, down from 8% as<br />

European cruise deliveries dropped 33% y-o-y). Korean yards<br />

did successfully win most orders, taking 43% of contracts by<br />

CGT compared to 41% for China.<br />

»Newbuild pricing dropped around 5% over the year but of<br />

more concern for yards was the shorten ing orderbook, which<br />

fell by 19% / 13% to160.5 mill. dwt/70.9 mill. CGT. As a % of<br />

the fleet, this orderbook is now at its lowest level for 31 years<br />

(7%),« Gordon writes in his analysis. On a global level, forward<br />

cover (orderbook / annual output) is 2.5 years but is now much<br />

shorter in Japan. Shipyard consolidation continued with the<br />

number of active yards falling to 358 (-14%) for all yards and<br />

to 118 (-7%) for yards building vessels over 20k dwt. At the<br />

shipbuilding peak, there were 322 active yards (>20k dwt).<br />

Clarksons’ data also shows an increasing array of Energy<br />

Saving Technologies (ESTs) being added to newbuild designs.<br />

Gordon also sees this trend for retrofits and expects this may<br />

prompt more repair yard demand (especially with IMO<br />

2030 short term measures). »Despite the current technology<br />

uncertainty, with the increas ing focus on GHG emissions reduction,<br />

our projections suggest strong future fleet renewal<br />

requirements. After a year of Covid-19 operational challenges<br />

and a first half order ›drought‹, the associated opportunities<br />

for yards and suppliers around the green transition may be a<br />

good place to end this review,« says Gordon.<br />

Reparatur von Propellerausrüstung und Ruderanordnungen<br />

Komplette Reparaturlösungen einschließlich Endbearbeitung<br />

und Montage vor Ort<br />

Kaltausrichtung von Propellerwellen und Ruderschäfte<br />

Klassengenehmigte Reparaturen - Rund um die Uhr erreichbar<br />

MarineShaft A/S<br />

9850 Hirtshals<br />

Denmark<br />

info@marineshaft.com<br />

Halvside Feb. 2<strong>02</strong>1_TYSK.indd 1 18-01-2<strong>02</strong>1 14:23:14<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

49


Shipbuilding & Design<br />

Shipowners better stick to the rules<br />

Emissions, ballast water and other regulations were recent challenges for shipping. Now<br />

three important letters appear on the radar – IHM. Due to COVID-19, the Korean Register<br />

is offering remote surveys to help shipowners to comply with new regulations<br />

The European Ship Recycling Regulation<br />

(EU-SRR) for Inventory of<br />

Hazardous Materials is now in force. As<br />

of 31 December 2<strong>02</strong>0, ships larger than<br />

500 GT and flying the flag of an EU member<br />

state must have an IHM Certificate on<br />

board. The same deadline applies to vessels<br />

flying non-EU flags but visiting EU<br />

ports, they must provide an IHM Statement<br />

of Compliance (SoC). To enforce this<br />

requirement, EU/EEA member states’ port<br />

authorities are now authorized to control<br />

ships in order to verify whether they have<br />

a valid IHM Certificate or Statement of<br />

Compliance (SoC), or a Ready for Recycling<br />

Certificate (RfRC), on board.<br />

45 companies with more than 800 vessels<br />

operated from Germany have chosen<br />

the South Korean classification society,<br />

Korean Register (KR), as their trusted<br />

partner for IHM certification. »Feedback<br />

from our customers has been overwhelmingly<br />

positive with many applauding our<br />

speed and efficiency of service,« says Michael<br />

Suhr, Regional Director North Europe<br />

of KR. Other ship owners, however,<br />

who initially put the issue on the back<br />

burner, were then unprepared for the<br />

challenges brought about by the Covid-19<br />

pandemic, he says.<br />

As a result of the global disruptions,<br />

ships in ports around the world were delayed<br />

or inaccessible, sampling appointments<br />

with IHM expert companies (Hazmat<br />

experts / service supplier) could not<br />

take place and the necessary IHM Initial<br />

Survey by the classification society could<br />

not be ordered. However, KR was able to<br />

coordinate and offer remote surveys for<br />

its customers working in close cooperation<br />

with several flag state authorities. In<br />

addition, KR issued an official letter to all<br />

its customers to certify to any Port State<br />

Control officer that the shipping company<br />

is under contract with KR and that the<br />

IHM certification is in progress.<br />

So far, KR’s customers vessels have<br />

not experienced any problems with inspections<br />

in Europe. Following successful<br />

certification, KR’s vessels always have<br />

a Statement of Compliance for the IMO<br />

Hong Kong Convention (HKC) on board,<br />

in addition to the EU-SRR IHM certificate.<br />

The HKC has not yet been come into<br />

force, but many in the industry expect the<br />

HKC to be ratified soon, and its scope is<br />

very close to that of the EU-SRR. Under<br />

the EU-SRR, additional hazardous materials<br />

need to be investigated, e.g. (Perfluorooctanoic<br />

acid (PFOS) and Hexabromocyclododecane<br />

(HBCDD). In most cases,<br />

KR can issue the certificates for a full five<br />

years of validity.<br />

Different flag states treat the issue differently.<br />

For the German flag for example,<br />

IACS classification societies are only<br />

authorized to issue an interim certificate<br />

for five months and the final certificate<br />

comes later from German Flag Authority<br />

(BG-Verkehr). Some flag states also insist<br />

that the certificate should be adapted<br />

to the class run of the ship or shortened<br />

in duration.<br />

Hazardous materials have often been<br />

found on board ships as part of the IHM<br />

process. Asbestos in particular poses a<br />

challenge for a shipping company. Depending<br />

on the age of the ship and the flag<br />

state, the shipping company must dispose<br />

of these materials properly within three<br />

years. In the case of valve gaskets, proper<br />

disposal is quite easy and the professional<br />

proof of disposal must always be added<br />

to the IHM documentation (IHM Part I).<br />

IHM verification survey on board<br />

In cases of more extensive asbestos<br />

findings, dialogue should be sought with<br />

the responsible flag state and a coordinated<br />

risk assessment may lead under certain<br />

circumstances, to the disposal being<br />

postponed until a later date or even<br />

until ship recycling. The solution will of<br />

course always be based on ensuring that<br />

the ship’s crew is in no way endangered<br />

by the asbestos findings.<br />

Every ship that has received an IHM<br />

certification must also maintain the IHM<br />

system. If any machinery or equipment<br />

has been newly installed, removed or replaced<br />

or the hull structure including its<br />

coating is renewed, it should be reflected<br />

with the entry in »Records of Change«. In<br />

addition, the Material Declaration (MD)<br />

and Supplier’s Declaration of Conformity<br />

(SDOC) for newly installed or renewed<br />

products should be attached to the IHM<br />

Record. The IHM Part I with Record<br />

of Change including main data and attached<br />

MD´s and SDOC needs to be accessible<br />

(and regularly updated) on board<br />

for PSC and Class Inspection and IHM<br />

Class Renewal.<br />

At the moment, many IHM expert companies<br />

offer IHM Maintenance as a software<br />

solution, and in fact most of the shipping<br />

companies supported by KR have<br />

opted for a service package from an IHM<br />

© Korean Register<br />

50 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Shipbuilding & Design<br />

Further information on IHM<br />

The International Maritime Organization<br />

(IMO) adopted “The Hong Kong<br />

International Convention for the safe of<br />

environmentally sound recycling of<br />

ships” in 2009. It was followed by the EU<br />

Ship Recycling Regulation (EU-SRR) in<br />

2013 that requires every ship from<br />

>500 GT calling at EU ports to carry an<br />

inventory of hazardous material (IHM).<br />

The IHM quantifies and locates hazardous<br />

materials on board of ships which<br />

are known to represent a potential hazard<br />

to people and the environment. The<br />

IHM consists of three parts:<br />

• Part I: Hazardous materials contained<br />

in the ship’s structure and equipment<br />

• Part II: Operationally generated wastes<br />

• Part III: Stores<br />

IHM Part I reports, which are prepared<br />

either during the construction of the<br />

ship or by IHM expert companies when<br />

the vessel is in operation, are based on<br />

document analysis and on-board investigation<br />

through sampling and visual<br />

checks. They should be certified by the<br />

flag states or by recognized organizations<br />

(ROs), such as the Korean Register. IHM<br />

Part I reports are maintained and kept<br />

up to date until the end of the ship’s life.<br />

As of 31 December 2<strong>02</strong>0, for ships in<br />

operation flying the flag of an EU member<br />

state, the IHM Certificate is required.<br />

The same deadline applies to vessels in<br />

operation flying non-EU flags but visiting<br />

EU ports, for which the IHM Statement<br />

of Compliance (SoC) is required.<br />

EU/EEA member states’ port authorities<br />

will be authorized to inspect ships in<br />

order to verify whether they have a valid<br />

IHM Certificate or Statement of Completion<br />

(SoC), or a Ready for Recycling<br />

Certificate (RfRC), on board.<br />

Korean Register (KR)<br />

The Korean Register (KR) was established<br />

in 1960 with the purpose of promoting<br />

safety of life, property and the protection<br />

of the marine environment. KR currently<br />

classes an international fleet of<br />

3,050 vessels totaling 72 million GT. It is<br />

headquartered in Busan, South Korea .<br />

expert company. The software is automatically<br />

sorting and requesting the necessary<br />

MD’s and SDOC’s for inclusion in<br />

the IHM report by controlling the purchasing<br />

process in the shipping company.<br />

Only a few shipping companies maintain<br />

the Record of Change independently and<br />

designate a responsible person to manage<br />

it within the shipping company.<br />

After a maximum timeframe of five<br />

years, an IHM Renewal Survey is requested<br />

by the classification society. A few even<br />

request an annual survey to verify the Records<br />

of Change.<br />

Before a ship can be scrapped at the end<br />

of its lifetime the Convention requires<br />

that all possible residual pollutants on<br />

board in the form of waste (IHM Part II<br />

Wastes generated in operation) and any<br />

residual stockpiles (IHM Part III Stores)<br />

should also be included in the IHM documentation.<br />

This IHM Part II and Part III must<br />

be prepared no more than three months<br />

prior to the scrapping date. When all<br />

three parts are available, the classification<br />

society issues the final IHM Ready<br />

for Recycling Certificate (RfRC), which<br />

the scrapper yard requires for proper<br />

disposal.<br />

Michael Suhr comments: »KR’s Hamburg<br />

branch office is currently carrying<br />

out the first IHM Part II and Part III inspection<br />

for a German ship owner with<br />

the corresponding documentation for<br />

the EU-SRR being handled by the nominated<br />

IHM expert company.« The first<br />

ship maintained by KR IHM Certification<br />

is to be scrapped in Turkey before<br />

March 2<strong>02</strong>1 in accordance with EU-SRR<br />

requirements and Ready for Recycling<br />

Certificate (RfRC).<br />

n<br />

email: sales@headwaytech.com | http://en.headwaytech.com | TEL: (86) 532 8310 7817<br />

ENWA Water Technology represents Headway’s BWMS in Norway and Germany<br />

http://en.headwaytech.com | http://www.enwa.com<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

51


Green & Efficient<br />

German suppliers – against all odds<br />

The corona crisis is speeding up the reorientation process at German marine equipment<br />

suppliers. With all forecasts being rather vague, not only marine and offshore equipment<br />

suppliers have to continue to proceed with caution<br />

In retrospect, 2<strong>02</strong>0 began well for makers<br />

of marine and offshore equipment<br />

following a surge in sales to 11.1 bn € in<br />

2019. The level of incoming orders indicated<br />

further growth, and the sector was<br />

able to expand its workforce in a targeted<br />

manner. Moreover, the tax incentives for<br />

promoting research that had long been<br />

called for were at last put into effect, and<br />

ideas for innovative product development<br />

could be further developed.<br />

Corona hit the industry<br />

Then the effects of the Corona pandemic<br />

became increasingly noticeable in spring.<br />

The crisis affected initially the factories<br />

and current production: companies had<br />

to respond quickly and intelligently and<br />

do all they could to prevent customer-related<br />

production coming to a stillstand. It<br />

was also necessary to ensure the supply of<br />

components from other countries and organise<br />

deliveries to customers on schedule.<br />

The global shock caused by the pandemic<br />

and its increasing impact in the<br />

course of 2<strong>02</strong>0 then also resulted in declines<br />

in incoming orders at many firms.<br />

Corona also negatively affected another<br />

activity greatly contributing to the success<br />

of companies in the sector, namely<br />

their support of plant and equipment on<br />

ships over the entire service life, as the<br />

massive national and international travel<br />

restrictions imposed in the wake of the<br />

pandemic made it difficult for assemblers<br />

and commissioning engineers to work on<br />

site in a value-added manner.<br />

Situation in companies<br />

German suppliers are about to speed up their reorientation process, says Jörg Mutschler<br />

The sea transport sector has meanwhile<br />

recovered: freight rates are picking up,<br />

cargo transport volume is rising very<br />

rapidly worldwide, and all ships in service<br />

require technical maintenance to ensure<br />

they can operate as planned. The crisis<br />

seems to have been almost overcome<br />

in Asia. Incoming orders are being registered<br />

especially from China.<br />

On the other hand, the situation is currently<br />

unpredictable in the cruise shipbuilding<br />

segment, which is so strong in<br />

Europe and is an important customer for<br />

German marine and offshore equipment<br />

suppliers. The incoming order situation<br />

as a whole is thus still unsatisfactory, with<br />

the result that many firms are continuing<br />

with short-time work in order to avoid<br />

redundancies. However, the effective and<br />

rapid reorganisation initiated in spring<br />

is now paying off – shift and home office<br />

working arrangements have been established<br />

and are being used flexibly.<br />

There has been further growth in customer<br />

contacts via video conferences, and<br />

even contractual negotiations can be carried<br />

out via web conferences. The digital<br />

services enable even small or medium-sized<br />

companies to develop in some<br />

cases new, hitherto neglected markets.<br />

Flexible visualisations with e.g. augmented<br />

reality enable maintenance and service<br />

operations to be performed with trained<br />

assistants on site.<br />

Many companies in the sector invested<br />

at an early stage in teleservice und predictive<br />

maintenance and can now reap the<br />

benefits, sooner than envisaged. It is even<br />

possible in principle to carry out the entire<br />

commissioning of components and<br />

systems by remote control. Despite the<br />

use of all the new possibilities available,<br />

however, it is becoming apparent that<br />

personal contact and also personal support<br />

are highly valued factors that are<br />

simply missed at the present time.<br />

Post-corona period<br />

All forecasts are currently rather vague,<br />

and thus not only marine and offshore<br />

equipment suppliers have to continue<br />

to proceed with caution. More than<br />

64,000 highly qualified persons are employed<br />

in the industry in Germany. Even<br />

during the Corona crisis, the firms, many<br />

of which are small or medium-sized enterprises,<br />

are retaining their qualified<br />

staff for as long as possible. However,<br />

companies need a future-oriented exit<br />

strategy to overcome the special situation<br />

they face at the present time.<br />

The fleet renewal programme promoted<br />

by the Maritime Coordinator Norbert<br />

Brackmann is helping German shipyards.<br />

© VDMA Marine<br />

52 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Green & Efficient<br />

Marine equipment suppliers will probably<br />

benefit from this programme more in<br />

the medium term. It is generally important<br />

that the state funds now spent are<br />

efficiently used also in the crisis for innovation<br />

and future-oriented investment<br />

projects. Directly effective assistance for<br />

makers of maritime plant and equipment<br />

is provided by the permanent increase in<br />

losses carried back, the general and unrestricted<br />

degressive depreciation as well<br />

as the further expansion of tax incentives<br />

for promoting research. With these structural<br />

changes, the sector will become the<br />

enabler for the key future market drivers<br />

digitalisation and green shipping.<br />

Green shipping<br />

Despite the Corona crisis, the global climate<br />

goals set nationally and internationally<br />

remain a focal concern when it comes<br />

to the future of shipping. Over 90% of<br />

goods are transported by water, and a<br />

global fleet of more than 50,000 oceangoing<br />

ships has to be rapidly modernised<br />

to improve efficiency and environmental<br />

protection. No matter whether newbuilding<br />

or retrofit projects are involved, all innovations<br />

that make sea transport cleaner<br />

are assured of a good future.<br />

Apart from electric drive systems, international<br />

shipping in particular requires<br />

clean combustion systems. There<br />

is a need for ongoing improvement in<br />

the efficiency and processing of the energy<br />

carriers, which should be entirely climate-neutral<br />

if possible. The way forward<br />

is via LNG, ammonia and green hydrogen<br />

from renewable energies.<br />

The VDMA working group »Power-toX<br />

for Application« is considering solutions<br />

involving green hydrogen, in what ever<br />

form and whatever aggregate state, for<br />

marine propulsion purposes. The prerequisite<br />

here is climate-neutral electricity<br />

generated from wind and solar energy.<br />

Apart from cooperation with the offshore<br />

wind industry, the VDMA sees considerable<br />

potential in foreign trade partnerships<br />

with countries which thanks to<br />

their geographical location can efficiently<br />

produce hydrogen from solar energy.<br />

Large production plants made in Germany<br />

are to be established in such regions<br />

and operated for the mutual benefit of<br />

both partners.<br />

The ecologically and economically efficient<br />

ship of the future has to be designed<br />

with a climate-neutral drive and the intelligent<br />

independent linking of all shipboard<br />

systems with the option of simple<br />

system extension and interchange of<br />

components without time or adjustment<br />

losses over the vessel’s entire lifecycle and<br />

service life.<br />

SMM 2<strong>02</strong>1 and 12 th NMK<br />

Particularly in an era of home office and<br />

travel restrictions, it is vital to maintain<br />

and expand existing global contacts in<br />

and around the sector. Everyone is looking<br />

forward to the first international attendance<br />

events, which might eventuate<br />

in the second half of 2<strong>02</strong>1.<br />

The next sector meeting now directly<br />

ahead of us is SMM DIGITAL. We expect<br />

the international programme and<br />

congress contributions at the first digital<br />

SMM to provide a significant boost<br />

for the industry and business in the<br />

2<strong>02</strong>1 financial year – against all the odds<br />

in the run-up to the event.<br />

We will then be given an overview of<br />

the German maritime sector at the possibly<br />

hybrid 12 th National Maritime<br />

Conference in Rostock in May 2<strong>02</strong>1. The<br />

preparations for this event are under way,<br />

with participants from all segments of the<br />

maritime industry regularly meeting to<br />

discuss subjects and proposed solutions.<br />

Especially at this time, it is becoming<br />

clear that the German maritime sector in<br />

many areas must and is able to reorient<br />

itself in order to continue to be successful<br />

in the world market and act as innovation<br />

driver.<br />

Author: Jörg Mutschler<br />

Managing Director<br />

VDMA Marine Equipment and Systems<br />

Working Group<br />

Power-toX for Application<br />

The shipping industry must identify smart ways to replace fossil fuels to become more sustainable.<br />

We, the VDMA Power-to-X for Applications, are convinced that P2X is such a smart way that helps<br />

the combustion engine to play a key role also in the future.<br />

We are the network for P2X solutions and the cross-industry platform for exchange, communication,<br />

and cooperation. Find out more on<br />

https://p2x4a.vdma.org/en/<br />

Shutterstock<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

53


Green & Efficient<br />

LNG at the heart of the transition<br />

Following a momentous year for LNG as a marine fuel, Rolf Stiefel of Bureau Veritas (BV),<br />

Germany, reflects on the success as well as some of the challenges that lie ahead for shipping<br />

as it readies itself to make the transition to a cleaner future ahead<br />

The shipping industry is making the<br />

transition to a lower carbon future.<br />

One of the key steps being taken<br />

now to make that transition is the<br />

development of LNG-fueled shipping.<br />

2<strong>02</strong>0 has been a very significant year for<br />

LNG as a marine fuel with four of the<br />

nine 23,000 TEU gas fueled containerships<br />

ordered by CMA CGM entering<br />

into service. There are also a further<br />

five 15,000 TEU ships being built<br />

for the same owner. In parallel, to bunker<br />

the 23k TEU ships, the world’s largest<br />

LNG bunkering vessel, the »Gas Agility«,<br />

has also entered service and the largest<br />

ever ship-to-ship bunkering which,<br />

in this case, was from 18,600 m3 membrane<br />

tank to 18,600 m3 membrane tank<br />

(another first), took place in Rotterdam<br />

in November last year when the »CMA<br />

CGM Jacques Saade« was on her maiden<br />

voyage. All these ships and the bunker<br />

vessel are, or will be, classed by BV.<br />

To date, LNG as a marine fuel has primarily<br />

been used for ferries, offshore support<br />

vessels (OSVs), and other relatively<br />

small-scale ship types and sectors. This is<br />

now changing, and the biggest and most<br />

important challenge for deep-sea shipping<br />

– reducing emissions – is now being<br />

addressed.<br />

Pioneer CMA CGM<br />

It was in November 2017 that Rodolphe<br />

Saadé, Chairman and CEO of CMA CGM<br />

Group, made the pioneering choice to<br />

equip its future series of nine 23,000 TEU<br />

mega ships with LNG-powered, low speed<br />

engines – a first in the history of shipping<br />

for ultra large container vessels (ULVCs)<br />

and a first step towards energy transition<br />

of deep-sea maritime transportation at<br />

significant scale. The installed power of<br />

these nine container ships alone eclipses<br />

the total installed power of all other LNG<br />

fueled ships to date with 63.840kW on the<br />

single crankshaft.<br />

The increased size of this new breed of<br />

LNG-fueled ships is driving bunkering<br />

needs well beyond the capacity of LNG<br />

trucks, or even small bunker barges used<br />

for smaller bunkering operations at bunkering<br />

terminals. This has led to the development<br />

of LNG bunkering vessels<br />

(LNGBVs). Although a fairly recent development<br />

within the LNG value chain,<br />

LNGBVs are quickly gaining a prominent<br />

role and growing in size, offering a higher<br />

volume potential as well as significant<br />

flexibility, effectively removing barriers<br />

related to port infrastructure and draft<br />

limitations.<br />

Regulatory challenge<br />

However, as with every emerging technology<br />

there comes the challenge of<br />

adapting to a regulatory framework that<br />

is constantly evolving. Bureau Veritas has<br />

been working closely with the industry<br />

to understand and address the risks and<br />

challenges clients and stakeholders face.<br />

BV’s position across the whole LNG value<br />

chain has allowed active participation<br />

in the development of LNGBVs as well as<br />

projects such as that of the CMA CGM<br />

ships to become a reality.<br />

BV is also working on the potential alternative<br />

fuels of tomorrow: addressing<br />

many of the risk, regulatory, technical,<br />

54 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Green & Efficient<br />

© Bureau Veritas<br />

technology, and innovation challenges<br />

to ensure that new hydrogen, methanol,<br />

or ammonia-based propulsion solutions<br />

and containment systems will be<br />

fit for purpose – providing the confidence<br />

that shipowners and providers of<br />

capital or insurance will require. But to<br />

progress from where we are today to the<br />

commercial and logistical availability of<br />

such new fuels and new ship designs to<br />

bunker those fuels for deep-sea maritime<br />

transportation may be a long road. If we<br />

know that LNG is a transition fuel, we do<br />

not know how long that transition may<br />

be. And, right now, gas fueled ships are<br />

the cleanest option. There is no other<br />

viable alternative commercially available<br />

and that is likely to remain the case<br />

for the decade to come – or perhaps for<br />

even longer.<br />

Deck« – Shell addressed many of the opportunities<br />

and challenges the industry<br />

is facing. LNG raises questions particularly<br />

related to its methane emissions (or,<br />

as the issue is more commonly referred<br />

to as, methane slip) across the supply<br />

chain. Certainly, camps of those for gas<br />

and those against have now formed – the<br />

latter stating that investment in LNG now<br />

is wasteful, that it will not meet climate<br />

ambitions, and that investment should be<br />

focused on greener alternatives. The crux<br />

though is that there is no other alternative<br />

fuel option available yet for deep-sea<br />

maritime transportation. This might result<br />

in »no investment« in new tonnage<br />

coming years, effectively extending the<br />

operational lifespan of outdated inefficient<br />

vessels just to satisfy transportation<br />

needs.<br />

The fact is that both LNG today and tomorrow,<br />

as well as the prospect of greener<br />

fuels on the horizon will have to co-exist.<br />

BV’s perspective is that we need to address<br />

the risks and challenges of all potential<br />

fuels and technologies.<br />

Today the only mature option is LNG,<br />

but even with LNG the need remains to<br />

expand the infrastructure – hence BV’s<br />

focus on supporting the development of<br />

safe LNG bunker vessels (LNGBVs) and<br />

bunkering operations, as well as supporting<br />

owners of LNG fueled ships. In its own<br />

recently released Technology Report, Bureau<br />

Veritas describes the key areas of development<br />

for LNGBVs, focusing on:<br />

• Containment systems<br />

• Operational profile<br />

• LNG transfer systems<br />

But perhaps the most significant recent<br />

factor helping drive the development of<br />

LNG into more mainstream and deepsea<br />

trades is the efficiency of the newest<br />

dual-fuel engines developed by MAN<br />

and WinGD. Both engine designers have<br />

been addressing the concerns raised by<br />

data from the earliest four-stroke engines<br />

related to methane slip during the combustion<br />

cycle.<br />

While the four-stroke engines have<br />

also now improved, the overall efficiency<br />

of the new larger, two-stroke low speed<br />

engines suitable for deep-sea ships, offers<br />

a much higher level of performance<br />

than seen to date. These engines provide<br />

a credible and immediately available option,<br />

with the additional potential to burn<br />

carbon-neutral synthetic gas, bio-methane,<br />

or apply CC. These are very positive<br />

developments for shipping and the new<br />

ULVCs recently delivered to CMA CGM<br />

are flagships for this new breed of twostroke,<br />

dual-fueled engines.<br />

While we keep looking at the full range<br />

of options we need to make the best use of<br />

the technology and fuels available today<br />

to accelerate the urgently needed fleet renewal<br />

to modern more efficient designs.<br />

The availability of LNG and of ever improving<br />

engines, containment systems,<br />

new bunkering infrastructure, and anticipated<br />

growing demand for shipping<br />

means that LNG is a fuel of the future –<br />

but available today.<br />

Author: Rolf Stiefel,<br />

Regional Chief Executive Central Europe<br />

and Russia, Bureau Veritas<br />

No alternative available<br />

When combined with other operational<br />

measures such as carbon capture<br />

(CC) onboard of ships, the development<br />

of more bio-methane, or the<br />

production of hydrogen based synthetic<br />

methane, LNG may provide a longer<br />

bridge than many had initially anticipated.<br />

Indeed, it has the potential to<br />

become a real future proof fuel option<br />

for decarbonizing deep-sea maritime<br />

transportation.<br />

In its recent report released in July –<br />

»Decarbonizing Shipping: All Hands on<br />

A dedicated containment system is needed for the use of LNG as fuel<br />

© Bureau Veritas<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

55


Green & Efficient<br />

Remote and in-person<br />

The pandemic proved the business case for remote survey but surveyors will continue to<br />

