Views
5 years ago

The Prince George's County Historic Preservation Program

The Prince George's County Historic Preservation Program

The Prince George's County Historic Preservation

The Prince George’s County Historic Preservation Program Greenbelt Center School This brochure was prepared by the Historic Preservation Section, Countywide Planning Division of the Prince George’s County Planning Department/M-NCPPC. For more information, contact the Prince George’s County Historic Preservation Commission, c/o M-NCPPC, County Administration Building, 14741 Governor Oden Bowie Drive, Upper Marlboro, MD 20772. Call 301-952-3520, or consult www.mncppc.org/county/hpc.htm Introduction The history of Prince George’s County is embodied in its older buildings, structures, and archeological sites—in buildings remaining from eighteenthcentury plantations, in nineteenth-century crossroad communities, in early twentieth-century streetcar suburbs, and in those still-rural areas that recall the county’s agricultural heritage of tobacco raising and horse breeding. From sites yielding prehistoric artifacts, to eighteenth-century farms, to commercial buildings of the early twentieth century, the county’s history can be traced by what remains on the landscape. The preservation of these resources helps us to retain our sense of history and community. It also aids in the education of our children and our new residents by showing them, through the history embodied in everyday surroundings, the depth and breadth of our common heritage. The Historic Preservation Commission The county’s Historic Preservation Ordinance, enacted in 1981, established a nine-member Historic Preservation Commission (HPC). Members of the HPC are appointed by the County Executive and are knowledgeable in such areas as architecture, planning, real estate, and historic preservation. The HPC reviews land use proposals affecting historic resources. HPC staff, provided by the M-NCPPC Planning Department, assist owners planning exterior alterations to historic buildings and respond to community survey and research requests. The Historic Preservation Commission meets on the third Tuesday of every month at 6:00 p.m. in the County Administration Building in Upper Marlboro, unless otherwise announced. The public is encouraged to attend. How Historic Sites and Districts Are Created In some cases a property’s significance lies in its architectural style, historical or cultural associations or in its archeological features. It may also be noteworthy as the work of a highly skilled craftsman or as the site of an important event. Historic districts are established to protect and Dorsey Chapel, Glenn Dale promote special areas of historic and architectural value. Districts evoke a special sense of time and place that contributes to the area’s unique identity. When a district is established, historic district regulations ensure that physical changes are consistent with each property’s individual character and the character of the district as a whole. Through the county’s Historic Preservation Ordinance, the HPC can designate a property as a historic site if the property is listed in the county Inventory of Historic Resources and if it meets specific criteria of architectural or historical significance. Similarly, a group of historic properties sharing significance and proximity can be designated as a historic district. The process of designation involves the preparation of a research report documenting the history and architectural characteristics of the historic resource; this research may be initiated by the property owner or local citizens. The HPC then holds a public hearing to receive the comments of the residents and other interested parties and then makes a decision. The County Council hears appeals of the commission’s decisions on designations. The Historic Area Work Permit Process Changes to the exterior features of a historic site require a Historic Area Work Permit (HAWP), in addition to any other permits required by the county. Such changes include alterations, additions, demolition of exterior features, and grading work or landscaping that will affect the setting. Similarly, changes to a property within a designated historic district (including new construction) require a HAWP. If alterations are planned for an unevaluated historic resource included in the Historic Sites and Districts Plan inventory, a property owner should request a historic site evaluation. If, after that evaluation, a property is classified as a historic site, exterior work will require a HAWP. If the property does not meet the criteria to become a historic site, a HAWP will not be required. The HPC encourages owners to submit preliminary plans for its review before applying for a HAWP. Staff can provide technical assistance and information on financial incentive programs including tax credits and grant programs. The Benefits of Preservation Tax Credits and Grants Historic site and historic district designation recognizes and protects the character of the designated property or area. Historic site owners are eligible to receive bronze plaques awarded by the HPC to place on their properties. In addition, owners may be eligible for a Prince George’s County Preservation Tax Credit on county property taxes of ten percent of the cost of approved restoration work, or five percent of the cost of compatible new construction within a historic district. Owners may also qualify for preservation loan programs when such funds are available. Property owners are encouraged to contact staff and submit an application for tax credits prior to the commencement of work. Ashland Hay Barn Upper Marlboro Warren House, Riverdale Park In cooperation with the Historic Preservation Commission, the Prince George’s County Historic Property Grant Program was launched in 2008. Grants of up to $100,000 are available for the acquisition, rehabilitation, preservation and restoration of historic property in Prince George’s County. All work must meet the Secretary of the Interior’s standards, and grant recipients must place a perpetual historic preservation easement on the property before receiving grant funds. The grants are available to individuals, nonprofit organizations and incorporated municipalities. For more information, consult www.mncppc.org/county/propertygrant.htm. A Maryland state income tax credit of 20 percent of the qualified capital costs spent on rehabilitation for owner-occupied residential property and for commercial property can be taken by owners of (1) designated historic sites; (2) properties listed in the National Register of Historic Places; (3) contributing properties within historic districts listed in the National Register; or (4) contributing properties within county historic districts. The rehabilitation must comply with the Secretary of the Interior’s Standards for Rehabilitation and