British Coins and Medals - St James's Auctions

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British Coins and Medals - St James's Auctions

British Coins and Medals

1 Celtic coinage, Durotriges (mid 1 st century BC – mid 1 st century AD), uninscribed silver stater,

crude head of Apollo r., rev. disjointed horse l., tail extends upwards, pellet in ring before, pellet

below (S.366), about very fine; Victoria, crown, 1845, star edge stops, young head l., rev. crowned

shield of arms within wreath (S.3882; ESC.282A), fine (2) £80-100

2 Visigoths, pseudo-imperial series in the name of Justinian I (527-63), tremissis, bust of

Justinian r., rev. Victory advancing r., wt. 1.41gms. (cf. W. Tomasini, The Barbaric Tremissis

in Spain and Southern France, Anastasius to Leovigild, ANS NNM 152, 1964, 297), nearly

extremely fine, very rare £1500-2000

3 Edward III, third coinage, third period (1346-51), noble, London, large lettering, king with

sword and shield stg. facing in ship, chevron barred A, rev. ornate cross, E in centre, wt.8.27gms.

(S.1481; N. 1110), some surface marks, typical for this coinage, very fine or better, very rare £3500-4000

4 Edward III, fourth coinage, pre-treaty period (1351-1361), noble, London, class E, mm. cross

3, annulet stops, king with sword and shield stg. facing in ship, rev. ornate cross, E in centre,

wt.7.77gms. (S.1490; N.1180; Schneider 24, same obverse die), extremely fine £2500-3000


5 Henry IV, heavy coinage (1399-1412), noble, mm. cross pattée, London, king with sword and

shield standing and facing in ship, crescent on rudder, rev. new royal arms with three lis in French

quarters, Type 1b, Shield 2, wt. 7.70gms. (S.1706; N.1336 [ER]; cf. Schneider.194, different dies),

slightly soft on the king’s hair, otherwise extremely fine, an unusually full round coin and a handsome piece,

extremely rare thus £20,000-25,000

The gold noble coinage (23ct fine, or .995 pure gold) of this reign was officially reduced in weight (from 120 gr.

to 108 gr.) early in 1412. The earlier Heavy Coinage varieties, such as the example offered here, all bear one of

four initial or mint marks -- the crescent, coronet, star or pellet -- by which they are most easily distinguished

from subsequent issues. While the style did not change from that of the previous reign, these were the first gold

issues of the House of Lancaster. One of the main purposes of issuing these coins was for merchants’ use in the

Flemish weavers’ trade, and in fact since Edward III the noble had existed in large part as an international trade

coin, but also of course for homeland banking transactions. Numerous imitations made in Flanders undermined

confidence in the wool-for-gold trade in England while in Flanders Flemish law forbade use of the real thing,

the English gold coin. In this reign, for over a decade, the English weight remained as it had from the previous

reign, but so many imitations circulated in England that a crisis was reached by 1408. The competing coins did

not represent the same value in gold content. A decision had to be reached, either to convert the imitations or

to bring the English noble to the same gold value. The latter course of action was chosen as most efficacious.

Fineness was maintained but the weight was reduced to match that of the Flemish piece. It is uncertain exactly

when lighter pieces began to be struck thereafter, but Easter of 1412 marked the official date of change.

For the early Heavy Coinage, mintage had slowed to a halt at Calais by 1404, while London Mint production

continued albeit much reduced, accounting for the rarity of these coins today. London production began again

in considerable numbers following the weight reduction of 1412. This brief period up to 1412 provides modern

collectors with one of the most intriguing gold issues for study. Heavy Nobles are rare per se, let alone in such

a condition as is seen on this outstanding specimen.


