Research Chronicle, 2006 - School of Nursing - University of North ...

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Research Chronicle, 2006 - School of Nursing - University of North ...

Research Chronicle

2006–2007

Y E O M A Y E R S W I F T - S C A N L A N H A M I L T O N O E R M A N N H O D G E S B E E B E R

The UNIVERSITY of NORTH CAROLINA at CHAPEL HILL


Carolina Nursing is published by

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

School of Nursing for the

School’s alumni and friends.

Dean

Linda R. Cronenwett, PhD, RN, FAAN

Sandra G. Funk, PhD, FAAN, Associate Dean for Research

Executive Content Editor

Jennifer Leeman, DrPH, MDIV

Research Assistant Professor

Managing Editor

Whitney L. J. Howell

Contributing Writers

Jennifer Leeman

Whitney L. J. Howell

Images and Photography

Catherine Carter

Dan Sears

Whitney L. J. Howell

istockphoto

Research Support Center Staff

Greg Workman, Administrative Assistant

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Annie Skilton, RSC Processing Assistant

Design and Production

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Anne Webb, Associate Director,

Alumni Affairs and Annual Fund

Whitney L. J. Howell, Associate Director,

Public Relations and Communications

Talat Qazi, Assistant to the Director

School of Nursing

The University of North

Carolina at Chapel Hill

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Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7460

(919) 966-4619

E-mail: sonalum@unc.edu

http://nursing.unc.edu

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committed to equality of educational opportunity

and does not discriminate against

applicants, students or employees based

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University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

that sexual orientation be treated in the

same manner. Any complaints alleging

failure of the institution to follow this policy

should be brought to the attention of the

General Counsel and the Assistant to the

Chancellor and Director for Minority Affairs.

From the Dean

Dear Alumni and Friends,

This year marks the beginning of

a transition phase for the School of

Nursing. With the construction of new

observation and genetics lab resources in

the Biobehavioral Lab and the addition

of seven new faculty who will conduct

research, a new era of nursing research is

dawning at the School!

Over the past several decades, the

SON has built and maintained a stellar

reputation as a world-class nursing

research institution. The School has

ranked as one of the top five recipients of

National Institutes of Health funding since

1994. As federal funding dollars continue

to wane, our consistent ability to capture

a large portion of NIH dollars speaks

highly of the quality of both our research

and our researchers.

That firm research foundation is

expanding this year. Construction on

an observation lab will allow some new

and veteran researchers to conduct more

studies on campus, including ones looking

at depression and infant feeding

patterns. You’ll read more about the

observation lab and some of the work

to be conducted there in this issue. In

addition to the observational facilities,

a new genetics lab will further expand

and enhance the resources that the

Biobehavioral Lab already offers, including

sleep study and physiological research.

But, the changes don’t stop with

our building. The face of Carolina nursing

research is also transforming. At the

end of this academic year, two faculty

who helped fashion the SON’s research

efforts will retire. We are fortunate that

both Barbara Germino and Joanne Harrell

will stay on at the school to work on

various grants and advise other student

and faculty research. Over the years, we

have been fortunate to have their strong

leadership and have benefited from their

ground-breaking studies and determined

efforts to secure consistent, sizeable grant

financing for the school. We will always

be grateful for their work.

To carry on their important legacy,

seven nurse investigators—some new

professionals and some veterans—joined

our School family this year. Combining

this new fount of intellect and research

facilities with the strong research traditions

that already exist in the SON will

ensure that the School’s reputation as an

institution that fosters creative investigation

and produces expert nurse researchers

is secure for years to come.

These many changes hold great

promise for a year filled with growth and

development. In this issue, you’ll also read

about the School’s research accomplishments

over the past year. Please celebrate

with me the School’s incredible scientific

achievements.

Sincerely,

Linda R. Cronenwett, PhD, RN, FAAN

Dean and Professor


Features

Welcoming New

Faculty Researchers

The SON embarks on a

new era of research

Beginning Five New

Research Studies

Faculty recieve external

funding for new work

2

15

6

The Cutting Edge of

Observational Research

The SON is creating a state-of-the-art

biobehavioral observation lab

New Research

Findings

Research

Chronicle

THE UNIVERSITY OF

NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL

SCHOOL OF NURSING

2006–2007

18

Contents 2006–2007

9

Expanding Research on

Cancer and Cancer Care

21

Doctoral Student Grants

A banner year for funding

the future of nursing research

Summer Institutes 24

Faculty Research Activities ’06-’07 25

Faculty Research Grants 25

Educational and Professional Grants 27

Faculty Publications 27

Faculty Grant Review Activities 32

Faculty Editorial and Abstract Review Activities 33

Faculty Distinguished Professorships 34

Faculty Honors and Awards 34

Doctoral Student and Postdoctoral Fellow Activities 35


2

Welcoming

New Faculty Researchers

Anna Song Beeber, PhD, RN Assistant Professor

Anna Beeber’s background is geriatric nursing, and her primary interest is in helping older adults and their

families get the resources they need so that older adults can continue to live in the community. She also has

clinical practice experience in geriatric acute, primary and long-term care, as well as in the Program of All-

Inclusive Care for the Elderly (PACE), a comprehensive program that provides interdisciplinary community care

for nursing home-eligible older adults.

