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20 - Red Bank Register Archive

20 - Red Bank Register Archive

20 - Red Bank Register

BANK REGISTER .fOLUME LII, NO. 21. liinid Wnklr. Ent«r»d u BM«I4-0UU Hltto M tb* P«t- offlct at pad Buk.il. 1. anlw tb* Art oj U*nti ». 1810. EED BANK, N. J., WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 20, 1929. RADIO RESEARCH WORK. A LABORATORY BOON TO BE' . BUILT NEAR HOLMDEL. Bzperluenfa to be Mado on Three large Farms Which the Bell Tele- phone Company Recently Bought on Longatreet Road and Mug Lane The Bell telephone company will have a. radio receiving station on property near Holmdel which It has bought. Six weeks ago the 'Roberts farm on Lbngatroet road and the ad- joining two Herbert farms were sold. The sale was mado to William B. Wallace of Upper Montclalr, but the real purchaser was tho Bell telephone company and the company now holds the deeds for all three places. As told In The Register at the time Mr. Wallace bought the farms for the . telephone company, there is a total Of 437 acres. The price was $80,1300. The tract will be used by research engineers of tho Bell company lab- oratories for an experimental radio receiving station. It will be In charge of H. T. Frlls and C. R, Englund. Mr. Frlls states that a thorough studio of radio antennas will be made and an open Bpaee of about 2,000 feet in diameter will be needed for each group of antennas. For that reason the level land on the three farms Is especially desirable. A building -with a floor space of about 6,000 square feet will be con- structed for a laboratory. "Knowing as we do the pride which our neigh- bors take In their estates," said Mr. Frlls, "Mr. Englund and I are happy to assure them that we plan nothing which will mar the appearance of tho countryside. No manufacturing will be carried on Tho men at the lab- oratory will be largely engineers and research men. "We will repair tho old split-chest- nut fence around tho property, which will give sufficient protection for our needs. Tho fields will bo mowed regularly and the whole place will be kept neat and attractive. About fifteen mon will form our Initial staff. They, with their fam- ilies, will live at Red Bank and com trlbuto to the proporty of this Bee- lion." The research work Is expected to be of great Importance In trans- atlantic radio telephoning. Experts In this work state that transatlantic antennas niusf be highly directive; that Is they must respond, strongly to signals from a particular direction and be as little sensitive as possible to signals from other directions. The method of test Is to set up an antenna and then go around It with a portable transmitter, measuring the response at various angles to the antenna. Facts gathered at tho Cllff- wobd laboratory have been used in designing the transatlantic antennaB at Netcong, which are In regular use now for telephone calls between Amorlca and Europe. Another problem whloh tho Bell en» glneers will attack In their new lab- oratory is that of static. The engin- eers hope that acquiring knowledgo of whero static comes from and whBn and why may help to eliminate It The program calls for recording of static sounds on an Instrument which runs continuously. Its antonna Is mounted on a turntable about sixty feet long, which rotates slowly. Marks on the record show the direction to which the antenna waa pointed for ' each "static" Impulse, and so a good Idea Is obtained of the direction and Intensity of each disturbance. A study of short wave radio conditions Is planned. Asked 'about what effect tho lab- oratory work would have upon the re ceptlon of radio programs In private homes, Mr. Frlls said there would be no effect at all. the work of the laboratory will deal primarily with receiving programs. What few ex- perimental transmitters thero will bo In the laboratory will be operated at low power and at wave lengths much shorter than tho broadcasting range. NEW SHOWROOM OPENED FDBUO INSPECTION OF H. ZOBEL'S NEW BUILDING. Structure at Broad Street and Hard Ing Koad is Ono of Finest Aw mobile Showrooms in State—Man; Congratulate the Owner. Ono of Now Jersey's largest an most attractive automobile show rooms was the center of attraclo. Saturday afternoon and evenim when Henry L. Zobel's now butldln, at the corner of Broad street an Harding road wifs opened for publ! Inspection. Mr. Zobel end his bus; ness associates were showered wltr congratulations in person, by .letter telegrams, telephone calls and b; scores of floral tributes. Mr. Zobel's friends are loud their praises of the magnlScen building which he has erected in Re Bank's fast growing commercial cen ter. The building, erected from plan prepared by Vincent