must be certified by the Maryland Historical Trust prior to beginning work. For information on eligibility for state and federal preservation tax credits and funding, contact the Maryland Historical Trust, 100 Community Place, Crownsville, MD 21032-2023,410-514-7600, or consult www. marylandhistoricaltrust.net. Prince George’s County Archeology Review Process The archeology component of the county’s historic preservation program calls for a specialized approach to protecting resources. The ability to predict with reliability where archeological sites are located is an important goal of the county’s program. In early 2004, the Prince George’s County Planning Board issued an initiative to protect archeological sites during the development process. Blue Willow ceramics, Croom The Planning Board expressed particular interest to investigate the possible existence of slave quarters and graves, as well as archeological evidence of the presence of Native American peoples. In November 2005, the Prince George’s County Council enacted legislation authorizing the Prince George’s County Planning Department/M-NCPPC to require Phase I investigations as part of the subdivision application process to identify archeological sites within a property. County archeological guidelines were developed through the collaboration of Historic Preservation staff, professional archeologists, the Historic Preservation Commission, developers, real estate professionals, interested citizens, and other parties of concern. The results of the investigations have made substantial contributions to the understanding of the county’s history, including slave life and the lifeways of Native Americans. These discoveries have also enabled the county to protect historic landscapes and sites that would otherwise be lost forever. The National Register of Historic Places The National Register of Historic Places is a list of properties acknowledged by the U.S. Government as worthy of recognition and preservation. The National Register is maintained by the Secretary of the Interior and administered by the National Park Service. Properties listed in the National Register include districts, sites, buildings, structures and objects that are significant to the nation, the state or to the local community. The National Register honors properties individually and within historic districts and provides recognition and serves as a planning tool. Listing in the National Register provides the following benefits in preserving historic properties: The prestige of national recognition that a property is of significance in American history, architecture, archeology, engineering and/or culture. Nomination involves a multistep review process that includes professional evaluations of the significance of the property. Consideration in the planning for federally and state-assisted projects. Procedures require careful consideration of any impacts on National Register properties by projects involving federal and state funds, licenses, permits, or tax benefits. There is no review for a project that uses private funds and does not require state or federal permits or licenses. Eligibility for federal income tax benefits that include (1) a 20 percent investment tax credit for certified rehabilitation of historic commercial, industrial, and rental residential buildings, and (2) a charitable donation deduction for the conveyance of a perpetual easement to a qualified preservation organization. Eligibility for a Maryland income tax credit of 20 percent of the qualified capital costs for approved rehabilitation of owner-occupied residential buildings and for commercial buildings. Eligibility to apply for federal and state grants and low-interest state loans for historic preservation projects. National Historic Landmarks The National Historic Landmarks program, another cultural resources program of the National Park Service, was established in 1935 to identify and protect places possessing exceptional significance in illustrating the nation’s heritage. National Historic Landmarks can be buildings, sites, districts, structures or objects determined by the Secretary of the Interior to be nationally significant in American Poplar Hill on His Lordship’s Kindness, Clinton history and culture. National Historic Landmarks are eligible for special federal grants and for technical preservation advice from the National Park Service, as well as for the benefits listed above for National Register properties. How to Get Involved There are a number of nonprofit community oganizations and government agencies active in location preservation efforts. Here are just a few: Prince George’s County Historical and Cultural Trust (15 volunteers appointed by the County Executive), in conjunction with the HPC, has established a Countywide organization of volunteers, the Friends of Preservation, to support preservation efforts. The Friends of Preservation Newsletter, produced by the Historical and Cultural St. John’s Church, Broad Creek 2007 Historic Preservation Reception at Snow Hill, Laurel Trust, contains articles about preservation issues, the proceedings of the HPC, and information about preservation-related classes, tours and special events. Trust volunteers also run The Newel Post, a recycling center for salvaged architectural elements. For more information, contact 301-627-4499 or consult www.pgchct.blogspot. com The Prince George’s County Historical Society and Library is a membership organization dedicated to promoting an appreciation of Prince George’s County heritage. Headquartered at the Greenbelt Branch of the Prince George’s County Public Library, the society maintains a research collection on county history; publishes a monthly newsletter, News and Notes; holds programs and special events for members; conducts guided tours and educational activities for the public; and recognizes historical and preservation activities with annual awards. For information on Historical Society activities, contact 301-464-0590 or consult www.pghistory.org Prince George’s Heritage, Inc., a countywide, nonprofit preservation organization staffed by volunteers, administers the Prince George’s Heritage grants program and can award small grants for research and restoration projects. Prince George’s Heritage works closely with the Historic Preservation Commission in education efforts. For more information, call Doug McElrath, Chair, 301-405-9210 or dmcelrat@ umd.edu. The M-NCPPC Natural and Historical Resources Division (Department of Parks and Recreation) offers interpretative programs at M-NCPPCowned historic sites and a range of volunteer opportunities. The department also operates a curatorship program that allows individuals interested in rehabilitating historic properties to enter into long-term lease agreements. For more information, call 301-218-9651, or consult www.pgparks.com/ places/historicsites.html

