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248 TYLNEY HALL.

he transported his hothouse plants into the open air, crop-

ped all his choicest buds and blossoms to make bouquets

and fill baskets; nor did it make him amends for his real

flowers, to see artificial ones in wreaths and festoons decorating

his favourite " old statutes," so that Mercury looked

as if he was going to dance in a ballet, and Neptune as if he

had just come from Covent Garden. The grooms grew

weary of galloping express on coach-horses, as the jealous

tradespeople of the village tardily executed, or altogether

neglected, the stray orders for forgotten articles which they

grumbled " had better have been had down from London,

like the rest." To crown the confusion, the cub arrived

full of boisterous spirits, and began to amuse himself with

a whole flock of larks, a phrase that indicated those prac-

tical jokes, in which persons of limited capacity are so apt

to indulge. He locked the butler in his pantry sent off

the footmen, when most in request, on frivolous errands

plugged the pipes of keys fastened chairs together set

tables topsy-turvy shut the cat in the china-closet fas-

tened the house-dog to the gate-bell and then was dis-

covered ranting as Belvidera, with his clumsy person thrust

into a new dress that had just been sent home for his

sister. 'Tilda screamed and scolded, the mother begged

and prayed but the mischievous spirit of this domestic

Caliban was not properly quelled till Twigg senior had ten

times turned him out of the business, twenty times cut

him off with a shilling, and, at last, given him a sound

cuffing with his own fatherly hands.

It seemed impossible that the festive preparations could

be completed by the given day ; but the time came, and

every thing was in order. As the cub had predicted, the

governor had rolled a great many entertainments into one.

In the centre of the lawn stood a large marquee, containing

an ample cold collation, which made a very showy appearance,

the principal dishes being kept cold by the new massive

silver covers, each surmounted by the family emblem, a bee,

big enough for a cockchafer. Above this pavillion waved, or

rather should have waved, a broad silken banner, that had

often fluttered and flaunted in the procession of the Worshipful

Company of Ironmongers, but now, for want of

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