J. Eck of Re Bank, Is the last word In an autorni bile showroom, service departmen and offices. It Is far ahead of an; building of Its kind In this sectlo and It sets a fast pace for othei buildings to be erected In this vicln ity. A feature of Saturday afternoon' calling hours was tho visitation in body of tho Monmouth county ant mobile dealers' association, of whic Mr. Zobel Is a prominent membc: Tho county automobile dealers show- ered congratulations upon Mr. Zobi and in their deep esteem for him am his endeavors said it In flowers b; leaving a huge basket of fall bloom Tho show room was a verltabl flower garden. These boskets am vases of flowers were arranged foi effect between tho large display o the late model Buick cars, which 1 the car to bo-featured by Mr. Zobel in hia new building. Tha now showroom and sales de partrnent will be In charge of Leo: B. Browcr of Red Bank, who has been associated with Mr. Zobel man; years. Mr. Brower will have Misi Dorothy Mullancy as his secretary Miss Mullanoy has been In Mr. Zo- bel's Red Bank office several yean and is entirely familiar with tho sec- retarial duties required of her. Although Saturday afternoon anc evening were set apart by Mr. Zobe' for public Inspection Mr. Zobel want it known, that any person Is at liber- ty to visit his now building at any time, and Mr. Browor or any of hia assistants will bo glad to receivi thorn and show thorn through. ANNUAL CHARITY BALL. Policemen Bock From Vacations, John Stoyo and Sprig B. Williams of the police department returned to their, duties Saturday after having two weeks' vacation. Mr. and Mrs. Williams made an automlblo trip to Richmond, Virginia. Patrolmen Ben- jamin Cook of Oakland street and Joseph Shoedy of Shrewsbury ave- nue are now having their vacations. Big Thanksgiving Dinner at Five Corners' tea room on main road at Lincroft, Why bother pre- paring your Thanksgiving dinner when you can enjoy a good old-fash- ioned home-cooked meal with us for $1.60? We specialize In broiled chiek- on and steak dinners and tasty club and chicken sandwiches. Catering to banquets and all social affairs. Bridge partios invited, tables and cards furnished. Charles F. Couch, proprietor, telephone Rod Bank 2826. —Advertisement • . «-.-* . Magistrate's' Court for Monmouth county. All com' plaints promptly Investigated. Bad accounts and checks collected. Day and night service. Justice Elmer C. Walnrlght, 4 Patterson avenue (jnear Broad street), Shrewsbury, N. J.. tele- phone 4. At B4 Broad street Ited Bonk, by appointment only.—Adver- tisement *i fc 1 The Easy Way to- do your ChrlBtmas shopping In comfort: Visit new storo In town, Japanese shop. They have charm- Ing, moderately priced little gifts, Oriental novelties and gifts for homes. You are cordially Invited for Inspection. 62 Monmouth street., op- posite Borough Hall.—Advertisement BED BANK ELKS TO HOLD AF- FAIR DECEMBKK 4TH. It Will be Held lit the Berkeley-Car- teret Hotel at Asbury Park—Entire Proceeds Will bo Used In Charity Work. Indications are that the sixth an nual charity ball of the Red Bank lodge of Elks to be'held at tho Berk- oley-Carteret hotel at Asbury Park Wednesday evening, December 4th, will be largely attended. ThiB will be the third year that the affair has been held In the crystal ballroom of tho Berkeley-Carteret, which will bo especially decorated for tho occasion Muslo will be provided by Hackett's ton-piece orchestra. All of the pro- ceeds will be devoted to the charit- able work of tho lodge. Tho affair Is Informal and is open to tho public. In previous years It has been attended by persons from all partB of Monmouth county and from other parts of tho state. It Is In charge pf the entertainment com- mlttoe of tho lodge, which ik com- posed of Fred S. Hayes, Charles Mount, Arthur Mlckons, Charles Schneider, Thomas Hackett, Tony Hunting, Leo Green, Walter A. Kraft and Elmer Dey. The Mooso Ball. Tho masquerade ball to bo held by the Rod Sank lodgo of Moose will take place on Wodnesday, December 11th, in the Mooso home at Pearl and Wall streets. Valuable prizes will be awarded for tho best costumes, tho first lady's prize being a diamond ring and the first man's prize a gold watch. Your Favorite Photograph of any person, or a view of your home, will be reproduced on a Christ- mas card, In various designs. Art Kraft Shoppe, Rod Bank-—Adver- tisement «^*-^ . Dpholst«ry Cleaned. ;We dry clean upholstery In your enr as well au your upholstered furnl- turofeLcon's, 70 White street phone 1545. —Advertisement i . Largo assortment of tally, place nncl score cardB. Studio Art Shoppo, 44 Monmouth street, Bed Bank.