In her dissertation, Beeber explored how elders, families and staff view the process of enrolling in the PACE

program and the barriers that arise during enrollment. As a post-doctoral fellow at the SON, she continued her

research on older adults and use of community-based long term care services by studying roadblocks to service

access and identifying patterns of service use. The National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes

of Health (NINR, NIH) funded her post-doctoral research through an Institutional National Research Service Award. She also received

funding from a John A. Hartford Foundation Building Academic Geriatric Nursing Capacity Fellowship.

She currently collaborates with Joshua Thorpe, PhD, MPH, at Duke University School of Nursing and with Sheryl Zimmerman, PhD,

in the UNC-Chapel Hill School of Social Work.

Vitals: PhD, Nursing, University of Pennsylvania

MSN, Adult and Geriatric Nurse Practitioner Programs, University of Pennsylvania

BSN, Nursing, Hartwick College

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL SCHOOL OF NURSING

RESEARCH CHRONICLE 2006–2007

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

School of Nursing (SON) has embarked on a

new era of nursing research. This year, seven

new faculty members who conduct research

began their work at the SON. While some

are just beginning their professional careers,

others come to the school with many years

of research experience.

WOW!Carolina’s

the place to be!


eeber ~ hamilton ~ hodges

Jill Hamilton, PhD, RN Assistant Professor

Healthcare in the African American community is the focus of Jill Hamilton’s research. In particular, she is

interested in how older African Americans handle cancer survivorship, and as a three-time SON graduate, Hamilton

has returned to the School to conduct her work.

Hamilton’s goal in her current study, “Helping Older African American Cancer Survivors Cope,” is to evaluate

a questionnaire to measure coping strategies used by older African American cancer survivors. She received R01

funding from the NINR and National Center for Minority Health and Health Disparities, NIH, for the study. One of

Hamilton’s long-term goals is to develop a culturally sensitive measure of coping to evaluate the effectiveness of

interventions with older African American cancer survivors.

After earning a BSN from the SON, she took positions as a staff nurse at Duke University Medical Center and,

then, Emory University Hospital. She also completed post doctoral work at Oregon Health and Science University.

As a faculty member, Hamilton has held positions at the North Carolina Central University Department of Nursing, the Nell Hodgson

Woodruff School of Nursing and UNC-Chapel Hill.

Vitals: PhD, Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

MSN, Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

BSN, Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Eric Hodges, PhD, APRN, BC Assistant Professor

Nutrition during childhood has been a longtime interest for Eric Hodges. For the past 10 years, he has honed his

skills as a nurse, family nurse practitioner and child nutrition expert at academic institutions nationwide. Now, he

focuses on mother-child feeding cues and patterns, specifically how a mother or guardian responds to a child’s

hunger and fullness signs.

Hodges is studying childhood nutrition in an effort to stave off the rising trend of obesity in children. One of

the long-term goals of his research is to teach mothers and guardians how to readily identify feeding cues so they

can respond appropriately.

While advancing his education, he also taught human development courses with an emphasis on children and

adolescents. He received funding from the NINR, NIH, the Nurses Educational Fund Inc., and the Northwest Health

Foundation for his doctoral research. Funding for his post doctoral work came from the National Institute for Child Health and Human

Development, NIH.

Vitals: PhD, Family Nursing, Oregon Health & Science University

MSN, Family Nurse Practitioner, George Mason University

BSN, Nursing, University of Tennessee-Memphis

BA, International Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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RESEARCH CHRONICLE 2006–2007

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Deborah Mayer, PhD, RN, AOCN, FAAN Associate Professor

Improving cancer care and studying the needs of cancer survivors have fueled Deborah Mayer’s 30-year career.

Her passion is developing the next generation of nursing strategies for this area, including applying healthcare

strategies online.

As a research scientist at Tufts-New England Medical Center, she joined a NIH-funded research project

to create a Web site for families with children undergoing bone marrow transplant. The site offers help and

information that can positively affect the child and family’s quality of life. Mayer also wants to develop a Web site

for adults that will provide details about the long-term effects of cancer treatment and ways to decrease the risk

of cancer recurrence or the development of new cancers.

Mayer is a past Oncology Nursing Society president and was recently appointed editor of the ONS

Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing. Before joining the SON faculty, she was co-founder and chief medical officer of Cancer Source,

www.cancersource.com, a comprehensive and personalized source of cancer-related information.