Historic Preservation Program - Village of Great Neck Plaza
Historic Preservation Program - Village of Great Neck Plaza
JLUS - Prince George's County Planning Department
Historic Preservation Projects and Case Studies - Kentucky ...
Identifying, Evaluating, and Preserving Minnesota's Historic ...
The Ridgley Family in Prince George's County
Preservation in New York: The Next Generation - Historic Districts ...
Winter 2011 - The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation
Form-Based Guidelines for Historic Preservation - Omaha By Design
Design Standard Guidelines - Prince George's County Planning ...
Design Guidelines for the Preservation of Historic Resources
2013 Real Estate Forum – National Trust for Historic Preservation
Department of Environmental Resources - Prince George's County
Historic Properties Preservation Plan Element - City of Las Vegas
Downloading - Prince George's Community College
South Bowie Library - Art in Public Places - Prince George's County
Preservation Plan - Wisconsin Historical Society
Historic Preservation and Rightsizing - Heritage Ohio
Presentation from Minnesota State Historic Preservation Office
PRESERVATION AWARDS Inside - The Georgia Trust for Historic ...
Summer 2010 - The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation
Historic Preservation Plan - City of Anaheim
Fall 2010 - The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation
Nepa and nhpa - Advisory Council on Historic Preservation
FALL 2009.indd - The Georgia Trust for Historic Preservation
Subregion Four - Prince George's County Planning Department
Technical Report - Prince George's County Planning Department
PRINCE GEORGE'S COUNTY SOLID WASTE TRANSFER STATION ...