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Great Expectations - Planet eBook

Great Expectations - Planet eBook

Joe, that she wore this

Joe, that she wore this apron so much. Though I really see no reason why she should have worn it at all: or why, if she did wear it at all, she should not have taken it off, every day of her life. Joe’s forge adjoined our house, which was a wooden house, as many of the dwellings in our country were - most of them, at that time. When I ran home from the churchyard, the forge was shut up, and Joe was sitting alone in the kitchen. Joe and I being fellow-sufferers, and having confidences as such, Joe imparted a confidence to me, the moment I raised the latch of the door and peeped in at him opposite to it, sitting in the chimney corner. ‘Mrs. Joe has been out a dozen times, looking for you, Pip. And she’s out now, making it a baker’s dozen.’ ‘Is she?’ ‘Yes, Pip,’ said Joe; ‘and what’s worse, she’s got Tickler with her.’ At this dismal intelligence, I twisted the only button on my waistcoat round and round, and looked in great depression at the fire. Tickler was a wax-ended piece of cane, worn smooth by collision with my tickled frame. ‘She sot down,’ said Joe, ‘and she got up, and she made a grab at Tickler, and she Ram-paged out. That’s what she did,’ said Joe, slowly clearing the fire between the lower bars with the poker, and looking at it: ‘she Ram-paged out, Pip.’ ‘Has she been gone long, Joe?’ I always treated him as a larger species of child, and as no more than my equal. ‘Well,’ said Joe, glancing up at the Dutch clock, ‘she’s been on the Ram-page, this last spell, about five minutes, 10 Great Expectations

Pip. She’s a- coming! Get behind the door, old chap, and have the jack-towel betwixt you.’ I took the advice. My sister, Mrs. Joe, throwing the door wide open, and finding an obstruction behind it, immediately divined the cause, and applied Tickler to its further investigation. She concluded by throwing me - I often served as a connubial missile - at Joe, who, glad to get hold of me on any terms, passed me on into the chimney and quietly fenced me up there with his great leg. ‘Where have you been, you young monkey?’ said Mrs. Joe, stamping her foot. ‘Tell me directly what you’ve been doing to wear me away with fret and fright and worrit, or I’d have you out of that corner if you was fifty Pips, and he was five hundred Gargerys.’ ‘I have only been to the churchyard,’ said I, from my stool, crying and rubbing myself. ‘Churchyard!’ repeated my sister. ‘If it warn’t for me you’d have been to the churchyard long ago, and stayed there. Who brought you up by hand?’ ‘You did,’ said I. ‘And why did I do it, I should like to know?’ exclaimed my sister. I whimpered, ‘I don’t know.’ ‘I don’t!’ said my sister. ‘I’d never do it again! I know that. I may truly say I’ve never had this apron of mine off, since born you were. It’s bad enough to be a blacksmith’s wife (and him a Gargery) without being your mother.’ My thoughts strayed from that question as I looked disconsolately at the fire. For, the fugitive out on the marshes Free eBooks at Planet eBook.com 11

  • Page 1 and 2: Great Expectations By Charles Dicke
  • Page 3 and 4: as the river wound, twenty miles of
  • Page 5 and 6: ‘There, sir!’ I timidly explain
  • Page 7 and 8: at the Battery, early in the mornin
  • Page 9: Chapter 2 M y sister, Mrs. Joe Garg
  • Page 13 and 14: On the present occasion, though I w
  • Page 15 and 16: his cheek and speaking in a confide
  • Page 17 and 18: ‘Hark!’ said I, when I had done
  • Page 19 and 20: great convenience that the Hulks we
  • Page 21 and 22: Chapter 3 I t was a rimy morning, a
  • Page 23 and 24: had not the same face, and had a fl
  • Page 25 and 26: you enjoy it.’ ‘Did you speak?
  • Page 27 and 28: eing there; ‘did you notice anyth
  • Page 29 and 30: crossed his two forefingers, and ex
  • Page 31 and 32: to shield me from the vengeance of
  • Page 33 and 34: gracious in the society of Mrs. Hub
  • Page 35 and 36: to put salt upon their tails. That
  • Page 37 and 38: estless people they were, in conseq
  • Page 39 and 40: Mr. Pumblechook had begun to beam u
  • Page 41 and 42: Chapter 5 T he apparition of a file
  • Page 43 and 44: far might you call yourselves from
  • Page 45 and 46: marshes was. They had not enjoyed t
  • Page 47 and 48: was, on Joe’s back, and there was
  • Page 49 and 50: down, and two of his men ran in clo
  • Page 51 and 52: any set expression - looked at the
  • Page 53 and 54: lack darkness. Our lights warmed th
  • Page 55 and 56: eturned, and his guard were ready,
  • Page 57 and 58: marked that his beer was flat or th
  • Page 59 and 60: Chapter 7 A t the time when I stood
  • Page 61 and 62:

    of Prices, and by this oracle Biddy

  • Page 63 and 64:

    ‘I don’t spell it at all,’ sa

  • Page 65 and 66:

    careful perspicuity, that I asked h

  • Page 67 and 68:

    we’re up to. It must be done, as

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    Eight of ‘em, and she’s not com

  • Page 71 and 72:

    shaking her head at me as an encour

  • Page 73 and 74:

    make all along: ‘Boy, be for ever

  • Page 75 and 76:

    coach-maker, who appeared to get on

  • Page 77 and 78:

    lechook, discomfited. ‘Ah!’ sai

  • Page 79 and 80:

    not going in.’ And scornfully wal

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    ‘Look at me,’ said Miss Havisha

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    play cards with this boy.’ ‘Wit

  • Page 85 and 86:

    game out.’ Saving for the one wei

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    ewery-lane, and leaned my sleeve ag

  • Page 89 and 90:

    ewing utensils still were. When I f

  • Page 91 and 92:

    Chapter 9 W hen I reached home, my

  • Page 93 and 94:

    pence make three and fourpence,’

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    ‘Goodness, uncle! And yet you hav

  • Page 97 and 98:

    thing.’ ‘Should you, Pip?’ sa

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    upon his ‘ed, can’t sit and wri

  • Page 101 and 102:

    Chapter 10 T he felicitous idea occ

  • Page 103 and 104:

    solved to try it, and that very eve

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    ‘Rum,’ repeated the stranger.

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    expounded the ties between me and J

  • Page 109 and 110:

    unusual circumstance to tell her ab

  • Page 111 and 112:

    Chapter 11 A t the appointed time I

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    was Camilla, very much reminded me

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    ‘Yes; I think you are very pretty

  • Page 117 and 118:

    ‘There, there, there!’ with the

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    with her stick; ‘that, where thos

  • Page 121 and 122:

    thinking of you in the night - The

  • Page 123 and 124:

    speaker. This change had a great in

  • Page 125 and 126:

    on this day!’ She stood looking a

  • Page 127 and 128:

    he led, as if I had been under a sp

  • Page 129 and 130:

    was always knocked down; but, he wo

  • Page 131 and 132:

    Chapter 12 M y mind grew very uneas

  • Page 133 and 134:

    tion of pushing Miss Havisham in th

  • Page 135 and 136:

    could my character fail to be influ

  • Page 137 and 138:

    away. There was a most irritating e

  • Page 139 and 140:

    Chapter 13 I t was a trial to my fe

  • Page 141 and 142:

    ‘Which I meantersay, Pip,’ Joe

  • Page 143 and 144:

    ‘This is wery liberal on your par

  • Page 145 and 146:

    ‘Well!’ cried my sister, with a

  • Page 147 and 148:

    was pushed over by Pumblechook, exa

  • Page 149 and 150:

    lent spirits on the road home, and

  • Page 151 and 152:

    my hold, I only felt that I was dus

  • Page 153 and 154:

    Chapter 15 A s I was getting too bi

  • Page 155 and 156:

    ing them that had been much in my h

  • Page 157 and 158:

    can’t help yourself—‘ ‘My d

  • Page 159 and 160:

    I reminded Joe of my half-holiday.