In addition to her faculty appointment with the SON, Mayer is also affiliated with North Carolina Memorial Hospital and the

Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Vitals: PhD, Nursing, University of Utah

MSN, Medical-Surgical Nursing (Oncology), Yale University

BSN, Nursing, Excelsior College

NP certificate, Nursing, University of Maryland

Diploma, Nursing, Pennsylvania Hospital

Marilyn Oermann, PhD, RN, FAAN Professor and Chair, Division of Adult and Geriatric Health

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL SCHOOL OF NURSING

RESEARCH CHRONICLE 2006–2007

Marilyn Oermann has had a prolific career studying and writing about nursing education and ways to

improve teaching strategies. Currently, her work centers on how research reports, Web sites and other

sources are used in clinical nursing literature.

With so much information available in the Internet age, one goal of Oermann’s research is to

encourage nurse authors to carefully weigh the information they use when writing, especially since more

researchers are choosing to glean information online. In a recent study, she determined that 33 percent

of Web site citations are defunct after five years, and 20 percent disappear within a year of publication.

Oermann has also written many books, chapters and articles on nursing education topics.

She is the editor of the Journal of Nursing Care Quality and past editor of the Annual Review of

Nursing Education.

Vitals: PhD, Curriculum and Instruction, University of Pittsburgh

MSNEd, Medical Surgical Nursing/Nursing Education, University of Pittsburgh

BSN, Nursing, Pennsylvania State University

mayer ~


oermann ~ swift-scanlan ~ yeo

Theresa Swift-Scanlan, PhD, RN Assistant Professor

Swift-Scanlan’s road to researching the epigenetics of breast cancer began far from any nursing school. She began

her career working in marine biology, became interested in healthcare during her work with the Peace Corps and

slowly wound her way to study genetics and nursing.

Swift-Scanlan is studying the genetics and molecular biology of breast cancer with the goal of advancing

cancer prevention and early detection. Throughout her career, she has received funding from several institutions.

Her doctoral studies were funded by a National Research Service Award from the NINR, NIH, and a Doctoral

Scholarship in Cancer Nursing from the American Cancer Society.

Swift-Scanlan plans to build on the findings from her epigenetics research to improve risk assessment

and, hopefully, assist women in making decisions regarding screening and risk-reduction measures, such as

mastectomy and chemoprevention.

Vitals: PhD, The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing

BSN, Nursing, The Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing

MS, Marine Molecular Biology, University of Maryland

BS, Biology (focus in marine biology), Old Dominion University

SeonAe Yeo, PhD, RNC, FAAN Associate Professor

SeonAe Yeo’s career as a nurse midwife, nurse practitioner, researcher and educator has moved her frequently

between the United States and Japan. She is a women’s health researcher focused on physical activity and exercise

among pregnant women.

With funding from Blue Cross and Blue Shield and the NINR, NIH, Yeo tested the effect that walking had on a

woman’s risk of preeclampsia as compared to the effect of stretching. In addition, she has studied the relationships

among overweight/obesity, physical activity and the incidence of depression among pregnant women.

Yeo plans to continue to focus her research on interventions to reduce risk of preeclampsia in high-risk women.

Vitals: MSN, Nursing, University of Illinois

PhD, Health Science, Tokyo University

MS, Health Science, Tokyo University

BSN, Nursing, St. Luke’s College of Nursing

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On the Cutting Edge of

Observational Research

Behaviors can greatly affect the risk for

many chronic illnesses. Physical activity

and eating a healthful diet, for example,

can decrease the risk for a range of

chronic diseases, such as cardiovascular

disease, cancer and diabetes. How

caregivers behave can also influence the

health and well being of the individuals

for whom they provide care. A mother’s

responses to her infant can affect the

child’s development. Likewise, the way

certified nursing assistants interact with

nursing home residents may be central

to residents’ emotional well being.

Researchers in the School of Nursing

(SON) use observational research methods

to better understand human

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL SCHOOL OF NURSING

RESEARCH CHRONICLE 2006–2007

behavior and measure the effect interventions

have on behavior change. To

help researchers study behavior, the SON

is creating a state-of-the-art observation

lab in its Biobehavioral Lab (BBL).

Researchers using observational

research methods typically videotape

individual behavior or interactions

between two or more people, such as

a mother and child. Videotaping may

occur at the SON or at an off-site location,

including the subject’s home or a

healthcare setting. Researchers review

the videotapes and code and analyze

the behaviors, often using software

specially designed for that purpose.

“We have an explosion of

observation-related research

going on among researchers

studying mental health and

among those studying children

and infants,” said BBL director

Virginia Neelon, PhD, RN.