—Ad- vertisement • Typewriter Headquarters. Typewriters rented, bought and BoliL Trubln's. 88 Broad street Red Bank,—Advertisement, Reward. Ono hundred dollars reward will be paid by tho Board of Education of Holmdel for' the arrest and con- viction of tho person or persons do- ing damage to the school property of Holmdel township. Board of Education of Holmdol, A. L. McCleos, Clork. —Advertisement. , ^ i ^ • Justice of the Peace. Criminal and civil cases given prompt and careful attention. Olltco open from 7:00 A. M. until 0:00 P. M. daily except Sunday. Gilbert M. Keith. 2 Wallace street. Bed Bank, next to Western Union.—Advertise- ment Hard to Do Things. Somo things are hard to do if you so at them in a hard way. An easy way to do them is to advertise them lii Tho Register's Want Department By using Luko Longhead's columns you can find tenants, sell proporty, secure help, get a job and do lots of othor things that might bo hard If dono In some other way.—Advertise- ment Marcel Wave SO Cents. Given by expert lady attendants. By malo attendant $1.00. Phone 2024 for an appointment today? Mon- mouth Beauty Parlor and Barber Shop. 1C0 Monmouth street, Red Bank, N. J.—Advertisement Visiting; Chiropodist Dr. Frances Cooko Casler will innlto appointments by telephone to como to you when needed. Telephone Eatontown 427 between 8:00 P. M. and 10:00 P. M.—Advertisement Dance Every Night at tho San Remo, Ocean • avenue, West End. MUBIC by Schury's orches- tra. Reserve your tables for New Years eve.—Advertisement. Moth-Proof Bugs Free given to those having their summer _ garments dry-cleaned. Leon's, .70 I White street—Advertisement^ ; IfTBEMEN'S ANNIVERSARY. Independent Company Raising; Money For Celebration Next Year. Members of Independent fire com- pany of Red Bank are selling tickets for the Bhows at the Carlton theater today, tomorrow and Friday to raise funds for. their fiftieth anniversary celebration, which will be held next year. A hot roast-beef supper will be held at the flrohouse on Mechanic street Thursday night, December Sth. "The Mysterious Dr. Fu Manchu" will be shown at the Carlton today and "Why Leave Homo" will be tho picture tomorrow and Friday. The firemen disposed of most of their tickets Saturday from Independent flro truck, which was parked on Broad street. Morris Holmstedt is chairman of the committee and his assistants are Max Welsman, Frank Dlckman, Louis Hartman, Harry Klatsky, Anthony Bublln and James HIggins. Mrs. Fred blsen of Sprlngr street Is chairman of the committee of women who will help the firemen with the roast-beef supper. ROAD CHANGE OPPOSED. DOGS AND LADIES FIGHT. DOUBLB BATTLE ON A STREET \T NAVESINK. The Ladles Fought Half an Hour and After They Were Separated They Hod Each Other Arrested— Both of Them Fined. Simultaneously In the Hillside sec- tion of Navesink two battles tqok place last Wednesday afternoon. The combatants In ono fray were two In- furiated dogs. Tho combatants in the other fight were two Infuriated ladles. So much dust was raised by tho double battle that the specta- tors were able to glimpse It only at times. When the smoke of battle cleared away considerable carnage was revealed. Both dogs were badly bitten and mauled. One lady had a swollen eye and both ladles had scratches, bruises and cuts, to say nothing of aching scalps duo to hand- fuls of hair having been pulled out. The ladles are Mrs. Josephine Scott and Mrs. Catherine Peters. The dogs gof their battle started first. One dog was owned by Mrs. Scott and ono was owned by a friend of Mrs. Peters. The animals raised a great hullabaloo by growling, snarling and whining, and,in a short time a crowd gathered. Mrs. Scott and Mrs. Pe- ters arrived at the scene simultane- ously. Both tried to stop the dog fight but they used different meth- ods. Mrs. Peters tried to beat off Mrs. Scott's dog and Mrs. Scott tried to beat off the othor dog. An argument ensued. Each lady blamed the other for hitting at a dog. Words led to blows and soon the ladles were fighting each other with as much earnestness aa the dogs were fighting each other. The double battle raged half an hour. Each woman made a dead set at the other woman's hair and there was more hair pulling than there was any other kind of fighting. The la- dies • expressed derogatory opinions ibout each other as tney fought The fortunes of battle varied, first nc woman and then the other seem- ingly having theobetter of the fray. At length the fight developed Into a sort of a wrestling match. The wom- rolled over and ground, pounding each pulling each other's hair over on the other and as they did 10. At length their rolling: stopped and Mrs. Scott was on top. She got fresh and deathlike grip on her opponent's hair and pulled' and pulled with all her might, her faco " elng contorted with