play a critical role in the next industry evolution<br />

Since first launching the service of remote<br />

surveys two years ago, we have<br />

seen demand from shipowners and operators<br />

surge since expanding the range of<br />

remote options significantly in response<br />

to industry feedback<br />

The process has streamlined business<br />

operations for marine and offshore operators<br />

as well as equipment manufacturers<br />

globally. And while the pandemic has accelerated<br />

demand, the advantages for operators<br />

are such that this was always destined<br />

to become a routine operation and<br />

we are well past the tipping point of market<br />

acceptance.<br />

The advantages of this technology are<br />

obvious in that they enable attendance remotely<br />

for an increasing number of survey<br />

types, which means we can continue<br />

to provide safety services at a distance.<br />

There are some challenges to be managed;<br />

in particular, the increasing reliance on<br />

the ship’s crew for assistance with the<br />

survey. Since remote survey requires live<br />

video streaming in most cases, this can<br />

require satellite bandwidth.<br />

It should also be remembered that<br />

while remote survey may work well for<br />

some operators, it is not necessarily suitable<br />

for every situation. The intent is to execute<br />

a survey remotely that is as effective<br />

as a physical attendance and this means<br />

the remote process takes a significant degree<br />

of commitment from the crew and<br />

the owner side as well as from ABS surveyors.<br />

»Changed forever«<br />

Of course, Covid-19 has made remote<br />

survey increasingly important, but the<br />

pace at which this adoption continues<br />

once physical access again becomes easier<br />

depends on the direction of travel for<br />

the wider industry. Remote survey technology<br />

has changed the landscape forever<br />

for class societies and their customers,<br />

but despite an accelerated take-up, remote<br />

survey will not be the only means<br />

of ensuring compliance with class rules<br />

in future.<br />

At some point it will be operationally<br />

possible and desirable to have more surveyors<br />

undertake surveys in person. But<br />

it would clearly make no sense at all to<br />

simply get back onboard and do things<br />

the way they were done before.<br />

What class and owners need to address<br />

is how we can better support the survey<br />

process by blending humans and technology.<br />

We know that the maritime industry<br />

is overburdened with paperwork around<br />

inspections and that much of this work<br />

has very low value.<br />

Ideally, technology would free surveyors<br />

and crew alike to focus on the important<br />

safety work while the machines<br />

crunch data. By augmenting the process<br />

in this way, we can safely transition to the<br />

world we know is coming. That may see<br />

more remote operations and inspection<br />

processes but we will still need intelligent<br />

experienced humans to interpret them.<br />

Physical access is getting less important<br />

© Meyer<br />

This blend of remote and physical survey<br />

potentially enhances the safety value<br />

of the process, focussing the skilled humans<br />

in the loop on the key areas where<br />

they add the most value.<br />

What is critical to the future of survey<br />

in person – as well as to the safety of ships<br />

and crews - is that we re-think the physical<br />

arrangement of marine assets to mitigate<br />

transmission of infectious diseases.<br />

It’s an urgent question for the industry<br />

that we have addressed with the publication<br />

of the Guide for Mitigation of<br />

Infectious Disease Transmission On<br />

Board Marine and Offshore Assets, including<br />

an industry-first notation; Infectious<br />

Disease Mitigation-Arrangements<br />

(IDM-A), indicating compliance with the<br />

standards.<br />

Surveys and infections<br />

As has been demonstrated multiple times<br />

this year, floating assets are every bit as<br />

vulnerable to outbreaks of infectious disease<br />

as land-based facilities. The guidance<br />

responds to the pressing industry<br />

need for strategies to mitigate the transmission<br />

of infectious diseases by allowing<br />

operators and owners to clearly demonstrate<br />

that the risks of infectious outbreaks<br />

have been considered.<br />

Industry adoption of infection mitigation<br />

physical arrangements and operational<br />

practices will be fundamental<br />

to the resumption of more physical surveys<br />

in 2<strong>02</strong>1. ABS stands ready to support<br />

owners and operators, with a flexible approach<br />

that works with their operational<br />

requirements.<br />

To provide the highest possible level<br />

of flexibility, we have released Smart<br />

Scheduler, a mobile survey booking tool<br />

that allows surveys, including remote<br />

options, to be scheduled via SMS text or<br />

WhatsApp in less than a minute from anywhere<br />

24/7.<br />

Augmenting what humans do<br />

It’s a smart, intuitive system which leverages<br />

real-time AIS data to enable booking<br />

of in-person and remote surveys and<br />

56 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Green & Efficient<br />

a custom pre-arrival checklist which<br />

brings together port state data from all<br />

ABS-classed vessels. Other tools include<br />

ISM Code Findings and a Port State Control<br />

risk tool which provides customized<br />

inspection analytics by vessel or fleet.<br />

This breaking down of traditional data<br />

barriers means that an owner classing<br />

with ABS can understand the choices<br />

around their upcoming survey and access<br />

new types of information including data<br />

that illustrate how inspection and detentions<br />

are trending. They can also make a<br />

judgement as to whether the physical cost<br />

of a survey is going to be different from<br />

one port to another.<br />

We don’t see the provision of this technology<br />

as removing humans from loop,<br />

it’s more a case of augmenting what they<br />

do, and we think the effects will be transformational<br />

for delivery of class services.<br />

Accessing data this way reinforces safety<br />

for owners because it provides access to<br />

the latest intelligence, not the last paper<br />

copy that can be located.<br />

This combination of remote, smart and<br />

human-centred technologies is transforming<br />

the future of survey and how it fits into<br />

our vision of shipping’s digital future.<br />

A topic of debates: remote surveys<br />

Author: John McDonald,<br />

Senior Vice President ABS<br />

© ABS<br />

Cranes & life-saving packages<br />

To reach a safe place you need more than just a boat.<br />

Made in Germany.<br />

Davits Cranes<br />

Aftersales Industry<br />

www.di-hische.de<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

57


Green & Efficient<br />

Navigating towards decarbonization<br />

The maritime sector is targeting a strong reduction in its CO2 and greenhouse gas (GHG)<br />

emissions. However, the industry faces a bigger question than what alternative fuel to opt<br />

for and that is whether alternative fuels alone are enough to meet the 2050 targets<br />

The strategy is being driven by pressure from the regulators,<br />

public and the media. Achieving this is not simple and we are<br />

trying to help the industry answer some of the pressing questions,<br />

particularly when it comes to the most promising alternatives to<br />

fuel for the maritime fleet in the short term, and to identify the<br />

long term barriers that will have to be overcome.<br />

Moving from sulphur to CO2<br />

At the start of the decade there were a host of promising fuels<br />

all jostling for position as the feedstock of the future for the<br />

maritime sector. At the time, the challenge was how to combat<br />

the problem of high sulphur fuel when the only viable option<br />

appeared to be low sulphur fuel, which was prohibitively<br />

expensive. The two alternative fuels that were leading the<br />

Research for future fuels is on-going<br />

© Stena<br />

Aquametro Oil & Marine entwickelt und vertreibt weltweit<br />

Systeme und technische Anlagen zur Optimierung und<br />

Steuerung von Fluidsystemen auf Schiffen, in Fahrzeugen und<br />

in Industrieanwendungen. Zum nächstmöglichen Zeitpunkt,<br />

suchen wir am Standort Rostock, einen<br />

Sales Manager (w/m/d)<br />

Zu Ihren Aufgaben gehört der aktive Vertrieb der Aquametro<br />

Oil & Marine Produkte in Deutschland und Nordeuropa mit<br />

Neukundenakquise und Betreuung der aktuellen Kunden.<br />

Sie haben eine abgeschlossene Ausbildung oder Studium im<br />

technischen oder kaufmännischen Bereich und umfassende<br />

Kenntnisse im technischen Vertrieb in der Schifffahrt oder<br />

maritimen Industrie sowie mehrjährige Erfahrung in der<br />

Auftragsabwicklung nationaler und internationaler Geschäfte?<br />

Dann bieten wir Ihnen eine zukunftsorientierte Aufgabe<br />

mit Eigenverantwortung und kurzen Entscheidungswegen.<br />

Wir freuen uns auf Ihre aussagefähige Bewerbung an:<br />

hr@aquametro-oil-marine.com<br />

Aquametro Oil & Marine GmbH<br />

Friedrich-Barnewitz-Str. 11<br />

18119 Rostock<br />

www.aquametro-oil-marine.com<br />

way at that time were liquified natural gas (LNG) and methanol,<br />

although others were already attempting to make a case<br />

in the form of liquified petroleum gas (LPG), ethanol, Di-Methyl-ether<br />

(DME), synthetic diesel, raps-methyl-ether (RME)<br />

and Bio oils.<br />

Now a decade later the challenge of sulphur has been replaced<br />

by CO2. When it comes to short, regular trips such as ferries, battery<br />

powered ships are an optimum solution, provided the electricity<br />

is generated from renewable sources. But there are other<br />

options available to reduce GHG emissions in the form of biofuels,<br />

hydrogen and ammonia.<br />

Barriers for alternative fuels<br />

The first barrier is the availability. If a fuel is not readily available,<br />

we must produce it or we must obtain it from somewhere<br />

else. This is the case for hydrogen and ammonia. How we produce<br />

these fuels, or »energy vectors«, is an integral part of the way to<br />

decarbonization: their production processes must be based on renewable<br />

sources, or on carbon capture, to support the global sustainability<br />

of the entire cycle from production to final user. The<br />

lower emission, or the zero emission, from shipping (the user)<br />

shall not be jeopardized by the emission needed for their production.<br />

There are three further barriers that need solutions in the<br />

form of safety, health impact and environmental impact. Obviously,<br />

these three are important to consider when you are looking<br />

for the optimum answer for an alternative fuel. The environmental<br />

impact is not always CO2, for ammonia it could be<br />

the nitrogen oxides that could be released in lack of additional<br />

abatement measures. When it comes to health considerations,<br />

ammonia is toxic, while on safety, hydrogen is explosive and<br />

highly flammable.<br />

58 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Green & Efficient<br />

There are also technical hurdles<br />

that need to be overcome. Even if<br />

solutions are found on the safety<br />

and health issues of these<br />

potential alternative fuels,<br />

and they will be, to becomes<br />

an industry wide<br />

solution will require<br />

a global supply chain,<br />

something that none of<br />

these fuels have at present.<br />

Ships travel throughout the<br />

world so the logistics chain<br />

must be able to meet that demand<br />

wherever the vessels are. We have seen<br />

the bunkering shortages suffered with<br />

the LNG supply chain. However, when<br />

we consider new fuels it cannot just be<br />

for the marine sector, it must have a<br />

wide appeal otherwise it will be prohibitively<br />

priced. The marine industry<br />

is only one part of the global driver for<br />

decarbonization so there cannot be a<br />

special fuel that is only suitable for the<br />

marine industry.<br />

A prime example of this multi-sector<br />

demand comes from Germany where<br />

they are following a plan to reduce the<br />

emissions by using hydrogen that will<br />

be imported from Australia. If this plan<br />

comes to fruition, hydrogen will become<br />

one of the fuels that works for the logistic<br />

chain and be cost effective because cost<br />

is related to the availability. The logistic<br />

chain, the technical solution and cost all<br />

go hand in hand.<br />

Overcoming public sensitivities<br />

Aside from these barriers there is another<br />

hurdle to overcome, and some<br />

would say more fundamental, in the<br />

form of social perception. Take LNG;<br />

it is true that its use can reduce emissions<br />

compared to diesel but to some<br />

the perception is that the having LNG<br />

on board could be much more dangerous<br />

than having diesel.<br />

It is not hard to imagine the social<br />

concerns about highly explosive and<br />

flammable hydrogen or a toxic fuel like<br />

ammonia. Another thing that is particularly<br />

important is that ammonia is<br />

not like hydrogen and LNG, in that they<br />

are not toxic and are odourless. So, it is<br />

important that all these things are taken<br />

into consideration and relevant issues<br />

are technically solved in advance<br />

when a strategy is developed for alternative<br />

feedstock for the maritime sector<br />

and beyond.<br />

A further barrier for<br />

both hydrogen and ammonia<br />

is their ratio<br />

energy/volume,<br />

with both fuels<br />

exceptionally<br />

low in this<br />

ranking. Ammonia<br />

needs<br />

to be three<br />

times the volume<br />

of today’s<br />

marine gas oil and<br />

this could have an impact<br />

on the layout and capability<br />

of the vessel. This is a prime reason<br />

why alternative fuels alone cannot be the<br />

entire solution.<br />

Working alongside the move to an alternative<br />

feedstock we need more efficient<br />

fleets allied with a change in operational<br />

habits. The greater the fleet efficiency<br />

the more we can reduce the quantity of<br />

fuel that is required to be carried. Along<br />

with this it requires considerable change<br />

in some current operational habits. Examples<br />

of this are bunkering schedules<br />

and the operational speed of vessels. It is<br />

through a combination of these measures<br />

(alternative fuel, efficiency improvement<br />

and amended operational patterns) that<br />

can put the marine industry in a position<br />

to reach the target in 2030 and beyond.<br />

Using LNG as a transition fuel<br />

However, despite all the options and barriers,<br />

hydrogen and ammonia are possible<br />

solutions to achieve the 2050 target. It<br />

will need to be deployed in tandem with<br />

improvement in the performance of the<br />

fleet. But in the short term, the window<br />

up until 2030, hydrogen is not a viable option.<br />

There is no possibility of the global<br />

maritime fleet transitioning to hydrogen<br />

in that time frame or indeed the logistical<br />

infrastructure being put in place. However,<br />

the need to decarbonise the shipping<br />

fleet is pressing and so the interim solution<br />

will be LNG or even better Bio LNG.<br />

This will be a transition fuel that moves<br />

the sector along the path to a low carbon<br />

future, reducing emissions until the age of<br />

hydrogen is ready to take over the mantle.<br />

Author: Andrea Cogliolo<br />

Marine Senior Director, RINA<br />

A whole new world<br />

of Intelligent Voyage<br />

Management.<br />

Built in user management<br />

Single view voyage planning with<br />

environmental and regulatory layers<br />

Enhanced optimisation<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

59


Green & Efficient<br />

Der erste Neubau bei der Fosen Yard in Emden – ein Kasko für ein Insel-Versorgungsschiff<br />

© Fosen Yard Emden<br />

Alles aus einer Hand<br />

Seit 2019 ist die Fosen Yard Emden auf dem Gelände der ehemaligen Nordseewerke<br />

aktiv und verbindet traditionellen Stahl- und Schiffbau mit innovativen Produkten.<br />

Geschäftsführer Carsten Stellamanns blickt optimistisch in die Zukunft<br />

Herr Stellamanns, wir haben zuletzt im<br />

Sommer vergangenen Jahres über den<br />

Bau der Lachsfarmen berichtet. Wie ist<br />

denn der aktuelle Stand?<br />

Stellamanns: Der Bau der Lachsfarmen<br />

geht gut voran. Wir bauen zwei der Prototypen<br />

für den Offshore-Einsatz, im<br />

Wesentlichen hier in Emden. Gefertigt<br />

werden zunächst vier Halbringe. Wir stehen<br />

kurz vor der Fertigstellung der Stahlstruktur<br />

des ersten Halbringes, dieser<br />

wird im Frühjahr zur Endmontage nach<br />

Norwegen transportiert werden.<br />

Man muss sich die Dimensionen der<br />

Bauten vor Augen führen, mit einem<br />

Durchmesser von 80 m und einer Höhe<br />

von ca. 25 m sind die Farmen viel größer,<br />

als man es erwartet und von den<br />

bekannten Anlagen in den Fjorden gewohnt<br />

ist. Eine Anlage wird am Ende ca.<br />

600.000 Lachse fassen, das ist schon imposant.<br />

Mit dem Lachsfarmprojekt haben Sie<br />

den Betrieb auf dem Werftgelände in<br />

Emden aufgenommen. Wie sehen Sie<br />

den Neustart heute?<br />

Stellamanns: Es war und ist immer noch<br />

eine spannende Zeit. Wir haben im April<br />

2019 mit der vorhandenen Mannschaft sofort<br />

den Bau der Prototypen gestartet. Das<br />

war natürlich in vielerlei Hinsicht eine<br />

große Herausforderung. Unsere Schwesterwerft<br />

in Norwegen hat uns vor allem<br />

in der Anfangszeit personell unterstützt.<br />

Inzwischen haben wir uns breiter aufstellen<br />

können, auch durch neue Mitarbeiter,<br />

die vorher an anderer Stelle in der Branche<br />

tätig waren. Dies freut mich besonders,<br />

weil wir nun als zuverlässiger und guter<br />

Arbeitgeber wahrgenommen werden. Seit<br />

dem Start haben wir unsere eigene Belegschaft<br />

um etwa dreißig Mitarbeiter vergrößert.<br />

Mit allen Partnerunternehmen<br />

arbeiten derzeit knapp 500 Menschen auf<br />

der Fosen Yard in Emden.<br />

Die Anlagen der Werft sind alle wieder<br />

im Einsatz?<br />

Stellamanns: Wir haben tatsächlich die<br />

Anlagen vollständig wieder in Betrieb<br />

nehmen können. Dabei haben wir erheblich<br />

investiert, auch in die Brennmaschinen.<br />

Heute können wir auf drei Brennmaschinen<br />

verschiedene Stähle von bis zu<br />

70 mm Dicke verarbeiten und ca. 200 t<br />

pro Woche zuschneiden. Die Brennlayouts<br />

werden in Emden von unseren eigenen<br />

Mitarbeitern erstellt. Unsere automatische<br />

Paneelfertigung erlaubt maximale<br />

Maße von 18 m x 15 m. Die Vorfertigung<br />

findet größtenteils überdacht statt, so<br />

dass wir von Wind und Wetter nicht beeinträchtigt<br />

werden. Auch hier haben wir<br />

zum Beispiel in die Beleuchtung der Hallen<br />

investiert. So sind wir gerüstet, auch<br />

umfangreiche Aufträge und komplexe<br />

Anlagen effizient und qualitativ hochwertig<br />

abzuarbeiten.<br />

Wie sehen Sie den Markt für Neubauten<br />

aktuell?<br />

Stellamanns: Es ist natürlich so, dass viele<br />

Kunden und potenzielle Kunden von der<br />

Corona-Pandemie massiv betroffen sind.<br />

Investitionen werden zurückgestellt oder<br />

im schlimmsten Fall vollständig gestrichen.<br />

Vor einem Jahr waren Neubauslots<br />

für 2<strong>02</strong>1/2<strong>02</strong>2 bei uns fast ausnahmslos<br />

vergeben, jetzt mussten auch wir umdisponieren.<br />

Dennoch sind wir zuversichtlich,<br />

mit unserer Mannschaft und<br />

unserem Qualitätsstandard am Markt bestehen<br />

zu können und Anschlussbeschäftigung<br />

zu finden. Wir werden uns weiter<br />

gegen den Branchentrend stemmen, so<br />

wie es uns bislang auch gelungen ist.<br />

60 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Green & Efficient<br />

Abstract: Everything from a single source<br />

Since 2019, Fosen Yard Emden has been operating on the premises of former Nordseewerke,<br />

combining traditional steel construction and shipbuilding with innovative products<br />

and solutions. Managing Director Carsten Stellamanns is quite optimistic about<br />

the future. The yard is not only about to complete two huge fish farms for Norway, but<br />

recently also delivered its first newbulding, the hull of an island ferry, to a German client.<br />