The new BBL observation lab will

include an observation room, video and

audio recording equipment and computers

for data coding and analysis. The

observation room will be soundproofed

to ensure privacy and will be equipped

with multiple video cameras, allowing

investigators to view behavior from

more than one angle. Researchers will

be able to observe subjects of all ages

from very young infants to older adults.

A dedicated set of computers in the

lab has the software necessary to code

and analyze observational data. The

BBL’s biomedical engineer, Brant Nix,

continues to be one of its most valuable

resources. Nix trains faculty and their

research teams to use the coding software

and to transfer and store videos.

He also provides advice on which recording

equipment to purchase and use.

A sketch of the layout for the new observation lab

that will be part of the Biobehavioral Lab. This facility

will give study participants privacy, but will also allow

researchers to gather data in a controlled environment.


School of Nursing Faculty using

Observational Methods

Suzanne Thoyre, PhD, RN, was among

the first faculty members to use observational

methods in the SON. She initially

studied the behavior of premature

infants and nurses during bottle feeding

in the hospital. Premature infants’

irregular breathing during feeding can

cause hypoxemia and may lead to neurologic

injury, dysfunctional feeding

patterns and poor growth. By better

understanding feeding behaviors, Thoyre

hopes to train nurses and parents to

minimize episodes of respiratory distress

and hypoxemia during feeding.

To study infant and nurse behaviors,

Thoyre videotaped feedings with a

close-up of the infant and developed a

coding system for the feeding interaction.

Swallowing and respiratory sounds were

transmitted to the videotape from a small

microphone placed on the infant’s neck.

A research assistant coded the feeder’s

behaviors, such as when the nurse put

the bottle in the mouth, moved the

nipple to encourage sucking or took the

nipple back out to encourage breathing,

as well as the infant’s state and readiness

for feeding. A speech pathologist

then coded the infant’s responses to

the feeding, specifically when the infant

became behaviorally disorganized or

demonstrated swallowing or respiratory

dysregulation. In addition to observational

data, oxygenation, heart rate, respiratory

and sucking data were collected

using a system custom-made in the BBL.

In more recent research, Thoyre is partnering

with Marcia Van Riper, PhD, RN, to

study the feeding interaction between

parents and their 1- to 3-year-old children

with Down Syndrome. Close to half

of children with Down Syndrome have

difficulty making the transition to foods

that require chewing. Children who don’t

learn to chew foods have lifelong food

restrictions and are at greater risk for gastrointestinal

problems and malnutrition.

In a pilot study, Thoyre and Van Riper

videotaped mothers feeding their infants

either a bottle or breastfeeding. Mothers

were then interviewed about their working

model of feeding, using a video playback

interview strategy. Parent and child

behaviors were observationally coded.

“Many of the same principles apply to

feeding both infants born prematurely and

young children with Down Syndrome,”

Thoyre said. “In both cases, parents have

difficulty when their child responds in an

unexpected way during feeding. Through

my research, I hope to help parents better

adapt to the needs of their child.”

Linda Beeber, PhD, RN, CS, is using

observational methods to study interactions

between mothers with depressive

symptoms and their infants and

toddlers. Depressive symptoms can

impair mother-child interactions.

“There has to be an integrated

dance between mother and child

that involves a reciprocal cuing

and responding,” Beeber said.

A research assistant observes and codes research

footage from Sue Thoyre’s feeding study.

“What you see with depressed mothers

is that the infant cues her, and the

mother may not respond, over responds

or may respond inappropriately.”

Mother-child interactions are central

to a child’s development. When this

interaction is disrupted, children are at

greater risk for developmental and psychological

problems. Beeber is testing

the effectiveness of an interpersonal and

skills-based intervention that partners

master’s-prepared psychiatric nurses with

mothers for five months. Beeber uses

observational methods to determine

how sessions with the nurse affect the

mother’s interactions with her child.

A data collector goes to participants’

homes and videotapes 45 minutes of

unstructured interchange between

the mother and child. Expert coders

then view the tape and code different

aspects of the child and mother’s

behaviors and their interaction with

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each other, such as eye contact, physical

closeness, teaching and touching. They

also assess the mother’s overall sensitivity

and responsiveness to the child.

The National Institute of Mental Health,

National Institutes of Health (NIMH, NIH)

and the U.S. Department of Health and

Human Services (DHHS), Administration

for Children and Families provided funding

for most of Beeber’s research. Beeber

has done her research in close partnership

with Early Head Start, a nationwide

program that provides childcare and

other services for low-income families.

In 2005, the Early Head Start branch

of DHHS awarded Beeber funding to

develop and test a curriculum that

teaches Early Head Start employees how

to support depressed parents. Beeber

and her team spent a year developing

the curriculum and then another year

using the curriculum to train employees.

Now in their third year, they tape

structured interactions among Early Head

Start staff, the depressed parent and

the child to evaluate how well the Early

Head Start workers support the parent.