  • Page 161 and 162:

    women I have ever seen, that passio

  • Page 163 and 164:

    own, to come back. Miss Sarah Pocke

  • Page 165 and 166:

    een running to seed, leaf after lea

  • Page 167 and 168:

    den at Camberwell. Orlick, with his

  • Page 169 and 170:

    Chapter 16 W ith my head full of Ge

  • Page 171 and 172:

    us when we picked him up at the tur

  • Page 173 and 174:

    the substitution of Tea for Joe, an

  • Page 175 and 176:

    Orlick, without a doubt! She had lo

  • Page 177 and 178:

    dy, however. Her shoes came up at t

  • Page 179 and 180:

    miserable little shop and the miser

  • Page 181 and 182:

    carrying on, I was half inclined to

  • Page 183 and 184:

    punishment for belonging to such an

  • Page 185 and 186:

    don’t mind my speaking so openly

  • Page 187 and 188:

    efore him, to obscure that demonstr

  • Page 189 and 190:

    ‘Well!’ said the stranger to Mr

  • Page 191 and 192:

    terfuge.) ‘Well? Have you found i

  • Page 193 and 194:

    when he had surveyed me at his leis

  • Page 195 and 196:

    the present possessor of that prope

  • Page 197 and 198:

    you at once, I am paid for my servi

  • Page 199 and 200:

    chair. He sat astride of the chair

  • Page 201 and 202:

    ered his valedictory remarks. They

  • Page 203 and 204:

    vally partickler, Pip;’ and then

  • Page 205 and 206:

    ‘If you had waited another moment

  • Page 207 and 208:

    Chapter 19 M orning made a consider

  • Page 209 and 210:

    ‘You may be sure, dear Joe,’ I

  • Page 211 and 212:

    ecalled to me that evening in the l

  • Page 213 and 214:

    ‘Mr. Trabb,’ said I, ‘it’s

  • Page 215 and 216:

    sibly remunerate him for his pains.

  • Page 217 and 218:

    ound from the Boar, that I hope you

  • Page 219 and 220:

    apprentice, and, in effect, how he

  • Page 221 and 222:

    I began packing that same afternoon

  • Page 223 and 224:

    ‘No, Miss Havisham.’ ‘And Mr.

  • Page 225 and 226:

    in taking it fell asleep. Biddy was

  • Page 227 and 228:

    Chapter 20 T he journey from our to

  • Page 229 and 230:

    who wiped his nose with his sleeve

  • Page 231 and 232:

    While I looked about me here, an ex

  • Page 233 and 234:

    it was a toss-up. Have you paid Wem

  • Page 235 and 236:

    fer him hany termth. Mithter Jagger

  • Page 237 and 238:

    which was painted over. ‘Tell him

  • Page 239 and 240:

    Chapter 21 C asting my eyes on Mr.

  • Page 241 and 242:

    ‘Why, you’re a regular cross-ex

  • Page 243 and 244:

    London fashion, but said yes. ‘I

  • Page 245 and 246:

    ut Barnard’s is musty. This is yo

  • Page 247 and 248:

    had sent for me on a trial visit, a

  • Page 249 and 250:

    He had not a handsome face, but it

  • Page 251 and 252:

    the waiter was not there to watch m

  • Page 253 and 254:

    influenced the father’s anger. No

  • Page 255 and 256:

    which she afterwards stopped all th

  • Page 257 and 258:

    I had grand ideas of the wealth and

  • Page 259 and 260:

    with just the same air as he had ta

  • Page 261 and 262:

    I deceive myself on a point where m

  • Page 263 and 264:

    self. ‘Gracious me, Flopson!’ s

  • Page 265 and 266:

    ing out of entirely personal motive

  • Page 267 and 268:

    defence, for, before I had been the

  • Page 269 and 270:

    much, but in his limited way (he st

  • Page 271 and 272:

    instrument were not likely to agree

  • Page 273 and 274:

    thus became aware of the mutual rel

  • Page 275 and 276:

    house?’ said Mrs. Pocket. ‘Besi

  • Page 277 and 278:

    justice. Nor, did I ever regard him

  • Page 279 and 280:

    Wemmick was at his desk, lunching -

  • Page 281 and 282:

    inkstand, to get this blot upon you

  • Page 283 and 284:

    off, when convenient to you. Have y

  • Page 285 and 286:

    Chapter 25 B entley Drummle, who wa

  • Page 287 and 288:

    tracted expensive habits, and began

  • Page 289 and 290:

    to try it on, for love or money.’

  • Page 291 and 292:

    ‘ - At the back, there’s a pig,

  • Page 293 and 294:

    seen the Aged. Never heard of him.