6 Henry V (1413-1422), noble, type C, London, king with sword and shield stg. facing in ship,

mullet by sword arm, broken annulet on ship, rev. ornate cross, h in centre, wt. 6.97gms. (S.1742;

N.1371), good very fine or better £1400-1600

* ex Reigate Hoard, sold Glendining, 8 December 1992, lot 22

7 Henry VI, annulet issue (1422-c.1430), noble, London, king with sword and shield stg. facing in

ship, annulet by sword arm, rev. ornate cross, h in centre, annulet in one spandrel, wt.6.92gms.

(S.1799; N.1414; Whitton [II]), about extremely fine, well struck, an excellent example £3000-3500


8 Henry VI, annulet issue (1422-c.1430), noble, London, king with sword and shield stg. facing in

ship, annulet by sword arm, rev. ornate cross, h in centre, annulet in one spandrel, wt. 6.96gms.

(S.1799; N.1414), extremely fine £3000-3500

9 Edward IV, first reign, light coinage (1464-1470), ryal, London, mm. crown, king with sword

and shield stg. facing in ship, E on banner at stern, rev. rose upon radiate sun in centre of

ornate cross, large fleurs in spandrels, wt. 7.55gms. (S.1950; N.1549), a little creased, good very

fine £1400-1600

10 Edward IV, first reign, light coinage (1464-1470), ryal, continental imitation of London type,

king with sword and shield stg. facing in ship, E on banner at stern, rev. rose upon radiate sun in

centre of ornate cross, wt. 7.42gms. (S.1952), lightly cleaned, otherwise about very fine £700-800


11 Edward IV, second reign, angel, mm. annulet (1471-3), the archangel Michael slaying the dragon,

rev. ship holding shield, cross above, E and rose at sides, wt. 5.11gms. (S.2091; N.1626), about

extremely fine £1400-1600

A most attractive piece.

12 Edward IV, second reign (1471-1483), angel, mm. pierced cross, the archangel Michael slaying

the dragon, rev. ship holding shield, cross above, E and rose at sides, wt. 5.07gms. (S.2091;

N.1626), slightly clipped, otherwise about very fine £600-700

13 Richard III (1483-1485), groat, type 3, London, mm. halved sun and rose 3, crowned bust

facing within tressure, rev. long cross with three pellets in each angle (S.2157; N.1679), in plastic holder,

graded by NGC as XF40, about extremely fine with an excellent portrait, scarce in this grade £2250-2500


14 Henry VII (1485-1509), halfgroat, profile issue, probably Canterbury, mm. rose, crowned bust r.,

rev. shield of arms (S.2261; N.1751/2), some weakness in legend, otherwise extremely fine, very rare £150-200

With a superb portrait of the king.

15 Henry VIII, second coinage (1526-44), crown of the double rose, London, mm. lis, crowned

double rose between crowned h-K, rev. crowned shield of arms between crowned h-K, wt. 3.69gms.

(S.2274; N. 1788; Whitton [iii]), nearly extremely fine, an excellent example £2500-3000

16 Henry VIII, second coinage (1526-44), halfcrown, London, mm. rose, crowned double rose

between h-K, rev. crowned shield of arms, h-K at sides, wt. 1.90gms. (S. 2285; N. 1794; Whitton

[i]), nearly extremely fine, an excellent example, rare £2500-3000


17 Henry VIII, third coinage (1544-1547), sovereign, London, mm. lis, king enthroned facing,

holding orb and sceptre, rose below, rev. crowned shield of arms with lion and griffin supporters,

HR below (S.2290; N.1824), in plastic holder, graded by NGC as VF35, good very fine, struck on a full flan

with a good portrait, rare £15,000-16,000


18 Henry VIII, third coinage (1544-1547), half sovereign, Tower mint, mm. pellet in annulet, king

enthroned facing, holding orb and sceptre, rose below, rev. crowned shield of arms with lion and

griffin supporters, wt. 5.99gms. (S.2294; N.1827), some weakness, small piece clipped from edge, otherwise

about extremely fine, good portrait and struck on a full flan £4000-4500

19 Henry VIII, posthumous coinage (1547-1551), half sovereign, Southwark, mm. -/S, Edward VI

enthroned facing, holding orb and sceptre, rose below, rev. crowned shield of arms with lion and

griffin supporters, wt. 5.92gms. (S.2394; N.1866), some slight weaknesses, good very fine for issue, with a

good portrait £2500-3000


20 † Edward VI, second period (1549-1550), sovereign, mm. y, king enthroned facing, holding orb

and sceptre, rev. crowned shield of arms with lion and griffin supporters, ER below (S.2433;