“I really think observational methods

are state-of-the-art. I use paper and

pencil questionnaires and interviews, too,

because they’re the best way to learn

what someone thinks or believes,” Beeber

said. “But if you really want to look at outcomes,

particularly for things like interventions

that involve behaviors, there is nothing

better than observational methods.”

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL SCHOOL OF NURSING

RESEARCH CHRONICLE 2006–2007

A child participates in Linda Beeber’s study of Hispanic

mothers living with depression. Beeber is studying

mother-child interactions and how depression can

affect how a mother responds to her child’s cues.

Eric Hodges, PhD, APRN, BC,

devoted much of his early career to

pediatric healthcare, and he will continue

that research using observational

methods to study mother-child feeding

cues and patterns in the BBL.

“Childhood obesity is a growing

problem that could gain its foundation

during infancy,” Hodges said. “To help

control this epidemic, we need to determine

whether certain patterns of caregiver

responses to infant feeding cues undercut

the child’s ability to self-regulate eating,

setting them up for obesity later.”

So far, Hodges has determined that

infants present far fewer hunger cues

than they do fullness cues. However,

mothers or caregivers seem to recognize

and react to the hunger cues faster

than the ones that indicate fullness.

To determine how infants indicate

they are hungry, how caregivers respond

and how those reactions affect the

infant’s feeding, Hodges videotapes

these interactions, most often between

Kai eats watermelon, representing infant

feeding patterns seen in Eric Hodges observational

study, looking at how mothers and

caregivers read and interpret infants’ cues

for hunger and fullness.

mother and child. He analyzes the

10-minute span immediately before an

infant feeds until the minute immediately

following to assess how engaged

both parties are in the feeding process.

Through these interactions, Hodges

can see when the infant first presents

hunger cues and how long it takes for

the caregiver to respond with food.

Additionally, he can determine when the

infant gives cues that he or she is full

or when the caregiver stops feeding.

“The videotapes also help capture the

tone of the feeding interactions between

the caregiver and infant through attention

to things like positive or negative

vocalizations,” Hodges said. “We also

asked the caregivers how they interpret

or think about the cues they receive from

infants when deciding when to feed.”

Hodges said he hopes to develop

tools for use during infancy and toddlerhood,

that will help parents and other

caregivers correctly interpret feeding cues.

Sharing this knowledge could help infants

develop enduring healthy eating patterns.

With funding from the Alzheimer’s

Association, Mary Lynn Piven, PhD,

APRN, BC, is using observational methods

to study the emotional care that certified

nursing assistants (CNAs) give to nursing

home residents with dementia. Using

the computerized coding system in the

BBL, Piven and a research assistant are

reviewing 50 tapes of CNA’s interactions

with nursing home residents. Through

this review, they will isolate and code the

behaviors that constitute emotional care.

Piven’s research is described in greater

depth in the article on newly-funded

faculty research studies on page 17.


Building the School’s Programs of

Research on Cancer and Cancer Care

In 2006, approximately 1.4 million men and women in the United Faculty who conduct research at the School of Nursing (SON)

States were diagnosed with some form of cancer, according to are actively studying the science of cancer, the relationships cancer

the American Cancer Society. Last year alone, nearly 565,000 men patients have with their healthcare providers and how survivors

and women died from the disease. Cancer cuts across sex, race approach their lives and activities after successful treatment. These

and age, but every year, providers are able to detect it earlier and efforts are doing much to improve the quality of life these patients

provide more effective treatments. As a result, there are a growing

number of cancer survivors.

have both during and after treatment.

Managing the Uncertainty Younger Breast Cancer Survivors Experience

More than 210,000 women are diagnosed with breast cancer

annually, based on American Cancer Society statistics. Most

often, it is postmenopausal women who hear this frightening

news, but a small group of women under age 50 get the same

scare every year. For them, survival means a life spent coping

with treatment side effects and worrying about recurrence.

These younger survivors have a set of concerns that are

distinctly their own: young children, fertility and premature

menopause. Like older breast cancer survivors, they also worry

about sexual function and body image. Nearly every day, they

encounter something that elicits worry about a relapse, such as

a doctor’s appointment or a symptom reminiscent of their cancer.

Many women need some way or someone to help them

manage this stress while juggling their daily responsibilities.

School of Nursing faculty members Merle Mishel, PhD, RN,

FAAN, and Barbara Germino, PhD, RN, FAAN, have developed

an intervention designed to meet those coping needs. Their goal

is, through nursing care, to help women manage the uncertainty

of their condition, handle the symptoms of cancer survivorship

and improve their psycho-social well being. A study testing

this intervention is funded through the National Institute of

Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health (NINR, NIH).