  • Page 295 and 296:

    at half-past eight precisely we sta

  • Page 297 and 298:

    had done all that, and had gone all

  • Page 299 and 300:

    the housekeeper, with the first dis

  • Page 301 and 302:

    a pitch little short of ferocity ab

  • Page 303 and 304:

    much to drink, and I know we talked

  • Page 305 and 306:

    smith on the same side of the way;

  • Page 307 and 308:

    Chapter 27 ‘ MY DEAR MR PIP, ‘I

  • Page 309 and 310:

    certain things for breakfast that h

  • Page 311 and 312:

    pled playbill of a small metropolit

  • Page 313 and 314:

    that it should tumble off again soo

  • Page 315 and 316:

    emonstrance against this tone. ‘W

  • Page 317 and 318:

    known, and understood among friends

  • Page 319 and 320:

    Blue Boar’s posting-yard; it was

  • Page 321 and 322:

    their coarse mangy ungainly outer s

  • Page 323 and 324:

    But I must have lost it longer than

  • Page 325 and 326:

    you!’ like and order to dogs - ag

  • Page 327 and 328:

    Chapter 29 B etimes in the morning

  • Page 329 and 330:

    me a few steps towards the house.

  • Page 331 and 332:

    ‘Are they any wiser?’ said Sara

  • Page 333 and 334:

    ences which had so wrought upon me,

  • Page 335 and 336:

    strongly felt. It would have rankle

  • Page 337 and 338:

    ‘Then you don’t? Very well. It

  • Page 339 and 340:

    ‘Hear me, Pip! I adopted her to b

  • Page 341 and 342:

    asked me how often I had seen Miss

  • Page 343 and 344:

    with her hair - which assuredly had

  • Page 345 and 346:

    Chapter 30 A fter well considering

  • Page 347 and 348:

    him, his teeth loudly chattered in

  • Page 349 and 350:

    As confidence was out of the questi

  • Page 351 and 352:

    I stopped for a moment to consider

  • Page 353 and 354:

    since we have been talking with our

  • Page 355 and 356:

    Because it is decidedly the case wi

  • Page 357 and 358:

    eputation and that I should be pres

  • Page 359 and 360:

    een out a long time and walked an i

  • Page 361 and 362:

    nocent and indispensable action did

  • Page 363 and 364:

    Meanwhile, Mr. Waldengarver, in a f

  • Page 365 and 366:

    - the role (if I may use a French e

  • Page 367 and 368:

    ‘Halloa, Mr. Pip,’ said he; ‘

  • Page 369 and 370:

    and attending to anxious whisperers

  • Page 371 and 372:

    should have asked the favour of you

  • Page 373 and 374:

    - and so he has ‘em, soul and bod

  • Page 375 and 376:

    Chapter 33 I n her furred travellin

  • Page 377 and 378:

    ‘Yes, I suppose so.’ She answer

  • Page 379 and 380:

    expectations in a heap. ‘Two thin

  • Page 381 and 382:

    to my visit for any consideration.

  • Page 383 and 384:

    Estella, with a sigh, as if she wer

  • Page 385 and 386:

    Chapter 34 A s I had grown accustom

  • Page 387 and 388:

    his own, and doing a great deal of

  • Page 389 and 390:

    his principal, I think. He never di

  • Page 391 and 392:

    paying the money. In point of merit

  • Page 393 and 394:

    allusion to its heavy black seal an

  • Page 395 and 396:

    mediate days in the curious state o

  • Page 397 and 398:

    nately stuffing himself, and making

  • Page 399 and 400:

    like a shadow and never continueth

  • Page 401 and 402:

    tient, and teach myself while I tea

  • Page 403 and 404:

    ‘Yes, Mr. Pip.’ ‘Not to menti

  • Page 405 and 406:

    Chapter 36 H erbert and I went on f

  • Page 407 and 408:

    oughly destroyed any slight notion

  • Page 409 and 410:

    Jaggers stopped me. ‘I am not pai

  • Page 411 and 412:

    eyes again, I found that he had bee

  • Page 413 and 414:

    ‘Then is it your opinion,’ I in

  • Page 415 and 416:

    Chapter 37 D eeming Sunday the best

  • Page 417 and 418:

    of the chimney, and the ghostly tum

  • Page 419 and 420:

    ed at the possibility of my having

  • Page 421 and 422:

    Sunday night; and I rather suspecte

  • Page 423 and 424:

    sent the path of virtue, I am justi

  • Page 425 and 426:

    Chapter 38 I f that staid old house

  • Page 427 and 428:

    when we sat apart at a darkening wi

  • Page 429 and 430:

    hurt and diseased, she sat with her

  • Page 431 and 432:

    heat of the other, that was almost

  • Page 433 and 434:

    ‘Who taught me to be hard?’ ret

  • Page 435 and 436:

    tatters of old banners that I have

  • Page 437 and 438:

    ‘Of Richmond, gentlemen,’ said

  • Page 439 and 440:

    on; now with encouragement, now wit

  • Page 441 and 442:

    mle with any idea of making me - me

  • Page 443 and 444:

    Chapter 19 I was three-and-twenty y

  • Page 445 and 446:

    was curiously flawed by the wind; a

  • Page 447 and 448:

    neither on us is to blame for that.