Despite the Corona pandemic, the shipyard has grown its staff to about 300 employees<br />

and is looking for more orders both in the repair and newbuilding sectors.<br />

Carsten Stellamanns<br />

Haben Sie die Produktion unterbrechen<br />

müssen aufgrund der Pandemie?<br />

Stellamanns: Glücklicherweise waren<br />

wir bislang kaum betroffen und haben<br />

durchgehend produzieren können. Bereits<br />

seit März 2<strong>02</strong>0 haben wir umfangreiche<br />

Maßnahmen getroffen und beibehalten,<br />

um das Infektionsrisiko für<br />

unsere Mitarbeiter möglichst klein zu<br />

halten. Dazu gehören zum Beispiel ein<br />

Schichtsystem, auch in der Verwaltung,<br />

und Corona-Tests in der Belegschaft und<br />

für die Subunternehmer. Dies alles haben<br />

auch unsere Kunden positiv wahrgenommen,<br />

zumal ja viele Werften, national wie<br />

international, mit Schließungen reagieren<br />

mussten.<br />

Was macht für Sie persönlich den Reiz<br />

der Aufgabe aus?<br />

Stellamanns: Mich hat die Werft in Emden<br />

schon seit meiner Kindheit begleitet,<br />

auch wenn ich vielleicht nicht erwartet<br />

habe, hier einmal tätig zu sein. Umso<br />

mehr freut es mich, gemeinsam mit allen<br />

Mitarbeitern am Erfolg und Erhalt des<br />

Werftstandortes Emden beteiligt zu sein.<br />

Was ist in Ihren Augen die Kernkompetenz<br />

der Fosen Yard Emden?<br />

Stellamanns: Wir sind in der Lage, unseren<br />

Kunden eine qualitativ hochwertige<br />

und effiziente Fertigung zu bieten. Wir<br />

haben eine hoch motivierte Belegschaft,<br />

die sich aus erfahrenen und jungen Mitarbeitern<br />

zusammensetzt, allesamt echte<br />

Fachleute. Gemeinsam mit unseren Partnern<br />

in der Fosen Yard Gruppe können<br />

wir dem Kunden die gesamte Wertschöpfungskette<br />

aus einer Hand bieten, an unseren<br />

Standorten in Emden und auch in<br />

Norwegen.<br />

Wie funktioniert die Arbeitsteilung?<br />

Stellamanns: Fosen Yard in Rissa hat<br />

große Erfahrung in Refurbishments von<br />

RoPax-Fähren und Passagierschiffen. Die<br />

© Fosen Yard Emden<br />

Fosen Design & Solutions, unser Ingenieurbüro<br />

in Norwegen, ist in Bezug auf alternative<br />

Antriebslösungen hoch angesehen.<br />

Gemeinsam mit dem Standort in<br />

Emden ist die Fosen-Gruppe in der Lage,<br />

hochkomplexe Schiffbauprojekte zu verwirklichen.<br />

Auch die Fertigung von Rümpfen<br />

oder Sektionen sind ein sehr interessanter<br />

Markt für uns. Schon jetzt stellen wir<br />

fest, dass für Endkunden, aber auch für<br />

andere Werften, die Stabilität des Schiffbaupartners<br />

eine immer größere Rolle<br />

spielt. Viele internationale Standorte haben<br />

derzeit Probleme, ausschließlich über<br />

den Preis zu bestehen, wenn die politischen<br />

Rahmenbedingungen als unsicher<br />

wahrgenommen werden. Gleiches gilt<br />

derzeit auch in Bezug auf die Pandemie.<br />

Hier können wir punkten.<br />

Haben Sie neben den Lachsfarmen weitere<br />

Projekte im Bau?<br />

Stellamanns: Bei Lachsfarmen gehen<br />

wir von einem Wachstumsmarkt in den<br />

nächsten Jahren aus. Hier wird die Erfahrung<br />

der Fosen Gruppe, nun auch in<br />

Emden, bei künftigen Projekten eine große<br />

Rolle spielen. Aber wir können weitaus<br />

mehr.<br />

Kurz vor Weihnachten haben wir unseren<br />

ersten Neubau abgeliefert, einen<br />

Kasko für eine ostfriesische Werft. Diese<br />

wird das Schiff, ein Insel-Versorgungsschiff<br />

für das Wattenmeer, finalisieren.<br />

Das Projekt konnten wir trotz der Pandemie<br />

fristgerecht fertigstellen. Für die<br />

Belegschaft war dieser erste Neubau natürlich<br />

etwas Besonderes, und so sollte es<br />

ja auch sein.<br />

Die Aufträge akquiriert also nicht nur<br />

die Zentrale in Norwegen?<br />

Stellamanns: Nein, das war in diesem<br />

Fall ein lokales Projekt. Natürlich arbeiten<br />

wir mit unserer Schwesterwerft eng<br />

zusammen. Es gibt Projekte, bei denen<br />

beide Standorte an der Auftragserfüllung<br />

beteiligt sind. Diese bieten wir natürlich<br />

auch gemeinsam an.<br />

Aber es ist ein klar formuliertes Ziel des<br />

Eigentümers, den Standort Emden so aufzustellen,<br />

dass wir allein im Wettbewerb<br />

agieren können, auch Aufträge selbst gewinnen<br />

zu können. Darauf richten wir die<br />

Organisation aus. Schlank und schlagkräftig<br />

wollen wir sein, und da sind wir<br />

auf gutem Wege. Jeder potenzielle Auftraggeber<br />

kann sich also gern an uns direkt<br />

in Emden wenden (lacht).RD<br />

Für einen norwegischen Kunden wurde eine gigantische Fischfarm für 600.000 Lachse gebaut<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

61


SMM Tech-Hub<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> SMM HUB<br />

ANTTI MARINE<br />

Invisible ethernet cable system<br />

Antti Marine, a manufacturer of marine doors,<br />

has invented a new solution for online door cabling.<br />

The innovation is an ethernet-equipped hinge, dubbed<br />

»Antti e-hinge.« E-hinge is part of the same system of<br />

service-free and adjustable hinges introduced by Antti<br />

in 2011 – but offers a different choice for online cabling.<br />

According to the company, reasons to switch<br />

include ease of installation, safety, and its low profile<br />

compared to previous options.<br />

Markko Takkinen, Commercial Director at Antti-Teollisuus,<br />

describes e-hinge as the optimal ethernet<br />

cable solution: For ship owners and builders,<br />

e-hinge is the safest and easiest way to get all the features<br />

of their existing online system, without the lead<br />

cover. It’s a completely hasslefree and invisible system<br />

and doesn’t carry the same risk of damage as the exposed<br />

systems they have now,« he says.<br />

E-hinge is identical to a standard door hinge but<br />

comes equipped with online access and data transfer.<br />

According to the company, e-hinge simply takes the<br />

place of one or more hinges on a standard door , »it’s<br />

completely invisible and a cinch to install.«<br />

Antti first introduced an online door cabling system<br />

in 2013, aboard the cruise vessel »AIDAstella« – but<br />

there were tradeoffs. Structural modifications to the<br />

door were necessary, and what’s left was an obvious,<br />

surface-mounted lead panel on the door leaf and a cable<br />

– or cables – stretching plainly from door to frame.<br />

According to Takkinen, the seed for what would<br />

become Antti e-hinge was planted by a customer in<br />

March 2017. »A major ship operating company requested<br />

we replace the existing lead cover with something<br />

less visible and better looking. The idea started<br />

to grow immediately.«<br />

Antti chose a Swiss hinge manufacturer as their<br />

partner on the project. In close collaboration, e-hinge<br />

took its form and met validations for mechanical durability,<br />

electrical connectivity and data transfer capability.<br />

The final decision to invest in the product was<br />

made in early 2019, and Antti moved forward decisively<br />

with the final stage of development.<br />

The result was a connected hinge as simple to install<br />

as a regular one. »It worked just perfectly. For<br />

builders and maintenance it’s a return to the old<br />

days of offline systems, because the procedure with<br />

e-hinge is no different. Doors can be built, installed,<br />

or removed with no extra considerations – e-hinge<br />

is a service-free system, and even the height of the<br />

hinge can be adjusted,« Takkinen says. Although the<br />

standard use-case is to have one Antti e-hinge per<br />

door, additional e-hinges can be added for future<br />

applications.<br />

Komplettf ilter<br />

Filterelemente<br />

Ersatzteile<br />

Zubehör<br />

Zentrifugen<br />

Reinigungsmittel<br />

Reparatur<br />

Installation<br />

Die Spezialisten für Filtertechnologie<br />

in Schifffahrt und Industrie<br />

Quality<br />

Made<br />

in<br />

gerMany<br />

Mehr als 35 Jahre Erfahrung<br />

in Filtertechnologie<br />

Fil-Tec Rixen GmbH®<br />

Osterrade 26 • D-21031 Hamburg<br />

Phone: +49 (0)40 656 856-0<br />

info@fil-tec-rixen.com<br />

www.fil-tec-rixen.com<br />

Wir liefern Filterelemente<br />

und ersatzteile für einfach-,<br />

Doppel- und Automatik filter<br />

für Schmieröle, Brennstoffe,<br />

Hydraulik öle, Wasser und Luft<br />

aller namhaften Hersteller sowie<br />

ersatz für Filtrex, Moatti,<br />

Nantong und Kanagawa Kiki.<br />

Sonderanfertigungen, verbesserte<br />

Spezial lösungen,<br />

kundenspezifische Einzelstücke<br />

nach Muster/Zeichnung gehören<br />

ebenfalls zu unserem Bereich.<br />

Als Vertragspartner liefern wir<br />

Austausch- und Originalfilterelemente<br />

von Fleetguard,<br />

Rexroth Bosch, Hengst,<br />

Triple R, Mann+Hummel,<br />

Mann Filter, Filtration Group.<br />

62 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


SMM Tech-Hub<br />

DESMI OCEAN GUARD<br />

Type approval for bulker BMWS configuration<br />

Desmi Ocean Guard has announced<br />

the type approval of a new<br />

configuration of its CompactClean<br />

Ballast Water Management System<br />

(BWMS) by both the US Coast Guard<br />

and the Danish Maritime Authority.<br />

This configuration is named CompactClean<br />

Bulker and must be seen as<br />

an additional product line to the existing<br />

CompactClean product lines. It<br />

is designed for higher flowrates during<br />

de-ballast solving one of the main<br />

operational issues faced by bulk carriers<br />

complying with ballast water regulations.<br />

So far, typical ballast water management<br />

systems have been approved with<br />

just one maximum flowrate, which is the<br />

same during ballast and de-ballast operations,<br />

but now Desmi Ocean Guard introduces<br />

a tailor-made solution.<br />

Some vessel types, in particular bulk<br />

carriers, often experience a need to be<br />

able to discharge ballast water faster<br />

than the time they spend on ballast<br />

water uptake. This is related to<br />

the speed of cargo loading, which is<br />

for some cargo types and ports much<br />

faster than the speed with which they<br />

can unload cargo. The ballast water<br />

uptake and discharge speeds need to<br />

match this in order to not become obstacles<br />

to the operation of the vessel.<br />

According to the company, in all its<br />

simplicity, the type approved solution<br />

enables the CompactClean system to<br />

be configured with any combination of<br />

its approved filters and UV units, and<br />

as the filter is by-passed during de-ballasting,<br />

the need for a higher de-ballast<br />

flowrate can be accommodated by selecting<br />

a UV unit larger than the filter.<br />

Klausdorfer Weg 163, 24 148 Kiel - Germany<br />

Tel.: +49 (0) 431 66 111-0, Fax: +49 (0) 431 66 111-28<br />

E-mail: info@podszuck.eu, Internet: www.podszuck.eu<br />

BRAND MARINE CONSULTANTS<br />

New app for marine claims<br />

Covid-19 doesn’t slow the brand Marine Consultants<br />

(bMC) Group. According to the company, the<br />

whole team have been kept very busy and were instrumental<br />

on several interesting and complex projects in<br />

recent months. bMC have been honoured to be engaged<br />

on challenging projects across the globe throughout<br />

2<strong>02</strong>0. From Galapagos to the Philippines it seems that<br />

the bMC staff have been there and done it all. A large<br />

part of what the company does relies on international<br />

travel, that has been made particularly difficult in recent<br />

months, but bMC always found a way to serve clients<br />

and to keep the team safe. Somehow in the past<br />

year, bMC staff have also stepped up and dedicated<br />

time to develop a brand new, tailor made web application<br />

– SalvageApp. The application was conceived<br />

to give clients a real improvement in the information<br />

flow during a marine claims incident. SalvageApp takes<br />

advantage of the decades of marine claims experience<br />

across the bMC Group from claims handling to technical<br />

expertise. The development team have worked hard<br />

to ensure that SalvageApp delivers exactly that, th company<br />

stated. This impressive tool is a real credit to the<br />

bMC team and the talented developers.<br />

Klausdorfer Weg 163 | 24148 Kiel | Germany<br />

Tel. +49 (0) 431 6 6111-0 | Fax -28<br />

info@podszuck.eu | www.podszuck.eu<br />

<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

63


SMM Tech-Hub<br />

HEADWAY<br />

Delivery of three EGCS to OOCL<br />

Recently, Headway Technology<br />

Group delivered exhaust<br />

gas cleaning systems (EGCS) for<br />

three 4,500 TEU container carriers<br />

owned by Orient Overseas Container<br />

Line (OOCL) in Taiwan. It<br />

is reported that Headway has integrated<br />

the full process including<br />

3D-scanning, designing, prefabrication,<br />

manufacturing, installation,<br />

commissioning, and service.<br />

With the seamless conjunction of<br />

each process, Headway eliminated<br />

the hazards due to lack of communication<br />

among manufacturer,<br />

designing institution and shipyard.<br />

»With the turn-key solution,<br />

Headway avoided huge potential<br />

cost that might occur during retrofitting,«<br />

said the project manager<br />

of OOCL. As for the outlook for<br />

EGCS, Headway’s EGCS project<br />

leader analyzed that – based on the<br />

recent increase of inquiry and contracts<br />

on OceanGuard EGCS – the<br />

differential price between MGO<br />

and LFO tends to increase in the<br />

coming years. It is a good time for<br />

the shipowners to reconsider the<br />

installation of an ehaust gas cleaning<br />

system, says Headway.<br />

MMG<br />

Efficiency enhancement<br />

Nowadays there are more forward-pressing<br />

reasons for an optimisation<br />

of a vessel’s efficiency than ever.<br />

Besides the obvious motivation of fuel<br />

savings, the reduction of CO2 emissions<br />

will be a requirement for the operation<br />

of the fleet. In the face of upcoming<br />

IMO regulations, the efficiency levels of<br />

almost all sea-going vessels will have to<br />

be evaluated. The introduction of EEXI<br />

and CII underlines the demand for efficiency<br />

enhancement measures. MMG<br />

supports their customers on this path<br />

with efficiency analysis based on stateof-the-art<br />

numerical simulation methods<br />

and the preparation of detailed<br />

re-design reports to provide recommended<br />

procedures for the efficiency<br />

optimisation process. As<br />

a direct contribution to this process,<br />

MMG offers propeller re-design<br />

together with the optimised<br />

fin cap solution ESCAP and can<br />

look back on a reference list of<br />

about 400 retrofit projects for numerous<br />

customers world-wide.<br />

According to the company, these measures<br />

have proven the potential for fuel<br />

savings up to 14%.<br />

We support you in the EEXI/CII<br />

certification process.<br />

Phone: Email: www.<br />

The Propeller<br />

64 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


SMM Tech-Hub<br />

PROPULSION ENGINEERING<br />

Partner for all shaft line repairs<br />

Based on reliable measurements, excellent engineering<br />

and long-term experience Propulsion Engineering<br />

takes care for the project of the customers to assure<br />

the optimal technical solutions within the agreed<br />

time frame and budget. The services include, engineering<br />

and supervision, alignment, repair, 3D measurement,<br />

vibration analysis, installation and mounting as<br />

well as on-site machining. Propulsion Engineering offers<br />

analysis and development of solutions in close coordination<br />

with clients. The company attends and supervises<br />

the subsequent implementation process on<br />

site. This involves cooperating with the clients and the<br />

shipyard as a team. The colleagues on site are in constant<br />

exchange with the technical office in the company<br />

headquarters. »This guarantees the highest quality<br />

standards,« Propulsion Engineering stresses.<br />

VDMA<br />

Power-to-X for Applications<br />

It is the stated goal of the shipping industry to<br />

operate shipping with less and less climate pollution.<br />

The Paris Agreement and the International<br />

Maritime Organisation (IMO) both have set ambitious<br />

targets. But with today’s technology, these<br />

goals cannot be achieved. Thus, it is necessary to<br />

identify smart ways to replace fossil fuels. The<br />

members of VDMA working group Power-to-X<br />

for Applications, are convinced that P2X is such<br />

a smart way and that it will play a key role in the<br />

future for shipping. »We are the network for P2X<br />

solutions and the cross-industry platform for exchange,<br />

communication, and cooperation. We involve<br />

stakeholders along the value chain, from the<br />

development of manufacturing processes through<br />

synthetic fuel production and raw materials using<br />

power-to-X technologies to the end user. The<br />

competition for the best concepts has only just begun,<br />

but the combustion engine will continue to<br />

play a key role in the future,« VDMA stated. Find<br />

out more at https://p2x4a.vdma.org/en/<br />

High<br />

availability<br />

Low space<br />

requirement<br />

Easy<br />

installation<br />

NEW: GCU evo<br />

For LNG tankers and bunker vessels<br />

Combustion of the boil-off gases on the<br />

basis of the 100 % free-flow solution<br />

Low NOx values thanks to<br />

cold flame technology<br />

Short flame due to surface burner<br />

Methane combustion from 0.4 to 4.5 t/h<br />

For pre-orders and requests<br />

SAACKE GmbH<br />

Südweststraße 13 | 28237 Bremen, Germany | Tel. +49 421 6495-0 | marine@saacke.com<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

www.saacke.com<br />

65


SMM Tech-Hub<br />

WOMA<br />

Robot for cleaning operations with Ultra-High-Pressure water<br />

Cleaning, surface preparation and paint stripping of<br />

large areas, such as ship walls or large storage tanks in industry,<br />

still prove to be a challenge. In manual Ultra-High-Pressure<br />

(UHP) projects, large scaffoldings and a high number<br />

of personnel are essential. The Woma Magnet Lizard<br />

is a safe, efficient and time-saving alternative in the cleaning<br />

and preparation of metallic surfaces with UHP water,<br />

the company stated. The self-propelled, automated cleaning<br />

robot is purely pneumatically driven and remote-controlled.<br />

It achieves maximum cleaning and paint removal<br />

results using a specifically engineered rotating water tool.<br />

While the Magnet Lizard ensures the highest level of safety<br />

for the user at all times, the self-propelled water tool is<br />

also resistant to uneven surfaces and obstacles by regulating<br />

the contact pressure on the cleaning pot itself, Woma<br />

says. Welds or portholes are no problem thanks to the optimized<br />

arrangement of holding magnets and control chains<br />

and can be easily mastered or bypassed thanks to the intuitive<br />

operation. According to the company, the Magnet Lizard<br />

achieves the best performance in a system solution with<br />

the mobile UHP-unit Woma EcoMaster MK3. Up to four<br />

manual spray devices can be replaced with this solution.<br />

Equipped with an energy-efficient motor based on the latest<br />

emissions regulations, the integrated Woma high-pressure<br />

pump 250M delivers 25 liters per minute at a pressure<br />

of 2,800 bar, thus enabling residue-free cleaning and effective<br />

removal of paints and coatings with an effective working<br />

width of up to 370 mm.<br />

FIL-TEC RIXEN<br />

Filter technology for more than 35 years<br />

For more than 35 years, the filter specialist<br />

Fil-Tec Rixen has been involved in<br />

the improvement, manufacture, service<br />

and sales of filters and their filter spare<br />

parts for shipping and industry. The necessary<br />

technical improvements in filter<br />

cartridges and filter elements to extend<br />

the service life, which were realized with<br />

the introduction of Fil-Tec filter elements,<br />

are based on 35 years of experience and<br />

analyses from practical experience. Continuous<br />

training of the engineers and service<br />

personnel, as well as constant contact<br />

with shipping companies and the responsible<br />

engineers on ships and in the industry’s<br />

production facilities, enables the<br />

company to react quickly and extremely<br />

flexibly to all conceivable problems.<br />

»Only the combination of experience<br />

and the use of state-of-the-art production<br />

methods and control systems guarantees<br />

the high technical standard of Fil-<br />

Tec filter cartridges and filter elements,«<br />

stresses the company.<br />

• Drahtseile • Tauwerk • Festmacher<br />

• CASAR Bordkranseile • Anschlagmittel<br />

• Prüflasttest bis 1.000 t<br />

• Segelmacherei • Taklerei • Montage<br />

Walter Hering KG<br />

Porgesring 25<br />

22113 Hamburg<br />

Telefon: 040 – 73 61 72 -0<br />

eMail: info@seil-hering.de<br />

www.seil-hering.de<br />

Elektrische Antriebe für Schiffswinden<br />

und Offshore, für NT-Betrieb bis -50°C<br />

electrical drives for marine winches<br />

and offshore, for LT-operation down to -50°C<br />

BEN BUCHELE ELEKTROMOTORENWERKE GMBH<br />

POPPENREUTHER STR. 49A<br />

90419 NÜRNBERG<br />

POSTFACH 91 04 40<br />

9<strong>02</strong>62 NÜRNBERG<br />

TEL. +49 911 3748-0 FAX +49 911 3748-138<br />

Internet: www.benbuchele.de<br />

E-Mail: info@benbuchele.de<br />

66 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


SMM Tech-Hub<br />

WÄRTSILÄ<br />

Waste water systems for Carnival cruisers<br />

The technology group Wärtsilä has signed a framework<br />

agreement with the global cruise ship operator Carnival Corporation<br />

covering the supply and installation of waste water<br />

and dry waste treatment systems for up to 32 vessels across<br />

many of its operating brands. The framework is consistent<br />

with Carnival’s policies for compliance with the latest and<br />

most stringent environmental legislation.<br />

Wärtsilä’s Membrane Bioreactor waste water treatment<br />

plants are used for the handling of black and grey waste water.<br />

According to the company, the system surpasses the most<br />

demanding standards currently set by the International Maritime<br />

Organisation (IMO) for sewage discharge, including paragraph<br />

4.2 of MEPC 227 (64), which applies to special areas.<br />

Similarly, Wärtsilä’s dry waste handling systems comply<br />

with the most stringent IMO Marpol requirements, and are<br />

designed to minimise greenhouse gas emissions.<br />

The Wärtsilä equipment will be delivered and installed onboard<br />

different ships across many of the operating brands between<br />

2<strong>02</strong>0 and 2<strong>02</strong>5.<br />

The portfolio of global cruise line brands of Carnival Corporation<br />

includes Carnival Cruise Line, Princess Cruises,<br />

Holland America Line, Seabourn, P&O Cruises (Australia),<br />

Costa Cruises, Aida Cruises, P&O Cruises (UK) and Cunard.<br />

Carnival Corporation also operates Holland America Princess<br />

Alaska Tours, a tour company in Alaska and the Canadian<br />

Yukon.<br />

Your Partner for<br />

• Hull Building<br />

• Ship Building<br />

• Block Building<br />

• Segment Building<br />

• Offshore Fish Farming<br />

• Pipes<br />

• Offshore Structures<br />

• Steel Structures<br />

Fosen Yard Emden GmbH<br />

Zum Zungenkai | 26725 Emden<br />

Fon + 49 4921 85 - 2257 | Fax + 49 4921 85 - 2244<br />

info@fosenyard-emden.com | www.fosenyard-emden.com<br />

MAKES THE FUTURE AT SEA<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

67


SMM Tech-Hub<br />

MICRODATA DUE<br />

Wireless fire detection<br />

Microdata Due is specialized in designing fire detection<br />

systems for demanding applications such as<br />

cruise and naval vessels. According to the company,<br />

know how, reliability and support are the key factors<br />

that have made it one of the market leaders. Constant<br />

research and development activities ensure the continuous<br />

improvement of system performance.<br />

A recent solution, currently under testing, is a wireless<br />

fire detection system for harsh environments such as the<br />

lashing bridges of a container ship. Serious cargo-related<br />

fires on board of container ships have occurred at the<br />

rate of about nearly one/month. The increased size of<br />

container ships has a real impact on the potential severity<br />

of such incidents that often end with the loss of the<br />

ship and the entire cargo. The first tests on board have<br />

shown that a significant increase in automatic fire detection<br />

is possible even in rough environments on deck,<br />

Microdata informs.<br />

TSI<br />

Flexibility is the key<br />

Since 1989, TSI Turbo Service International<br />

stands for turbocharger engineering, overhauling<br />

and as a provider of spare parts. The company<br />

has opened a new workshop in Genoa, Italy,<br />

in June 2<strong>02</strong>0. The company also has workshops<br />

in Rotterdam, Italy, Malta, Houston, Southampton<br />

and partners in Dubai, Hong Kong, China,<br />

Singapore, and Turkey. All of the spare parts are<br />

100% quality inspected upon entrance, and are<br />

recorded in the system to ensure full traceability<br />

at all times. TSI is an independent company, ensuring<br />

the flexibility to offer services for all models<br />

of marine and power turbochargers. All work<br />

is covered by a 12-month warranty. »During these<br />

difficult times it is important for our customers<br />

to look at alternative supplier routes«, the company<br />

stresses. »You will be looking for suppliers that<br />

are either recommended, economical, and reliable<br />

whilst not compromising on quality and service<br />

that you have received from the OEM supplier.<br />

TSI are committed to supporting you. We<br />

are increasing our stock of parts and have negotiated<br />

better terms with our fully quality audited<br />

suppliers to ensure that we can offer even better<br />

cost savings to you,« says TSI. Its sales and<br />

technical team are fully operational to support<br />

the customers and interested parties through online<br />

Zoom meetings or emails to answer any of<br />

their questions.<br />

Alignment and Repair Services<br />

All from One Source – World Wide<br />

www.prop-eng.com<br />

68 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


SMM Tech-Hub<br />

CLYDE & CO<br />

Shipyards seek insurance cover against »force majeure«<br />

Clyde & Co is one of the world’s leading maritime<br />

and insurance law firms. The company is present<br />

in over 50 cities on six continents, and – since<br />

2019 – also in Hamburg. Daniel Jones and his English<br />

team are part of Clyde & Co’s Hamburg team.<br />

»Parties to shipbuilding contracts (SBC) have,<br />

like commercial parties in most industries, faced<br />

particular issues due to the Covid-19 pandemic.<br />

Some shipyards have said they have faced a delayed<br />

supply of, or the inability to obtain, materials,<br />

whilst others have faced disruption to their workforce.<br />

Delivery of vessels have in some cases been<br />

made more complicated, delayed and costly, because<br />

of Covid-19 related travel and quarantine restrictions,«<br />

says Jones.<br />

Several shipyards issued force majeure (FM)<br />

declarations following the spread of Covid-19 to<br />

seek extensions to the delivery date under their<br />

SBC. According to Jones, in most SBC, FM is treated<br />

as a permissible delay entitling a shipyard to an<br />

extension of the delivery date. However, whether<br />

a shipyard is entitled to rely on an event as FM in<br />

order to obtain an extension will depend on the<br />

wording of the contract in question. »Epidemics«<br />

are often specifically mentioned in shipbuilding<br />

FM clauses.<br />

These clauses will generally also require causation,<br />

in other words that delay to the construction<br />

of the vessel is caused by the FM event. Finally, in<br />

order to rely on an event as FM, shipyards need to<br />

comply with notice requirements in the SBC, says<br />

Jones.<br />

Disputes may arise where a shipyard has served<br />

FM Notice(s) claiming that Covid-19 is an FM<br />

event which entitles to postpone delivery. The consequence<br />

of a shipyard missing the contractual delivery<br />

date by a stipulated period is that the buyer<br />

may cancel the contract and claim a refund of the<br />

pre-delivery instalments under the Refund Guarantee.<br />

In dealing with legal disputes, arbitrators may<br />

need to consider whether the shipyard was entitled<br />

to postpone delivery for delays caused by Covid-19.<br />

Ihr Spezialist für<br />

Schiffbauverträge<br />

Clyde & Co Europe LLP<br />

Esplanade 40, 20354 Hamburg<br />

T +49 40 8090 3<strong>02</strong>00 | F +49 40 8090 3<strong>02</strong>99<br />