“Younger breast cancer survivors have a different outlook

on life than older survivors do,” Mishel said. “We

wanted to give them a way to manage those feelings so

they don’t feel trapped by the overwhelming number of

stimuli that can trigger worries about a recurrence.”

More than 120 white and 120 African American women

across North Carolina who are two- to four-years past treat-

ment will be enrolled in the study, called “Managing Uncertainty

Day to Day.” As part of the study, participants are paired

with nurse interveners who call them weekly for a month to

help them use new skills to manage worries about a recurrence.

Nurse interveners function as a sounding board for the

participants while offering methods for how best to handle

difficult situations, such as expressing fears to loved ones.

“We can already see that we’re meeting a need for these

women, even if it’s not obvious to them that they have

these needs,” Germino said. “You can hear the relief in the

voices of the women as they get information and strategies

they can use in their daily lives.”

In addition to phone calls, women in the intervention

group also receive a CD and a manual. The CD offers strategies

to effectively communicate thoughts and feelings as well

as strategies for identifying positive life events. The CD also

includes information on self-calming techniques to avoid

succumbing to anxiety when facing an event that prompts

recurrence concerns. The manual includes details about

various issues breast cancer survivors face, including hot

flashes, hormonal changes, weight gain and body image.

Mishel and Germino hypothesize that women who receive

the uncertainty management intervention will manage their

concerns better, experience less symptom distress and have

more positive psycho-social well being compared to the women

who do not receive the CD portion of the intervention.

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Coping in Older African American Survivors

Turning to God, helping others and getting assistance from family

and friends. These are all ways cancer survivors choose to cope

with the diagnosis. No one handles living through cancer in the

same fashion, and little information exists about how older African

Americans manage survivorship.

For African American cancer survivors over age 55, turning to God

is often the preferred support mechanism, according to research

conducted by SON faculty member Jill Hamilton, PhD, RN.

“Many say that their relationship with God provides the kind

of support that is not available from family members and friends,”

Hamilton said about her research findings thus far. “God is there

when no one else is.”

With funding from the NINR and the National Center for

Minority Health & Health Disparities (NCMHD), NIH, Hamilton is

evaluating a questionnaire she developed to assess coping

strategies of older African American cancer survivors. Part of her

research will focus on support provided from God and from family

and friends.

In the questionnaire, Hamilton asks survivors about

the support they receive from family and friends,

aspects of their spirituality and how they give

back to others. So far, she said, many survivors

“We have needed a better

measure to determine how older

African American survivors use

social support to cope with

their experience,” Hamilton

said. “We need this

information to coach

family members on

ways to provide

better support.”

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL SCHOOL OF NURSING

RESEARCH CHRONICLE 2006–2007

have expressed feelings and shared information about how they

cope that family members present during the interviews said they

had not previously known.

“We have needed a better measure to determine how older

African American survivors use social support to cope with their

experience,” she said. “We need this information to coach family

members on ways to provide better support.”

Hamilton does not intend to use the results of her

questionnaire to tell people what type of coping strategies or

support mechanisms they need. Rather, she sees the goal of her

research as helping both family members and survivors identify

ways they can better provide support to themselves and each

other. Older African Americans are often reluctant to ask for help,

and Hamilton said she hopes her questionnaire will provide a way

for them to communicate their needs to family members or others

who can provide assistance.


Healthy Behaviors Not More Prevalent in Cancer Survivors

As modern medicine improves, the number of cancer survivors

continues to increase – roughly 3.5 percent of the U.S. population,

or 10 million people, have survived a cancer diagnosis. They are,

however, at increased risk for a recurrence or new cancer. It

would be reasonable to anticipate that this group would engage

in more healthy lifestyle behaviors than the general population.

But, that would be a bad bet.

According to research conducted by SON faculty member

Deborah K. Mayer, PhD, RN, AOCN, FAAN, cancer survivors do

not smoke less, eat more fruits and vegetables, engage in more

exercise or control their weight any more than people who have

never had cancer. Mayer conducted her research as part of a predoctoral

National Research Service Award funded by the NINR, NIH.

“This isn’t what we expected to find,” Mayer said. ”We anticipated

that cancer survivors, having experienced a life-threatening

disease, would take pains to live a healthier life by eating better,

not smoking and remaining active. The findings are disconcerting,

and we need to understand more to work

with survivors regarding health promotion.”

Mayer analyzed data from the National

Cancer Institute’s Health Information

National Trends Survey (HINTS), which

includes information from telephone interviews

with 6,369 people, 619 of whom previously

had cancer. The control group consisted

of 2,141 other respondents without a

personal or family history of cancer.

