newsletter november 2012.pdf - Youth Networks

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newsletter november 2012.pdf - Youth Networks

– Newsletter November 2012 -

”DNS Tvind”

The Necessary

Teacher Training College

www.dns-tvind.dk

News from the DNS

teams, this time from

Morocco,

Mozambique,

Denmark & Palestine

1


– Newsletter November 2012 -

WHAT IS NEW IN NOVEMBER?

Photo report: DNS 2012 in Morocco

Our first year students send best greetings from Africa—in particular

from Morocco. They had good investigation periods

where they lived with families, experienced Moroccan village

life, fixed their busses here and there, enjoyed Moroccan tea and

cuisine, dig deep into different political, social and economical

questions of Morocco and took care of their second home—the

bus. Read more

My job is more than only work, by Darja

For sure, my job is more than only work. My job – is my life

now. I spend 24/7 at my working place, with colleagues, with

students. We share our daily routine, responsibilities, plans,

and with a time – memories. Now those people are the most

important part of my life – present. Read more

Manual for beginner teachers, by Marina

Travel for one month, by bus, from Denmark to Turkey, with

a group of eight students.

This was the proposal that I couldn’t reject and to be honest I

just had the same words spinning in my mind, “It will be awesome!”

Read more

www.dns-tvind.dk

Moroccan village investigation, by Uldis

I spent four days with my team-mate Egle in a Moroccan

mountain village. On a sunny day around four in

the afternoon we were dropped out of (maybe just off)

our bus by our teacher in Morocco mountain area.

Teacher pointed up the mountains: "Those houses, it

looks like there is a village. If someone will take you

there then it is fine. If not," he pointed down the mountain,

"try your luck there." Read more

Visiting the museum in Maputo, by Ruta

8th of October is a teacher's day in Mozambique. Usually

it is a holiday for the teachers and students, but since

our students and teachers are living together on the campus,

I and Gita have decided to bring the students to the

museum in Maputo. Read more

Palestine: it is not a conflict, it is an occupation,

by Natalya

During my „Do what you find most appropriate to do”

period I had a chance to go to Palestine myself for the 1 st

time. Moreover I could organize a study trip for 4 students

from PTG (Practical-Theoretic Basic Education)

and make a project with our friend’s organization in the

refugee camp. Well, it sounded like a really right thing

for me to do. Read more

2


– Newsletter November 2012 -

DNS 2012 is already in Morocco

Our first year students send best greetings from Africa—in particular from Morocco. They had good investigation

periods where they lived with families, experienced Moroccan village life, fixed their busses here and

there, enjoyed Moroccan tea and cuisine, dig deep into different political, social and economical questions of

Morocco and took care of their second home—the bus. Hereby you can enjoy some pictures from their first

month, already reaching Morocco, but on the way towards Mauritania, Senegal and Guinea Bissau.

Follow DNS 2012 on our Official DNS Facebook page: http://www.facebook.com/PromotionTvind

www.dns-tvind.dk

3


– Newsletter November 2012 -

My job is more than only work, by Darja DNS 2013

For sure, my job is more than only work. My job – is my life

now. I spend 24/7 at my working place, with colleagues,

with students. We share our daily routine, responsibilities,

plans, and with a time – memories. Now those people are

the most important part of my life – present.

About one month ago I started to work in Bustrup School

Center (1 hour away from the DNS college). The main thing

about this place – it is a school, one of those small boarding

schools. They have around 19 students, who are ”troubled

kids”, but not the most hard case. Every one of them have

their own study program, but from the first view, and most

of the time, they are just simple teenagers. Ages vary from 12

-18, so probably I am looking like one of the students here.

Their program consists of a lot of practical stuff.

Bustrup has a fitness center, a small gallery and we just

started to run a shop with

things from China (not classic

ones, as I thought before, but

modern ones) – there are

cups, pillows, sofas, clocks,

teapots, vases etc.

As I heard when I was coming

here – the main purpose

of my job is that shop. All the

pedagogues are doing their

jobs, and there is not much

time or energy left for something

else. As I don't know

Danish yet, and I cannot

work with students, I should

just help somewhere around

that shop, the gallery and the

fitness center.