www.clydeco.com<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

69


SMM Tech-Hub<br />

SAACKE MARINE SYSTEMS<br />

Safe sea transport of LNG<br />

Saacke Marine Systems is breaking new ground in<br />

methane combustion on LNG tankers with its new<br />

product - the GCU evo. The further development<br />

of the classic Gas Combustion Unit consists of<br />

a cost-effective combination of the combustion<br />

unit with a modified surface burner.<br />

The abbreviation evo stands for »evolution«.<br />

In order to take into account the ever<br />

decreasing space available in the engine room<br />

of LNG tankers, Saacke has designed this system<br />

solution with significantly smaller dimensions<br />

with the same or even improved performance. According<br />

to the company, in addition to saving space,<br />

the new model offers further advantages for marine<br />

engineering. For example, NO x emissions are reduced in<br />

the range of 60 to 80 mg/m3 thanks to special cold flame<br />

technology and digital remote maintenance can be used.<br />

The optimized design not only reduces the required<br />

space on board, but also the installation costs and thus<br />

the effort for customers when using a Saacke GCU. In<br />

addition, maintenance costs can be reduced due to the<br />

lower complexity of the system. No<br />

special foundation is required for<br />

the GCU evo with an output of 5.5 to<br />

6.3 MW. The system can be mounted<br />

directly on the deck as a stand-alone<br />

unit with simple installation. In<br />

addition, due to its compact design<br />

and functionality, the surface<br />

burner offers a short flame and<br />

requires a smaller number of<br />

blowers. The further development<br />

does not forego the<br />

proven strengths of the classic<br />

GCU such as fail-safe control,<br />

electric ignition and the 100 % free-flow solution<br />

for combustion of the methane components in the climate-damaging<br />

boil-off gas without a compressor and<br />

at very low pressure. The GCU evo, which is ready for<br />

series production, is available in different output sizes<br />

from 0.4 to 4.5 t/h methane combustion with various<br />

size gradations.<br />

JOIN THE<br />

REVHULLUTION<br />

The HullSkater is a revolutionary onboard solution<br />

specially developed for proactive cleaning.<br />

Together with the premium antifouling SeaQuantum<br />

Skate, Jotun Hull Skating Solutions will maintain a clean<br />

hull, even in the most challenging operations. This<br />

groundbreaking approach is now in the final verification<br />

stage, in collaboration with leading industry partners.<br />

www.jointherevhullution.com<br />

Download our<br />

Marine brochure<br />

READ MORE<br />

70 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


ADVERTORIAL<br />

Elektrifizierungslösungen<br />

für die maritime Energiewende<br />

SIEMENS ENERGY MARINE GESTALTET DIE ZUKUNFT DER SCHIFFFAHRT<br />

Die Elektrifizierung der Schifffahrt<br />

spielt eine Schlüsselrolle in der Energiewende.<br />

Die bedarfsgerechte Verteilung<br />

der Energie sowie die Anbindung<br />

neuer Energiequellen im (teil-)<br />

elektrifizierten Schiffsverbund bietet<br />

große Potentiale für Einsparungen,<br />

Effizienzsteigerungen und die Einhaltung<br />

von IMO-Grenzwerten. Im Rahmen<br />

des digitalen Showrooms „Marine<br />

World – We Energize Marine“<br />

stellt Siemens Energy Marine ab dem<br />

<strong>02</strong>.Februar 2<strong>02</strong>1 innovative Lösungen<br />

vor, um die Potentiale der energetischen<br />

Infrastruktur von Schiffen<br />

auszuschöpfen und lädt zum Experten-Austausch<br />

über maritime Anwendungen<br />

und Zukunftstechnologien.<br />

https://www.siemens-energy.com/marineworld<br />

Um die Zukunftsfähigkeit ihrer Flotten<br />

zu gewährleisten, setzen Reedereien<br />

zunehmend auf moderne<br />

Brennstoffzellentechnologie und optimierte<br />

Antriebsmotoren. Vordringlichstes<br />

Ziel ist es, den Energiebedarf<br />

betriebswirtschaftlich möglichst effizient<br />

zu regeln und gleichzeitig die<br />

Einhaltung der Emissionsgrenzwerte<br />

der IMO sicherzustellen. Dazu bedarf<br />

es einer gesamtheitlichen Betrachtung<br />

des Systems: Vom strömungsoptimierten<br />

Betrieb des Schiffskörpers<br />

bis zum Einsatz von umfassenden<br />

Digitalisierungs- und Automatisierungslösungen<br />

in der Steuerungs-,<br />

Verteilungs- und Instandhaltungstechnik.<br />

Umweltfreundliche und<br />

wirtschaftliche<br />

Antriebslösungen<br />

Moderne Antriebslösungen erfüllen<br />

die steigenden Anforderungen an<br />

wirtschaftliche und ökologische Nachhaltigkeit<br />

durch einen schlanken Aufbau,<br />

verlängerten Life-Cycle, eine hohe<br />

Belastbarkeit und Verfügbarkeit sowie<br />

einen kundennahen Remote- und Vor-<br />

Ort-Service.<br />

An diesen Kriterien orientiert sich<br />

auch die Antriebstopologie der Siship<br />

BlueDrive© Family von Siemens Energy<br />

Marine. Die Mittel- bzw. Niedrigspannungs-DC-Schiffsantriebe<br />

basieren<br />

auf bewährten, standardisierten<br />

Siemens Komponenten, die auf Basis<br />

weltweiter Betriebserfahrung ständig<br />

konsequent weiterentwickelt werden.<br />

Die Lösungen sind je nach Kundenanforderung<br />

hochgradig konfigurierbar<br />

und besonders auf die Energie-Infrastrukturen<br />

von diesel-elektrisch, hybrid<br />

oder vollelektrisch betriebenen<br />

Schiffe ausgelegt.<br />

Digitale Möglichkeiten nutzen<br />

Heutige Schiffssysteme stellen eine<br />

Vielzahl an Informationen bereit, die<br />

eine Vielzahl an Optimierungsmöglichkeiten<br />

eröffnen. Über eine systematische<br />

Erfassung und Bearbeitung<br />

der Daten können sämtliche Systemkomponenten<br />

präzise gesteuert, Emissionsquellen<br />

identifiziert, die Beanspruchung<br />

überwacht und geeignete<br />

Instandhaltungsmaßnahmen automatisiert<br />

geplant werden. Durchgängig<br />

strukturierte Automatisierungslösungen<br />

und KI-Anwendungen helfen dabei,<br />

die Crew zu entlasten und die<br />

Leistungsfähigkeit des Systems zu optimieren.<br />

Siemens Energy Marine stellt die entsprechenden<br />

Funktionen über das SI-<br />

SHIP EcoMAIN© System als webbasierte<br />

Applikation zur Verfügung, so<br />

dass die Vorteile jederzeit und überall<br />

genutzt werden können. Bei Bedarf lassen<br />

sich die Funktionen um vielfältige<br />

Optionen erweitern, etwa mit einer<br />

Routenplanung zur Berücksichtigung<br />

von geografischen und regulativen Besonderheiten.<br />

Marine World –<br />

We Energize Marine<br />

In der Woche vom <strong>02</strong>.- 05.Februar<br />

2<strong>02</strong>1 diskutieren zahlreiche Siemens-<br />

Experten und Partner anhand langjähriger<br />

Erfahrung und konkreter<br />

Anwendungsfälle die neuesten Entwicklungen<br />

und Lösungen für die<br />

Elektrifizierung von Wasserfahrzeugen.<br />

Neben zahlreichen interaktiven<br />

Formaten schafft die digitale Veranstaltung<br />

die Möglichkeit zum direkten<br />

Austausch und Vernetzung per Live-<br />

Video Chat.<br />

Weitere Informationen und Zugang:<br />

https://www.siemens-energy.com/marineworld<br />

© Siemens<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

71


Schifffahrt | Shipping<br />

✕<br />

Auch das Logo an der Fassade der Hamburger<br />

Unternehmenszentrale wird bald nur noch den<br />

Schriftzug DNV – ohne GL – tragen<br />

© DNV GL<br />

Ende einer Ära – DNV trennt sich von GL<br />

Der Germanische Lloyd, mehr als anderthalb Jahrhunderte eines der wichtigsten maritimen<br />

Unternehmen weltweit und ein Hamburger Traditionsname, ist bald nur noch ein Kapitel im<br />

Geschichtsbuch. Ab dem 1. März heißt es nur noch Det Norske Veritas, kurz DNV<br />

Die Spatzen pfiffen es immer mal wieder<br />

von den Dächern, jetzt passiert<br />

es. Im Laufe des Jahres soll der traditionsreiche<br />

Schriftzug »GL« als Zusatz im Unternehmensnamen<br />

DNV GL verschwinden.<br />

In einer Mitteilung begründet Remi<br />

Eriksen, CEO der norwegischen Klassifikationsgesellschaft,<br />

den Schritt mit einer<br />

»Vereinfachung und Stärkung unserer<br />

globalen Marke«.<br />

Der Name »DNV GL« sei kein Name,<br />

der den Kunden leicht von der Zunge<br />

gehe, erklärte Eriksen noch. Viele Akteure<br />

in der maritimen Welt hätten den Namen<br />

aus Bequemlichkeit ohnehin gern<br />

auf »DNV« verkürzt. »Die Namensvereinfachung<br />

ist daher eine logische Konsequenz<br />

der erfolgreich abgeschlossenen<br />

Fusion«, sagt Unternehmenschef<br />

Eriksen.<br />

Der bisherige Doppelname war durch<br />

den Zusammenschluss von DNV (Det<br />

Norske Veritas) und GL (Germanischer<br />

Lloyd) im Jahr 2013 entstanden. Der<br />

1867 von 600 Reedern, Schiffbauern<br />

und Versicherern in Hamburg gegründete<br />

Germanische Lloyd war da gerade<br />

146 Jahre alt geworden. DNV war bereits<br />

drei Jahre früher an den Start gegangen.<br />

Es entstand damals die weltgrößte<br />

Klassifikationsgesellschaft mit rund<br />

17.000 Beschäftigten, 2,5 Mrd. € Umsatz<br />

und Vertretungen in rund 100 Ländern.<br />

Schluss nach 154 Jahren: Der Germanische<br />

Lloyd ist ab März endgültig Geschichte<br />

Die DNV Foundation übernahm 63,5 %<br />

der Anteile an der neuen Gesellschaft, die<br />

übrigen 36,5 % lagen zunächst noch bei<br />

der Mayfair-Holding der Tchibo-Erben<br />

Günter und Daniela Herz, die den GL im<br />

Jahr 2006 für 575 Mio. € gekauft hatten.<br />

Hauptsitz des neuen Unternehmens<br />

wurde Høvik nahe der norwegischen<br />

Hauptstadt Oslo. Die maritime Sparte,<br />

die rund 40 % des Konzernumsatzes<br />

ausmachte, behielt ihre Zentrale und<br />

zunächst rund 1.500 Mitarbeiter in der<br />

Hamburger Hafencity.<br />

Doch schnell wurde nach dem Zusammenschluss<br />

klar, dass es keine Fusion<br />

unter Gleichen war, wie anfangs<br />

behauptet wurde. Die Führungspositionen<br />

sind oder wurden vorzugsweise mit<br />

Norwegern besetzt. Und Ende 2017 verkauften<br />

die Herz-Geschwister schließlich<br />

ihre Anteile an die DNV-Stiftung.<br />

Das GL blieb vorerst Bestandteil des Namens,<br />

doch schon damals wurde spekuliert,<br />

wie lange eigentlich noch.<br />

In der seit der Lehman-Pleite andauernden<br />

Krise in Schifffahrt und Schiffbau<br />

musste auch der Schiffsklassifizierer<br />

deutliche Umsatzeinbußen auf etwa<br />

2 Mrd. € (2018) hinnehmen und die<br />

Zahl der Arbeitsplätze, darunter auch<br />

in Hamburg, massiv auf insgesamt etwa<br />

12.000 verringernKF<br />

72 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Schifffahrt | Shipping<br />

Zur Person: Marcus Schärer<br />

1997-2001: Sales Manager,<br />

Hanseatic Marine Services<br />

2001–2008: Account Manager,<br />

Shell Marine<br />

2008–2012: Sales Manager<br />

DACH, Shell Marine<br />

2012–2015: Offer to Cash<br />

Manager, Shell Marine<br />

2015–2016: Global Technical<br />

Manager, Shell Marine<br />

2016–2<strong>02</strong>0: Marketing &<br />

Business Development Manager,<br />

Shell Marine<br />

2<strong>02</strong>0–heute: Global Technical<br />

& Operations Manager, Shell<br />

Marine<br />

»Für mich ist die <strong>HANSA</strong><br />

ein Spiegelbild der<br />

maritimen Welt«<br />

BEWERTUNG<br />

(1 bis 5 Sterne)<br />

AKTUALITÄT<br />

THEMENSPEKTRUM<br />

KOMPETENZ<br />

RELEVANZ<br />

LAYOUT/GESTALTUNG<br />

VERSTÄNDLICHKEIT<br />

GESAMTEINDRUCK<br />

Die <strong>HANSA</strong> im Blickpunkt<br />

»Zur Tiefe mehr Kontroverse«<br />

Seit 20 Jahren ist Marcus Schärer inzwischen<br />

bei Shell Marine, bei einem der weltweit<br />

größten Hersteller und Händler von<br />

Mineralöl, Kraft- und Schmierstoffen sowie<br />

einer der größten Charterer. Gelernt<br />

hat er mal Koch, sogar in einem 2-Sterne-<br />

Restaurant, bevor es ihn vor zwei Jahrzehnten<br />

in die maritime Wirtschaft verschlug.<br />

Seither, so erzählt er, begleitet ihn auch die<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong>. »Mal in einem Stapel lauter Fachzeitschriften<br />

auf dem Schreibtisch im Büro<br />

oder aber auf Reisen in der Tasche.«<br />

Wie ein Spaziergang über die SMM<br />

Schärer liest viel und gern, und er schätzt<br />

die Lektüre der <strong>HANSA</strong>. »Oft ist das Lesen<br />

wie ein Spaziergang über eine Messe<br />

wie die SMM.« Womit er das breitgefächerte<br />

Themenspektrum meint und<br />

lobt. »Es ist immer wieder interessant zu<br />

sehen, wie riesig diese Industrie ist und<br />

wie sich die verschiedenen Themen ständig<br />

weiterentwickeln.« Er empfinde es als<br />

wichtig, seine »Welt der Schmierstoffe«<br />

zu verlassen und den Horizont zu erweitern<br />

– dabei gebe die <strong>HANSA</strong> eine gute<br />

Orientierung. Dafür nehme er sich dann<br />

auch Zeit, gern am Wochenende. Gleichzeitig<br />

räumt er ein, dass nur etwa 10–15%<br />

der Texte wirklich bis zu Ende liest, »das<br />

sind die Sachen, die mich auch in der Tiefe<br />

interessieren.«<br />

Online nutzt Schärer nach eigenen Angaben<br />

täglich vieleAngebote, um sich zu<br />

informieren. Das gehöre schließlich zu seinem<br />

Job. Aber immer dann, wenn die Zeit<br />

es hergibt, greift er nach eigenem Bekunden<br />

eben auch gern auf die hintergründigen<br />

Beiträge in einem Monatsmagazin<br />

wie der <strong>HANSA</strong> zurück. Themen, Aktualität,<br />

Kompetenz und Relevanz bekommen<br />

von ihm 4 oder sogar 5 Punkte, also<br />

Bestwertungen. »Für mich ist die HAN-<br />

SA ein Spiegelbild der maritimen Welt.«<br />

Er empfindet es durchaus als angenehm,<br />

Texte in der Muttersprache, also<br />

auf Deutsch, zu lesen. Das sieht er als eine<br />

Stärke der <strong>HANSA</strong>, die er als die führende<br />

Publikation im deutschsprachigen<br />

Raum ansieht. Gleichzeitig schränke dies<br />

die Verbreitung und Wahrnehmung in der<br />

international geprägten maritimen Welt<br />

natürlich ein. Inhalte anderer Publikationen<br />

könne man leichter mit Kollegen teilen.<br />

»Ich glaube aber, dass die <strong>HANSA</strong> als<br />

englischsprachige Zeitschrift gute Chancen<br />

am Markt hätte, sagt Schärer. Denn<br />

mit ihren qualitativ wertigen und fundiert<br />

recherchierten Beiträgen brauche sie sich<br />

nicht hinter anderen Publikationen zu verstecken.<br />

»Gerade im Heft finde ich immer<br />

wieder Informationen, die ich so woanders<br />

noch nicht gelesen habe.«<br />

Für die kommenden Jahre sieht er<br />

zwei Megatrends, auch für die <strong>HANSA</strong><br />

– Dekarbonisierung und Digitalisierung.<br />

»Das sind die Themen, die nicht nur die<br />

gesamte Industrie bewegen werden, sondern<br />

mit denen sich die <strong>HANSA</strong> weiter<br />

profilieren könnte«, sagt Schärer. Es sind<br />

aus seiner Sicht auch die Handlungsfelder,<br />

die für die deutschen Unternehmen<br />

und im deutschen Markt insgesamt auf<br />

der Agenda stehen müssten. »Alle reden<br />

darüber, aber kaum einer weiß heute, wo<br />

die Reise wirklich hingeht.« Mit ihrem<br />

Knowhow und der technischen Expertise<br />

könnten, ja müssten sich die hiesigen<br />

Hersteller und Zulieferer positionieren,<br />

um ihre Marktanteile zu sichern oder<br />

zurückzuerobern.<br />

Megatrends als Chance<br />

Er verweist auf die Klimaziele zur CO2-<br />

Rediuzierung, denen sich auch sein Unternehmen,<br />

Shell, verschrieben habe und<br />

daher große Anstrengungen auf diesem<br />

Gebiet unternehme. »Doch in der Schifffahrt<br />

und somit auch im Schiffbau fragt<br />

sich jeder, mit welchem Kraftstoff, mit welcher<br />

Antriebslösung das gelingen kann«,<br />

meint Schärer. Auch das Potenzial der Digitalisierung<br />

aller Prozesse sei längst noch<br />

nicht ausgeschöpft. »Das geht schließlich<br />

weit über die Anschaffung moderner Office-Programme<br />

hinaus.«<br />

Es bestehe gerade in der Schifffahrt<br />

großer Nachholbedarf, in diesem Bereich<br />

»spielt jetzt aber auch die Musik.« Eine<br />

Fachzeitschrift wie die <strong>HANSA</strong> könne<br />

und sollte dabei Hilfestellung geben, die<br />

technischen Hintergründe ebenso wie<br />

die Zusammenhänge erklären und einordnen.<br />

»Das wird gebraucht«, sagt Schärer.<br />

Bei aller Wertschätzung für die sachlich-fundierte<br />

Berichterstattung wünscht<br />

er sich von der <strong>HANSA</strong> gerade bei diesen<br />

Zukunftsthemen nicht nur die gewohnte<br />

Tiefe, sondern auch mehr Kontroverse.<br />

»Nur Mut dazu«, sagt Schärer. n<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

73


Schifffahrt | Shipping<br />

25% der MPP-Tonnage sind älter als 15 Jahre<br />

Das sehr schmale Orderbuch in der Mehrzweck- und Schwergutschifffahrt macht sich<br />

immer mehr in der Altersstruktur der Flotte bemerkbar<br />

Bis auf sehr wenige Ausnahmen<br />

haben die MPP-Reedereien lange<br />

keine Neubauten mehr bestellt. Zu<br />

knapp waren und sind die Kassen bei<br />

vielen, zu unsicher ist der Ausblick auf<br />

entsprechende Ladungsmengen und –<br />

märkte. Hinzu kommt die mehr oder<br />

minder umfangreiche Konsolidierung<br />

in der Branche, in deren Rahmen einige<br />

Akteure verschwunden oder in anderen<br />

aufgegangen sind. Strukturelle<br />

Maßnahmen scheinen die Unternehmen<br />

noch immer stärker zu beschäftigen<br />

als Neubau-Pläne.<br />

Nicht außer Acht zu lassen ist außerdem,<br />

dass es für ältere, vermeintlich<br />

auszusortierende MPP-Schiffe in<br />

vielen Fällen noch immer Abnehmer<br />

in Nischenmärkten gibt. Dadurch verringert<br />

sich das globale Tonnage-Angebot<br />

insgesamt nur in unzureichendem<br />

Maße. Damit die Nachfrage zu<br />

auskömmlicheren Raten führen kann,<br />

müsste Kapazität abgebaut, sprich außer<br />

Dienst gestellt und verschrottet<br />

werden. Die verschärften und zu höheren<br />

Kosten führenden Scrapping-Anforderungen<br />

der Europäischen Union<br />

sind jedoch ein weiteres Hindernis.<br />

So lässt eine Flottenmodernisierung<br />

in der MPP-Schifffahrt weiter<br />

auf sich warten, wie ein Blick auf den<br />

aktuellen Marktbericht des Hamburger<br />

Maklers Toepfer Transport zeigt.<br />

Auch wenn den Beteiligten durchaus<br />

bewusst ist, dass die strengeren<br />

Umweltvorgaben der Internationalen<br />

Schifffahrtsorganisation IMO einige<br />

substanzielle Anpassungen nötig machen,<br />

und zwar immer dringender.<br />

Mittlerweile hat ein Vierteil<br />

der Tonnage die Altersgrenze von<br />

15 Jahren überschritten, die Hälfte<br />

davon hat sogar schon mindestens<br />

20 Jahre auf dem Buckel. Zum<br />

Vergleich: Vor etwas mehr als einem<br />

Jahr lagen die Anteile noch bei 9%<br />

und 13%. Der Anteil der maximal<br />

fünf Jahre alten Tonnage sank hingegen<br />

von 46% auf 39%.<br />

Altersstruktur MPP-Flotte / TDW<br />

Altersstruktur > 100 t Krankapazität<br />

MPP-Flotte / TDW<br />

> 100 t Krankapazität<br />

1.957.739<br />

1.957.739 13%<br />

13%<br />

> 25.000 tdw<br />

20.000 - 24.999 tdw<br />

15.000 - 19.999 tdw<br />

10.000 - 14.999 tdw<br />

5.000 - 9.999 tdw<br />

2.000 - 4.999 tdw<br />

4.199.348<br />

4.199.348 27%<br />

27%<br />

1.869.451<br />

1.869.451 12%<br />

12%<br />

20<br />

10<br />

63<br />

90<br />

98<br />

Betrachtet man den Teilmarkt der<br />

Projektschiffe mit einer Krankapazität<br />

von mindestens 240 t sieht es nur<br />

unwesentlich besser aus. 9% sind älter<br />

als 20 Jahre, 14% älter als 15 Jahre.<br />

1.408.599<br />

1.408.599 9%<br />

9%<br />

Die globale MPP-Flotte<br />

> 240t Krankapazität<br />

1<br />

148<br />

6.056.529<br />

6.056.529 39%<br />

39%<br />

aktive Flotte<br />

Orderbuch<br />

26<br />

0 - 5 Jahre<br />

(75 0 - 5 Schiffe) Jahre<br />

(75 Schiffe)<br />

6 - 10 Jahre<br />

(324 6 - 10 Schiffe) Jahre<br />

(324 Schiffe)<br />

11 - 15 Jahre<br />

(296 11 - 15 Schiffe) Jahre<br />

(296 Schiffe)<br />

16 - 20 Jahre<br />

(132 16 - 20 Schiffe) Jahre<br />

(132 Schiffe)<br />

> 20 Jahre<br />

(189 > 20 Schiffe) Jahre<br />

(189 Schiffe)<br />

Im Herbst 2019 waren es noch 5% und<br />

13%. Trotz einigen Neubauten in diesem<br />

Segment ging auch hier der Anteil<br />

der maximal fünf Jahre alten Tonnage<br />

zurück: von 49% auf 39%. MM<br />

© Toepfer Transport<br />

74 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Schifffahrt | Shipping<br />

