PRANAVA-VADA

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PRANAVA-VADA

PRANAVA-VADA

VOL. III.


THE SCIENCE OF THE SACRED WORD

BEING A SUMMARISED TRANSLATION

OF

THE PRANAVA-VADA

OF

GARGYAYANA

BY

BRAGA VAN DAS, M.A.

with notes by Annie Besant

VOL. III.

Theosophical Publishing Bouse, Adyap, Kadras, India

1913


SECTION III. (Oontinued.)

CHAPTER XXVII.

PARA AND APARA-PRAKJ.tTI.

Light and shade as Para and A para-prakrti.­

JivatIria as the third.-The next stage of condensation

as saHva, rajas and tamas; corresponding

to ..A.tma-(orJivatma-) prakrti, ParaandApari

respectively.-Endless repetitions of these and

further and further condensatiolls.-M an a s, bU9-

9hi, and ahailkara.-ChiHa, mahaHva and mamatva.-Thence

three akash It s.-Thence three

vayus, and so on.-Endless triplets, even denser

than earth.-Other counts, by sevens, etc.-Formations

of Il'toms by action and re-action.

New facts and names arise out of this conjUllction

of light and shade that was described

in the preceding chapter. Light is Par ap

l' a k r t j; shadow is A par ii.-p l' a k r P; the

t picture' born of the two is the J i v it t m i1.

Out of the conjunctions of this triplet of Par it,

A par it 3.nd J i v it t m ii, arises the other triplet

of sat t v a, r It j a s, and tam It s. The first is

At m a-p l' It k r t i, i.e., the Self Itself (the

possessor of the light); raj as is Pit l' a-p r a k r t i

or prakaB.ha, light; tamas (darkness)

is A pit r it-p l' a k r t i.1 In other words, the I is

1 In the preceding chapter, A par a t m a was

said to possess the quality of light and to reside


164

PRA:tlAVA-VAVA.

become," says the Brahma-Sft{1·a. And again:

From one kind of expansive and contractive

vibration, spa n g a and s p h u raJ). a, is born

one (kind of substance). (In other words, the

same root-matter, M 11 1 a-prakrti, in different

kinds of vibrations, appears as different

substances, with different sense-qualities).

From the vibrations of r 11 p a, there is born

taste, which can be felt only when visible shape

is definitely present already.

Finally, from the vibrations of taste, is born

smell. In each one is included the 'experience'

of another. (? Also, each one of the sensations

of anyone sense has a specifically corresponding

sensation belonging to each one of the other

senses, e.g., sweet smell, sweet taste, sweet appearance,

sweet touch, sweet sound). Medical

science (in the department of Chemistry) tells

us how such and such an odour may be produced

out of such and such a taste belonging

to such and such a substance.

The sense-qualities belong to their respective

substances and sense-organs, universally. (The

same vibrations of the same atom will constitute

the same substance, and will produce the

same sensation in or on the receiving organs

constituted in the same way, in any time and

any space. In other words, given the same

constitution of sense-organ, and of the vibrating

,..

LOVE AND HATE. 165

atom, the resultant sensation experienced will

be the same, in all times and all spaces).

The well-known quintuplication, p a fi chi·

k a r a Q a, l of the elements, has arisen in this

wise. When the less known two other elements

become manifest, then sap t i-k a r a l}. a or

septuplication will be generally recognised.

By the' conquest' of this sense-multiplication,

this innate tendency to evolve new sense-qualities,

substances, sense-organs, etc., 1 a y a is

secured. 'Conquest' here means abolition, annihilation.

It is true that complete annihilation

of anything is not possible. Yet at the same

time we see that I a y a is a constant and

nnignorable fact also-in the way of inaction,

sleep, by means of the Negation. It is ever

present in the Logion. The condition between

I and' This is I a y a, dissolution, reabsorptionl

the point of neutrality wherein both factorS'

become concealed. It is also the condition

between This and Not, and between Not and I;

1 In current Ver!anta works, this word means that

at the present stage of our evolution these five

elements exist for us united in a definite proportion,

a moiety of each (giving the name) plus onequarter

of the other half consisting of each of the

other four. But here the word seems to mean

simply the 'becoming or making five' of what

was the one root-matter.


iv

find it of some help in the culture and regulation of

their emotional nature, the soundness and purity of

which lie at the root of human welfare.

The Indian Review, Madras, July, 1901.

THE SCIENCE OF PEACE Rs. 4-8-0

It The student should carefully study Bhaga.van

Das' Science of Peace, in which the metaphysical

questions involved are expounded with rare acumen

and felicity."

ANNIE BESANT (A Study in Oonsciousness, p. 6.)

Writing a series of articles on the subject; in

The Theosophist (1909), Mrs. Annie Besant said in a

prefatory note; It These articles are an exposition

of one of the most valuable books issued under

the inspiration of 'I.'heosophy, The Science of Peace,

by Bhagavan Das. Those who, seek a lasting intellectual

foundation for their thinking will find

much help from this valuable and original work."

THE SCIENCE OF SOCIAL ORGANISATION·

. ,

OR THE LAWS OF MANU IN THE LIGHT

OF THEOSOPHY Rs. 2-8-0.

Popular edition 1-8-0.

" Admirable Convention Lectures ..• A rare

combination of deep learning and felicitous phrasing."

ANNIE BESANT (Theosophy in India, 1910.)

.. This book, like others from the same pen, has

the indefinable quality of distinction: subtlety and

v

precision of thought, scholarly culture and urbanity

of expression all mingling to. produce something

eminently readable and provocative of re:H.ection.

A great subject has been presented in a clear

and pleasant way ... Weare shown, with .••

admirable skill and lucidity, what J)harma meant

to the age in which it was given. For those who

look forward to a great revival of Indian spirituality,

The Science of Social Organisation by Bhaga.van

Das is rich in instruction ... An admirable·

organon of the new idealism, which, though new in

its hopes and aspirations, is yet reonian in its

sources, and which, through the cyclic process of the

Aryan race, must eventually bring back all the

scattered members of that race to the level of

thought and aspiration from which many thousands

of yea.rs a.go, they started on their long journey ...

... A book of the highest excellence and value.

... A work which is clearly the outcome of long

years of thonght and study, but which has also,

just as clearly, been a labour of love."

PROf!'. E. A. WODEHciuSE, M. A. (OXON.)

(The O. H. O. Magazine, October, 1910.)

"A revelation ... of the scientific principles which

underlie our old social organisatiou ... It has been a

delight and an instruction to read the work."

MAHAMAHOPADHYAYA PAiwIT ADITYARAM BHATIA­

OHARTA, M. A., F. A. u., late Professor of Samskrt,

Muir College, Allahabad.


PAGE LiNE FOR READ:

220 11 Soheme, Soheme

218 22 )

222 25 If, SO, Hso,

248 26 love love,

"

X

14 Manifests Manifests,

252 27 xiii., xiii.)

253 29 where in wherein

272 1 samiihara samiihiira

355 27 Kundiilini KumJiilini

361 25 prapbimbiis ••• prap bim b8.B

27 sound Bound,

"

VOLUME III.

PAGE LINE FOR READ:

6 27 (of ohitta,) of ohitta,

35 21 iva jiva

38 19 bhriitrtvena bhriitrtvena.

94. 29 ohohn

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