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The Cadet. VMI Newspaper. May 30, 1955 - New Page 1 [www2.vmi ...

The Cadet. VMI Newspaper. May 30, 1955 - New Page 1 [www2.vmi ...

The Cadet. VMI Newspaper. May 30, 1955 - New Page 1 [www2.vmi

VOLUME XLV COLUMN ONE by Jere Real There is an item that this writer feels should be mentioned before the end of the present school year. The "Rats" are now out of the ratline and have assumed the status of Fourth Classmen. In their new category, they have a great deal of freedom that they have not had previously. It is lime for the present Fourth Classmen to try and view their new position objectively. This new class must now try to determine just what their future course at the Institute will be. It is the first opportunity that these men have to make plans independently, and in considering their next three years at VMI, they might make a great difference in their life after their graduation as well as during the remainder of their cadetship. In this vein there exists extracur ricular activities that might be taken up. The value of the extra-curricular activity in connection with a college education cannot be underes timated vrfth regard to its value in broadening the individual and increasing his objectivity. As "Rats," most of the new Fourth Clasmen had little time to enter into a number of outside interests. Now that the men of the Fourth Class are relaed from this limitation, their energies may be directed toward any number of outside fields. Area and interest groups, The Glee Club, academics organizations, and publications, offer profitable experience that is an essential part of any collegiate system military or not. There was an instructor here during my "Rat" year who- advised a group of "Rats" in his class by all mean to take up some extra-curricular activity. He emphasized that to get something out of VMI and to give VMI something in return it was necessary to do something besides "study and march." As Third Classmen next year the Class of '58 will have to assume new responsibilities and duties that will determine their relative outcome in 1958 when they graduate. If the right selection is made at the present time and the men of '58 decide now as to their activities and their general plans for the future, there will be no doubt as to their success as upperclassmen and as graduates. Jones To Lecture Astonomy Class BY L. H. Diuguid Mr. Arthur Roland Jones has been appointed lecturer for the coming Sale Planetarium. He will lecture on the aspects of the heavens. The English-born Mr. Jones left the navy a First Officer. The Building Mr. Jones will give his talks in the planetarium building, tentatively planned to be located on a line with and to the rear of the library. It will be a building about thirty feet square and twenty feet high, containing a spherical representation of the heavens, and seating about sixty people. Completion is expected to be sometime this fall. The planetarium equipment has been donated by E. Ashton Sale, Jr. in memory of his father. Mr. Sale is a member of the Board of Visitors and is with the Sale Knitting Company, Martinsville. His father was treasurer of VMI. Mr. Jones was born in England in 1909. He attended Liverpool Nautical College and received his teaching diploma at Alsager Training College, Crewe, England. He has also attended the University of Richmond and has taught math and science in Virginia's public schools. He was an instructor at Kent in England. The new instructor was in the British Merchant Navy from 1926 to 1945. He served as Executive Naval Officer during this time and handled positions of Chief Of Navi- VIRGINIA MILITARY INSTITUTE, LEXINGTON, VIRGINIA, MAY 30, 1955 NUMBER 29 Rod McCormick and William Child inspect a musket of the type that they, along with other team members, will fire next year in the North-South shoot. Mr. Child is team Captain and Mr. McCormick is team Adjutant. These are elective positions. Newly Formed Musket Team To Fire In Sectional, Shoot Manns To Captain '56 Baseball Nine George Manus will succeed Dave Woolwine next year as Captain of the Keydet Baseball team. Manus was elected in an election held by the team last Friday night. George, who is sometimes called "The Mole" by his team mates, is a five foot eight inch catcher from Brooklyn, New York and has been a member of the varsity team for three years. He has received a monogram each year and is one of the few Cadets at the Institute to have lettered in a varsity sport during his flat year. The red haired Irishman has been around the baseball circles for quite some time. When he was in high school he copped the Most Valuable Player award two years running with successive batting averages of .600. This is a remark' able average for anyone, but especially so for one whose outside interests include his major. Civil Engineering, and cadet waitership. Baccalaureate Service To Be Heard On WRVl The Baccalaureate service as conducted by The Right Reverend William H. Marmion in Jackson Hall will be broadcast over the radio on that date it was announced today by the VMI Department of Public Relations. The station which will carry the program is WRVA in Richmond Virginia and the program will run from 11 A. M. until noon on Sunday June 5. Included in the service and in the broadcast will be the Virginia Military Institute's famed Glee Club headed by Colonel H. N. Dillard. The Glee Club will sing the anthem "The Creation" by Willy Richter. Bishop Marmion is a native of Texas and resided in that state until the time of his departure to at- tend the Virginia Seminary in Alexandria, Virginia. While in Texas, Bishop Marmion attended the Houston public schools and Rice Institute where he received a Bachelor of Arts degree in 1929. He was ordained Deacon on July 20th, 1932 after his graduation from the Virginia Seminary. He was made an ordained priest on April 5th, 