Altersstruktur MPP-Flotte / TDW<br />

Altersstruktur > 240 t Krankapazität<br />

MPP-Flotte / TDW<br />

> 240 t Krankapazität<br />

989.596<br />

989.596 14%<br />

14%<br />

1.894.604<br />

1.894.604 27%<br />

27%<br />

661.204<br />

661.204 9%<br />

9%<br />

731.723<br />

731.723 11%<br />

11%<br />

2.733.494<br />

2.733.494 39%<br />

39%<br />

Die globale MPP-Flotte<br />

> 100t Krankapazität<br />

0 - 5 Jahre<br />

(41 Schiffe)<br />

0 - 5 Jahre<br />

(41 Schiffe)<br />

6 - 10 Jahre<br />

135 Schiffe)<br />

6 - 10 Jahre<br />

135 Schiffe)<br />

11 - 15 Jahre<br />

(135 Schiffe)<br />

11 - 15 Jahre<br />

(135 Schiffe)<br />

16 - 20 Jahre<br />

(62 Schiffe)<br />

16 - 20 Jahre<br />

(62 Schiffe)<br />

> 20 Jahre<br />

56 Schiffe)<br />

> 20 Jahre<br />

56 Schiffe)<br />

Clemens Toepfer<br />

Der Geschäftsführer des Hamburger<br />

Schiffsmaklers Toepfer Transport erwartet<br />

trotz dem Aufschwung in der<br />

Container- und Mehrzweck-Schifffahrt<br />

(MPP) keine größeren Neubau-<br />

Aktivitäten. Clemens Toepfer spricht<br />

im PODCAST außerdem über seine<br />

Einschätzung zu kommende Marktentwicklungen,<br />

das »Prügeln« um<br />

Ladungen von Carriern aus unterschiedlichen<br />

Schifffahrtssegmenten,<br />

Pläne für Toepfer Transport, die<br />

Zusammenarbeit mit seinem Bruder<br />

Christoph Toepfer von Borealis Maritime,<br />

Vor- und Nachteile eines traditionsreichen<br />

Familiennamens und<br />

den Reedereistandort Deutschland.<br />

© Toepfer Transport<br />

> 25.000 tdw<br />

20.000 - 24.999 tdw<br />

15.000 - 19.999 tdw<br />

10.000 - 14.999 tdw<br />

5.000 - 9.999 tdw<br />

2.000 - 4.999 tdw<br />

53<br />

58<br />

136<br />

187<br />

1<br />

276<br />

306<br />

2<br />

aktive Flotte<br />

Orderbuch<br />

26<br />

bbc-chartering.com<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

75


Schifffahrt | Shipping<br />

Offshore-Installation im Fokus<br />

Die Windindustrie ist für die MPP-Schifffahrt ein elementar<br />

wichtiger Markt. Doch nicht nur in puncto Verschiffung.<br />

Auf der Suche nach einträglichem Geschäft setzt nach der<br />

niederländischen Spliethoff-Gruppe nun auch Harren &<br />

Partner aus Bremen auf den Markt der Installation von<br />

Offshore-Windanlagen. H&P sicherte sich jetzt mit der<br />

»Wind Lift I« ein gebrauchtes Jack-up-Schiff für die Hamburger<br />

Heavylift-Tochter SAL, beziehungsweise für die eigens<br />

neu gegründete Gesellschaft SAL Renewables, die sich<br />

»auf die Offshore-Wartung und -Installation von Windkraftanlagen<br />

und den dazugehörigen Komponenten« fokussieren<br />

soll und in Bremen ansässig ist.<br />

Matthieu Moerman, Head of Projects bei SAL Renewables:<br />

»Die Megawatt-Kapazität von Windparks steigt ständig und<br />

alte Windparks müssen mit neuen Turbinen erneuert oder<br />

stillgelegt werden. Mit der »Wind Lift« I zielen wir nicht nur<br />

auf den Installations- und Wartungsmarkt, sondern auch auf<br />

die Stilllegung und Aufrüstung alter, bestehender Windparks.«<br />

Martin Harren, Geschäftsführer von Harren & Partner, erläuterte<br />

die Strategie hinter der Neugründung: »Die weltweite<br />

Nachfrage nach Energie ist höher als je zuvor, und es findet<br />

derzeit eine große Energiewende statt. Die Projekte, die sich<br />

aus diesem Wandel ergeben, sind entscheidend für unser Geschäft.<br />

SAL Renewables ist eine perfekte Ergänzung zu unserem<br />

etablierten Logistikgeschäft.«<br />

Die Spliethoff-Gruppe hatte hingegen wie berichtet einen<br />

Neubau in Auftrag gegeben. Die Niederländer setzen auf einen<br />

generell wachsenden Bedarf nach Installationstonnage. Experten<br />

untermauern diesen Ansatz: Das Beratungsunternehmen<br />

Rystad Energy hatte erst kürzlich die Schiffskapazität als<br />

Hauptengpass für die Entwicklung der Offshore-Windkraft<br />

identifiziert.<br />

Der Markt für Schiffe, die in der Lage sind, große Offshore-<br />

Windkomponenten zu installieren, wird durch die wachsende<br />

Nachfrage aus der globalen Entwicklungspipeline schnell<br />

überholt, zeigt die Analyse. Demnach wird die globale Flotte<br />

nicht ausreichen, um die Nachfrage nach 2<strong>02</strong>5 zu befriedigen,<br />

was Raum für die Bestellung von mehr Spezialschiffen und<br />

Umbauten von Schwerlastschiffen für die Öl- und Gasindustrie<br />

schaffe.<br />

© Harren & Partner<br />

»Wir sehen große Chancen im US-Verkehr«<br />

Die Windenergieprojekte im Land gewinnen weiter an Dynamik [...] Sogar in den USA, wo in<br />

den letzten vier Jahren ein großer Lärm um die Unterstützung der fossilen Brennstoffindustrie<br />

gemacht wurde. Es scheint, dass die Pandemie die Unterstützung für Windenergieprojekte nicht<br />

beeinträchtigt hat, auch wenn sich einige Projekte verschieben. Bei AAL haben wir in unser Flottenprofil<br />

und unsere globale Infrastruktur investiert. Unsere Mega-MPP-Schiffe sind ideal für<br />

den Transport von sehr langen Windtürmen und -blättern, die kleinere MPP-Schiffe schlicht<br />

nicht auf wirtschaftliche Weise transportieren können<br />

Michael Morland, General Manager<br />

Americas, AAL shipping<br />

SPEAKERS’<br />

CORNER<br />

Lesen Sie den kompletten<br />

Kommentar vonMichael Morland<br />

in unserer »Speakers’ Corner«<br />

auf www.hansa-online.de<br />

MPP-Raten klettern über 7.000 $<br />

Weit entfernt vom Höhenflug in der Containerschifffahrt<br />

bleiben die Charterraten für MPP-Schiffe zu Beginn des<br />

Jahres im positiven Trend. Die Werte des Vorjahres aber<br />

bleiben unerreicht.<br />

Der Toepfer Multipurpose Index weist eine Durchschnittsrate<br />

von zuletzt 7.005 $/Tag für Schiffe mit 12.500 tdw aus.<br />

Das liegt zwar nur leicht mit 74 $ über dem Dezember-<br />

Wert, wurde aber zuletzt im März 2<strong>02</strong>0 vermeldet. Gerade<br />

im letzten Monat des Vorjahres hatte es mit einem Zuwachs<br />

von mehr als 200 $/Tag einen ordentlichen Push nach oben<br />

gegeben. Grund war die hohe Nachfrage nach Tonnage vor<br />

den Feiertagen und ein Mangel an Leercontainern weltweit.<br />

Das hatte dazu geführt, dass sowohl von Linienreedereien<br />

als auch von Verladern vermehrt MPP-Tonnage für Containertransporte<br />

eingechartert wurden, um den Bedarf zu<br />

decken.<br />

Verglichen mit dem Vorjahr hat dieses Schifffahrtssegment<br />

- anders als die Containerschifffahrt - allerdings weiter immensen<br />

Nachholbedarf. Denn die Durchschnittsraten liegen<br />

noch immer fast 400 $ unter den Januar-Preisen aus 2019.<br />

Vorerst könnte es aus der Containerschifffahrt weitere Impulse<br />

für die MPP-Branche geben. »Wir erwarten, dass die<br />

Erholung in den kommenden Monaten andauern wird«, heißt<br />

es bei Toepfer Transport.<br />

76 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


BUCHKoehler<br />

Bekannt aus Radio<br />

und Zeitung<br />

NEU!<br />

" ( D ) 19,95 • ISBN 978-3-7822-1373-8<br />

" ( D ) 14,99 • eISBN 978-3-7822-1486-5<br />

" ( D ) 19,95 • ISBN 978-3-7822-1361-5<br />

LUST AUF KREUZFAHRT<br />

UNSERE BESTSELLER<br />

" ( D ) 24,95 • ISBN 978-3-7822-1265-6<br />

" ( D ) 18,99 • eISBN 978-3-7822-1410-0<br />

" ( D ) 24,95 • ISBN 978-3-7822-1287-8<br />

" ( D ) 19,99 • eISBN 978-3-7822-1470-4<br />

" ( D ) 29,95 • ISBN 978-3-7822-1306-6<br />

Jetzt bestellen auf koehler-mittler-shop.de, direkt im Buchhandel<br />

oder telefonisch unter 040/70 70 80 322<br />

koehler-books.de


Schiffstechnik | Ship Technology<br />

© MN 3D<br />

Sensordatengestützte Wartung –<br />

intelligente Bauteile<br />

In der maritimen Branche existieren bisher relativ wenige industrielle Anwendungen<br />

additiver Fertigungstechnologien. Die bekanntesten und wirtschaftlich sinnvollen<br />

Einsatzfälle betreffen die Herstellung von Schiffspropellern, die Reparatur von großen<br />

Wellen und Gehäuseteilen mittels Laserpulverauftragschweißen sowie den Aufbau komplex<br />

geformter Rumpfsegmente aus Kunststoff<br />

Das Maritime Netzwerk für den 3D-<br />

Druck (MN3D), bestehend aus<br />

20 Unternehmen und Forschungseinrichtungen<br />

vorwiegend aus dem Norden<br />

Deutschlands, hat im Januar 2<strong>02</strong>0 seine<br />

Arbeit aufgenommen. Diese Kooperation<br />

basiert auf einer Initiative des Maritimen<br />

Clusters Norddeutschland (MCN) und beabsichtigt<br />

nun, die additive Fertigung in<br />

der Schiffbau- und Zulieferindustrie weiter<br />

zu verbreiten und deren individuellen<br />

Nutzen für die Branche zu erschließen.<br />

Ziel der Beteiligten ist die Identifikation<br />

neuer Anwendungsmöglichkeiten<br />

mit maritimem Bezug und die Entwicklung<br />

optimierter Bauteile oder Produktionsprozesse.<br />

Dabei sind die spezifischen<br />

maritimen Anforderungen und Einsatzbedingungen<br />

wie beispielweise die Korrosionsgefahr<br />

durch Seewasser, die oftmals<br />

sehr großen Bauteildimensionen<br />

und die hohen Belastungen an Bord zu<br />

berücksichtigen. Mehrere Arbeitsgruppen<br />

innerhalb des Netzwerkes widmen<br />

sich unterschiedlichen Themenfeldern,<br />

in denen Forschungs- und Entwicklungsprojekte<br />

geplant sind. Die Interessen<br />

der Unternehmen richten sich etwa<br />

auf die Qualitätssicherung 3D-gedruckter<br />

Komponenten, die Kombination von<br />

verschiedenen Materialien im additiven<br />

Herstellprozess, die Konditionierung von<br />

Bauteiloberflächen und die Skalierung<br />

der Prozesse für großformatige Bauteile.<br />

Deutlich mehr Gestaltungsfreiheit<br />

Der 3D-Druck bietet sowohl für Polymerwerkstoffe<br />

als auch für Metalle technische<br />

Möglichkeiten, die sich mit konventionellen<br />

Herstellverfahren nicht realisieren<br />

lassen. Neben der Gestaltungsfreiheit für<br />

die derart produzierten Komponenten besitzt<br />

die additive Fertigung den charakteristischen<br />

Vorteil der Funktionsintegration.<br />

Das bedeutet, dass die Bauteile durch<br />

entsprechende Modifikation zusätzliche<br />

Funktionalitäten wahrnehmen können,<br />

um ihren Einsatz zu optimieren.<br />

Ein Beispiel stellt die Einbringung von<br />

konturnahen Kühlkanälen dar, die in ein<br />

Bauteil »hineingedruckt« werden können,<br />

die Hohlräume der Kanäle werden also<br />

beim schichtweisen Aufbau von Material<br />

ausgespart. Ein anderes Beispiel ist die Integration<br />

von Sensorik in einem Bauteil,<br />

Zugprüfung eines<br />

additiv hergestellten<br />

Probekörpers mit<br />

integrierter Sensorik<br />

und zwar auch an Positionen im Inneren<br />

des Bauteils, die von seiner Oberfläche aus<br />

nicht mehr zugänglich sind.<br />

Laufzeit- vs. zustandsbasiert?<br />

© Fraunhofer IAPT<br />

Insbesondere in der maritimen Anwendung<br />

können diese Sensoren wertvolle<br />

Informationen liefern. Der Zustand von<br />

Anlagen an Bord eines Schiffes muss regelmäßig<br />

mit zeitaufwändigen und kostenintensiven<br />

Methoden überprüft werden.<br />

Im Falle eines auftretenden Schadens<br />

wird der Schiffsbetrieb gestört und eventuell<br />

sogar unterbrochen, was dann zusätzliche<br />

Kosten hervorruft.<br />

Derzeit erfolgen die meisten der notwendigen<br />

Wartungen laufzeitbasiert,<br />

unabhängig vom tatsächlichen Zustand<br />

der Anlagen. Durch die Integration der<br />

Sensorik lassen sich jedoch intelligente<br />

Bauteile erschaffen, die ihre Belastung<br />

selbst überwachen und bei Bedarf eine<br />

erforderliche Reparatur anzeigen. Eine<br />

somit erreichte zustandsbasierte Wartung<br />

und Substitution von Komponenten<br />

senkt die Betriebskosten und steigert<br />

die Zuverlässigkeit der Anlagen.<br />

78 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Schiffstechnik | Ship Technology<br />

© Fraunhofer IAPT<br />

3D-gedruckter Probekörper mit einem eingebetteten Dehnungsmessstreifen (unten) sowie einem oberflächlich positionierten Vergleichssensor (oben)<br />

Sensoren im Metallbauteil<br />

Als Mitglied des MN3D-Netzwerkes unterstützt<br />

die Fraunhofer-Einrichtung für<br />

Additive Produktionstechnologien IAPT<br />

die Unternehmen der maritimen Industrie<br />

bei der Umsetzung innovativer Ideen.<br />

Dem Fraunhofer IAPT aus Hamburg ist<br />

es gelungen, Sensoren während des 3D-<br />

Druckprozesses im Inneren eines Metallbauteils<br />

zu platzieren.<br />

Zu diesem Zweck wird der additive<br />

Aufbau im pulverbettbasierten Laserstrahlschmelzverfahren<br />

unterbrochen,<br />

der Sensor in das Bauteil eingeklebt und<br />

der Schichtaufbau anschließend fortgesetzt,<br />

sodass der Sensor vollständig vom<br />

3D-gedruckten Material umschlossen ist.<br />

Abbildung 1 zeigt einen Probekörper mit<br />

einem eingebetteten Dehnungsmessstreifen<br />

(DMS) in der Ansicht sowie im Querschnitt.<br />

Die Position des eingebetteten<br />

Sensors ist nur temporär im Ablauf des<br />

3D-Drucks zugänglich, dessen Aufbau in<br />

z-Richtung erfolgt. Der integrierte Sensor<br />

wird über ebenfalls eingebettete Signalleitungen<br />

mit elektrischem Strom versorgt.<br />

Die spezielle Herausforderung besteht<br />

darin, den Sensor im additiven Fertigungsprozess<br />

vor Hitzeeinwirkung zu<br />

schützen und ihn beim Aufschmelzen des<br />

Pulvermaterials durch den Laserstrahl<br />

nicht zu beschädigen. Zur Überprüfung<br />

der Funktionsfähigkeit des eingebetteten<br />

Sensors verfügt der Probekörper<br />

über einen zweiten Dehnungsmessstreifen<br />

an der Oberfläche, dessen Ergebnisse<br />

im Zugversuch als Referenzwerte dienen.<br />

Abbildung 2 belegt die übereinstimmende<br />

Reaktion der beiden Sensoren auf die<br />

Vergleich der Messwerte<br />

von integriertem<br />

und oberflächlich<br />

positioniertem DMS<br />

Belastung des Probekörpers im Zugversuch<br />

und somit die Einsetzbarkeit des<br />

eingebetteten Sensors.<br />

Vorausschauende Wartung<br />

Übertragen auf reale Bauteile können<br />

belastende Kräfte, resultierende Verformungen<br />

oder auch Schwingungen mit<br />

Hilfe von integrierten Sensoren erfasst<br />

und statistisch ausgewertet werden, um<br />

eine Bauteilhistorie zu erstellen. Einzig<br />

die additive Fertigung erlaubt es dabei,<br />

die Sensoren an beliebiger Stelle auch im<br />

Bauteilinneren zu positionieren und die<br />

Messwerte dort aufzunehmen, wo sie die<br />

größte Relevanz besitzen.<br />

Auf Basis der Überwachungsdaten<br />

wird eine belastungsgesteuerte, vorausschauende<br />

Wartung (Predictive<br />

Maintenance) von maritimen Komponenten<br />

möglich, um teure Reparaturen<br />

und unplanmäßige Liegezeiten im Hafen<br />

zu vermeiden. So leistet die additive<br />

Fertigung indirekt einen Beitrag zur<br />

weiteren Digitalisierung und der Vision<br />

intelligenter Bauteile, die selbständig<br />

und rechtzeitig ihren eigenen Ersatz<br />

bestellen.<br />

Autoren: Olaf Steinmeier, Gefei Li<br />

Fraunhofer-Einrichtung für Additive<br />

Produktionstechnologien IAPT<br />

Abstract: Sensor-based maintenance – intelligent components<br />

There are relatively few industrial applications of additive manufacturing technologies<br />

in the maritime sector so far. However, stressing forces, resulting deformations or even<br />

vibrations can be recorded with the assistance of integrated sensors and statistically evaluated<br />

to create a »component history«. Only additive manufacturing allows the sensors<br />

to be positioned anywhere, even inside the component, and to record the measured values<br />

where they are most relevant. Based on monitoring data, predictive maintenance<br />

can avoid expensive repairs and unscheduled lay times in port.<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

79


Schiffstechnik | Ship Technology<br />

Die ersten 3D-gedruckten Ersatzteile<br />

wurden bereits an Bord geliefert<br />

© Thome<br />

3D-Druck in der Praxis<br />

Die Schifffahrtsunternehmen Thome Shipmanagement und Wilhelmsen gehören zu den<br />

»Pionieren« in der Anwendung von additiver Fertigung im Flottenbetrieb. Nach langer<br />

Planungszeit wurde die Einbindung in die Praxis mittlerweile gestartet<br />

Die Schifffahrtsindustrie gibt jedes<br />

Jahr Milliarden von Dollar für Ersatzteile<br />

aus. Es erfordert eine Menge<br />

an Planung, Verbindung und Terminierung<br />

zwischen einem Schiff und<br />

der Landorganisation, um sicherzustellen,<br />

dass die richtigen Produkte verfügbar<br />

sind, wenn ein Schiff sie benötigt,<br />

da Verspätungen ernsthafte Sicherheitsprobleme<br />

und Offhire-Perioden verursachen<br />

können, die sich negativ auf die<br />

Rentabilität auswirken.<br />

Selbst bei sorgfältiger Planung können<br />

unerwartete Probleme auftreten, berichtet<br />

der weltweit aktive Shipmanager<br />

Thome, bei denen Notfall-Ersatzteile an<br />

ein Schiff geschickt werden müssen, mit<br />

allen damit verbundenen zusätzlichen<br />

Kosten und Unterbrechungen des normalen<br />

Schiffsbetriebs.<br />

Lieferung teurer als Ersatzteil<br />

Hinzu komme die mangelnde Verfügbarkeit<br />

einiger Artikel, von denen viele<br />

lange Vorlaufzeiten haben. Und dann<br />

sei da noch die Frage der Lieferung,<br />

wenn die Teile an bestimmte Orte geflogen<br />

werden müssen, damit das Schiff<br />

sie beim nächsten Hafenanlauf mitnehmen<br />

kann.<br />

Sehr oft übersteigen die Kosten für die<br />

Lieferung den Angaben zufolge bei weitem<br />

die Kosten für das Ersatzteil selbst.<br />

80 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Abstract: Thome and Wilhelmsen turn to 3d printed spare parts<br />

