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Journal of Organizational Behavior

J. Organiz. Behav. 31, 1–5 (2010)

Published online in Wiley InterScience

(www.interscience.wiley.com) DOI: 10.1002/job.708

The

Incubator

Crafting scholarly life: Strategies for

creating meaning in academic careers

NED WELLMAN 1 * AND GRETCHEN SPREITZER 2

1

Ross Q1

Q1 School of Business Management and Organizations, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor,

Michigan, U.S.A.

2

Stephen M. Ross School of Business, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, U.S.A.

Summary Job crafting, which occurs when individuals proactively make changes to their jobs, can be a

useful tool for academics seeking more meaningful careers. We suggest changes to the

cognitive, task, and relational aspects of academic jobs that can infuse scholarly work with

more personal meaning. Copyright # 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Introduction

Keywords: job crafting; meaning; high quality connections

A Q2 series of recent articles has reignited a spirited discussion about the meaning of a career in

organization studies. These pieces have questioned whether our efforts to date have succeeded in

advancing knowledge (Hambrick, 2007), improving the world of practice (Ghoshal, 2005), or helping

young scholars advance their careers (Glick, Miller, & Cardinal, 2007). The widespread attention these

articles have garnered suggests that many organizational scholars are interested in making their careers

more personally meaningful.

In this Incubator, we use job crafting theory to frame a discussion of how organizational scholars can

increase the meaning of their work by changing the way they work. Our foundational assumption is that

increasing the personal meaning of academic jobs is valuable and desirable.

Individuals job craft when they make proactive changes to the content and boundaries of their jobs

(Wrzesniewski & Dutton, 2001). Job crafters may engage in three types of crafting: Cognitive crafting,

which involves changing task-related boundaries and mindsets, task crafting, which involves changing

the content of work—the number, scope and type of job responsibilities, and relational crafting, which

UNCORRECTED PROOFS

involves changing the quality and amount of our interaction with others while working. When

individuals craft their jobs in these ways, the jobs become more meaningful to them. Although all

workers job craft on some level, the recent concerns regarding the meaning of a career in organization

studies suggest scholars in our field could benefit from increasing the personal meaningfulness of their

work experiences. Therefore, in the remainder of this Incubator we will suggest new ideas of each form

of crafting to inspire scholars to build more positive personal meaning into their jobs.

* Correspondence to: Ned Wellman, Ross School of Business Management and Organizations, University of Michigan, 7010

Tappan St., Ann Arbor, MI 48104, U.S.A. E-mail: ewellman@umich.edu

Copyright # 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Received 7 April 2010

Accepted 11 April 2010

Q2


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2 N. WELLMAN AND G. SPREITZER

Cognitive Crafting

Cognitive crafting involves changing task-related boundaries and cognitions. We propose two forms

of cognitive crafting that can help organizational scholars derive more meaning from their work:

(1) enlarging one’s perspective and (2) leveraging more of one’s best self. Enlarging one’s perspective

involves appreciating all of the ways scholarly work can make an impact on others, which in turn

infuses the work with more personal meaning. Boyer (1990) suggests scholarship encompasses four

separate yet overlapping functions: The scholarship of discovery, which involves the advancement of

knowledge through original research and theorizing; the scholarship of integration, which involves

making connections across disciplines and paradigms; the scholarship of application, which involves

applying knowledge to consequential problems via consulting and service; and the scholarship of

teaching, which involves transmitting, transforming, and extending knowledge to students.

We submit that while conducting and publishing research is an important activity in the function of

discovery, the other three functions of scholarship can also generate personal meaning. For example, a

colleague of ours fulfilled his teaching responsibilities in an experiential learning course by developing

a challenging assignment that required students to raise money for the Make-a-Wish foundation. The

assignment helped the students learn about teamwork and leadership, and the students also raised over

$35 000 for the charity in just two days. By enlarging the cognitive boundaries of his job to include the

scholarship of teaching and application, our colleague increased the personal meaningfulness of his

work. In doing so, he also created an assignment that was deeply meaningful to his students and

received a perfect rating on student evaluations. Our colleague’s experience suggests that by enlarging

our perspective we can create work that is more meaningful to both ourselves and others.

We suggest that scholars also engage in a second form of cognitive crafting by leveraging more of

their best selves. The Reflected Best-Self is an exercise developed to identify a person’s special

strengths and talents (Roberts, Dutton, Spreitzer, Heaphy, & Quinn, 2005). In this exercise, individuals

use stories from friends, family and colleagues to identify times when they have made a positive

contribution to the lives of others. From analyzing these stories, individuals are able to empirically

identify their personal strengths. Often people are surprised to learn of the myriad ways they make a

difference to others. We believe that academics can benefit from undertaking the Reflected Best-Self

exercise. They can also engage in a modified version of the exercise by reflecting on the informal

everyday feedback they have received from others regarding what they do well and how they make a

positive difference. Scholars can also identify their best selves by considering patterns of peak

experiences in their work lives—times when they felt particularly vibrant and impactful at work. For

example, some may be particularly gifted facilitators who can uncover the unspoken issues that keep a

group from being a team, while others might be strategic thinkers who can envision the next big idea.