  • Page 449 and 450:

    He had replaced his neckerchief loo

  • Page 451 and 452:

    ‘How?’ ‘Ah!’ He emptied his

  • Page 453 and 454:

    could not have been exceeded if he

  • Page 455 and 456:

    was I went for, ‘if it ain’t fo

  • Page 457 and 458:

    epugnance; it could have been no wo

  • Page 459 and 460:

    dilated until it filled the room, a

  • Page 461 and 462:

    As the man made no answer when I as

  • Page 463 and 464:

    and daylight, I dozed again; now, w

  • Page 465 and 466:

    finger that made me turn hot and si

  • Page 467 and 468:

    ‘There’s something worth spendi

  • Page 469 and 470:

    ‘You take it smoothly now,’ sai

  • Page 471 and 472:

    or three in the afternoon. He was t

  • Page 473 and 474:

    ‘Quite, sir.’ ‘I communicated

  • Page 475 and 476:

    very grain of the man. The influenc

  • Page 477 and 478:

    ed my face, appealing in dumb show

  • Page 479 and 480:

    Chapter 41 I n vain should I attemp

  • Page 481 and 482:

    as still and lifeless as the stairc

  • Page 483 and 484:

    ignorant determined man, who has lo

  • Page 485 and 486:

    ‘And you have, and are bound to h

  • Page 487 and 488:

    Chapter 42 ‘ Dear boy and Pip’s

  • Page 489 and 490:

    acquainted wi’ a man whose skull

  • Page 491 and 492:

    lodging, in case he should ever get

  • Page 493 and 494:

    wi’ - Stop though! I ain’t brou

  • Page 495 and 496:

    etwixt us? And when we’re sentenc

  • Page 497 and 498:

    Chapter 43 W hy should I pause to a

  • Page 499 and 500:

    only one night, and, on my return,

  • Page 501 and 502:

    ly, that if my own shoulder had urg

  • Page 503 and 504:

    ‘Wai-ter!,’ said Drummle, by wa

  • Page 505 and 506:

    Chapter 44 I n the room where the d

  • Page 507 and 508:

    ‘But when I fell into the mistake

  • Page 509 and 510:

    settling her hands upon her stick,

  • Page 511 and 512:

    ‘It is in my nature,’ she retur

  • Page 513 and 514:

    on this, you visionary boy - or man

  • Page 515 and 516:

    my name. ‘I was not quite sure, s

  • Page 517 and 518:

    the night, we stared at one another

  • Page 519 and 520:

    o’clock. The little servant happe

  • Page 521 and 522:

    ‘I wouldn’t go into that,’ sa

  • Page 523 and 524:

    him my opinion that it was not safe

  • Page 525 and 526:

    mended that even if you came back l

  • Page 527 and 528:

    Chapter 46 E ight o’clock had str

  • Page 529 and 530:

    ways at it.’ ‘At rum?’ said I

  • Page 531 and 532:

    up together, and taken hot, and it

  • Page 533 and 534:

    fire, I asked him first of all whet

  • Page 535 and 536:

    when the time comes you may be cert

  • Page 537 and 538:

    in a week, and he never brought me

  • Page 539 and 540:

    hope that was rent and given to the

  • Page 541 and 542:

    and who wouldn’t hear of anybody

  • Page 543 and 544:

    had ascended to the clouds in a lar

  • Page 545 and 546:

    on their faces, when there was an o

  • Page 547 and 548:

    Chapter 48 T he second of the two m

  • Page 549 and 550:

    Wemmick?’ Mr. Jaggers asked, soon

  • Page 551 and 552:

    ‘was rather painful to me.’ The

  • Page 553 and 554:

    ably unscrewed.’ I felt that this

  • Page 555 and 556:

    case. You may be sure,’ said Wemm

  • Page 557 and 558:

    Chapter 49 P utting Miss Havisham

  • Page 559 and 560:

    ‘You said, speaking for your frie

  • Page 561 and 562:

    there, and she took from her pocket

  • Page 563 and 564:

    influences; that, her mind, broodin

  • Page 565 and 566:

    long; you know what time the clocks

  • Page 567 and 568:

    withdrawing my head to go quietly a

  • Page 569 and 570:

    edly of what had happened, though w

  • Page 571 and 572:

    was much harder to strive against t

  • Page 573 and 574:

    a name,’ said Herbert, ‘but, sh

  • Page 575 and 576:

    ‘I think in my seventh year.’