The shipping companies Thome Shipmanagement and Wilhelmsen<br />

are among the »pioneers« in the application of additive manufacturing<br />

in fleet operations. It takes a lot of planning, liaison and scheduling<br />

between a ship and its office to make sure that the right products<br />

are available when a vessel needs them. The disruption caused by<br />

the Covid-19 pandemic has also made the situation even trickier to<br />

co-ordinate. The 3DP Early Adopter Program gives Thome and other<br />

Wilhelmsen customers that are taking part in the pilot exclusive access<br />

to Wilhelmsen’s on-demand 3D printing capabilities or additive<br />

manufacturing as it is also known.<br />

Schiffstechnik | Ship Technology<br />

Hamburgs<br />

maritimes Herz<br />

Ebenfalls von Bedeutung: Veraltete<br />

Ersatzteile, bei denen der<br />

offensichtliche Mangel an Verfügbarkeit<br />

und die Notwendigkeit,<br />

eine Lösung zu finden, an die<br />

Stelle rein finanzieller Faktoren<br />

tritt, wenn dies für den reibungslosen<br />

Betrieb eines Schiffes unerlässlich<br />

ist.<br />

Die durch die Covid-19-Pandemie<br />

verursachten Unterbrechungen<br />

haben die Situation noch<br />

schwieriger zu koordinieren gemacht,<br />

da länderspezifische Restriktionen<br />

zu Beginn des Jahres<br />

2<strong>02</strong>0 sowie der Mangel an internationalen<br />

Flügen enorme Probleme<br />

in der Lieferkette verursachten.<br />

Selbst wenn ein Teil an den<br />

richtigen Bestimmungsort geflogen<br />

werden könnte, gab es immer<br />

noch keine Garantie dafür, dass<br />

die zuständigen Behörden eine<br />

rechtzeitige Zollabfertigung und<br />

Lieferung an das Schiff zulassen<br />

würden.<br />

»Genau zum richtigen Zeitpunkt«<br />

habe die Marine Products<br />

Division der Wilhelmsen-Gruppe<br />

ein Pilotprojekt zum 3D-<br />

Druck von Ersatzteilen gestartet<br />

und Thome wegen seiner engen<br />

Zusammenarbeit mit Reedereikunden<br />

dazu eingeladen, erklärt<br />

der Shipmanager. Das »3DP Early<br />

Adopter Program« gibt Thome<br />

und anderen Wilhelmsen-Kunden,<br />

die an dem Pilotprojekt teilnehmen,<br />

exklusiven Zugang zu<br />

On-Demand-3D-Druckmöglichkeiten.<br />

Der Shipmanager begann die<br />

Kooperation mit Wilhelmsen vor<br />

etwa einem Jahr, wobei die enge<br />

Zusammenarbeit der IT-Teams<br />

als »ein wesentliches Element«<br />

beschrieben wird, um sicherzustellen,<br />

dass die Software von Wilhelmsen<br />

vollständig in die Thome-<br />

Prozesse integriert werden konnte.<br />

Es fanden auch Mitarbeiterschulungen<br />

statt, bei denen sowohl<br />

die Teams an Bord als auch die an<br />

Land aktiven Beschaffungsteams<br />

die Grundlagen des Systems erlernten,<br />

um die Bestellung von<br />

3D-gedruckten Ersatzteilen zu erleichtern.<br />

Phase 2 gestartet<br />

Regelmäßige Treffen sowie interne<br />

Team-Updates waren ein wichtiger<br />

Faktor bei der Behebung von<br />

Systemfehlern oder Prozessproblemen.<br />

Für dieses Projekt war laut<br />

Thome ein fast ein Jahr währender<br />

Planungs- und Verbindungsprozess<br />

nötig. Dies sei aber unerlässlich<br />

gewesen, um alle Systeme<br />

und Verfahren zu testen und sicherzustellen,<br />

dass das Personal<br />

entsprechend geschult wurde.<br />

Kürzlich erhielt der Shipmanager<br />

die ersten 3D-gedruckten<br />

Ersatzteile, bei denen es sich um<br />

Speigattstopfen handelte. Mittlerweile<br />

arbeitet man an einer Aufstellung<br />

potenzieller additiv gefertigter<br />

Produkte, die zur Verfügung<br />

gestellt werden sollen.<br />

Thome tritt nun in Phase 2 des<br />

Projekts mit Wilhelmsen ein, in<br />

der die Unternehmen noch enger<br />

zusammenarbeiten wollen, um<br />

an gegenseitig vorteilhaften Entwicklungsideen<br />

zu arbeiten und<br />

das System noch weiter zu verfeinern.RD<br />

...mehr<br />

geht nicht!<br />

Erleben Sie die<br />

ganze Geschichte der Schifffahrt<br />

in der weltweit größten<br />

maritimen Privatsammlung<br />

in Hamburgs ältestem Speichergebäude<br />

mitten in der HafenCity.<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

KAISPEICHER B | KOREASTRASSE 1 |20457 HAMBURG<br />

TELEFON: 040 300 92 30-0 | WWW.IMM-HAMBURG.DE 81<br />

ÖFFNUNGSZEITEN: TÄGLICH VON 10 BIS 18 UHR


HÄFEN | Ports<br />

Da die Prognosen für den Containerumschlag schwächer ausfallen, muss sich Hamburg wieder stärker als Universalhafen positionieren<br />

Dämpfer für den Hamburger Hafen<br />

Hamburg muss sich von ehemals hochfliegenden Entwicklungsprognosen verabschieden.<br />

Laut einer neuen Studie soll der Containerumschlag bis 2035 noch 13 Mio. TEU statt der<br />

einst erhofften 20 Mio. TEU erreichen – das hat Konsequenzen für künftige Planungen<br />

© HHM<br />

Von 20, 25, ja sogar von bis zu<br />

30 Mio. TEU war in Hamburg die<br />

Rede, wenn in der Vergangenheit das<br />

Potenzial des Containerumschlags beschrieben<br />

wurde. Eine neue Studie im<br />

Auftrag der Hafengesellschaft HPA sorgt<br />

jetzt für Ernüchterung: In den kommenden<br />

15 Jahren soll die Jahresmenge<br />

von heute 9,3 Mio. TEU auf höchstens<br />

13 Mio. TEU steigen. Auch der Gesamtumschlag,<br />

der zu zwei Dritteln von Containern<br />

bestimmt ist, soll langsamer<br />

wachsen als gedacht.<br />

Von 2009 bis 2019 nahm der Seegüterumschlag<br />

um jährlich etwa 2,6 Mio. t<br />

bzw. insgesamt 23,8 % auf rund 137 Mio. t<br />

zu. Im Basisszenario wird bis 2035 gegenüber<br />

2019 ein weiteres Wachstum des<br />

Güterumschlags um knapp 30 % auf<br />

rund 177 Mio. t erwartet. Dies entspricht<br />

im Durchschnitt einem Zuwachs von<br />

2,5 Mio. t p.a. bzw. 1,6 % p.a. Konventionelles<br />

Stückgut kommt auf ein durchschnittliches<br />

jährliches Wachstum von<br />

0,5 %, trockenes Massengut auf 2,1 %.<br />

Dagegen geht der Umschlag flüssigen und<br />

trockenen Massenguts um -1,2 % bzw.<br />

-1,5 % zurück. Der Containerumschlag<br />

erreicht im Basisszenario ein Niveau von<br />

rund 13,1 Mio. TEU. Im besten Fall werden<br />

es bis 2035 bis zu 14,0 Mio. TEU bei<br />

einem Gesamtumschlag von 192 Mio. t.<br />

Umschlagentwicklung 2007 bis 2019<br />

(+40,2 %). Hierbei wird unterstellt, dass<br />

durch die Fahrrinnenanpassung der Elbe<br />

positive Effekte im Güterumschlag generiert<br />

werden können und sich gleichzeitig<br />

der Rückgang im Umschlag fossiler Energieträger<br />

weniger dynamisch entwickelt.<br />

Im sogenannnten unteren Szenario sind<br />

© HPA<br />

82 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


HÄFEN | Ports<br />

es dagegen nur 11,1 Mio. t bei einem auf<br />

150 Mio. t anwachsenden Gesamtumschlag<br />

(+9,6 %).<br />

Bisherige Planungen für eine Erweiterung<br />

der Hafenflächen müssten überdacht<br />

werden, räumte Wirtschaftssenator<br />

Michael Westhagemann daraufhin ein.<br />

Gemeint ist unter anderem die seit vielen<br />

Jahren geplante Westerweiterung des Eurogate-Terminals<br />

im Waltershofer Hafen.<br />

In diesem Jahr will seine Behörde die Arbeit<br />

an einem neuen Hafenentwicklungsplan<br />

aufnehmen. Die Opposition forderte<br />

umgehend mehr Tempo, gezielte Investitionen<br />

und die Förderung von Innovationen<br />

zur Stärkung des Standortes, um<br />

auch künftig im internationalen Wettbewerb<br />

bestehen zu können.<br />

Westhäfen sind enteilt<br />

Umschlagpotenzial für containerisiertes Stückgut bis 2035<br />

<br />

Gründe für die neue, deutlich zurückgeschraubte<br />

Prognose gibt es einige. Zu den<br />

traditionellen Nachteilen wie der langen<br />

Revierfahrt über die Elbe und dem Verzug<br />

bei der sogenannten Fahrrinnenanpassung<br />

für größere Containerschiffe<br />

sind in jüngerer Vergangenheit weitere<br />

Faktoren hinzugekommen. Die Energiewende<br />

in Deutschland führt zu Einbußen<br />

beim Umschlag klassischer Massengüter<br />

wie Kohle. Und der Wettbewerb an der<br />

Nordrange bis nach Le Havre hat an Härte<br />

zugenommen.<br />

Dabei sind die deutschen Häfen, auch<br />

Hamburg, gerade bei der Effizienz ihrer<br />

Terminals gegenüber den Westhäfen Rotterdam<br />

und Antwerpen ins Hintertreffen<br />

geraten, wie der Terminalbetreiber Eurogate<br />

einräumen musste. Die Folge: »teilweise<br />

signifikante Marktanteilsverschiebungen«,<br />

wie es in der gemeinsam vom<br />

Ingenieurbüro Ramboll, dem Hamburger<br />

Institut Economic Trends und cpl<br />

verfassten Studie heißt.<br />

So sei die Containermenge von<br />

2007 bis 2019 bei einer durchschnittlichen<br />

jährlichen Wachstumsrate<br />

von 1,5 % um etwa ein Fünftel auf<br />

47,25 Mio. TEU angestiegen. Rotterdam<br />

und vor allem Antwerpen konnten<br />

dabei zulegen, während Hamburg<br />

und Bremerhaven tendenziell an Boden<br />

eingebüßt haben.<br />

Die in den drei Szenarien berücksichtigen<br />

Wettbewerbsfaktoren wirken<br />

zudem unterschiedlich auf die Transhipmentmärkte<br />

und Fahrtgebietsstrukturen,<br />

heißt es. Hier ergibt sich<br />

eine Differenz im Wachstum von bis zu<br />

32 %, je nachdem, wie sich die Elbvertiefung,<br />

die Entwicklung des Jade-Weser-<br />

Ports in Wilhelmshaven und die Tendenz<br />

zu Ostsee-Direktanläufen bei den Linienreedereien<br />

auswirken. Auch Mittelmeer-Dienste<br />

und -Häfen entwickeln sich<br />

gegenüber den Häfen in Nordeuropa zunehmend<br />

zu Konkurrenten.<br />

Im Fahrtgebiet von/nach Asien, dem<br />

wichtigsten in Hamburg, sei mit Verlagerungen<br />

im Containerverkehr unter<br />

anderem nach Wilhelmshaven sowie auf<br />

die Neue Seidenstraße zu rechnen, Nordamerika-Verkehre<br />

dürften dagegen kaum<br />

wachsenKF<br />

Abstract: A setback for Hamburg<br />

Germany’s largest port has to say<br />

goodbye to overambitious cargo forecasts.<br />

According to a new study, container<br />

throughput in Hamburg is expected<br />

to reach only 13 mill. TEU by<br />

2035 instead of 20 mill. TEU that were<br />

forecast for many years. Among other<br />

things, significant transhipment<br />

volume could be lost to other ports in<br />

the North Sea and in the Mediterranean<br />

region. Previous plans for port<br />

expansion and investments will probably<br />

have to be reconsidered.<br />

Transshipment in den Häfen der Nordrange 2019<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

© HPA<br />

© HPA<br />

•<br />

•<br />

•<br />

•<br />

•<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

83


HÄFEN | Ports<br />

GREEN PORTS<br />

ROTTERDAM<br />

Vopak prüft Landstromnutzung<br />

Die Bereitstellung von Landstrom ist eines der Kernthemen für den Rotterdamer Hafen.<br />

Die Landstromanlage an der Landzunge bei Rozenburg wird im ersten Quartal in Betrieb<br />

genommen, nun lässt auch Vopak Europoort diese Möglichkeit der Stromversorgung untersuchen.<br />

Vopak Europoort befindet sich in Höhe der<br />

Anlegestelle von Heerema auf der anderen Seite des<br />

Calandkanals. Die Heerema-Schiffe sind die ersten,<br />

die durch die Landstromanlage mit umweltfreundlicher<br />

Energie versorgt werden. Die Untersuchung<br />

von Vopak konzentriert sich auf die Sicherheit sowie<br />

die technische und wirtschaftliche Umsetzbarkeit:<br />

Was wird zur Realisierung benötigt, was kostet<br />

es und was bringt es? Die Untersuchung soll im<br />

Sommer 2<strong>02</strong>1 abgeschlossen sein.<br />

PORT OF TYNE<br />

Schritte zur vollständigen Elektrifizierung eingeleitet<br />

Port of Tyne soll bis zum Jahr 2030 kohlenstoffneutral<br />

und bis 2040 zu einem vollelektrischen Standort entwickelt<br />

werden. Derzeit arbeiten die Briten an einem Programm<br />

zur Elektrifizierung, das die Umstellung der alten Materialumschlaganlagen<br />

von Diesel auf kohlenstoffarme Elektrizität<br />

beinhaltet. Nach Abschluss dieses Programms wird<br />

erstmals in einem britischen Hafen ein dieselbetriebener<br />

Liebherr-Hafenmobilkran auf vollelektrischen Betrieb umgestellt.<br />

Bestehende dieselbetriebene Drax-Hopper, die für<br />

den Schüttgutumschlag eingesetzt werden, werden ebenfalls<br />

elektrifiziert. Port of Tyne hat außerdem in eine neue<br />

Flotte von Elektrofahrzeugen, LED-Beleuchtung in allen<br />

Gebäuden und Anlagen und intelligente Energieüberwachungszähler<br />

investiert. Zudem gibt es ein Team, das das<br />

Potenzial für die Installation von Sonnenkollektoren auf<br />

Lagergebäuden prüft.<br />

VALENCIA<br />

Hafen tritt Klimainitiative bei<br />

Die Port Authority of Valencia (PAV) tritt dem World Ports Climate<br />

Action Program (WSPS) bei. Diese Initiative pflegt Synergien der Zusammenarbeit<br />

mit der International Association of Ports and Terminals<br />

(IAPH) und bringt zwölf der wichtigsten Häfen der Welt zusammen. Die<br />

PAV-Vertreter sind in vier der fünf WPCAP-Arbeitsgruppen vertreten: Effizienz,<br />

Politik und Governance, Energie für Schiffe und dekarbonisierte<br />

Terminals. Hierbei sind Initiativen wie die Roadmap »Green Hydrogen<br />

with H2Ports« hervorzuheben, ein Pilotprojekt für den Bereich Mobilität<br />

und Seeverkehr, das im Hafen von Valencia durchgeführt wird, um Wasserstoff<br />

in die Hafenlogistik einzubinden mit dem Ziel, die Umweltauswirkungen<br />

zu reduzieren.<br />

84 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


HÄFEN | Ports<br />

LONG BEACH<br />

Hafen wird ausgezeichnet<br />

Das Port of Long Beach Community<br />

Grants Program, eine mehr als 46 Mio. $ teure<br />

Initiative zur Bekämpfung der mit dem Warenverkehr<br />

verbundenen Umweltverschmutzung,<br />

ist mit Auszeichnungen des Los Angeles<br />

County und der US-Umweltschutzbehörde<br />

EPA geehrt worden. Beide Auszeichnungen<br />

– der Los Angeles County Green Leadership<br />

Award und der EPA Clean Air Excellence<br />

Award in der Kategorie Gregg Cooke Visionary<br />

Award – würdigen Innovationen zur Verbesserung<br />

der Nachhaltigkeit und der Luftqualität.<br />

Mit 175 Schifffahrtslinien, die Long<br />

Beach mit 217 Seehäfen verbinden, wickelt<br />

der Hafen jährlich ein Handelsvolumen von<br />

170 Mrd. $ ab und unterstützt damit mehr als<br />

575.000 Arbeitsplätze in Südkalifornien.<br />

HAMBURG<br />

Wasserstoffnetz kommt<br />

Der Hamburger Hafen bereitet die klimaneutrale<br />

Energieversorgung großer Industriebetriebe<br />

vor. Es geht um ein Wasserstoffnetz mit zunächst<br />

45 km Länge südlich der Elbe, das bis spätestens<br />

2030 einen Großteil der Industrieunternehmen<br />

mit »grünem« Wasserstoff versorgen soll. Hierfür<br />

könnten nach der Errichtung eines ersten Teils immer<br />

größere Strecken der bestehenden Erdgasleitungen<br />

umgenutzt werden, heißt es. Die städtische<br />

Gesellschaft Gasnetz Hamburg rechnet mit Investitionen<br />

von insgesamt knapp 90 Mio. € in den kommenden<br />

zehn Jahren. In der ersten Ausbaustufe bis<br />

2030 könnten Industrieunternehmen im Netzgebiet<br />

angeschlossen werden, die heute für rund ein Drittel<br />

des gesamten Hamburger Erdgasverbrauchs stünden.<br />

Durch die Ablösung der Erdgasenergiemenge<br />

von derzeit jährlich rund 6,4 Terawattstunden mit<br />

»grünem« Wasserstoff könnte Hamburgs gesamter<br />

CO2-Ausstoß rechnerisch um 1,2 Mio.t sinken.<br />

BUNDESVERKEHRSMINISTERIUM<br />

Klima- und Umweltschutz wird gefördert<br />

Für die Förderprogramme »IHATEC II«, »Digitale Testfelder in Häfen«<br />

und »Modernisierung der Küstenschifffahrt« gibt es aus Berlin insgesamt<br />

156 Mio. €. Aspekte des Klima- und Umweltschutzes sowie die<br />

Digitalisierung stünden im Fokus der neuen Förderaufrufe, teilte das Ministerium<br />

mit. Mit dem Förderprogramm für die Küstenschifffahrt würden<br />

erstmalig Innovationsimpulse und finanzielle Anreize zu einer Technologie-offenen<br />

Modernisierung in der Küstenschifffahrt gesetzt. Von<br />

2<strong>02</strong>1 bis 2<strong>02</strong>4 stehen hierfür insgesamt 44 Mio. € zur Verfügung. Die übrigen<br />

Summen entfallen auf neu aufgelegten Programm »Digitale Testfelder<br />

in Häfen« (63 Mio. €) und auf IHATEC II (49 Mio. €).<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

85


Hansa Port-Hub<br />

Im »Port-Hub« berichten wir über aktuelle Entwicklungen im Hafen- und Wasserbau.<br />

Übersichtlich, umfassend, unabhängig. Haben Sie uns Neuigkeiten in diesem Segment zu<br />

vermelden? Dann schicken Sie uns gerne eine Nachricht an redaktion@hansa-online.de.<br />

Wir sichten, verarbeiten, veröffentlichen. Wir freuen uns auf Ihre News!<br />

LE HAVRE<br />

Multi-Bulk-Terminal wird »revitalisiert«<br />

Der im Norden Frankreichs gelegene Hafen von Le Havre hat Lorany Conseils die<br />

Konzession für den Bau und den Betrieb eines Massengut-Terminals erteilt. Mit seiner<br />

Lage am Südufer des Canal Grande von Le Havre ist das Multi-Bulk-Terminal seit Mai<br />

2019 ohne Nutzer. Die an Lorany vergebene 20-jährige<br />

Konzession bezieht sich auf zwei Ziele, die sich<br />

der Hafen gesetzt hat. So sollen möglichst schnell<br />

Lösungen für die Entwicklung und den Ausbau<br />

des Klinker-Umschlags vorgeschlagen werden. Außerdem<br />

will man wettbewerbsfähige Lösungen für<br />

andere Arten trockenen Schüttguts wie Getreide,<br />

Erz, Baumaterialien, Erde, Sediment und mehr. Die<br />

Anlage auf der 14 ha großen Fläche soll bereits im<br />

Sommer 2<strong>02</strong>1 ihre Tätigkeit aufnehmen können.<br />

SAN ANTONIO<br />

Kapazität von Containerumschlaganlage steigt um 30 %<br />

STI San Antonio Terminal International (STI) in Chile<br />

wird für rund 44 Mio. $ erweitert. Eine entsprechende<br />

Vereinbarung hat der Betreiber jüngst mit der lokalen<br />

Hafenverwaltung Puerto San Antonio geschlossen.<br />

Im Gegenzug bewilligt der Hafen STI eine Verlängerung<br />

des laufenden Mietvertrags von fünf Jahren, der nun bis<br />

2030 gilt. Ursprünglich wäre er 2<strong>02</strong>5 ausgelaufen. Es ist<br />

geplant, die Kapazität des Umschlagplatzes um 30 % auf<br />

etwa 1,6 Mio. TEU zu erhöhen. Dieses Vorhaben hat der<br />

Betreiber schon seit einigen Jahren, jedoch kam es immer<br />

wieder zu Verzögerungen. Zwei zusätzliche Ship-to-Shore-<br />

Krane sollen angeschafft werden, ebenso wie zwei RTG-<br />

Krane, sechs Reachstacker, 26 neue Zugmaschinen und acht<br />

Chassis. Diese Investition soll in diesem Jahr beginnen und<br />

muss bis spätestens Ende 2<strong>02</strong>4 dem Hafenvermeiter vorliegen<br />

und von ihm genehmigt werden.<br />

KLAIPEDA<br />

Rohde Nielsen sichert sich Baggerauftrag<br />

Der Schifffahrtskanal zum litauischen Hafen Klaipeda wird auf bis zu<br />

15 m vertieft. Die staatliche Hafenbehörde hat den Auftrag an das dänische<br />

Wasserbauunternehmen Rohde Nielsen vergeben, das die wasserseitige<br />

Zufahrt bereits in den Jahren 2011 bis 2013 vertieft hatte. Die Europäische<br />

Union stellt 17,3 Mio. € für die Umsetzung des Projekts bereit. Durch<br />

die Vertiefung soll der zulässige Tiefgang von Schiffen vom nördlichen Teil<br />

des Hafens Klaipeda bis zur Malku-Bucht auf 13,8 m erhöht werden. Somit<br />

könnten Frachter mehr Ladung aufnehmen, wodurch das Schiffaufkommen<br />

insgesamt zurückgehen soll, um eine größere Sicherheit zu gewährleisten.<br />

86 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Hansa Port-Hub<br />

GDYNIA<br />

Suche nach Investoren<br />

Die Port of Gdynia Authority hat formell<br />

ein Verfahren zur Auswahl eines privaten<br />

Partners für das Projekt »Bau des Außenhafens«<br />

gestartet. Das Verfahren erfolgt in<br />

Form eines wettbewerblichen Dialogs. Dies<br />

sei die optimale Form der Auftragsdurchführung,<br />

die das Gesetz über das öffentliche<br />

Auftragswesen und das über die öffentlichprivate<br />

Partnerschaft für große Infrastrukturprojekte<br />

vorsehe, teilt der polnische Hafen<br />

mit. In diesem Frühjahr soll zudem mit<br />

dem Bau des Wellenbrechers sowie der Mole<br />

begonnen werden. Zuvor steht aber noch die<br />

Genehmigung durch das Ministerium für<br />

Klima und Umwelt aus. Eine als wichtig geltende<br />

Studie über Sedimente im Bereich des<br />

Außenhafens ist bereits abgeschlossen.<br />

HAIFA<br />

Meilenstein für neues Terminal<br />

Das »Hamifratz« Containerterminal im israelischen<br />

Hafen Haifa, auch bekannt als »Bayport«, hat<br />

einen weiteren Meilenstein auf dem Weg zur Inbetriebnahme<br />

in diesem Jahr erreicht. Vier zusätzliche<br />

Ship-to-Shore-Krane wurden mit dem Spezialschiff<br />

»Zhen Hua 16« angeliefert. Das »Hamifratz«-Terminal<br />

ist eines von zwei neuen großen Containerumschlageinrichtungen,<br />

die derzeit in Israel gebaut<br />

werden. Es entstand beinahe ausschließlich auf neuem<br />

Land, das aus dem Mittelmeer gewonnen wurde.<br />

Nach Fertigstellung verfügt es über 1.100 m Kailänge<br />

und eine Kapazität von 1,86 Mio. TEU. Bereits<br />

im Jahr 2015 sicherte sich Shanghai International<br />

Port Group (SIPG) mit Sitz in China den Zuschlag<br />

für den Betrieb für einen Zeitraum von zunächst<br />

25 Jahren. Das zweite neue Containerterminal in<br />

Israel wird derzeit im Hafen von Ashdod errichtet<br />

und als »Hadarom« oder »Southport«-Projekt bezeichnet.<br />

TRIEST<br />

HHLA übernimmt Umschlagplatz<br />

Die Hamburger Hafen und Logistik AG (HHLA) hat die geplante<br />

Übernahme der Mehrheit an einem Multifunktionsterminal in Italien abgeschlossen.<br />