1933 by Bishop Quinn, also a native of Texas. He served at St. James Church of Taylor, Texas and Grace Church of Georgetown, Texas until 1938 at which time he was appointed Associate Minister of St. Mark's Cuhrch in San Antonio, Texas. In 1938 Bishop Marmion moved to Birmingham, Alabama where he became Rector of St. Mary's-on-the- Highlands and in 1950 be became Rector of St. Andrews Cathedral in BY W. 0. CHILD Washington Blue Rifles came into Odd Summer Jobs Accented Wilmington, Delaware. A new twist in rifle teams has existence and were promptly chal- On May 13th 1954, Bishop Mar- come into being at VMI. A cadet lenged to a match by the Greys. By VMI Cadets On Furlough mion was appointed Bishop of this musket team armed with the .58 That was the first skirmish. The diocese, and he has served in that caliber rifle musket of the Civil idea caught on and snowballed un- Every summer for the past 115 is no exception. Kenny Dickinson capacity eever since. War and wearing the uniform of til at the 11th skirmish at Fort years cadets have been spreading and Jack Piggot both have jobs the Corps of 1861 has been formed Lee, Virginia, 17 teams compete out over the nation in a search with the National Forestry Service Bishop Marmion lias been, to participate in the 12th North- with a band, parade and other for the quick dollar and a good in Montana and Idaho respectively, throughout his career, an active South skirmish in October. The ceremonies. time to tide them over the follow- and plan to spend most of their worker with the youth of our na- formation of the team is now in The teams wear actual Civil War ing winter. time clearing brush trails. tion, and it is this growing move- the first stages of development al- uniforms or authenic reproductions It has occured to THE CADET Another man with his eye on ment which he has supported as though there has been considerable thereof and use W. equipment, that many of these people stream- plenty of money and a lot of hard Director of Diocesan youth camps. trouble in acquiring equipment due weapons, and the Civil War Maning over the country every summer • work is Charley Caldwell, a pros- to the fact that most of it went out ual. The accuracy of which these have . very singular and original 1 pective roustabout for the Louis- In addition to his work with the of date shortly after 1865 and I weapons are still capable is ideas "concerning the best (if not' iana oil fields. The rumor goes nation's youth, he has also been an most of the existing siirplus stock surprising and, aside from the the easiest) way to make a buck,; that there's a lot of money in the active member of such organiza- has been snapped up by existing pageantry of the event, there is which if presented here might j oil fields for anyone who's intions as the Birmingham Pastors teams. I quite a lot of amazingly good shoot- give you an idea of how to spend | terested in hard manual labor, so Union, of which he was president, The idea of the skirmish started ing done. At the 11th skirmish a (or not to spend) your vacation. | maybe this is your ticket. the Birmingham Sunday School a few years ago when a muzzle- team of eight picked riflemen armloading enthusiast gathered about ed with muskets, to the delight of Perhaps the most unusual idea ' Tom Dooley and Jim Dillard have Council, upon whose executive- him a group of similar enthusiasts the spectators and embarassment which has caught the ears of this decided they'd rather travel than council he sat, and the Department to form a musket team who wore of Fort Lee, actually outshot a reporter is the gold quest to be I work, so they'll be heading down of Christian Social Relations of the Confederate uniforms and called team composed of two officers from conducted by Tom Massie, Dale | toward Mexico at the end of sum- Executive Council of the Diocese themselves the First Virginia I Fort Lee armed with an Ml and Vaughan and Tiger Jackson. Deep mer camp. They expect to keep of Alabama. Greys. They succeeded in interest- a Belgian FN. (The proposed in the hills of Colorado, .so one' moving till their money runs out, Bishop Marmion was married on ing a group of Yankees and the NATO rifle) geologist says, lies a stream bed which they hope to be about Mex- December 28, 1935 to Mabel guaranteed to produce ten dollars ico City, a good 800 miles inside worth of gold dust per day to | the Mexican border. Daugherty Nail. They have two Former Commandant And Cadet Wise any man with the knowledge and I Well, there you have the ideas sons, William Henry Marmion, Jr., industry to pan it. So it will be i of a few in the Corps, and if you born May 26, 1942, and Roger Mills Publishes Philosophic History Of Man in search of this stream that Mas- still think you'd prefer working Nail Marmion, born January 19, sie and Co. will depart at the con- on the local survey crew, just re- 1955. They make their home at Col. Jennings C. Wise of Lexing- truly the Albertus Magnus, the clusion of summer camp. The member that it takes all kinds to 2730 Avenham Avenue, S. W., in ton is the author of a new histori- Doctor Universalis of the present stream is an actuality, however, make a world. Roanoke. cal treatise entitled "The Philo- age. His book should be read by and with the proper maps and sophic History of Civilization." It every person with any pride left of efluipment the prospectors might is published b^ the Philosophical independent thought." just strike it rich. Brown Culminates 49 Years Library, Inc. of New York. Col Wise, V.M.I. 1902, Professor Another man who seems to be The object of the work accord- Economics, Political Science and after a break in the monotony is As Heating Superintendent ing to the author is to produce on International Law, V.M.I., 1812-15, Bob Webster, apprentice smoke a non-political basis and without Among the employ at VMI there the Professor who first occupied the Post Exchange is now, was the jumper and fire fighter. Bod has religious bias an intellectual rev- is a man who, since January 7, the chair of Liberal Arts, and in- gymnasium. In those days, the got a job lined up with the Nationolution in the teaching of history. 