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396 TYLNEY HALL.

but in reality because she could not endure to remain an

inmate of the house since it became the property of her

nephew. His ill-disguised exultation had not escaped her

notice ; his dismissal of some of the oldest servants, con-

trary to his uncle's express injunction, excited her indignation

; and the haughty bearing he suddenly assumed, in

striking contrast to his adulation of herself, seemed to justify

the personal antipathy she had preconceived towards

him. She even began to entertain vague suspicions with

which she hardly dared to trust herself ; and the frankness

of her nature would not allow her to profess affection where

she felt dislike, or to pretend to confidence where she enter-

tained nothing but jealousy and mistrust. In spite therefore

of the most urgent remonstrances and the warmest

protestations from St. Kitts, who represented himself as

one who would be totally bereaved by her absence, she persisted

in her course, and the wheels of the Justice's car-

riage, as they rolled away with her, became wheels of torture

to the Creole, or, as he must now be called, Sir Walter.

"

There, she goes, curse her," he muttered between his

teeth, " to sow the seeds of her own infernal doubts and

fancies in the mind of Grace : she hates me, I know she

does, and my love in that quarter is as likely to thrive by

her countenance as a peach under a north wall."

To the Scotchwoman, who accompanied her mistress, the

change was equally desirable : educated in the serious and

somewhat rigid religious principles of her country, she

criticised with proportionate alarm the proceedings of the

new master of the house, who had gradually imbibed some

of the sceptical notions of his foster-mother. As men are

apt in such cases, he sought to reconcile himself to his infraction

of the divine laws, by disputing their authority.

Accordingly, to the great horror of Tibbie, he discontinued

the family devotions, in which, agreeable to old practice,

Sir Mark and his domestics had met and mingled in their

petitions and thanksgivings to the throne of grace ; nor did

Sir Walter, like his predecessor, attend punctually at the

parish church on each Sabbath, to join in the responses

with sonorous emphasis, or receive the pastor's final bene-

diction with a devout amen. In leaving such a house, the

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