But all along and as time goes, I am working with students.

Bustrup is housing two care homes – one is in the same

building as the school is, just upstairs, and here a few students

and some teachers and pedagogues live. The other

care home is a house ten minutes walk from the main building

– it is on the top of a hill, and has a nice view to the fjord

– that's why it is called Udsigten (view). Four guys 14-18

years old live there + one is coming only on weekends and

he is 20 already. One or two pedagogues are always in the

house. There are around six pedagogues and they are changing

all week long, spending 1-1,5 in the house. When they

are changing all the time, it is hard to look after the house.

They have to cook, to take kids everywhere, solve some

problems, so the house is not vacuum cleaned for few weeks

sometimes.

www.dns-tvind.dk

When I came

here I had no particularresponsibilities

at all. On

one hand – it was

nice, because I

could do whatever

I like, and it

w o u l d b e

counted as a

work. So, first

weeks I was helping to cook and joined art room activities,

yoga lessons, joined some programme for students, was helping

to clean, was spending some time with students, feeding

horses, helping to prepare for the trip and a lot of other

things. On the other hand – all the day long I was doing

something, as wanted to be useful on my job, and I still

couldn't be sure that it was enough that day, because being

everywhere – is the same as being nowhere. So, I am happy

now to receive some everyday responsibilities.

Every day I am waking up with everybody in the house, and

we are going to the school, where they are doing studies, and

I am going to do some tasks in the shop (there still are a lot of

work of making it nice, advertising, and comfortable). Also I

am still joining pedagogues group – next week helping with

TCE and preparation of presentation for the annual school

event. I am quite good with one autistic student, so now we

will go to the gym every day. Also we found a good way of

making me learn Danish and in the same way get along with

housemates – now I have lessons of Danish with one of them.

But there are thousands of other tasks – as I am a person,

who always can help.

I am developing “from inside”. If you don't have energy,

then you cannot do anything properly, and it is hard to find

balance between expressing yourself too much/ not enough,

overworking, working not enough, moving forward, or not.

Sometimes I am losing myself in thoughts and it takes time to

get back into a good and proper self feeling. But I am working

on it everyday.

There are a lot of cases, where you cannot do anything, because

some decisions are already done in the past. That's

why self control, self- development, “not sleeping” all the

time – is important. Because every single decision made influences

our future.

So, my work is more than only work. My work – it is a lot of

experiences, which like stairs are leading to the selfdevelopment,

and fulfilling every moment of daily life. I love

my job.

4


– Newsletter November 2012 -

Moroccan village investigation, by Uldis DNS 2012

"The world I love, the tears I drop, to be part of the way

can't stop. Ever wonder if it's all for You." /Red Hot Chili

Peppers/

I spent four days with my team-mate Egle in a Moroccan

mountain village. On a sunny day around four in the afternoon

we were dropped out of (maybe just off) our bus by

our teacher in Morocco mountain area. Teacher pointed up

the mountains: "Those houses, it looks like there is a village.

If someone will take you there then it is fine. If not," he

pointed down the mountain, "try your luck there."

At first we were looking how the bus is leaving. I didn't

want to look until it faded across several hills on the main

road. We knew that it will be dark in next two hours. Therefore

I started to go up the mountain road while Egle took

some 'good-bye' pictures. There was a proper asphalt road

along the foot of the mountain. Besides the completely astonishing

mountain views, I saw the closest house of the

supposed village. Our teacher also noticed this house:

"There is nothing interesting for You. You should go

higher." Explanation was simple: the house looked like

some rich guys property - smooth facade in light colors,

plastic windows, Kangoo next to house and satellite dish on

top of house. Fine, let's just skip this one. But how can we

get up the mountain? Next houses were not so close to this

one. Is it possible that cars are also going there? Let's just go

further the road and maybe we will see some way leading

up to that mosque tower in the center of other houses.

It somehow appeared that after 30 meters the road went

around the corner of some mountain rocks and further not

up, but down, and eventually it turned completely away

from our mountain peak to another.