effort as she did so. Just at that moment, when the battle seemed won for Mrs. Scott, tho ther lady worked ono hand loose and struck out with an uppercut The blow caught Mrs. Scott flush in he eye and disconcerted her to such an extent-that Mrs. Peters regained her feet Tho fighting was resumed. At the end of half an hour of light- ing the neighbors intervened. They itoppcd the ladies from lighting and ;hey stopped the dogs from fighting. Then tho ladies had each other ar- ested. Mrs. Scott was haled before uatlco Louis H. Mecse of Belford. >he was lined $25 and she was held In a bond of $500 to keep the peace. Her mother went on her bond. Mrs. Peters had her hearing last hursday night before Justice Elmer C. Wainright. Sho was fined the costs f the hearing, amounting to $7.60. Monster Card Party .nd llvo turkey raffle at St. Agnes's uditorlum, Atlantic Highlands, Frl- ay evening, November 22, 1929, ben- flt St. Mary'o, Now Monmouth, and It. Agnes, Atlantic Highlands. Card ;ames start 8:15 sharp. Door prize, efreshments served. A big night.— .dvortlscmcnt. Now Jersey Grocery Co. iro glvinff Wear Ever aluminum iremiums with your.purchases. Buy no best Pure Food groceries and veg- itablcs at this popular Whito Rosa itore. George J. Mack, man&ger, 114 tfonmouth street, Red Bank.—Ad- crtlsement. Every Wednesday Night Victor night' at Tusting's, Mon- louth street near Broad street tadlos, rolls, orthophontc vlctrolas, ecordB and pre-omlnont makes of ' " ' " " ' Bring tho SENATOR-ELECT STERNER SO PLAN CONFERENCE, At Regional Meeting of Lions Clubs 'He Stated He Would Do Hia Ut- most to Prevent Change of Loca- tion of Bayshoro Boulevard. A regional meeting of Lions clubs was held last Wednesday night" at the hog Cabin Inn on the shore road between Atlantic Highlands and Highlands. Senator-olect E. Donald Sterner, who was a guest of honor, announced that he would plan a con- ference with the state highway com- mission at which a representative of each of the nine Lions clubs at tho regional meeting will be Invited to at- tend, In an effort to bring about the building of the proposed bayshoro route, along the bayshore front as originally planned. Mr. Sterner as- sured the members he would do his utmost to have the road built along the shore front and not inland. At the meeting It was reported that a movement was under way change the route and the Lions club; passed a resolution to oppose any a 1 tempt to change tho original plan. About WO persons attended th meeting. Jonas Turncn of Asburj Park was toastmaster. Clubs repre- sented were Atlantic Highlands, High lands, Rumson, Red Bank, Keans- burgf, Union Beach, Long Branch an< Asbury. Park. Earlo S. Snyder read the followln lettor, which will be sent to tho stati highway commission: "It has como to the attention o: tho Lions Club of Atlantic Highland: members, severally and jointly, tha the State Highway commission plan: a serious deviation from the courS' •which we and the people of the short deem proper for Ocean boulevard a: it was originally planned and foi which civil legislation was passed. "It la our understanding that yo have recently contemplated a changi from the original plan to keep tin boulevard close to the bay shore an by your change of plans have shunt- ed the desired route to one leading through the backwoods, 6r so fa: from the shore front as to make ab- •gurdJJle title of Ocean boulevard. Il is our firm understanding and belie that, when tho legislation for an ocean b&ulevard waa passed, it wa intended that the road should sta.v close to the shore and, to this end, we should like to see it come through Keyport, as close to the water as pos sible, to Keansburg and thence along the Bhorefront, on a parallel noi further south than what is now known as the Port Monmouth road to Collins Point at Belford or Por-1 Monmouth, thence following close to tho bay shore across the small strip ot meadow lowland, either by bridg- ing or bulkheadlng-, coming int< Leonardo to connect with any road: therein at a point not farther south than Center avenua after leaving: thi meadow and thence through Leonar- do, entering Atlantic Highlands at a point not farther south than Center' avenue, thence by a route aa direct as posslblo through Atlantic High lands, to connect with what Is known as Ocean boulevard, Atlantic High lands, a point only one block fron- the water front, already famed as tho start of the Ocean boulevard from Atlantic Highlands to Cape May, and country-wide famed for its scenic beauty. "We wish to go on record as a civic body of Atlantio Highlands strictly opposed to any deviation from the originally contemplated Bhore boule- vard, believing that any such devla- ton, while possibly a saving in cost