The-Tibetan-Book-of-Living-and-Dying

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The-Tibetan-Book-of-Living-and-Dying

THIS LIFE: THE NATURAL BARDO 125

gossip that ego has been talking to you all your life, you will

find yourself hearing in your mind the clear directions of the

teachings, which inspire, admonish, guide, and direct you at

every turn. The more you listen, the more guidance you will

receive. If you follow the voice of your wise guide, the voice

of your discriminating awareness, and let ego fall silent, you

come to experience that presence of wisdom and joy and bliss

that you really are. A new life, utterly different from that

when you were masquerading as your ego, begins in you.

And when death comes, you will have learned already in life

how to control those emotions and thoughts that in the states

of death, the bardos, would otherwise take on an overwhelming

reality.

When your amnesia over your identity begins to be cured,

you will realize finally that dak dzin, grasping at self, is the

root cause of all your suffering. You will understand at last

how much harm it has done both to yourself and to others,

and you will realize that both the noblest and the wisest thing

to do is to cherish others instead of cherishing yourself. This

will bring healing to your heart, healing to your mind, and

healing to your spirit.

It is important to remember always that the principle of

egolessness does not mean that there was an ego in the first

place, and the Buddhists did away with it. On the contrary, it

means there was never any ego at all to begin with. To realize

that is called "egolessness."

THE THREE WISDOM TOOLS

The way to discover the freedom of the wisdom of egolessness,

the masters advise us, is through the process of listening

and hearing, contemplation and reflection, and

meditation. They advise us to begin by listening repeatedly to

the spiritual teachings. As we listen, they will keep on and on

reminding us of our hidden wisdom nature. It is as if we were

that person I asked you to imagine, lying in the hospital bed

suffering from amnesia, and someone who loved and cared for

us were whispering our real name in our ear, and showing us

photos of our family and old friends, trying to bring back our

knowledge of our lost identity. Gradually, as we listen to the

teachings, certain passages and insights in them will strike a

strange chord in us, memories of our true nature will start to

trickle back, and a deep feeling of something homely and

uncannily familiar will slowly awaken.

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