After going half an hour down and back up again we ended

www.dns-tvind.dk

up in front of the same supposed fancy house. It looked like

it was the only one “so fancy” on this side of the mountain.

Now the only difference in picture was that there was a

guy

sitting on the rock on the other side of the road in front of

the house. Let's go to him.

"As-salamu alaykum, do You speak English?"

"No."

"Parlez-vous français?"

"Un peu français. Un peu espagnol." Answered the guy less

than thirty years of age, bit shorter than me, but by look

much lighter in weight. He had black hair and darkish skin.

He was wearing black leather jacket, blue jeans, black hood

with zipper, light blue long-sleeve football sweater, and black

PUMA football kind of sneakers. But no socks.

"Ha ha! But I don't speak neither French, neither Spanish!

Non français, non espagnol."

I was smiling widely, and Egle also was smiling. But the man

was not. But what to do?!

"We are students. Studentos, amigo. And we want to get up

there." I pointed to mountain houses. "And we want to sleep

there." Instantly I put my hands together as for Christian

praying just not in front of me but under one of my ear's and

bent my head on the same side where I had put my hands.

That to my understanding was common charade for sleeping.

"And then we want to eat. Mange." And I turned with right

hand imaginary spoon in front of my mouth.

"English?"

"Yes."

"Non français?"

"No."

"Non espagnol?"

"No."

"English?"

"Yes.”

(continue on the next

page, page 6)

5


– Newsletter November 2012 -

Moroccan village investigation, by Uldis DNS 2012

During the conversation our new friend was all the time

wrapping in his fingers something blackish and sticky like

plasticizer.

"Espera, espera, espera." He was saying and holding his free

hand in half high position close to his chest.

Then he showed with slight gesture for us to sit down with

him.

"Espera."

And slight gesture.

I sat. Egle was standing on the road. Then she came closer

and asked, "What are we doing now?"

"Waiting,” I smiled both directions.

The guy put his stuff from his hand to his pocket and took

out of other pocket cigarette making ingredients - papers,

tobacco and filters -, and started to organize them. He made

a proper joint with the plasticizer like thing in it. For sure

that thing was hash. And then he started to smoke it and

offered to us.

"No. We are students and we cannot smoke. No."

Because of our refusal he didn't show any kind of special

face expressions. All time the same face. Then he smoked

and thought. He put on his hood and smoked some more.

Then he stood up, took his phone and called to someone.

Talked bit in Arabic and gave phone to me. "English."

"Hi."

"Hi. Only English?"

"Yes."

"Me not good in English. But ok. You want sleep?"

"Yes."

"How many people?"

www.dns-tvind.dk

"Two."

"How many nights?"

"Three."

"Ok. Give phone to man."

They talked in Arabic and gave the phone back to me.

"Ok. Together one thousand and six hundred Dirkhems."

"I don't have that much money. I have only two hundred."

"Only two hundred for night?"

"No. I have only two hundred. Only two hundred per three

nights."

"Ok. Give back phone to man."

They talked shortly in Arabic and ended conversation.

Silence.

At that point I was already in standing position. So I continued

conversation.

"Ok. Then we are going up the mountain. Me and my partner

we want to see what is …"

"Espera, espera, espera…" And he showed slight gesture

with hand so we sat down.

"Espera."

I sat. Man sat as well. He finished his joint, got up, and took

from me my bag and asked us with a gesture of his hand to

fallow him across the road directions to the fancy house.

6


– – Newsletter Newsletter November October 2012 - -

Manual for beginner teachers, by Marina DNS 2011

Travel for one month, by bus, from Denmark to Turkey,

with a group of eight students.

This was the proposal that I couldn’t reject and to be honest I

just had the same words spinning in my mind, “It will be

awesome!” This travel was part of my saving-up job, here in

the last period of my second year of DNS.

PTG is a school integrated in Tvind which basis is to educate

and integrate youngsters with challenges together with

youngsters with advantages. The combination of these two

groups creates a special way of education that provides, for

both, unique experiences.