By understanding their best selves, scholars can find ways to draw on their special strengths and

competencies in their everyday work life to make work more enjoyable and meaningful.

Task Crafting

UNCORRECTED PROOFS

Task crafting involves changing the content of the work we do. We suggest two forms of task crafting:

(1) Focusing on the questions we ask and (2) challenging ourselves to thrive. First, we should ensure

that our research is driven by questions that are meaningful personally, practically, and theoretically.

For example, several years ago, a number of scholars started to focus on topics related to Positive

Copyright # 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. J. Organiz. Behav. 31, 1–5 (2010)

DOI: 10.1002/job


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Organizational Scholarship (POS, Cameron, Dutton, & Quinn, 2003). They began studying positive

deviance and the generative forces that enable thriving in organizational contexts. Shifting the focus of

their research questions allowed this group of scholars to craft more personal meaning into their work

by participating in research projects they perceived as generative and life-giving.

Scholars can also create meaning by crafting more challenge into the content of their jobs. Engaging

challenges can create a sense of accomplishment from a job well done. Challenges also energize us and

help us learn more from our work. Crafting more challenge into our jobs might involve developing a

new teaching module that draws on one’s core research findings. For example, one of our colleagues

embraced the challenge of developing a computer-based teaching simulation called the Reciprocity

Ring which drew directly from his research findings on reciprocity in networks. The simulation also

became a mechanism for collecting data from his students and from companies to further fuel his

research. In addition, the Reciprocity Ring encouraged students to engage in altruistic actions toward

their classmates, which created an altruistic culture in the class that was positively received by the

students. Another colleague embraced the challenge of moving into the Dean’s office at her business

school and creating a new leadership initiative. Rather than continue in her successful trajectory as a

researcher, she took the risk of adding a new dimension of administration and leadership into her career

path. By embracing challenge, we can increase the quality, meaning, and impact of our work in all of

the four functions of scholarship.

Relational Crafting

CRAFTING SCHOLARLY LIFE 3

Relational crafting involves changing the quality and amount of interaction with others encountered

in jobs. We propose two forms of relational crafting that can increase the meaning of scholarly work:

(1) Fostering high quality connections and (2) increasing contact with beneficiaries. High quality

connections are relationships characterized by shared goals, shared knowledge, and mutual respect.

When individuals are involved in high quality connections, they experience feelings of vitality and

aliveness, as well as heightened positive regard for the other party in the connection (Dutton & Heaphy,

2003). While the most obvious source of high quality connections is one’s colleagues (we can choose

collaborators that we enjoy spending time with), we can also develop and foster high quality

connections with others we come in contact with. Some scholars make a concerted effort to get to know

their students—whether sharing a meal with them or organizing travel-study programs which involve

extended contact. Wright and Wright (1999, 2002) suggest that the participants in our research studies

can also be a source of meaning at work (they call this committed to participant research, or CPR). For

example, by informing at-risk participants in burnout research about the possible consequences of

emotional exhaustion and spending time to discuss coping strategies with them, Wright was able to

make an important difference to participants in his research, which in turn made his work more

UNCORRECTED PROOFS

personally meaningful. In fact, by using the CPR approach to fully connect with the participants in

his research Wright came to experience his work as a calling, rather than just a job or career

(Wrzesniewski, 2003).

Additionally, we should craft our working relationships to put us in more frequent contact with the

beneficiaries of our work. When individuals have contact with beneficiaries, they better understand the

true meaning of what they do (Grant, 2007). Too often though, scholars have limited contact with

beneficiaries. To remedy this, we should make a conscious effort to seek out more interaction with

beneficiaries. One powerful way of increasing contact with beneficiaries is by adopting a CPR

approach—in which every participant in a research study becomes a potential beneficiary of the

Copyright # 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. J. Organiz. Behav. 31, 1–5 (2010)

DOI: 10.1002/job


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4 N. WELLMAN AND G. SPREITZER

researcher’s efforts. CPR research involves going beyond a ‘‘do no harm’’ philosophy with the

participants in our research. Instead, we can actively think of how we can make a positive difference to

our research subjects. Wright, for example, counseled an at-risk participant in his burnout studies to

consider a different job that would be less stressful—she later reported what a positive effect the

change had on her health and marriage (Wright & Wright, 2002).