Eighty-two percent of survivors and 85.1 percent of participants

without a history of cancer reported eating less than five

fruits or vegetables a day. More than 22 percent of survivors currently

smoked, as did 18.4 percent of those without a history of

cancer. Close to 55 percent of cancer survivors and almost 47 percent

of those without a history of cancer did not participate in

regular physical activity, though the rates of regular activity varied

by type of cancer. The mean body mass index (BMI) for both

groups was virtually the same – 27 for survivors and 26.5 for

those without a history of cancer – with more than half of both

groups being overweight or obese. A healthy BMI is considered

less than 25.

According to research…cancer survivors do not

smoke less, eat more fruits and vegetables, engage

in more exercise or control their weight any more

than people who have never had cancer.

Mayer said she hopes these findings will prompt nurses to be

more vigilant in assessing the smoking levels, dietary habits, exercise

routines and weight management efforts of their cancer

patients. As the healthcare providers with the most contact with

patients, she said, nurses should be prepared to provide additional

information and resources to promote healthy lifestyle behaviors

in cancer survivors.

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12

Doctoral Students’ Research on

Cancer Survivors and Cancer Care

Health Disparities in Physician-Patient Relationships

Current statistics indicate that African Americans are more likely

to die from breast, colorectal and prostate cancer than other

ethnic groups. An open channel of communication between

doctor and patient is one way to combat health disparities and

get patients the information they need to be knowledgeable

about their own health and course of treatment. Previous

research shows that when physicians use partnership-building

behaviors, patient outcomes improve, but the degree of the

partnership changes based on patient demographics. Physicians

tend to behave differently with white patients, giving them

more information and opportunities to express their feelings

than patients from other racial or ethnic minority groups.

With funding from the SON’s CIHDR, SON doctoral

student, Yolanda Wall, MSN, RN, BC, conducted a small

pilot study to determine the types of partnership-building

behaviors and information-giving behaviors that physicians

use when talking with men seeking treatment for early

prostate cancer. She looked at physician partnership-building

behaviors by race, age and education of the patient.

Wall analyzed transcripts of doctor-patient interactions

for 10 white and 10 African American

randomly-selected participants in Merle

Mishel and Barbara Germino’s

Yolanda Wall, MSN, RN, BC, is studying doctorpatient

interactions to determine if doctors treat

white and African American patients differently.

Partnering With the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill is home to

the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, one of 39

National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer

Centers and one of only two Specialized Programs of

Research Excellence (SPORE) in breast cancer and in gastrointestinal

cancers nationwide. The Center’s 250 faculty from

across the disciplines have more than $120 million in funding

to conduct basic science and clinical research on cancer

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study, entitled “Decision Making Under Uncertainty in Men

with Prostate Cancer.” Wall looked at how often and in what

situations physicians use partnership behaviors and informationgiving,

such as encouraging a patient to ask questions and

whether those behaviors vary with the patient’s race.

The transcripts indicated that physicians welcomed white patients

to ask more questions and express their desires about treatment.

African American patients, Wall said, did not receive the same

level of encouragement.

“These findings mirror what is already in the literature,

and they are what I expected,” Wall said. “The results can

potentially increase our knowledge about the healthcare

encounters between minority patients and their physicians.”

Her findings are particularly important to nursing

because these data alert nurses working in cancerrelated

settings that they need to help patients increase

their level of participation during medical visits.

“I see nurses as being in the middle of patient

communications,” Wall said. “As nurses, we can make

an impact and, hopefully, help develop good, productive

patient-provider communication patterns.”

In the future, Wall hopes to expand her research to

include breast cancer and colorectal cancer patients.

control and prevention and to improve treatment and care

for cancer patients and survivors.

Faculty members and doctoral students in the SON

are actively involved in the Center’s programs of research

and research training. Merle Mishel, PhD, RN, FAAN, and

Deborah Mayer, PhD, RN, FAAN, are two of the SON’s

faculty that have joint appointments in the Lineberger

Comprehensive Cancer Center. Both are also part of


Assessing Women’s Lifestyle Choices in The Context of Their Perceived Breast Cancer Risk

Approximately 30 percent of all breast cancers are related to a

family history of the disease, and a woman who has an affected

first-degree relative is about two times more likely to contract it

herself. But family history is only one factor contributing to breast

cancer risk. Physical inactivity, obesity and excessive alcohol intake

all increase the likelihood a woman will develop the disease, so controlling

these lifestyle behaviors can be very important. Not everyone,

though, recognizes that these behaviors increase their risk.

In a study that combines secondary data analysis with in-depth

interviews, SON doctoral student, Denise Spector, NP, MSN, MPH,

is analyzing data on 20,000 women who had at least one sister

with breast cancer to see if a relationship between family factors

and lifestyle exists. She also interviewed a subset of women to

assess their perceptions of risk.

Spector received her funding from the SON’s Center

for Innovation in Health Disparities Research (CIHDR) and

the American Cancer Society. CIHDR is funded through

a grant from the NINR, NIH, and the NCMHD, NIH.