N.1906), in plastic holder, graded by NGC as VF30, some weaknesses, otherwise very fine with a good

portrait £14,000-15,000

21 Edward VI, second period, half sovereign, mm. arrow (1547-8), crowned young bust r.,

EDWARD VI…legend, rev. crowned, garnished arms, E-R at sides, SCVTVM… legend

(S.2438; N.1908), in plastic holder, graded by NGC as VF35, good very fine with an excellent

portrait £4000-4500


22 Edward VI, third period, fine sovereign, mm. ostrich head (1551), crowned figure of king

enthroned facing, holding orb and sceptre, portcullis at feet, rev. shield of arms at centre of fullblown

rose, 15.03gms. (S.2446; N.1926; Schneider 701), this handsome and exceedingly rare coin was

purchased by Jonathan Rashleigh at the famous E. J. Shepherd sale in 1885. Subsequently repaired in the right

hand field it is otherwise a full and well struck piece, almost very fine and with a clear portrait. It is believed that

only six examples are in private hands £30,000-35,000

* ex Rev. E.J. Shepherd, Sotheby, 22 July 1885, lot 227, sold for £17/5/ex

E. Rashleigh, Sotheby, 28 June 1909, lot 811

ex Dr. R.J. Cassel, Glendining, 3 December 1924, lot 269

ex Thellusson, Sotheby’s, 19 October 1931, lot 43

ex C. Corbally Browne, Sotheby’s, 25 March 1935, lot 252

ex Spink Numismatic Circular, September 1979

ex Spink 38, 1983, lot 6

ex Noble Numismatics 43, November 1993, lot 2688


23 24

23 Edward VI, first period (1547-1549), portrait halfgroat, Canterbury, no mm., crowned bust r.,

reads EDOARD as usual for Canterbury mint, rev. shield over cross, S of TAS over N (S.2459;

N.1901; BNJ 1971, plate 2, no. 73), small metal flaw on king’s nose, otherwise very fine for issue, extremely

rare, especially in this condition £350-400

24 Edward VI, third period, very base issue, shilling, Tower mint, mm. y (1551), crowned bust 6 to

r., rev. garnished, oval shield of arms, E-R at sides, wt. 3.93gms. (S.2473A; N.1943/2), slightly weak

striking, fine or better for issue, rare £400-600

Hitherto unpublished with this date (see RC-B 210, SNC June 1950). This coin could be RC-B no V552 (Seaby

4448 27/6d), not sold through the Bulletin and returned to RC-B on 16 December 1952. Not mentioned by Potter

(1962) or Bispham (1985) in their BNJ articles.

25 Edward VI, fine silver coinage, crown, mm. y, 1551, crowned figure of king on horseback r.,

shouldering sword, date below, rev. long cross fourchée over shield of arms (S.2478; N.1933;

Lingford dies A-5), good very fine £4500-5000

This type (A5) is very rare in this condition – Lingford could only muster an example in Fine.