Discussion and Conclusion

In this Incubator, we suggested new ways that scholars can engage in cognitive, task, and relational job

crafting to increase the personal meaning of their work. A scholarly job crafting approach to

meaningful work presents a number of exciting possibilities, but also some challenges. First, prior

research has suggested that jobs present obstacles to aspiring crafters, and that these obstacles may

differ by career stage (Berg, Wrzesniewski, & Dutton, 2010). In academic careers, doctoral students

and junior scholars may feel less autonomy to job craft—especially if that crafting does not emphasize

the scholarship of discovery. Future research can assess how scholars at different stages effectively

craft their work. Second, although career outcomes outside of personal meaning are likely important to

many scholars, our discussion of scholarly job crafting focuses primarily on meaning. Third, scholars

who enact our suggestions must remain conscious of the impact their job crafting has on others to

ensure that in creating more positive meaning for themselves they do not negatively impact others’

experiences. Finally, although we have assumed that increasing the personal meaning of academic

work is unilaterally positive and desirable, this may not always be true. Employees whose work is

overly meaningful may become consumed by their work, at the expense of their outside activities, their

relationships with others, and their mental and physical health (e.g., Kreiner, Hollensbe, & Sheep,

2006). Thus, we should be attentive to warning signs that our work is becoming too meaningful and

consuming, and regulate our job crafting accordingly.

In closing, we invite you to think about new ways you might craft your job as an organizational

scholar, and then to put those ideas into practice. Start with something small to create some momentum.

Job crafting does not have to involve a large commitment like redesigning a course or taking on

administrative responsibilities; something as simple as stopping to talk with a former student can

significantly increase the feeling that one’s job is meaningful and important. As academics we have

an unparalleled degree of autonomy in our jobs, and hence unique opportunities to job craft. We

challenge you to take advantage of these opportunities and, using this Incubator as scaffolding,

construct a career that overflows with positive personal meaning.

Author biographies

UNCORRECTED PROOFS

Ned Wellman is a doctoral student in Management and Organizations at the University of Michigan’s

Stephen M. Ross School of Business. His research interests include leadership, leadership development,

and motivation.

Gretchen M. Spreitzer is professor of Management and Organizations at the Stephen M. Ross School of

Business at the University of Michigan. Her research has focused on employee empowerment and

leadership development, particularly during times of change. At Michigan, she is part of the Center for

Positive Organizational Scholarship where her recent research is on enabling employee thriving at work.

Copyright # 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. J. Organiz. Behav. 31, 1–5 (2010)

DOI: 10.1002/job


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References

CRAFTING SCHOLARLY LIFE 5

Berg, J. M., Wrzesniewski, A., & Dutton, J. E. (2010). Perceiving Q3

Q3 and reacting to challenges in job crafting at

different ranks: When proactivity requires adaptivity. Journal of Organizational Behavior.

Boyer, E. L. (1990). Scholarship reconsidered: The priorities of the professoriate. Princeton, NJ: Carnegie

Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.

Cameron, K. S., Dutton, J. E., & Quinn, R. E. (Eds.), (2003). An introduction to positive organizational

scholarship. In Positive organizational Q4

Q4 scholarship: Foundations of a new discipline. San Francisco:

Berrett-Koehler.

Dutton, J. E., & Heaphy, E. D. (2003). The power of high-quality connections. In K. S. Cameron, J. E. Dutton, &

R. E. Quinn (Eds.), Positive organizational scholarship: Foundations of a new discipline. San Francisco: Berrett-

Koehler Publishers, Inc.

Glick, W. H., Miller, C. C., & Cardinal, L. B. (2007). Making a life in the field of organization science. Journal of

Organizational Behavior, 28, 817–835.

Ghoshal, S. (2005). Bad management theories are destroying good management practices. Academy of Management

Learning and Education, 4, 75–91.

Grant, A. M. (2007). Relational job design and the motivation to make a prosocial difference. Academy of

Management Review, 32, 393–417.

Hambrick, D. C. (2007). The field of management’s devotion to theory: Too much of a good thing. Academy of

Management Journal, 50, 1346–1352.

Kreiner, G. E., Hollensbe, E. C., & Sheep, M. L. (2006). Where is the‘‘ me’’ among the‘‘ we’’? Identity work and

the search for optimal balance. Academy of Management Journal, 49, 1031–1057.

Roberts, L. M., Dutton, J. E., Spreitzer, G. M., Heaphy, E. D., & Quinn, R. E. (2005). Composing the reflected bestself

portrait: Building pathways for becoming extraordinary in work organizations. Academy of Management

Review, 30, 712–736.

Wright, T. A., & Wright, V. P. (1999). Ethical responsibility and the organizational researcher: A committed-toparticipant

research perspective. Journal of Organizational Behavior, 20, 1107–1112.

Wright, T. A., & Wright, V. P. (2002). Organizational researcher values, ethical responsibility, and the committedto-participant

research perspective. Journal of Management Inquiry, 11, 173–185.

Wrzesniewski, A. (2003). Finding positive meaning in work. In K. S. Cameron, J. E. Dutton, & R. E. Quinn (Eds.),

Positive organizational scholarship: Foundations of a new discipline (pp. 296–308). San Francisco: Berret-

Koehler.

Wrzesniewski, A., & Dutton, J. E. (2001). Crafting a job: Revisioning employees as active crafters of their work.

Academy of Management Review, 26, 179–201.

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Copyright # 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. J. Organiz. Behav. 31, 1–5 (2010)

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PLEASE RETURN THIS FORM TO:

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Fax: +44 (0)1243 770154

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