to the Highway Commission, is an absolute injustice to not' only the shore section but to the entire state of New Jersey, who would justly take pride In what will undoubtedly become famous as ono of the most delightful shore boulevards to bo found anywhere in tho country." CHURCH FIFTY YEARS OLD New Auto Dealers. George H. Roberts Co., which re- cently bought the property at the cor- ner of Maple avenue and Gold street, has taken possession of the placo and tho attractive automobile showroom has been refitted and made ready to receive the late models of the Graham-Palgn automobile. The Rob- erts Company has been mado local distributor of the Graham-Palgo lino and their new dealer announcement appears in this issue. prleht and grand pianos, amily tonleht- Advertiselenient Turkeys For Sole. Very flno blrd3 for Thanksgiving ir breeding; alivo or dead. Mrs. R. ".. Loo Morgan, Marlboro, N. J., hone Freehold 532-F-12.—Advertise- ent New Modern Press tot only presses your suit but shapes L to fit tho individual. Leon'a, 70 hlto street phone 1545, Red Bank. —Advertisement , or any Fuel OH burner; best grades and irlces." Unexcelled ,«prvlce. Fred D. /Ikott Co., Rod BjnkJ*. phone 552.— idvortlBcment'_ _^ Porter Bros., Tree Experts. Spraying, pruning, cavity filling, nd clearing. Phono Rurooon 323.— dvertlBement Business Opportunity. Twenty-six car capacity garage; es- tablished battery business completely equipped; living- Quarters on«socond loor; six rooms nnd bath, hot water ieat for entire bulldlnc: lot 75x125. Excellent opportunity for responsible party. Inquire A. C. Roes, postofllco building, Matawan, N. J.—Advertise- ment _ ^ Hair Mattresses remade and upholstering dono. We are specialists in the above lines. Prices reasonable. Workmanship guaranteed. Edward M. Miller & Company, Oceanport avenue, phone Long Branch 3820.—Advertisement. . • ^ »-«» — Taxidermist Havo your specimpn birds, hcada, small animals mounted by a taxi- dermist of 41 years' experience, who knows how to mount. August Schaeffer, taxidermist, Eatontown, across from old Monmouth Park race track.—Advertisement. C-Drlve-It Rent a car—drive It yourself. Hud- eon, Essex and other cars. You pay by tho mile. Tho Long Branch u- Drlvo, 850 Broadway, next" to City Hall, phone Long Branch 327.—Ad- vertlaement _ _ Top Soil, FIU Dirt. grading of all klndo. also roadways built; Lakewood sand, washed gra- vel, slog, cinders, bluo stone. Prices reasonable. Howard G. Rosevelt phono 1585, Red Bank.—Advertise- ment Tracton: McCorralcIc, Doorlng, Farmall, Wallls and Bolden's. Also several used Fordoona. S. P. Cono- vcr & BrO;. sales and service, Wlckn- tunk, N. J Phone Holmdel 0.—Ad- vertisement, Christmas Cards. Order now when you havo a great- er variety to select from. A lino lino Pianos and Service le best Dlrhnn's Piano Shop,,-. .....>.., .„ .cu num. n nn> unc lummond place, Red Bank, phoofl at all prices at Tho Register office.— AdvflrtifiQment. : Advertisement. GOLDEN JUBILEE CEXEBItATIO: TO BE HELD AT EVEBETT. St. Catherine's Catholic Church Wa: Dedicated on November 25th, 187! —Monslgnor Peter J. Fetrl of At lantio City to Preach. St. Catherine's Catholic church Everett' will have a golden Jublle next Monday in celebration of the fl: tleth anniversary of the church which was dedicated by tbe late Blsh op Corrlgan of the Newark dlocesi on November 25th, 1879. Tho postoi Rev. Francis J. Sullivan, formerly o the Blessed Sacrament parish a 1 Trenton, will celebrate a solemn hig] mass at eleven o'clock and Monslgno: Peter J. Petrl, pastor of Our Lad. Star of the Sea Catholic church o: Atlantic City, will deliver tho sermon Father Sullivan will be assisted I: tho mass by Rev. Martin F. CaBe; of Trenton as deacon and Rev. Fran els 3. McCallion of Pleasantvllle a sub-deacon. Fifteen other priests wl! be present in the sanctuary. Benediction, of tho Blessed Sacra- ment will be observed and the sing- ing and music will be provided the choir of Georgian Court collogi at Lakewood, which will be unde, the leadership of Sister Mary Bea- trice, professor of music at the col- lege. A dinner for the visiting clergy will be served Monday afternoon a the House of the Good Shepherd con- vent at Bradevelt, formerly the Rob ert J. Collier residence. Next Sun day will bo general communion day and mass will be celebrated by Fath er Sullivan at nlno o'clock. Mass wil be said at six o'clock Tuesday morn ln£ for the dead of the parish. The Everett church recently under- went complete renovations In prepar- ation for the jubilee at a cost $6,000. The Interior wa3 refinished and was furnished with new statues new stations of the cross and new altar fixtures. Including a set , o candlelabra. Electric lights were in- stalled. New