  • Page 577 and 578:

    into the City, and took my way to L

  • Page 579 and 580:

    Mr. Jaggers looked at me inquiringl

  • Page 581 and 582:

    more frank and manly with me. I rem

  • Page 583 and 584:

    of his defence, how the fact stood

  • Page 585 and 586:

    I think it would hardly serve her,

  • Page 587 and 588:

    Chapter 52 F rom Little Britain, I

  • Page 589 and 590:

    ‘No doubt.’ ‘Where?’ It had

  • Page 591 and 592:

    would be too close upon the time of

  • Page 593 and 594:

    no height at all.’ ‘Does he eve

  • Page 595 and 596:

    Chapter 53 I t was a dark night, th

  • Page 597 and 598:

    just within the shelter of the door

  • Page 599 and 600:

    ‘Why have you lured me here?’

  • Page 601 and 602:

    ever know what I had suffered, how

  • Page 603 and 604:

    made a picture of the street with h

  • Page 605 and 606:

    Old Orlick’s a match for you and

  • Page 607 and 608:

    ‘but ain’t he just pale though!

  • Page 609 and 610:

    Among the loungers under the Boar

  • Page 611 and 612:

    more upon my mind than a fear or a

  • Page 613 and 614:

    Chapter 54 I t was one of those Mar

  • Page 615 and 616:

    in those days than it is in these;

  • Page 617 and 618:

    est of gentlemen in a foreign count

  • Page 619 and 620:

    care to lose none of it, and our st

  • Page 621 and 622:

    the idea that we were followed. As

  • Page 623 and 624:

    ‘I knows what I thinks,’ observ

  • Page 625 and 626:

    mine, that he and Startop had had a

  • Page 627 and 628:

    up, much as Provis was, and seemed

  • Page 629 and 630:

    The look-out was kept, long after a

  • Page 631 and 632:

    tion; but, it was dreadful to think

  • Page 633 and 634:

    Chapter 55 H e was taken to the Pol

  • Page 635 and 636:

    prised than he thought. ‘We shall

  • Page 637 and 638:

    week. ‘And Clara?’ said I. ‘T

  • Page 639 and 640:

    erate allowance, he said, with noth

  • Page 641 and 642:

    That discreet damsel was attired as

  • Page 643 and 644:

    shook hands with him, and wished hi

  • Page 645 and 646:

    an impression, from his manner or f

  • Page 647 and 648:

    That miserable man would seem for a

  • Page 649 and 650:

    this association. The daily visits

  • Page 651 and 652:

    A gentle pressure on my hand. ‘Yo

  • Page 653 and 654:

    ing the lamp, possessed by the idea

  • Page 655 and 656:

    still settled down into Joe. I open

  • Page 657 and 658:

    with pleasure to see the pride with

  • Page 659 and 660:

    ‘Miss Sarah,’ said Joe, ‘she

  • Page 661 and 662:

    into the country, where the rich su

  • Page 663 and 664:

    sary? There’s subjects enough as

  • Page 665 and 666:

    mine. Ah! Had I given Joe no reason

  • Page 667 and 668:

    good hand, and said, in what I thou

  • Page 669 and 670:

    Chapter 58 T he tidings of my high

  • Page 671 and 672:

    salt on. In happier times,’ addre

  • Page 673 and 674:

    say to Joseph. Here is Squires of t

  • Page 675 and 676:

    larks were soaring high over the gr

  • Page 677 and 678:

    had never breathed this last baffle

  • Page 679 and 680:

    then ceased to tremble under old Bi

  • Page 681 and 682:

    ‘No, no,’ said Biddy, gently.

  • Page 683 and 684:

    Those attractions in it, I had seen

  • Page 685:

    e. I have been bent and broken, but

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