1907, has proven more faithful than stituted the first course of that De- Corps took annual spring hikes and al Forestry service in Montana in- In presenting the work the au- the most faithful. For nearly 49 partment, Commandant of Cadets camping maneuvers. Through the volving fire fighting by parachute. thor states that he has expended a years, Harry Brown, the "superin (1912-14), is the oldest living mem- First World War, there was the He .plans to spend one month lifetime upon it without a profit tendent" of the heating plant, has ber of the V.M.I. Faculty. His fath- beginning of a new building boom training for the fires and the next motive and that it is not based up- carried on in the tradition of the er was among the first casualties which, Harry says, "has kind of two months fighting them, which on mere speculation like the work honest, personable, sincere and in the Battle of Newmarket and changed things a bit." at $65 a week is a profitable and of Toynbee. It seeks to coordinate likeable sort of fellow. had three first cousins in the battle interesting way to spend the sum- "Since I've been at VMI, I have- modern scientific revelations with Since first setting foot on the corps including Capt. Henry A. mer.n't had any trouble or disturban- the ancient scriptures "in such a post, his job has been the para- Wise who commanded the Corps in ces, and I hope others can say the way as to set at naught the chal- The other men who have acmount of his well-lived existence . the battle after the wounding of same about me. I have yet to meet lenges by the Socialists and Comquired the deep sea bug are J. T. . . . and for some 49 years each Col. Shipp. Col. Wise wrote the a man here who I don't like a good munists of the concept .... of Parks and Ron Beebe. Leaving succeeding line of cadets has kept first Military History of the VMI bit." Such is the outlook of this a divine wisdom superior to human from their home port of Lewis- snugly warm, mostly because of his (1914- and the Long Arm of Lee intelligence." town on the Md. coast the two efforts. At first. Harry was as be- man who, for nearly half a century, (1916) in which a chapter is devot- It is reviewed in "Grass Roots" ed to the Institute as a school of will fish up and down the At-1 wildered about VMI as some of has served the Cadets of the VMI which quotes George Andrews Mor- arms. His father was the only grad- lantic Coast aboard commercial j the "Old Corps" Rats of that time, —sincerely, satisfactorily, and most iarty of Ogonquit, Maine, as foluate who ever sent five sons to the trawlers, their principal catch be-, but he quickly caught on and has of all—happily. lows: "The Philosophic History of Institute. About 40 members of the ing meinhader. Providing the set a pace which, during all these Civilization by Jennings C. Wise family have attended it. storms don't get too rough and years, has hardly wavered. who by the internationally known the fish continue to bite they'll Now almost 71 years old, Harry The Editor of Liberty & Progress, and celebrated American historian have a rather uniue experience. is still going strong. One thing | San Francisco, writes of Col. Wise's Francis Trevelyan Miller like Bar- latest book "It opens up a vast, There are always a few woods- though, he says. "It seems kind of on de Grazia of Vienna has rated new and entirely different outlook man in the crowd, and this year funny to see the boys who come to; Wise as the greatest living histor- VMI, graduate, get married and, upon history. The countless facets ian, is most timely, refuting as it have a few boys, and then send of the gem entitled the author to be NOTICE does the grossly materialistic his- these boys back up here. It almost rated as a great historian who has tory current in the schools, col- Due to the fact that the publica- makes me feel a little old, some- done more than his part in the enleges and universities of the prestion date for this issue of THE times.lightment of the world. I can only ent day. I am amazed by the scope CADET falls during the middle of Names like the late Blandy hope others will grab on to the of the author's researches. Wise is an examination period, the usual Clarkson, coach of the famous 1920 clues he has given to the history of eight pages has been reduced to ' Flying Squadron," Jimmy Leach gation, senior navigator, and troop the past." four. This Is the last issue before who was the star of that era, hun- officer on the Mauretania, Isle de Dr. Cary T. Jabob, Ph.D., Histor- Finals Issue when the 1955-56 staff dreds of cadets, and the various France, and Queen Elizabeth. He ian and Playwright, Charlottes- will officially take over. This Issue, superintendents who have come left the navy an First Officer. Va. rates the work as one of the too, will consist of only four pages. and gone—are all still prominent, Other activities of Mr. Jones in- very highest scholarship, like many Be sure to pick up your free copy in the mind of this man. Harry still clude membership in the Rich- other reviewers. after the graduating exercises eith- remembers the time when barracks mond Astronomical Society and It is especially gratifying to the er from • member of the circula- ended where Jackson Arch is now.' the British Astronomical Society. Corps to know a graduate has attion staff outside of barracks or in When the Chapel was on the site He is also a fellow of the British tained such eminence in the field your barracks room where one copy of the present Cammandant's of- Interplanetary Society. of letters. will be placed. fice; underneath the Chapel, where BAEBY BEOWN

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