vestments for tho rec- tor and a new set of altar linens, in- cluding a handmade altar cover, wore donated by the parishioners. The al tar cover was made by sisters of thi House of the Good Shepherd. Mos of the new furnishings will be used Monday for the first time. A set vestments, which has been secured for the occasion by ono of the Good Shepherd sisters, is valued at $1,000. The altar and church will bo decor- ated with large white and golden yel- low chrysanthemums. Rev. Walter T. Leahy, pastor of the Catholic church at Deal Beach, has written a story,of the church's his- tory, which will ba put In booklet form and distributed after the jubi- lee. A description of the celebration will bo included In, tho booklet .A. printeed list of all those who helped pay for the renovations to the church and donated its new fixtures will al- so bo distributed. In the early days when ona priest served the district from Sanfly Hooks •veil up In the northern part of trk state, the Everett Catholics walked to Red Bank to hear mass four or five time a year. The first priest to say mass at Everett was Father Kelly of South Amboy. He came every few months and held ser- vices at the homes of the parishion- ers having the largest houses. He would perform weddings and bap- Isms and he was known to have married as many as three couples on ono visit. Father Klleen was the next priest :o condupt services at Everett. He had charge of the Red Bank parish and he said mass at Everett onco a month. Father Kileen was followed by a French priest, who was suc- ceeded by Father Kane. Mass was celebrated at the homes of the var- ous residents during this time, but due to the Increased number of Cath- olics Bishop Corrigan of Newark lent Father Glennan, a curate at Jer- icy City, to build a church at Everett. Father Glennan lived at Red Bank. He started the building in February, 1870 and the church was dedicated n November of the same year. It ras 25x46 feet and cost $1,600. The mlldlng work was done by skilled :arpenters, but they were greatly helped by tho church members. In ho meantime Father Glennan was made pastor of tho Asbury Park Catholic church and, the Everett :hurch was made a mission to Aa- mry Park. Father Glennan had harge of the Everett church until .883. Ho came to Everett Saturday ight and stayed over until after tho unday service. Ho was assisted by Father John O'Connor, curate at Aa- :>ury Park. Father O'Connor later ecamc bishop of the Newark dio- lese. Everett became a mission of New Monmouth in 1883 and was under the lupervlsion of Father John O'Connor, lastor of tho New Monmouth church, ntil 1885. Father O'Connor of New ilonmouth and Father O'Connor of \sbury Park were not the same rieats. Bradevelt parish, which had been charge of Freehold and Monslgnor 'rederlck Klvllltz, built a church of _s own about that time. Rev. 'lichael O'Leary was made pastor of Sratlcvclt In 1885 with Everett aa a Ission. Father O'Leary lived with ohn Dolan at Everett until a rec- ory was built at .Bradevelt'in 1885. i'he late Rev. John Lawrence suc- :cedcd Father O'Lcfiry In 1800 and emained until 1895 when ho was re- laccd by tho late Hev. William racey. In 1004 Father Lawrence esumed charge of the Bradevelt and Everett churches and lie continued as •aator until 1007T Tho Everett church ad a silver Jubileo in celebration of s 25tli anniversary during Father '-.awrenco'a second term us pastor. Rev. John Caton, who waa recently ransfcrred from ntvcrsldo to 'Flor- ence, wan rcector of Bradevelt parish rom 1907 to 1900. Many Improvements I'ero made to tho two churches and lio parish rectory at Bradevelt while ather Caton was jinator. Rev. ames Goff, who is at Sarimac Lake, as tho parish priest from 1909 to .014. Ho was succeeded by the late nther James Hr-nly, who died in 1919 rector of the nnrlsli. Rev, Leon Coil, a missionary la China, had' charge of the parish during Father Healy's sickness and he continued in charge for a short time after Father Healy's death. Father Call was rec- tor of tho parish only a few months, but In that timo he succeeded in pay- Ing off a large mortgage on the rec- tory. .. •» The late Rev. John P. Grady as- sumed tho pastorate after Father Call served until October, 1924, when he died. While Father Grady was rector of the Bradevelt parish a large brick ^hurch was built at Marlboro, which was made a mission of Brade- velt. Mrs. Robert J. Collier- donated a large hall to the Everett and Bradevelt churches and the building was built while Father Grady was rector. The building Is known as Collier's hall. The parish was in charge of Freehold after Father Grady's death until January, 1925, when Father Sullivan took charge. He has since renovated the