50,01% der Anteile am »Piattaforma Logistica Trieste« (PLT)<br />

gehören jetzt dem Hafenkonzern. Die Anlage von HHLA PLT Italy verfügt<br />

über eine Gesamtfläche von 27 ha. Im nördlichen Teil werden bereits<br />

vorrangig Stückgutverkehre abgefertigt und logistische Dienstleistungen<br />

erbracht. Im Süden entsteht das neue Herzstück des Terminals: An dem<br />

neu erschlossenen Areal am seeschifftiefen Wasser sollen künftig Container-<br />

und RoRo-Verkehre abgefertigt werden.<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

87


HTG Kongress 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

01.–03.09.2<strong>02</strong>1 in Düsseldorf<br />

Veranstaltungen 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

11.<strong>02</strong>. Forum HTG »Möglichkeiten<br />

der naturnäheren Ufergestaltung<br />

in Hafenbereichen«<br />

17.03. WorkingGroup Junge HTG<br />

06.05. Forum Wissenschaft<br />

31.05. WorkingGroup Junge HTG<br />

10.06. Forum HTG<br />

22.07. WorkingGroup Junge HTG<br />

01.–<br />

03.09. HTG Kongress<br />

21.09. WorkingGroup Junge HTG<br />

30.09. Forum HTG<br />

20.10. Workshop Consulting<br />

04.11. Forum HTG<br />

10.11. WorkingGroup Junge HTG<br />

18.11. Kaimauerworkshop<br />

<strong>02</strong>.12. Workshop Korrosionsschutz<br />

09.12. Weihnachtsmarkt Junge HTG<br />

Anmeldungen unter:<br />

www.htg-online.de/veranstaltungen<br />

i<br />

Forum HTG<br />

»Möglichkeiten der naturnäheren<br />

Ufergestaltung in Hafenbereichen«<br />

11. Februar 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

Das Forum widmet sich diesmal schwer punkt mäßig<br />

den Möglichkeiten der naturnäheren Ufergestaltung<br />

in Hafen bereichen. Zu den Möglichkeiten<br />

referiert an diesem Abend<br />

Karsten Borggräfe,<br />

Stiftung Lebensraum Elbe.<br />

Der Zugang zur Veranstaltung erfolgt über<br />

MS Teams und per Outlook-Einladung.<br />

Bitte stellen Sie sicher, dass Sie die Konferenz software MS Teams<br />

nutzen können.<br />

Anmeldemodalitäten<br />

Anmeldungen bitte online unter<br />

https://www.htg-online.de/veranstaltungen/.<br />

Anmeldeschluss ist der 09.<strong>02</strong>.2<strong>02</strong>1.<br />

Ihre Ansprechpartnerin ist Bettina Blaume,<br />

tel. 040/428 47-2178, E-Mail: service@htg-online.de.<br />

Nicht<br />

verpassen!<br />

© FOTOLIA<br />

HTG Geschäftsstelle: Neuer Wandrahm 4, 20457 Hamburg, www.htg-online.de Vorsitzender: MDir Reinhard Klingen,<br />

service@htg-online.de Geschäfts führung: Dipl.-Ing. oec. Michael Ströh, Tel. 040/428 47-52 66, michael.stroeh@htg-online.de<br />

Ansprechpartnerin: Bettina Blaume, Tel. 040/428 47-21 78, service@htg-online.de<br />

88 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


SAVE THE DATE<br />

HTG Kongress 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

Maritim Hotel Düsseldorf<br />

1. bis 3. September 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

Weitere Informationen erhalten Sie unter www.htg-online.de<br />

Auslobung Förderpreise 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

Einreichungsfrist<br />

bis<br />

31.03.2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

Die Hafentechnische Gesellschaft e.V. vergibt in zweijährigem<br />

turnus unterschiedliche Förderpreise. Auch für 2<strong>02</strong>1 werden<br />

folgende Förderpreise ausgeschrieben:<br />

• HTG Förderpreise<br />

• Förderpreis für Innovation der<br />

Werner Möbius-Stiftung<br />

• Förderpreis der<br />

Victor Rizkallah-Stiftung.<br />

Mit diesen öffentlichen Anerkennungen werden zum einen<br />

herausragende Leistungen von Studierenden<br />

und des wissenschaftlichen Nachwuchses ausgezeichnet,<br />

zum anderen werden innovative und umsetzbare Ideen<br />

erfahrener Fachleute auf den Fachgebieten<br />

der Hafentechnischen Gesellschaft e.V. gewürdigt.<br />

Die Preisverleihung findet auf dem HTG Kongress<br />

vom 1.–3. September 2<strong>02</strong>1 in Düsseldorf statt.<br />

Einreichungsfrist ist der 31.03.2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

Die Ausschreibungstexte und alle nötigen Informationen<br />

zu den Teilnahme bedingungen finden Sie unter :<br />

www.htg-online.de »Förderpreise«.<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

89


HTG Wissensdatenbank für Mitglieder<br />

Die im Oktober 2<strong>02</strong>0 ins Leben gerufene Wissensdatenbank der HTG<br />

wurde um weitere Beiträge ergänzt.<br />

So finden Sie jetzt im Mitgliederportal der HTG unter<br />

Dokumente allgemeine Dokumente HTG Wissensdatenbank<br />

den Tagungsband des HTG Kongresses 2019 und vier Beiträge<br />

des Workshops »Korrosionsschutz für Meerwasserbauwerke«<br />

vom 10. Dezember 2<strong>02</strong>0.<br />

Wechsel im Vorsitz des Arbeitsausschusses Ufereinfassungen der HTG<br />

Nach 10 Jahren engagierter und erfolgreicher Arbeit<br />

als Vorsitzender des Arbeitsausschusses Ufer einfassungen<br />

verabschiedete sich Prof. Dr.-Ing. Jürgen<br />

Grabe am 31. Dezember 2<strong>02</strong>0 aus diesem Amt.<br />

Der Arbeitsausschuss Ufereinfassungen versteht seinen<br />

Arbeitsschwerpunkt ist die Fortschreibung der<br />

bisher herausgegebenen Empfehlungen zur Planung,<br />

zum Bau und zur Unterhaltung von Ufereinfassungen<br />

im See- und Hafenbau, in Binnenhäfen und an<br />

Wasserstraßen. Dabei werden neue wissenschaft liche<br />

Erkenntnisse, Erfahrungen aus der Praxis sowie geänderte<br />

Normen berücksichtigt und ggf. in weiteren<br />

Empfehlungen dokumentiert. Der Ausschuss<br />

regt Forschungs- und Entwicklungsarbeiten zur Planung,<br />

zum Bau und zur Unterhaltung von Ufereinfassungen<br />

im See- und Hafenbau sowie in Binnenhäfen<br />

und an Wasserstraßen an, indem er Felder und<br />

Themen benennt, auf denen ein Erkenntniszugewinn<br />

wünschenswert oder erforderlich ist. Der Ausschuss<br />

führt regelmäßig alle zwei Jahre den vielbeachteten<br />

Kaimauerworkshop durch.<br />

2010 hatte Prof. Grabe den Vorsitz im Fachausschuss<br />

übernommen. Mit seinem Wissen und seiner<br />

Erfahrung gestaltete Grabe die Arbeit im Ausschuss<br />

aktiv mit und wird dies auch in Zukunft<br />

tun: »Ich gebe zwar den Vorsitz auf, werde aber<br />

Prof. Dr.-Ing. Jürgen Grabe<br />

Dipl.-Ing. Frank Feindt<br />

dem arbeitsausschuss als Mitglied erhalten bleiben.«,<br />

so Grabe.<br />

Grabes Nachfolger ist seit dem 1. Januar 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

Dipl.-Ing. Frank Feindt, Leiter der Statische<br />

Prüfstelle Hafen/Leitung Technisches Büro EC-11,<br />

bei der HPA. Die HTG gewinnt mit Feindt einen<br />

kom petenten Vorsitzenden, der eine ausgewiesene<br />

Expertise in Fragen des Baus und der Unterhaltung<br />

von Ufer einfassungen besitzt.<br />

HTG Geschäftsstelle: Neuer Wandrahm 4, 20457 Hamburg, www.htg-online.de Vorsitzender: MDir Reinhard Klingen,<br />

service@htg-online.de Geschäfts führung: Dipl.-Ing. oec. Michael Ströh, Tel. 040/428 47-52 66, michael.stroeh@htg-online.de<br />

Ansprechpartnerin: Bettina Blaume, Tel. 040/428 47-21 78, service@htg-online.de<br />

90 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Spende und werde ein Teil von uns.<br />

seenotretter.de<br />

Einsatzberichte, Fotos, Videos und<br />

Geschichten von der rauen See erleben:<br />

#teamseenotretter<br />

Spendenfinanziert


BG Buyer’s HS 21 Guide <strong>02</strong><br />

Buyer’s Guide<br />

Dreh scheibe von Herstellern, Dienst leis tern, Experten und Zulieferern<br />

Schiffahrts-Verlag »Hansa« GmbH & Co. KG<br />

Stadthausbrücke 4 | 20355 Hamburg | Postfach 10 57 23 | 20039 Hamburg<br />

Tel. +49 (0)40-70 70 80-225 | Fax -208 | anzeigen@hansa-online.de | www.hansa-online.de<br />

Ihre Ansprechpartner im Außendienst<br />

Deutschland, Schweiz und Österreich<br />

Verlagsbüro ID GmbH & Co.KG<br />

Tel. +49 (0) 511 61 65 95 - 0 | Fax - 55<br />

info@id-medienservice.de<br />

Niederlande<br />

Mark Meelker<br />

Tel. +31 71-8886708, M: 06 515 84086<br />

hansa@meelkermedia.nl<br />

Skandinavien, England, Portugal,<br />

Spanien, Frankreich<br />

Emannuela Castagnetti-Gillberg<br />

Tel. +33 619 371 987<br />

emannuela.hansainternational@gmail.com<br />

USA<br />

Detlef Fox<br />

Tel. +1 212 896 3881<br />

detleffox@comcast.net<br />

Rubriken<br />

1 Werften<br />

2 Antriebsanlagen<br />

3 Motorkomponenten<br />

4 Schiffsbetrieb<br />

5 Korrosionsschutz<br />

6 Schiffsausrüstung<br />

7 Hydraulik | Pneumatik<br />

8 Bordnetze<br />

9 Mess- | Regeltechnik<br />

10 Navigation | Kommunikation<br />

11 Konstruktion | Consulting<br />

12 Umschlagtechnik<br />

13 Container<br />

14 Hafenbau<br />

15 Finanzen<br />

16 Makler<br />

17 Reedereien<br />

18 Shipmanagement | Crewing<br />

19 Hardware | Software<br />

20 Spedition | Lagerei<br />

21 Versicherungen<br />

22 Wasserbau<br />

23 Seerecht<br />

24 Schiffsregister | Flaggen<br />

25 Dienstleistungen<br />

1<br />

WERFTEN<br />

YARDS<br />

Werftausrüstungen<br />

Shipyard Equipment<br />

+49 40 781 293 42<br />

www.kj-marinesystems.com<br />

steelwork@kj-marinesystems.com<br />

Repairs and Conversions<br />

2<br />

ANTRIEBSANLAGEN<br />

PROPULSION<br />

Motoren<br />

Engines<br />

Volvo Penta<br />

Central Europe GmbH<br />

Am Kielkanal 1 · 24106 Kiel<br />

Tel. (0431) 39 94 0 · Fax (0431) 39 67 74<br />

E-mail juergen.kuehn@volvo.com<br />

www.volvopenta.com<br />

Motoren für Schiffshauptantriebe, Generatoranlagen, Bugstrahlruder<br />

Kupplungen Bremsen<br />

Clutches Brakes<br />

Hochelastische Kupplungen<br />

für Schiffshaupt- und<br />

Schiffsnebenantriebe<br />

Hochelastische Kupplungen<br />

für Schiffshaupt- und<br />

Schiffsnebenantriebe<br />

CENTA Antriebe Kirschey GmbH<br />

Bergische Str. 7 | 42781 Haan/Deutschland<br />

Tel. +49-2129-912-0 | Fax +49-2129-2790 | info@centa.de<br />

CENTA Antriebe Kirschey GmbH<br />

www.centa.info<br />

Bergische Str. 7 | 42781 Haan/Deutschland<br />

Tel. +49-2129-912-0 | Fax +49-2129-2790 | info@centa.de<br />

Propeller<br />

Propellers<br />

www.centa.info<br />

SCHOTTEL GmbH<br />

Mainzer Str. 99<br />

56322 Spay/Rhein<br />

Tel.: + 49 (0) 26 28 / 6 10<br />

Fax: + 49 (0) 26 28 / 6 13 00<br />

info@schottel.de · www.schottel.deScrew<br />

YOUR PROPULSION EXPERTS<br />

www.hansa-online.de<br />

192 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Buyer’s BG HS Guide 21 <strong>02</strong><br />

Propeller<br />

Propellers<br />

3<br />

5<br />

Service und Reparatur<br />

Service and repair<br />

MOTORKOMPONENTEN<br />

ENGINE COMPONENTS<br />

Abgasreinigung<br />

Exhaust gas cleaning<br />

KORROSIONSSCHUTZ<br />

CORROSION PROTECTION<br />

Farben Beschichtungen<br />

Colours Coatings<br />

Technologie und Service<br />

für Motoren und Antriebe<br />

Aggregate<br />

Motoren<br />

Getriebe<br />

Dieselservice<br />

Reparaturen<br />

Kolben<br />

Anlasser<br />

Turbolader<br />

Filter<br />

Brenn stoff-<br />

August Storm GmbH & Co. KG<br />

August-Storm-Str. 6 | 48480 Spelle<br />

systeme T 05977 73246 | F 05977 73261<br />

Instandhaltung Indikatoren von Diesel-<br />

Pumpen<br />

und Gasmotorenwww.a-storm.com<br />

THE SCRUBBER MAKER<br />

Anstriche- und Beschichtungsstoffe<br />

Ihr Experte für die Binnenschifffahrt in Deutschland und Europa:<br />

Anstriche- und Beschichtungsstoffe<br />

Marc Cordes, Tel.: 040 / 72003-126,<br />

Ihr Ansprechpartner E-Mail: marc.cordes@akzonobel.com<br />

für die Schifffahrt:<br />

Carsten Most | Tel. 040/72003-120<br />

E-Mail: carsten.most@akzonobel.com<br />

Mechanische Bearbeitung<br />

und Fertigung<br />

Motoren- und<br />

Ersatzteile<br />

Volvo Penta<br />

Central Europe GmbH<br />

Hannover<br />

Spelle<br />

Speyer<br />

August Storm GmbH & Co. KG – August-Storm-Straße 6 – 48480 Spelle<br />

Telefon +49 5977 73-0 – Telefax +49 5977 73-138<br />

info@a-storm.com – www.a-storm.com<br />

Kiel<br />

Hamburg<br />

Delmenhorst<br />

Berlin<br />

Am Kielkanal 1 · 24106 Kiel<br />

Duisburg<br />

Tel. (0431) 39 94 0 · Fax (0431) 39 67 74<br />

E-mail juergen.kuehn@volvo.com<br />

Mannheim<br />

www.volvopenta.com<br />

Schwerin<br />

Leipzig<br />

Motoren für Schiffshauptantriebe, Generatoranlagen, Bugstrahlruder<br />

Tirol<br />

Otto Piening GmbH<br />

Am Altendeich 83 D-25348 Glückstadt<br />

Tel.: +49 (4124) 9168 - 0 Fax: +49 (4124) 3716<br />

E-Mail: info@piening-propeller.de<br />

www.piening-propeller.de<br />

specialist plant for propellers<br />

and stern gears<br />

Filter<br />

Filter<br />

Filtration Group GmbH<br />

Essener Bogen 21<br />

22419 Hamburg<br />

Telefon: + 49 7941 6466 - 720<br />

Fax: + 49 7941 6466 - 392<br />

Industrial<br />

Entölungs- und Entwässerungssysteme für die<br />

Schiffahrt, Offshore-Plattformen und die Industrie<br />

Email:<br />

separation@filtrationgroup.com<br />

Website:<br />

industrial.filtrationgroup.com<br />

Wellen Wellenanlagen<br />

#<br />

Shafts Shaft Systems Anstriche- und Beschichtungsstoffe<br />

Ihr Experte für die Binnenschifffahrt in Deutschland und Europa:<br />

Marc Cordes, Tel.: 040 / 72003-126,<br />

E-Mail: marc.cordes@akzonobel.com<br />

HIER<br />

könnte Ihre Anzeige stehen!<br />

6<br />

SCHIFFSTECHNIK | AUSRÜSTUNG<br />

SHIP TECHNOLOGY|EQUIPMENT<br />

Ballastwasser<br />

Ballast Water<br />

Logo margin right<br />

Logo margin bot<br />

Monatlich neu:<br />

Buyer’s Guide<br />

Wärmeübertragung, Separation und Fluid<br />

Handling: Die Mehrheit aller Schiffe weltweit<br />

hat Ausrüstungen von Alfa Laval an Bord.<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

93 2


BG Buyer’s HS 21 Guide <strong>02</strong><br />

Rohrleitungsbau und -systeme<br />

Piping construction and systems<br />

Kälte Klima Lüftung<br />

Refrigeration Climate Ventilation<br />

Tanks<br />

Tanks<br />

+49 40 781 293 41<br />

www.kj-marinesystems.com<br />

piping@kj-marinesystems.com<br />

Repairs, Conversions, New Builds<br />

+49 40 319 792 770<br />

www.kj-marinesystems.com<br />

hvacr@kj-marinesystems.com<br />

Repairs, Conversions, Services, Sales<br />

Brandschutz<br />

Fire protection<br />

Mess- Prüfgeräte<br />

Measuring Testing Technology<br />

7<br />

Pumps<br />

Hochpräzise Durchflussmessgeräte für<br />

Ship Performance Monitoring Systeme.<br />

Kraftstoffverbrauchs- und Zylinderschmierölmessung<br />

für Dieselmotoren.<br />

KRAL AG, 6890 Lustenau, Austria<br />

Tel.: +43 / 55 77 / 8 66 44 - 0, kral@kral.at, www.kral.at<br />

HYDRAULIK PNEUMATIK<br />

HYDRAULICS PNEUMATICS<br />

+49 40 781 293 44<br />

www.kj-fireoff.com<br />

fireprotection@kj-fireoff.com<br />

FIRE PROTECTION: WATER · GAS · FOAM<br />

New Builds, Conversions, Repairs, Sales<br />

Hansa_Buyers_Guide_v01_niha.indd 2 03.<strong>02</strong>.2016 10:08:40<br />

Sicherheitsausrüstung<br />

®<br />

Safety Equipment<br />

Pumpen<br />

Pumps<br />

Pumps<br />

Hochqualitative Schraubenspindelpumpen<br />

für Kraftstoffe.Hermetisch dichte Pumpen<br />

mit Magnetkupplung für MDO und HFO.<br />

Dichtungen<br />

Sealings<br />

KRAL AG, 6890 Lustenau, Austria<br />

Tel.: +43 / 55 77 / 8 66 44 - 0, kral@kral.at, www.kral.at<br />

• Customized silicone<br />

and TPE-profiles<br />

• Sealing profiles for<br />

windows and doors<br />

V.A.V. Group Oy<br />

Paneelitie 3<br />

91100 Ii, Finland<br />

Tel. +358 20 729 0380<br />

www.vav-group.com<br />

Wärmeübertragung<br />

Heat Transfer<br />

Hansa_Buyers_Guide_v01_niha.indd 6 03.<strong>02</strong>.2016 10:08:41<br />

Für jede Anwendung das richtige Pumpenprinzip<br />

www.netzsch.com<br />

www.hansa-online.de<br />

Wärmeübertragung, Separation und Fluid<br />

Handling: Die Mehrheit aller Schiffe weltweit<br />

hat Ausrüstungen von Alfa Laval an Bord.<br />

Monatlich neu:<br />

Buyer’s Guide<br />

394 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Buyer’s BG HS Guide 21 <strong>02</strong><br />

9<br />

11<br />

16<br />

MESS- REGELTECHNIK<br />

MEASURING CONTROL DEVICES<br />

Mobile Strömungsmessungen<br />

Mobile flow measurements<br />

Signature VM - Bootsgestützte<br />

Strömungsmessungen in Küstengewässern<br />

und Ästuaren. Komplettausstattung für<br />

zuverlässige Messungen.<br />

terra4 GmbH<br />

Am Töppersberg 17<br />

16348 Wandlitz<br />

+49 33397 649511 | wirtz@terra4.de | www.terra4.de<br />

KONSTRUKTION CONSULTING<br />

CONSTRUCTION CONSULTING<br />

• Technology Consulting<br />

(e.g. Ballast Water Treatment, LNG Bunker)<br />

• Policy-, Strategy-, Development-<br />

+ PR Consulting (incl. EU Affairs)<br />

• Industrial Expertise for Investors,<br />

Interim + Project Management<br />

contact us:<br />

info@mvb-euroconsult.eu<br />

phone +49-170-76713<strong>02</strong><br />

www.mvb-euroconsult.eu<br />

MAKLER<br />

SHIP BROKERS<br />

CC<br />

Continental Chartering<br />

SHIPBROKERS<br />

CONTINENTAL CHARTERING GMBH & CO. KG<br />

Stadthausbrücke 4 | 20355 Hamburg | Germany<br />

Tel + 49 (40) 32 33 70 70 | Fax + 49 (40) 32 33 70 79<br />

office@continental-chartering.de<br />

www.continental-chartering.de<br />

SignatureVM_small_57x30.indd 1 07.09.2<strong>02</strong>0 14:55 Ingenieurbüro<br />

Druckmessung<br />

Logo100,60,0,60Anzhansa_Layout 1 28.11.13 09:07<br />

Engineer’s office<br />

24<br />

Pressure measurement<br />

Füllstand. Grenzstand. Druck.<br />

Zuverlässig unter allen Einsatzbedingungen<br />

VEGA-Messtechnik überzeugt sowohl in Häfen oder Küstennähe,<br />

als auch unter extremen Umgebungsbedingungen auf<br />

See. Mit unserer jahrzehntelangen Erfahrung kennen wir die<br />

Anforderungen der Branche. Deshalb verfügen wir über alle<br />

wichtigen Zertifizierungen und stehen damit für Zuverlässigkeit<br />

und Sicherheit.<br />

VEGA Grieshaber KG | info.de@vega.com | www.vega.com<br />

Füllstandsmessgeräte<br />

Fill level measuring devices<br />

Füllstand. Grenzstand. Druck.<br />

Zuverlässig unter allen Einsatzbedingungen<br />

VEGA-Messtechnik überzeugt sowohl in Häfen oder Küstennähe,<br />

als auch unter extremen Umgebungsbedingungen auf<br />

See. Mit unserer jahrzehntelangen Erfahrung kennen wir die<br />

Anforderungen der Branche. Deshalb verfügen wir über alle<br />

wichtigen Zertifizierungen und stehen damit für Zuverlässigkeit<br />

und Sicherheit.<br />

VEGA Grieshaber KG | info.de@vega.com | www.vega.com<br />

SHIP DESIGN & CONSULT<br />

Naval architects<br />

Marine engineers<br />

info@shipdesign.de · www.shipdesign.de · Hamburg<br />

Design – Construction – Consultancy<br />

Stability calculation – Project management<br />

HIER<br />

könnte Ihre Anzeige stehen!<br />

DIENSTLEISTUNGEN<br />

SERVICES<br />

Seewetter<br />

Postfach 301190 – 20304 Hamburg<br />

Tel. +49 69 8062 6181<br />

E-Mail: seeschifffahrt@dwd.de<br />

Ihr BUYER’S GUIDE-Eintrag erscheint zusätzlich<br />

und ohne Mehrkosten auch auf hansa-online.de<br />

Format 1 57 mm x 30 mm € 99,–<br />

je Rubrik und Erscheinen<br />

Format 2 57 mm x 40 mm € 132,–<br />

je Rubrik und Erscheinen<br />

Für die Anzeigen im Buyer’s Guide gilt eine Mindestlaufzeit von 6 Monaten.<br />

HERO LANG<br />

Luftaufnahmen<br />

BREMERHAVEN<br />

Der FOTOSPEZIALIST<br />

für Luftaufnahmen aus allen Bereichen der Schifffahrt<br />

Dieselstr. 17 | 27574 Bremerhaven | Tel. 0471-31063<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