26 Edward VI, fine silver coinage, crown, mm. tun, 1552, crowned figure of king on horseback r.,

shouldering sword, date below, rev. long cross fourchée over shield of arms (S.2478; N.1933; die B12),

light tooling on both sides, otherwise practically extremely fine, toned £4000-4500


27 28

27 Edward VI, fine silver coinage, sixpence, mm. y (1551), crowned bust facing between rose and

mark of value, rev. long cross fourchée over shield of arms (S.2483; N.1938), die flaw on face, good

very fine £400-500

28 Philip and Mary, shilling, 1555, English titles only, busts face-to-face, crown above, dividing

date rev. crowned, garnished shield of arms, legend reads POSVIMVS, second V over S (S.2501;

N.1968), fine £600-700

29 Philip and Mary, shilling, 1555; sixpence, 1554, busts face-to-face, crown above, dividing date,

rev. crowned, garnished shield of arms (S.2501/05; N.1968/70), fair to about fine (2) £300-350

30 Elizabeth I, third and fourth issues, half angel, mm. coronet (1573-8), the archangel Michael

slaying the dragon, rev. ship holding shield, cross above, E and rose above, wt. 2.47gms. (S.2517;

N.1992/1; B&C. D3), small crease, otherwise very fine, exceedingly rare £2000-2500

This appears to be only the second specimen known of this very rare mint mark, the other piece being the Hird,

Carlyon Britton and Ryan specimen sold at Christies, 26 February 1991, lot 601.


31 Elizabeth I, second issue, half pound, mm. cross crosslet (1560-1561), crowned bust l., rev.

crowned shield of arms, ER at sides, wt. 5.42gms. (S.2520; N.1994), good very fine £3500-4000

32 Elizabeth I, second issue, half pound, mm. cross crosslet (1560-1561), crowned bust l., rev.

crowned shield of arms, ER at sides, wt. 5.59gms. (S.2520; N.1994), good very fine £3000-3250


33 Elizabeth I, sixth issue, angel, mm. crescent (1587-89), the archangel Michael slaying the dragon,

rev. ship holding shield, cross above, E and rose above, wt. 5.11gms. (S.2531; N.2005; B&C C22),

very fine £2500-3000

34 Elizabeth I, sixth issue, pound, mm. woolpack (1594-1596), crowned bust l. wearing elaborate

dress, rev. crowned shield of arms, ER at sides, wt.11.16gms. (S.2534; N.2008; Schneider 799),

extremely fine, on full flan with an excellent portrait, small ‘dig’ by E of E-R on reverse with corresponding

obverse mark smoothed £7000-8000

* ex Pellegrino Collection, sold Spink, Zurich, 26 April 1978

35 Elizabeth I, third and fourth issues, halfgroat, mm. portcullis (1566), crowned bust l. (B&C

4D), rev. shield of arms, wt. 1.02gms. (S.2567; N.1999; BCW.PT-2/PT-a), a little clipped at 6 o’clock,

good very fine, extremely rare £250-300

Only a few specimens of this mintmark are known. This is only the second example with Bust 4D that has come

onto the market in the last 50 years and is superior to that offered in Spink Auction 140, lot 483.


36 Elizabeth I, third and fourth issues, threehalfpence, mm. portcullis, 1566, crowned bust l. (B&C

3G), rev. shield of arms, date above (S.2569; N.2000; BCW.PT-1A/PT-a), slightly creased and weakly

struck on obverse, fair/about fine, scarce mintmark for denomination £40-60

37 Elizabeth I, sixth issue, shilling, mm. key (1595-1598), crowned bust l., rev. long cross

fourchée over shield (S.2577; N.2014), a few light scratches on obverse and slightly creased, good fine;

Charles I, shilling, Tower mint, group D, mm. crown (1635-6), crowned bust l., mark of

value behind, rev. oval, garnished shield of arms (S.2791; N.2225), weakly struck in places, good

fine (2) £80-100

* ex Montville Collection

38 Elizabeth I, sixth issue, halfgroat, mm. bell (1582-3), crowned bust l., variety without pellets

as mark of value behind bust, rev. shield of arms, wt. 0.97gms. (S.2579; N.2016; B&C bust 6D;

BCW.BL-1/BL-a1), about fine £50-60

The stops after TAS. and DON. on the reverse signifies this is an early striking (not as good as that offered in St.

James’s Auction 9 [lot 562] but fuller weight and flan).