Everett and Bradevelt churches and the rec- tory at Bradevelt, equipping all the buildings with modern conveniences. About a year ago he organized so- cieties among the women of the par- ishes for tho care of the churches. Tha Everett church organization known as the Blessed Sacrament g^lld and its members provide the altar linen and keep the church sup- plied with flowers. Mrs. Walter Pal- mer Is president. The trustees of the Everett church arc John B. Brady and William H. Kelly. NEW CHURCH PROJECT. METHODISTS VISIT EDIFICES IN OTHER PLACES. Church Consultant, Architect and Or- gan Builder Will bo Engaged— Flans of Proposed Building to be Shown to Entire Congregation. Rapid progress is being made with the new Red Bank Methodist church building project. The building com- mittee has visited a number of new churches In the vicinity of Newark, New York and Philadelphia. It is the purpose of tho committee to erect a church that will meet the needs of the church for the future as well as tho present. The educational build- ing will represent the latest facilities and arrangements possible. A church consultant from one of the large universities will be engaged to advise with the committee and an architect and organ builder will also be engaged soon. When tentative plans are secured from the architect a committee consisting of the official board and departmental heads of the church will be called in for consul- tation. Afterward lantern slides will be shown of the proposed building to the congregation. When the com- mittee finally decides on tho build- ng plans the whole matter will be submitted to tho official board. WINS A SCHOLARSHIP. William Klatsky !B Studying Or- thopedics Under Dr. SchoU. William Klatsky, son of Samuel Klatsky of Klatsky's shoe store on East Front street, has won a scholar- ship to the Scholl orthopedic training school, which is being conducted this ear at the Cornish Arms hotel at New York. The school Is conducted by Dr. William SchoU, a foot specialist and manufacturer of Dr. Scholl'a 'oot appliances and remedies. Wll- iam Klatsky has managed his fath- ir'a store tho past year. ' The scholarship was awarded to William because of his ability and Icnowlcdge of shoe fitting, practl- }edlcs and retail selling. The course :omprises a through training in flt- lng of shoes, f^oot anatomy and foot somfort aids. Tho course has al- •eady begun and It will last several weeks. William graduated from the Red Bank high school In 1927. $1.50 PER YEAR PAGES 1 TO 16. TO RENEW APPUCAW, A BIG SURPRISE PARTY. P. J. GISLESON WAS GUEST OF HONOR THURSDAY NIGHT. A Party Was Given for Him by the American Mechanics at Appln- - gate's Restaurant—Past Councilors Will Have a Jubllco Here Tonight. A surprise party was given Thurs- day night at Applegate's restaurant on Monmouth street for P. J. .Gisle- son of Red Bank, state councilor of the American Mechanics lodge. The party was given by the Onward so- cial club made up Red Bank, which is members of the Red The Monmouth county past coun- cilors' association of the lodge will have, its tenth anniversary celebra- tion tonight at the River street schoolhousc. Mr. Gisleson attended a meeting at the Molly Pitcher hotel early Thurs- day night and he later went for a ride with William H. Jordon of North Long Branch. The ride ended at the restaurant, where Mr. Gisle- son was greeted by more than 100 lodge members from varioti3 part3 of the state. A dinner was served and Mr. Jordon was toastmaster. Mr. Gisleson was recently chosen state councilor and the speakers con- gratulated him and praised him for his work in the lodge. Those who spoke were Frank Howard Lloyd of Matawan, past councilor of the Mat- awan American Mechanics council; George Gray of Freehold, state in- side sentinel; Louis B. Richmond of Belford, state deputy councilor; Ed- win T. Barclay of Manalapan, state .secretary nnd E. Leroy Grant of Bev- erly, Btato vice councilor. Elmer R. Mitchell and George Antonldes of Red Bank were in charge of the par- ty. Professional entertainers will fur- nish the amusement at the anniver- sary celebration, which win be at- tended by members of the lodge, their families and friends. The ar- rangements committee is made up of Albert E. Snydor, Millard Aumack and Elmer Mitchell of Red Bank and George C. Hall and William Jordon of Long Branch. Mr. Aumack had charge of the en- tertainment Friday night at tho monthly meeting of the past coun- cilors' association at Neptune hall at North Long Branch. All the American Mechanics in the state havo been asked to attend church next Sunday for Thanksgiv- ing and the Red Bank council mem- bers will attend the'Baptist church. Tho pastor, Rev. Edward W. Miller, will preach a special