Symphony for the Common Man - Sydney Symphony Orchestra

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Symphony for the Common Man - Sydney Symphony Orchestra

Each soloist exists as part of an invisible whole, even

while retaining his or her own individuality. For this

reason, they are stationed so that they surround the

orchestra, and perform on instruments suitable to their

roles.

Although From me fl ows what you call Time was composed

in celebration of the signifi cant 100-year history of

Carnegie Hall, it diff ers considerably in mood from the

superfi cial intensity and liveliness of the usual percussion

concert. I have a preference for peaceful music, and at

present I want to let people listen only to music I myself

would wish to hear.

Because the fi ve solo performers individually assume

an important role, this work is not an ordinary concerto.

It is an orchestral work in which the orchestra, like nature,

surrounds us limitlessly, and out of that limitlessness the

soloists materialise in limited forms such as earth, wind,

water and fi re, then once again dissolve into limitless

nature. The ruling emotion of the work is one of prayer.

And because it both stimulates and is sustained by the

performers’ spontaneity, the work will always materialise

in a diff erent shape (or sound) whenever it is performed.

Although From me fl ows what you call Time is performed

straight through without a break, structurally speaking it

has several parts. As a guide to the audience, I have drawn

up a list of words indicating these sections, which have been

written down here and there in the score, like signs full

of meaning.

Introduction

Entrance of the Soloists

A Breath of Air

Premonition

Plateau

Curved Horizon

The Wind Blows

Premonition

Mirage

Waving Wind Horse

The Promised Land

Life’s Joys and Sorrows

A Prayer

© TORU TAKEMITSU

‘The ruling emotion of

the work is one of prayer.’

TAKEMITSU

sydney symphony 11

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