I remember I asked what would be my role during the

travel, since I did not have any experience as a teacher. I was

explained that since I am a very political person, my main

role was to be mainly together with the four girls, talking

and supporting them in the future situations.

On the 1 st of November I put my bags in the bus, said goodbye

to my team and Tvind and “embarked” on one more trip

that would blow my mind.

If you are planning to travel with a group of students

through fourteen different countries, during one month,

please read these advices:

I - Practice body language

“Sorry, I don’t understand Danish,” – I said. And she started

www.dns-tvind.dk

to move her hands, trying to explain to me something. I got

the idea, answered with my hands and we moved on.

Language can be a barrier, and that is a problem well known

all over the world, but what to do when you have to break

down all the barriers and communicate, doesn’t matter what,

with your students?

Let me start to say that it is not easy. You see yourself in a

completely new environment and new country, with people

that you don’t really know, jumping around, making noise

and speaking a language that you don’t understand. English

might not help, Danish is a hard option, silence cannot be

used during one month and body language is not enough.

So, my advice is: use all. Make yourself understandable, as

much as you can and enjoy it: Laugh about yourself, the others,

together, and let the communication flow.

II – Love before Demand

Never demand something from your students before you

give them your shoulder to sleep during a long night travel

in the bus. Before you prepare to them a dedicated sandwich

or put water in their face when they are not feeling well. Give

them your love and compassion before you demand whatever

is needed, otherwise your words will fall in an empty

hole between you and them.

III – Swallow your strong opinions and pride

The teachers working with you have more experience with

the students - that is a fact. But you will consider many times

their reactions, decisions and attitudes and you will conclude

that, sometimes, they are not the best. However, their experience

will talk louder and you, as a beginner teacher, only

have to understand that is your time to learn with them. Consider

yourself which behavior you think is correct and improve

the ones that you think are not appropriate. However,

independently of your opinions, do not contradict the other

teachers in front of the students. It is better to let the students

think that you don’t have strong opinions or preferences than

start arguing with their authority role model, in front of the

students.

IV – Be creative and teach with an attitude

Your students will appreciate and you will have fun. Use

your creativity to surprise them, to get their attention, to

make them laugh and mainly, to make them learn!

Through your own attitude you can show the principles and

values that you want them to learn. If you try to teach something

and your attitudes show the opposite, you will not

manage to pass the message you want.

7


– Newsletter November 2012 -

Palestine: it is not a conflict, it is an occupation, by Natalya DNS 2010

3 years ago I’ve met a group of children from Palestine in

Tvind summer camp. They told about their life in the refugee

camp and situation in Palestine. It was shocking, unbelievable

and I felt stupid that I’ve never heard about it before.

Since then I was following the news and participated in

organizing few events about it in Denmark and one more

summer camp for Palestinian kids.

During my „Do what you find most appropriate to do” period

I had a chance to go to Palestine myself for the 1 st time.

Moreover I could organize a study trip for 4 students from

PTG (Practical-Theoretic Basic Education) and make a project

with our friend’s organization in the refugee camp. Well,

it sounded like a really right thing for me to do.

Palestine exists under Israeli occupation for 45 years. People

have lost hope that there can be a peaceful solution to this

situation. Regular attacks by Israeli soldiers, no human

rights, no state and millions of refugees around the world -

that is still a daily reality for the Palestinian people. When I

was going I wanted to understand - How come this is going on

for so many years?

To get to Palestine you have to go via Israel. You do not

mention anything about Palestine on the border and later,

you get there by bus through a check-point. When I arrived

to the refugee camp and went through the “streets” for the

first time I started to feel the place; concrete 2-floor buildings

of different shape, no trees, no space, a lot of kids and men in

the streets. The PTG students came a week later and we

stayed the first few days in Jerusalem the “Holy city”, and

the hot political spot in this issue. It was a good place to

make investigations, to get to know people’s opinions and

observe the life of a very diverse and religious city.