sermon for tho occasion. BEACH POLLUTION SUIT. STEVENS AND STEKNEB ABE PREPARING EVIDENCE. At Least 1,000 Photographic Exhibits of Garbage pollution of New Jer- sey's Beaches to be Presented In State's Suit Against New York. Attorney-General William A. Stev- ens and Senator-elect E. Donald Ster- ner are in charge of the task of pre- paring data and evidence ;arbage suit between the A Christmas Sale.' The women of the Baptist church jf Red Bank cleared more than $100 >y a Christmas sale last week. Mrs. •Yank Conklln directed tho sale. NOTICE To tho Taxpayers ot tho Borough of Fair Haven. Tho assessment Hat for tho year 930 may bo inspected at my office on River road, Fair Haven, November !5th and 26th, 1929, from. 10:00 A. M. ,o 4:00 P. M., for tho purpose of en- .bllng 4he taxpayers to ascertain what assessment has been made igalnst hia or her property and con- fer informally with the assessor aa ;o tho correctness of the assesament •o tho end that nny erroi-3 may bo rorrected before illinfr of tho nsscss- nent Hot and duplicate. Chapter 236, Laws 1918. William Curchin, Assessor of Fair Haven Borough. —Advertisement. _ For Afternoon Weddings. Frock suits for hire; Tuxedoes also. . T. Jlnnnino, G7 Broad street, Red ?ank. For your convenience open Vcdnesday and Saturday evenings.— Advertisement. -•-*-•> — For Sale. Soda water, nil flavors, malt bev- ragca and distilled water. Ben). H. :rate. 14 North Brldco avenue, Red Jank. phono 1485—Advertisement Green Gnbtcs. Dine and dance with Roger Wolfe £ahn*B Serenadero. Special ehore innor, $2.50. Patten avenue, Long iranch.—Advertisement. A Special Thanksgiving Dinner if exceptional merit is prepared for •ou nt Applcpito's Restaurant, 47 ,lonmouth street, Red Bank—Ad- ertisement. Special Marcel Permanent Wave iy oxjiert, $5.00. Also wo do all bcau- y culture. At Molly Pitcher Hotel, hono 1221 for appointment.—Adyer- isement. _ . _ Dr. Dunn, Surgeon Chiropodist, hero dally from twountil six o'clock, econd National ihono Red Bank icnt. for the state of New Jersey and the city of New York aa the result of the pollution of New Jersey beaches. Mr. Stevens will have charge of the locality north of Asbury Park and Mr. Sterner will take care of the district south of As- bury Park. The two men plan to accomplish their purpose through Individual personal contacts and through conferences with local civic organizations. At a meeting last week In Long Branch evidence was collected from representatives of Long Branch, Deal, Asbury Park, Ocean Grove, Avon, Beach Haven, Arlington nnd Berk- eley by Duane E. Minard, assistant to Mr. Stevens. Mr. Minard said that 1,000 photographic exhibits and other evidences df the work of tho tides and currents in carrying tho garbage to the New Jersey const had been ob- tained and' placed in his hands. The hearing will bo hold before Charles K. Campbell, appointed by United States supremo court as a special master to take testimony. STANDARD OU, COMPANY RE-OPEN CASE, Tha Company Will Make .wuuiof Effort to Build an Automobile Servlco Station at the Corner ot Harding Boad and Hudson Avenue, The Standard oil company han riot given up its attempt to build a gaso- line station at tho corner of Harding road and Hudson avenue. A month] ago the adjustment zoning board re« fused to give permission to the corn., pany to put a service station at this location because the corner In quog. tlon is less than 200 feet from thq school property. Ona of the provi. slons of the zoning ordinance ia thai) service stations must be more than* t 200 feet from, achoolhouspa, churches/ and theaters. This stipulation Ig made because it is considered that service stations increase trafno has. ardsi Harding road its zoned &fl sj business district. When the matter came up a month! ago tho principal objection to thft service station was mado by John 8. Applegate, who is ono of tho trustees of the Millard Flllmoro Cornwell eg. tate. The estate owns several houses on zHarding road. Mr. Applegato contended that the proposed nervico station would impair the value o{ the houses, as well as increasing traffic dangers. Through some over, sight the board of educatlofftrecelved no notice of the hearing and the board was not represented. At the meeting of the school board last week several of the member*. stated that the Red Bank represen. tatlven of the Standard oil company wanted to arrange a conference with the school board relative to the pro, posed service station. A motion » i*lt'i tsnm it «»« S nt nil prices al "lt»c ftogwur fe Advert i**en!t

Coppolino Trial Starts Today - Red Bank Register Archive

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Longer Lines Loom for Less Gas - Red Bank Register Archive

simon.jan56