39 Elizabeth I, seventh issue, crown, mm. 1 (1601-1602), crowned bust l., with orb and sceptre, rev.

shield of arms (S.2582; N.2012), virtually extremely fine with a superb portrait, rare thus £7000-8000

* ex Baldwin’s Auction 48, 26.9.06, “One Hundred Numismatic Rarities”, lot 5021, realised £7290 inclusive.


40 James I, first coinage, gold crown, mm. thistle (1603-4), crowned bust r., rev. crowned shield of

arms, IR at sides, wt. 2.75gms. (S. 2611; N.2068; Schneider 4 [same dies]), slight crease across crown,

otherwise good very fine, extremely rare £15,000-17,000

* ex Bank of England, Sotheby, 13 July 1877, lot 22, sold for 14/ex

W Brice, collection purchased en bloc by H Montagu, 1887

ex H Montagu, Sotheby, 13 November 1896, lot 160

ex B Roth, Sotheby, 19 July 1917, lot 298

ex R C Lockett, Glendining, 11 October 1956, lot 2069

ex R D Beresford-Jones, Spink Auction 29, 2 June 1983, lot 82

ex D Dupree, collection purchased en bloc by Spink, 1989

ex Spink Auction 75, 29 March 1990, lot 200

ex Spink Auction 176, 30 November 2005, lot 465

It is believed that there are only five examples of this denomination in private hands.

41 James I, second coinage, rose ryal, mm. trefoil over tower both sides (1613), crowned figure of

king enthroned facing, holding orb and sceptre, portcullis at feet, rev. shield of arms at centre

of full-blown rose, wt. 13.79gms. (S.2613; N.2079), good very fine, with a pleasing portrait, very rare

mintmark £8000-9000

42 James I, electrotype of reverse of half angel, mm. cinquefoil (Grueber 541), probably early

20thC by Ready, very fine £80-100

James I half angel (S.2617) is a very rare coin.


43 James I, third coinage (1619-1625), rose ryal, mm. thistle, crowned figure of king enthroned

facing, holding orb and sceptre, portcullis at feet, rev. long cross fourchée over shield of arms,

mark of value above, all within ornate border, wt. 12.43gms. (S.2632; N.2108), struck on a large full

flan, extremely fine, a superb coin, very rare this choice £12,500-15,000

44 James I, first coinage, shilling, mm. thistle (1603-1604), transitional bust, crowned bust r., mark

of value behind, rev. shield of arms (S.2645A; N.-), slightly creased, fine, very rare £400-600

This variety was first published in the Spink Numismatic Circular in January 2007.


45 James I, second coinage, shilling, mm. tun (1615-1616), crowned fifth bust r., mark of value

behind, rev. shield of arms (S.2656; N.2101), a piece of ‘fine work’, extremely fine, reverse better, virtually

as struck £2750-3250

This piece is as good an example, if not better, as Lingford, lot 1218.

46 James I, third coinage, crown, mm. trefoil (1624), crowned figure of king on horseback r.

shouldering sword, rev. garnished shield of arms (S.2664; N.2120), in plastic holder, graded by PCGS

as VF20, fine, reverse better £650-700

With an interesting misstrike in the obverse legend.

47 James I, third coinage (1619-1625), crown, mm. lis (1623-4), crowned figure of king on horseback

r. shouldering sword, rev. shield of arms, plume above (S.2665; N.2121), in plastic holder, graded by

PCGS as VF20, good fine £700-750


48 James I, shilling, mm. lis; Henry VI, groat, Calais; Henry VIII, groat, fine to very fine (3) £200-250

49 Charles I, unite, Tower mint, bust 5, mm. tun (1636-8), crowned bust l., mark of value behind,

rev. crowned, oval, garnished shield, CR at sides, wt. 8.93gms. (S.2692; N.2153; JGB.97; Schneider