95 4


Termine<br />

Liebe Leserinnen und Leser, aufgrund der Corona-Pandemie sind viele Konferenzen, Messen und Seminare abgesagt oder<br />

verschoben worden. Die aufgeführten Termine sind bislang noch gültig. Weitere Absagen sind möglich, für aktuelle<br />

Informationen besuchen Sie bitte die Webseiten der Veranstalter.<br />

freight & trade events<br />

worldwide conferences | exhibitions | seminars for shipping commodities finance<br />

Marine + Offshore<br />

<strong>02</strong>.<strong>02</strong>.2<strong>02</strong>1 (online)<br />

Maritime Future Summit (<strong>HANSA</strong> und SMM)<br />

www.smm-hamburg.de<br />

<strong>02</strong>.-05.<strong>02</strong>.2<strong>02</strong>1 (online)<br />

SMM 2<strong>02</strong>1, www.smm-hamburg.com<br />

08.-09.03.2<strong>02</strong>1 (online)<br />

Seatrade Cruise Virtual<br />

www.seatradecruiseglobal.com<br />

10.-11.05.2<strong>02</strong>1 ROSTOCK<br />

Nationale Maritime Konferenz 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

www.bmwi.de<br />

11.-12.05.2<strong>02</strong>1 ROTTERDAM<br />

Envirotech for Shipping<br />

www.envirotechforum.com<br />

18.-20.05.2<strong>02</strong>1 CONSTANTA<br />

Europort Romania, www.europort.nl<br />

18.-20.05.2<strong>02</strong>1 GORINCHEM<br />

Maritime Industry<br />

www.maritime-industry.nl<br />

08.-09.06.2<strong>02</strong>1 MIAMI<br />

Cruise Ship Interiors Expo America<br />

www.cruiseshipinteriors-expo.com<br />

08.-10.06.2<strong>02</strong>1 HALIFAX<br />

H2O Conference<br />

www.hsocenference.ca<br />

08.-10.06.2<strong>02</strong>1 ROTTERDAM<br />

TOC Europe<br />

www.tocevents-europe.com<br />

15.-17.06.2<strong>02</strong>1 SOUTHAMPTON<br />

Seawork International<br />

www.maritimeprofessionals.net<br />

22.-24.06.2<strong>02</strong>1 AMSTERDAM<br />

Electric & Hybrid Marine World Expo 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

www.electricandhybridmarineworldexpo.com<br />

23.-24.06.2<strong>02</strong>1 AMSTERDAM<br />

Biobased Coatings Europe 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

www.wplgroup.com<br />

30.06.-<strong>02</strong>.07.2<strong>02</strong>1 BA RIA<br />

Inmex Vietnam<br />

www.maritimeshows.com<br />

16-19.08.2<strong>02</strong>1 HOUSTON<br />

OTC Offshore Technology Conference<br />

www.otcnet.org<br />

08.-10.09.2<strong>02</strong>1 HAMBURG<br />

Marine Interiors Cruise & Ferry<br />

www.marineinteriors-expo.com<br />

Shipping + Logistics<br />

16.<strong>02</strong>.2<strong>02</strong>1 (online)<br />

Wasserstoff: mit deutschen Häfen in die<br />

emissionsfreie Zukunft<br />

www.maritimes-cluster.de<br />

<strong>02</strong>.03+05.03.2<strong>02</strong>1 (online)<br />

Ports & Hinterland Europe 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

www.managementproducties.com<br />

<strong>02</strong>.-03.03.2<strong>02</strong>1 (online)<br />

3 rd GreenTech in Shipping Forum<br />

www.greentechshipping.com<br />

03.-04.03.2<strong>02</strong>1 GDYNIA<br />

Transport Week 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

www.transportweek.eu<br />

05.-07.03.2<strong>02</strong>1 TALLINN<br />

Tallinn Boat Show, www.meremess.ee<br />

23.-25.03.2<strong>02</strong>1 BILBAO<br />

World Maritime Week<br />

www.wmw.bilbaoexhibitioncentre.com<br />

15.-16.04.2<strong>02</strong>1 (online)<br />

Women in Shipping<br />

www.informaconnect.com<br />

20.04.2<strong>02</strong>1 ROTTERDAM<br />

39. Hafencongres Rotterdam<br />

www.managementproducties.com<br />

21.-22.04.2<strong>02</strong>1 ANTWERPEN<br />

Coastlink Conference<br />

www.coastlink.co.uk<br />

11.-12.05.2<strong>02</strong>1 ROTTERDAM<br />

24 th Ballast Water Management Conference<br />

www.wplgroup.com<br />

18.-20.05.2<strong>02</strong>1 BREMEN<br />

Breakbulk Europe<br />

www.europe.breakbulk.com<br />

20.-22.07.2<strong>02</strong>1 SCHANGHAI<br />

Intermodal Asia 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

www.intermodal-asia.com<br />

Commodities + Energy<br />

09.-10.03.2<strong>02</strong>1 (online)<br />

2 nd World Hydrogen Summit<br />

www.world-hydrogen-summit.com<br />

17.-18.03.2<strong>02</strong>1 PORTO<br />

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Energy Summit<br />

www.wplgroup.com<br />

25.-27.05.2<strong>02</strong>1 RAVENNA<br />

OMC Mediterranean Conference & Exhibition<br />

www.omc.it<br />

27.-28.05.2<strong>02</strong>1 LONDON<br />

9 th Annual Deep Sea Mining Summit<br />

www.deepsea-mining-summit.com<br />

07.-08.06.2<strong>02</strong>1 MADRID<br />

7 th International LNG Congress<br />

www.lngcongress.com<br />

08.-11.06.2<strong>02</strong>1 NANTES<br />

Seanergy 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

www.seanergy-forum.com<br />

WORLDWIDE SHIPYARDS 2<strong>02</strong>0 handbook<br />

Order your advert<br />

2<strong>02</strong>0<br />

www.EQUIP<br />

4<br />

SHIP.com<br />

www.SHIP<br />

2<br />

YARD.com<br />

Order online: ship2yard. com/<br />

ad<br />

96 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Impressum<br />

Inserentenverzeichnis | Index of Advertisers<br />

ABS Europe Division .................................................Titel<br />

Andritz Hydro GmbH ...................................................33<br />

Antti-Teollisuus Oy ......................................................20<br />

Aquametro Oil & Marine GmbH ......................................58<br />

AUMA Riester GmbH & Co. KG .......................................7<br />

BBC Chartering GmbH & Co. KG .....................................75<br />

BEN Buchele Elektromotorenwerke GmbH ..........................66<br />

brand MARINE CONSULTANTS GMBH ...........................39<br />

Chart Co. Ltd. ............................................................59<br />

Click Bond, Inc .........................................................U2.<br />

Clyde & Co (Deutschland) LLP ........................................69<br />

d-i davit international-hische GmbH .................................57<br />

DNV GL SE ................................................................3<br />

DGzRS .....................................................................91<br />

Emder Werft und Dock GmbH ........................................47<br />

FIL-TEC Rixen GmbH ..................................................62<br />

Fischer Abgastechnik GmbH & Co. KG ..............................45<br />

FOSEN YARD EMDEN GmbH ........................................67<br />

GROMEX GmbH .........................................................6<br />

Headway Technology Group (Qingdao) Co., Ltd. ...................51<br />

HEMPEL (Germany) GmbH ..........................................21<br />

INTERNATIONAL Farbenwerke GmbH. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .27<br />

Internationales Maritimes Museum Hamburg ......................81<br />

Jade Hochschule. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31<br />

JOTUN (Deutschland) GmbH .........................................70<br />

Kontor 17 Shipmanagement GmbH & Co. KG .......................19<br />

LINK 1. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .96<br />

MarineShaft A/S .........................................................49<br />

Maximilian Verlag GmbH & Co. KG .........................35, 77, U4<br />

Mecklenburger Metallguss GmbH MMG ............................64<br />

MercyShips ..............................................................U3<br />

MICRODATA DUE S.R.L. ..............................................41<br />

Podszuck GmbH .........................................................63<br />

propulsion engineering gmbh ..........................................68<br />

PureteQ A/S ..............................................................23<br />

RINA Germany GmbH .................................................25<br />

SAACKE GmbH .........................................................65<br />

Schaffran Propeller & Service GmbH .................................22<br />

Schiffahrts-Verlag »Hansa« GmbH & Co. KG ........................15<br />

Siemens Energy Global GmbH & Co KG .............................29<br />

TSI Turbo Service International .......................................48<br />

VDMA Verband Deutscher Maschinen- und Anlagenbau .........53<br />

Walter Hering KG. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .66<br />

WOMA GmbH ...........................................................34<br />

Das Anzeigenverzeichnis dient der Leserorientierung.<br />

Es ist kein Bestandteil des An zeigen auftrags. Der Verlag übernimmt keine Gewähr<br />

für Richtigkeit und Vollständigkeit.<br />

Herausgeber<br />

Prof. Peter Tamm †<br />

Geschäftsführung<br />

Peter Tamm, Thomas Bantle<br />

Redaktion<br />

Chefredakteur: Krischan Förster (KF)<br />

Tel. +49 (0)40-70 70 80-206 | k_foerster@hansa-online.de<br />

Stellv. Chefredakteur: Michael Meyer (MM)<br />

Tel. +49 (0)40-70 70 80-212 | m_meyer@hansa-online.de<br />

Redakteur: Felix Selzer (fs)<br />

Tel. +49 (0) 40-70 70 80-210 | f_selzer@hansa-online.de<br />

Redakteur: Thomas Wägener (TWG)<br />

Tel. +49 (0)40-70 70 80-209 | t_waegener@hansa-online.de<br />

Korrespondenten<br />

Schiffbau, Schiffsmaschinenbau, Schiffstechnik:<br />

Dr. Hans G. Payer, Dipl.-Ing. Michael vom Baur (MvB)<br />

Offshore: Anne-Katrin Wehrmann (aw)<br />

Märkte und Versicherungen: Michael Hollmann (mph)<br />

Director for Greater China: Dr.-Ing. Tao Jiang<br />

Asien: Patrick Lee<br />

Amerika: Barry Parker<br />

Großbritannien: Samantha Fisk<br />

Events<br />

Sabine Fahrenholz, Tel. +49 (0)40-70 70 80-211, Fax -214 | s_fahrenholz@hansa-online.de<br />

Layout<br />

Sylke Hasse, Tel. +49 (0)40-70 70 80-207 | s_hasse@hansa-online.de<br />

Verlag und Redaktion<br />

Schiffahrts-Verlag »Hansa« GmbH & Co. KG | Ein Unternehmen der TAMM MEDIA<br />

Stadthausbrücke 4, 20355 Hamburg | Postfach 10 57 23, 20039 Hamburg<br />

Tel.: +49 (0)40-70 70 80-<strong>02</strong>, Fax -214 | www.hansa-online.de<br />

Leitung Marketing und Anzeigen<br />

Markus Wenzel, Tel. +49 (0)40-70 70 80-312 | m_wenzel@hansa-online.de<br />

Anzeigenverwaltung<br />

Sandra Winter, Tel. +49 (0)40-70 70 80-225, Fax -208 | s_winter@hansa-online.de<br />

Verlagsvertretung für Deutschland<br />

Verlagsbüro ID GmbH & Co. KG | Tel. +49 (0) 511 61 65 95-0 | kontakt@verlagsbuero-id.de<br />

Australien: Michael Warneke, Permarinus – Maritime Consultancy Pty Ltd., Fremantle<br />

WA 6100 Australia, Mobile: +61 418 452 560, michael.warneke@permarinus.com.au<br />

GB, Frankreich, Spanien, Portugal, Skandinavien: Emanuela Castagnetti-Gillberg,<br />

Tel. +33 619 371 987, emanuela.hansainternational@gmail.com<br />

USA: Detlef Fox, D.A. Fox Advertising Sales Inc., 5 Penn Plaza, 19th Floor,<br />

NY 10001 New York, USA, detleffox@comcast.net<br />

Niederlande: Mark Meelker – Media, Telderskade 53, 2321 TR Leiden,<br />

Tel. +31 71-8886708, M: 06 515 84086, hansa@meelkermedia.nl<br />

Polen: LINK, Maciej Wedzinski, Wegornik 2/2, 72-004 Tanowo, Poland,<br />

Tel./Fax +48 91-462 34 14, acc@maritime.com.pl<br />

Abonnentenbetreuung/Vertrieb<br />

PressUp GmbH, Erste Agentur für Fachpresse-Vertrieb und -Marketing, Wandsbeker Allee 1,<br />

22041 Hamburg, Tel. +49 (0)40-38 66 66-318, Fax -299, hansa@pressup.de<br />

Betreuung Digital-Abos<br />

Markus Wenzel, Leiter Marketing Schiffahrts-Verlag »Hansa« GmbH & Co. KG,<br />

Tel. +49 (0)40-70 70 80-312 | m_wenzel@hansa-online.de<br />

Der Auftraggeber von Anzeigen trägt die volle Verantwortung für den Inhalt der Anzeigen.<br />

Der Verlag lehnt jede Haftung ab. Untersagt ist die Verwendung von Anzeigenausschnitten<br />

oder -inhaltsteilen für die Werbung.<br />

Alle Zuschriften sind an den genannten Verlag zu richten. Rücksendung unaufgefordert<br />

eingesandter Manuskripte erfolgt nur, wenn Rückporto beigefügt wurde. Alle Rechte, insbesondere<br />

das Recht der Vervielfältigung und Verbreitung sowie der Übersetzung, vorbehalten.<br />

Kein Teil der Zeitschrift darf in irgend einer Form (durch Fotokopie, Mikrofilm oder<br />

ein anderes Verfahren) ohne Genehmigung des Verlages reproduziert wer den. Namentlich<br />

gekennzeichnete Beiträge geben nicht unbedingt die Meinung der Redaktion wieder. Die<br />

Redaktion behält sich Änderungen an den Manuskripten vor.<br />

Die <strong>HANSA</strong> erscheint monatlich. Abonnementspreis Inland: jährlich EUR 192,00 inkl. Versandkosten<br />

und MwSt. Ausland: jährlich EUR 224,00 (EU ohne VAT-Nr.) inkl. Versandkosten.<br />

Einzelpreis: EUR 16,00 inkl. Versandkosten und MwSt. Versand per Luftpost innerhalb<br />

Europas und nach Übersee auf Anfrage. Abo PeP (Print + E-Paper): EUR 211,00 inkl. MwSt./<br />

Versand. Hansa+ EUR 252,00. Auslandbezug (EU): EUR 284,00. Studenten, Azubis: Print/<br />

PeP EUR 111,00, Hansa+ EUR 141,00. Für Mehrfachabos werden ab 100 Abos (unter einer<br />

Lieferanschrift) 25% Rabatt gewährt. Ab 250 Abos beträgt der Rabatt 50%. Mitglieder der<br />

HTG erhalten die Zeitschrift im Rahmen ihrer Mitgliedschaft. Der Abonnementspreis ist im<br />

Voraus fällig und zahlbar innerhalb 14 Tagen nach Rech nungs eingang. Abonnementskündigungen<br />

sind nur mit einer Frist von sechs Wochen zum Ende der Bezugszeit schriftlich beim<br />

Verlag möglich. – Anzeigenpreisliste Nr. 63 – Höhere Gewalt entbindet den Verlag von jeder<br />

Lieferverpflichtung. Erfüllungsort und Gerichtsstand ist Hamburg.<br />

Druck: Lehmann Offsetdruck GmbH, Norderstedt<br />

Für die Übernahme von Artikeln in Ihren internen elektronischen<br />

Pressespiegel erhalten Sie die erforderlichen<br />

Rechte unter www.presse-monitor.de oder telefonisch<br />

unter 030 284930 bei der PMG Presse-Monitor GmbH<br />

dnv<br />

Die <strong>HANSA</strong> ist Organ für:<br />

Verband für Schiffbau und Meerestechnik Schiffbautechnische e. V. (VSM) | AG Schiffbau-/<br />

Gesellschaft<br />

Offshore-Zulieferindustrie (VDMA) | e.V.<br />

Schiffbautechnische Gesellschaft e. V. (STG) |<br />

DNV GL | Normenstelle Schiffs- und Meerestechnik (NSMT) im DIN | Deutsches<br />

Komitee für Meeresforschung und Meerestechnik e. V. | Seeverkehrsbeirat des Bundesministers<br />

für Verkehr | IMO-Berichterstattung 18. - 20. November 2009 (Bundesverkehrs ministerium,<br />

104. Hauptversammlung in Berlin<br />

Abt. Seeverkehr) | Deutscher Nautischer Verein (DNV) | Deutsche Gesellschaft für<br />

Annual<br />

Ortung und Navigation (DGON) |<br />

General Meeting at Berlin<br />

Schutzverein Deutscher Rheder V. a. G. | Hafentech<br />

nische Gesellschaft e. V. (HTG) | The World Association for Waterborne Trans-<br />

18th – 20th November 2009<br />

port Infrastructure (PIANC) | Zentralverband der deutschen Seehafenbetriebe e. V.<br />

(ZDS) | Berufsbildungsstelle Seeschiffahrt | Deutscher Hochseefischerei-Verband e.V. |<br />

Deutsche Gesellschaft zur Rettung Schiffbrüchiger (DGzRS)<br />

<strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1<br />

97


Letzte Seite<br />

© IMMH<br />

Partikuliere – Nomaden auf dem Wasser<br />

Die Partikuliere sind Europas letzte<br />

Nomaden. In Deutschland sind<br />

heute noch gut 800 von Ihnen auf insgesamt<br />

7.000 km Binnenwasserstraße unterwegs.<br />

Aber was genau ist ein Partikulier?<br />

Ein Partikulier ist ein selbstständig tätiger<br />

Binnenschiffer ohne eine eigene<br />

landseitige Frachtzuführungsorganisation.<br />

Er besitzt maximal drei eigene<br />

Schiffe, von denen er eines selber fährt.<br />

Von einem Reeder unterscheidet sich<br />

der Partikulier darin, dass er nur seine<br />

eigenen Schiffe für den Gütertransport<br />

einsetzt.<br />

In alter Zeit erfolgte die Auftragsvergabe<br />

in den Häfen an sogenannten<br />

Schifferbörsen. Dort trafen zu festgelegten<br />

Zeiten die Schiffer und ihre Kunden<br />

zusammen. Mit der industriellen Revolution<br />

wuchs das Transportgeschäft<br />

stark an, sodass zunehmend kapitalkräftige<br />

Reedereien gegründet wurden,<br />

die mit ihren Flotten feste Verträge mit<br />

Kunden abschlossen. In dieser Zeit teilte<br />

sich das Transportgeschäft auf den<br />

Binnenwasserstraßen zwischen Reedereien<br />

und Partikulieren auf.<br />

Um sich gegen die Reedereien behaupten<br />

zu können, schlossen sich die Binnenschiffer<br />

zu Genossenschaften zusammen.<br />

Und das ist bis heute im Wesentlichen so<br />

geblieben. Die Transportkontrakte werden<br />

zu einem großen Teil mit einer der<br />

Genossenschaften geschlossen, welche<br />

die Reisen dann an die Schiffseigner vergeben.<br />

In einer der größten dieser Genossenschaften,<br />

der Deutschen Transport-Genossenschaft<br />

Binnenschifffahrt<br />

(DTG), haben sich heute in Deutschland<br />

rund 100 selbstständige Schiffseigentümer<br />

zusammengeschlossen. Viele Partikuliere<br />

sind aber auch direkt als Subunternehmer<br />

für eine Reederei tätig.<br />

Partikuliere betreiben ihr Geschäft oftmals<br />

bereits seit Generationen im Familienbetrieb.<br />

Lebensmittelpunkt der Familie<br />

ist das Schiff, auf dem sie an über<br />

300 Tagen im Jahr Ladung fahren und<br />

praktisch das Leben von Nomaden auf<br />

der Binnenwasserstraße führen.<br />

An Bord befindet sich die komplette<br />

Wohnung einer Familie mit Badezimmer,<br />

Küche, Wohn-, Schlaf- und Kinderzimmer.<br />

Auch wird ein Zimmer für einen<br />

Lehrling oder Angestellten vorgehalten.<br />

Sind kleine Kinder in der Familie, gibt es<br />

sogar einen, durch einen Zaun gesicherten,<br />

kleinen Kinderspielplatz an Deck.<br />

Schulpflichtige Kinder gehen auf Internate<br />

und reisen nur in den Ferien oder vereinzelt<br />

an Wochenenden mit auf dem Schiff.<br />

Fuhren auf deutschen Binnengewässern<br />

in den 1970er Jahren noch über<br />

3.000 Schiffer auf eigenen Fahrzeugen, so<br />

waren es um 1980 nur noch 1.800, von denen<br />

sogar nur noch 200 als komplett unabhängige<br />

Unternehmer tätig waren. Bis<br />

Mitte der 1990er Jahre war ihre Gesamtzahl<br />

bereits auf rund 1.000 Partikuliere<br />

gesunken. Die meisten von ihnen sind<br />

komplett an große Reedereien oder Genossenschaften<br />

gebunden. Ein weiteres Problem<br />

für das Gewerbe ist, dass den aktiven<br />

Partikulieren heute zunehmend der Nachwuchs<br />

fehlt, denn die Söhne oder Töchter<br />

der Binnenschiffer gehen vermehrt lieber<br />

Berufen an Land nach, anstatt das mühsame<br />

und krisenanfällige Geschäft der Eltern<br />

zu übernehmen.<br />

Autor: Gerrit Menzel, Internationales<br />

Maritimes Museum Hamburg<br />

Wäsche zum Trocknen aufgehängt,<br />

das Auto auf dem Dach, daneben ein Kinderlaufstall.<br />

Das typische Partikulierschiff ist nicht nur<br />

Arbeitsplatz, sondern auch Wohnung:<br />

für die Eignerfamilie hinten, für einen Angestellten<br />

im vorderen Teil<br />

Modellbauer: Gisbert Narozny Senior;<br />

Standort: Internationales Maritimes Museum<br />

Hamburg<br />

98 <strong>HANSA</strong> – International Maritime Journal <strong>02</strong> | 2<strong>02</strong>1


Komm an Bord!<br />

SCHENK NEUES LEBEN


DIE DEUTSCHE<br />

KÜHLSCHIFFFAHRT<br />

GERMAN REEFER SHIPPING<br />

Geschichte, Reedereien und Schiffe<br />

NEU!<br />

400 Seiten • zweisprachig Deutsch/Englisch<br />

über 200 Zeichnungen • mehr als 50 teilweise unveröffentlichte Fotos und Gemäldereproduktionen<br />

" (D) 29,95 I " (A) 30,70 I SFr* 35,90 • ISBN 978-3-7822-1380-6<br />

" (D) 23,99 • eISBN: 978-3-7822-1487-2<br />

Jetzt bestellen auf koehler-mittler-shop.de, direkt im Buchhandel<br />

oder telefonisch unter 040/70 70 80 322<br />

koehler-books.de

Hurra! Ihre Datei wurde hochgeladen und ist bereit für die Veröffentlichung.

Erfolgreich gespeichert!

Leider ist etwas schief gelaufen!