Finally we arrived to the refugee camp. My students seemed

to feel quite comfortable for such different surroundings. We

met our host and from there the real experience of Palestine

had started. During 2 weeks we visited the most politically

www.dns-tvind.dk

and culturally important towns, stayed with Arabic families,

talked to many people about the issue and could really

experience how life is like under occupation. I had a lot of

hard feelings and daily situations which showed me a bit

more of the truth. Every time I had to take a public bus

from Bethlehem to Jerusalem we passed through the check

point, where

Israeli soldiers with huge guns would go inside of the bus

and poke random Palestinians with it to show their ID. I was

watching and tried not to freak out, since I would simply get

into big troubles just for the fact of being on the Palestinian

territory. We painted the youth center of the Karama organization,

reorganized the garden and made nice activities and

discussions with local kids. While traveling around the West

Bank you experience beautiful landscapes, mountains, desserts

and terrible military surroundings. One of the worst

parts for me was to see The Wall. 700km long, 8-10m high

concrete blocks are cutting this land into pieces. It stands in

front of the Palestinian houses and goes through the olive

gardens to “protect” Israeli citizens from “dangerous” Arabs.

It looks as a physical expression of hate and mistrust. When

back in Denmark we will try to tell more to people about the

issue and organize a summer camp again. Few days after we

left Palestine, a terrible massacre happened again in Gaza -

hundreds of people were killed by Israeli soldiers. While

talking with my friends at home I could see that Western

media shows Palestinians as aggressive terrorists, missing

totally the part why do people react like that. Media writes,

“Palestinians shoot a rocket first”. Well, who was really first?

During the travel, I’ve got confident in what I know. There will be

a lot of discussions to take with opposite opinions, but talking about

the issue is all I can do to express my support for Palestinian people.

8


8th of October is a teacher's day in Mozambique.

Usually it is a holiday for the teachers and students,

but since our students and teachers are living

together on the campus, I and Gita have decided

to bring the students to the museum in

Maputo. We confirmed the idea with other teachers,

have agreed on the budget, transport, food

packages and were ready to go.

We were supposed to leave at 6, but the school bus

was late to come back to university, students were

late, because they have seen there were no bus… It

was heavily raining and it was not the best way to

start the morning.

After we have managed all our small issues, finally

at 6.30 we were moving to Maputo. First we went

to the museum of Geology. The guide was telling

the history of the continents, inner structure of the

earth, explaining about rock formations and of

course showing many beautiful stones, rocks and

minerals. I've already forgot all small morning

problems, because I felt so excited to see how curiously

the students were listening and exploring. It

was the first time for many of them to visit a mu

– Newsletter November 2012 -

Visiting the museum

in Maputo, by Ruta DNS 2009

www.dns-tvind.dk

seum; even many are 18 and more years old. After

talking pictures with diamonds, gold and many

others, we moved to the museum of History.

The museum of History is the biggest museum in

Maputo, it shows exhibitions of how the local people

were living long time ago, their traditional costumes,

house attributes, things what they have used

in their daily life. It also has a big exhibition of the

wild animals. When one of the students went inside

and saw a huge safari exhibition, she was so emotional

touched that she started to cry and had to

leave. She was afraid, that the fake animals would

hurt her. But the rest of the students really liked to

take pictures together with lions, elephants, giraffes

and many others.

The last one was the museum of art, where we have

seen many wooden sculptures, modern paintings of

famous Mozambican painters, many modern and

futuristic arts. I think it was a new experience for

many students, because art is not very popular between

the people here. Most of the visitors in the

museums were foreigners.

9


– Newsletter November 2012 -

DNS TVIND

The Necessary Teacher Training

– Newsletter November 2012 -

Thank you for reading!

You are most welcome to write

us your feedback, comments

and questions!

Students and teachers from DNS

Skorkærvej 8

Ulfborg

Denmark

6990

Email: info@dns-tvind.dk

Phone: +45 21 12 43 60

You are most welcome to follow us on different pages:

Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/PromotionTvind

Flickr: http://www.flickr.com/photos/dnstvind

Twitter: https://twitter.com/DNSdenmark

YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/DNStvind

www.dns-tvind.dk

10

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