156), nearly extremely fine with a good portrait £2000-2200

50 Charles I, double crown, Tower mint, mm. crown (1635-6), bust l., mark of value behind, rev.

crowned oval shield of arms, wt. 4.46gms. (S.2703), slight crease, good fine £500-600

51 Charles I, gold crown, Tower mint, mm. anchor (1628-9), crowned fourth bust l., mark of value

behind, rev. crowned oval shield dividing CR, wt. 2.26gms. (S.2715; N.2185), good very fine £600-700


52 Charles I, pattern angel, by Nicholas Briot, mm. B (1631-39), St. Michael slaying the dragon,

mark of value X for 10 shillings above the dragon’s head, legend CAROLVS D G MAG BRITANN

FRAN ET HIB REX around and separated from field by a thin-line circle, rev. intricately

detailed man o’ war, 3-masted ship with royal arms on mainsail, legend AMOR POPVLI

PRAESIDIVM REGIS around, mm. B for Briot between border and prow of ship, plain edge,

wt. 4.19gms. (S.2718; N.2665; Brooker 1247; W&R.32[R6]; Schneider 270), some slight surface

marks, extremely fine and bold in strike, full flan showing complete outer beaded rims, only 3 examples

in private collections, including this piece, which was originally pierced as a touch piece to the left of St.

Michael’s arm and subsequently plugged £25,000-30,000

By the early seventeenth century, the gold angel was a seldom seen denomination, not known to most of the

population of England. Traditionally it had often been chosen for good luck because St. Michael was considered to

be depicted slaying the Devil, and because of this it became the favoured coin for the ancient ‘laying on of hands’

ceremony, in which the king or queen (often symbolically) handed the coin to an ailing subject, who believed in the

monarch’s God-given power to heal and generally wore the coin (possessing this power) presented to him around

his neck on a ribbon for the rest of his life, in order to keep the Devil and his ailments at bay. Such coins became

amulets, never again used as money. When one did appear in the reign of Charles I, it tended to be pierced as a

result of this superstitious practice, and in fact many were pierced immediately upon being struck as their intended

use was as these ‘touch pieces’. Some researchers believe that the size of the hole indicates how much gold was kept

by a jeweller or by the mint as the fee for the service of piercing and providing a ribbon with which to wear such

a coin. Angels had also long been popular as good-luck pieces, favoured by sea-faring men and sometimes placed

in the hulls of ships.

Little is definitively known about the earliest patterns, where rarity takes on new meaning inasmuch as these pieces

tend to trade hands with far less frequency than do milled patterns, which might be equal in rarity yet tend to

come up for sale more frequently. The present coin is dramatic in design with a depth of detail seen on almost

no other angels, of any period. Peter Woodhead (Schneider Collection, Volume 2, commentary opposite Plate 20)

cites research that called this coin a touch piece struck for the Scottish coronation in 1633, while other scholars

variously argued for its being a pattern or just a Briot issue, with just 4 examples being known. The fact that this

extraordinary piece, most likely never intended for commerce and of special manufacture, was once pierced makes

it all the more enchanting, given its sheer rarity. Why it was made is an intriguing thought. Remembering, too,

that traditionally legends on coins were chosen to impart good luck, or as blessings upon a reign, the legend here

acquires an ironic sentiment for collectors, as it must have in its day among royalists, translating from the Latin to

mean ‘The Love of the People Is the King’s Protection’. Within about a decade of the minting of this coin, the

people’s protection of their sovereign withered before Cromwell’s army.


53 Charles I, triple unite, Oxford mint, mm. plume, 1642, crowned tall, narrow bust l., holding

sword and olive branch, rev. declaration on continuous scroll, three plumes above with mark of

value, wt. 26.92gms. (S.2724; N.2381), slight weakness on king’s arm, otherwise a really good very fine or

better, very rare £35,000-45,000


54 Charles I, unite, Oxford mint, mm. plume/-, 1643, crowned bust l., holding sword and olive

branch, mark of value behind, rev. declaration on scroll, date below, three plumes above, wt. 8.69gms.

(S.2734; N.2389), some weakness around edges, otherwise good very fine with a strong portrait £4500-5000

* ex Heckett collection, Sotheby’s, 25 May 1977

55 † Charles I, unite, Oxford mint, mm. plume/-, 1643, crowned bust l., holding sword and olive

branch, mark of value behind, rev. declaration on scroll, date below, three plumes above (S.2735A;

N.2389; Brooker 854), in plastic holder, graded by NGC as XF40, a little weak on chest, otherwise very

fine £5500-6000

56 † Charles I, half unite, Oxford mint, no mm., 1643, crowned bust l., to edge of coin, mark of

value behind, rev. declaration on scroll, date below, three plumes above ( S.2742; N.2395), in plastic

holder, graded by NGC as XF40, some flan flaws and weaknesses, otherwise about very fine £3500-4000


57 Charles I, crown, Tower mint, type 2b2, mm. harp (1632-3), crowned figure of king on horseback

l., holding sword, rev. oval, garnished shield of arms (S.2757; N.2193), in plastic holder, graded by

NGC as VF25, good fine/very fine £1300-1400

58 Charles I, crown, Tower mint, under Parliament, type 4, mm. eye (1645), crowned figure of king

on horseback l., shouldering sword, rev. oval, garnished shield of arms (S.2761; N.2198), small edge

split at 4 o’clock on obverse, slightly double struck, about extremely fine £1500-2000

59 Charles I, halfgroat, mm. triangle (1639-40); Charles II, maundy twopences (2): 1678/6; 1683;

maundy penny, 1677; William & Mary, maundy fourpence, 1689; George III, maundy pennies

(2): 1786; 1818 (S.2832/3388/90/3439/3759/96), fine to about extremely fine (7) £80-100

* ex Montville Collection

60 61

60 Charles I, Briot’s first milled issue (1631-1632), crown, mm. flower/B, crowned figure of king

on horseback l., brandishing sword, rev. crowned, oval, garnished shield, crowned CR at sides

(S.2852; N.2298), slight edge flaw, about fine £650-750

The first milled crown.

61 Charles I, halfcrown, York mint (1643-1644), type 7, mm. lion, crowned figure of king on

horseback l., brandishing sword, horse’s tail shows between hind legs, rev. crowned oval,

garnished shield of arms (S.2869; N.2315), toned, slight edge flaw at 6 o’clock on obverse, about

very fine £300-400


62 Charles I, groat, Oxford mint, mm. floriated cross, 1644, Oxford bust left within inner circle,

rev. declaration in centre, Shrewsbury plume and two lis above, date and OX below (S.2985;

N.2462; Brooker 956), in plastic holder, graded by NGC as AU50, almost extremely fine £525-575

63 Charles I, crown, Truro mint (1642-1643), mm. rose, crowned figure of king on horseback l.,

brandishing sword, king’s sash in two loose ends and he looks forward, rev. round garnished

shield of arms (S.3045; N.2531), toned, struck on a full round flan, some weakness on obverse through king’s

name, some small edge knocks on reverse, almost very fine, scarce £700-800

64 Charles I, halfcrown, Salopia (Shrewsbury) mint (1644), mm. lis, king on horseback l., grass

beneath, rev. crowned round shield of arms (S.3127; Allen K6), very fine for issue, extremely

rare £3000-4000

65 66

65 Charles I, Newark besieged, shilling, 1645, arched crown between C-R, mark of value below, rev.

OBS NEWARK, date below (S.3143; N.2640), about very fine £650-750

66 Charles I, Pontefract besieged, shilling, 1648, octagonal, in the name of Charles II, crown

above C-R, rev. castle gateway with flag dividing P-C, a cannon projecting from r. tower, to l., OBS

(S.3150; N.2648), a really good fine, rare £2750-3250

* ex Seaby, 1983

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