Spector’s dataset came from the National Institute of

Environmental Health Science’s Sister

Study: A Study of the Environmental and

Genetic Risk Factors for Breast Cancer. She

focused on current dietary practices, activity

levels, body mass index (BMI), alcohol

Doctoral student Denise Spector, NP, MSN, MPH, is

studying how white and African American women who

have a close female relative with breast cancer view

their own risk of developing the disease.

Lineberger’s Lance Armstrong Survivorship Program

Leadership Team. Mishel has taught in the Center’s cancer

courses and partnered on research projects. She is one of

seven reviewers for intramural grant submissions seeking

funding from the center. Mishel and Mayer are collaborating

with the Center as it develops new research proposals.

consumption and smoking to determine what relationship, if

any, existed between the behavior and breast cancer risk.

Through interviews with a subset of women from the larger

study, Spector discovered many inaccurately perceived their own

risk for the disease. More than half felt they were at low or slightly

elevated risk. In addition, most of these women did not consider

several unhealthy lifestyle behaviors, such as physical inactivity,

alcohol use, and obesity, to be factors in breast cancer risk

and saw very little cause for concern over their own actions.

“As a whole, many of the women interviewed thought

they were already leading a healthy lifestyle and had little control

over factors affecting their breast cancer risk,” she said.

Overall, the majority of women interviewed believed that

family history and exposure to harmful environmental factors

contributed to the disease. However, less than half saw

stress, unhealthy diet, inactivity, obesity and smoking as risk

factors. Only a minority of white women and none of the

African American women interviewed thought obesity was

a risk factor. The white women interviewed also were much

more likely to view smoking as contributing to risk.

Educating women about their actual breast cancer risk and

disseminating information about what they can do to affect that

risk is the goal of Spector’s future intervention, with a focus

on encouraging women to engage in healthier behaviors.

Mishel Mayer

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Cancer Survivors and Cancer Care

The School of Nursing’s new Epigenetics Lab

The Biobehavioral Lab (BBL) is creating an epigenetics lab where

Theresa Swift-Scanlan, PhD, RN, will continue studying the

epigenetics of breast cancer. The new lab will include several

pieces of equipment so Swift-Scanlan can extract, replicate and

measure genetic samples from women with breast cancer.

A nanodrop spectrophotometer will let her measure the very

small quantities of nucleic acids (DNA, RNA) and proteins

extracted from breast tissue. Many of the biological samples

collected in breast cancer research are available in very small

quantities that can only yield very small amounts (picograms) of

DNA. Because samples are so small, the lab will be outfitted with

several Thermocyclers, which Swift-Scanlan will use to make

multiple copies of specific DNA target sequences through a

Epigenetics and Cancer

Theresa Swift-Scanlan, PhD, RN, is studying the epigenetics

of breast cancer. Breast cancer is the second leading cause of

cancer death in women—one in eight women will be diagnosed

during her lifetime. Extensive research has established a strong

relationship between a woman’s breast cancer risk and her

genetic makeup and exposure to environmental risk factors.

However, little is known about how interaction between

genetics and environmental exposure affects a woman’s risk.

The science of epigenetics studies molecular modifications,

such as DNA methylation, that alter gene expression without

altering the primary sequence of DNA. Recent studies

have shown positive associations between some types of

epigenetic changes and environmental exposures, such

as smoking, dietary folate and alcohol intake. Epigenetic

modifications to DNA may be one of the mechanisms that

explain why these exposures increase a woman’s risk.

“One exciting aspect of this research is that many epigenetic

changes are reversible, which means they are potentially

amenable to treatment and intervention,” Swift-Scanlan said.

Epigenetics also offers the potential to more accurately

define breast cancer subtypes and give women and their

providers the information they need to guide decisionmaking.

There are many different types of breast cancer.

Some types are very responsive to treatment while others

are more likely to progress or recur. Treatment for breast

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process called polymerase chain

reaction. Subsequent experiments using Work conducted in the

Biobehavioral Wet Lab will

a “real-time” Thermocycler will enable

support Swift-Scanlan’s

Swift-Scanlan to quantify DNA

work with the epigenetics

methylation in each breast tissue sample

of breast cancer.

with sensitivity and specificity. She also will have access to

specialized ovens that will continuously mix her samples while

simultaneously heating them to the optimal temperature.

Virigina Neelon, PhD, RN, BBL director, is enthusiastic about

the new lab’s potential.

“The lab is expanding to allow us to look at more DNA and

molecular factors,” she said. “In particular, we’re interested in

factors that might not only have the potential to put you at risk

for cancer but also the potential to be reversed and thereby

diminish risk.”

cancer can have profound effects on a woman’s life.

Often, women must make decisions about whether

to elect chemical treatments, such as chemotherapy or

tamoxifen, both of which can have serious side effects.

Some women also must decide whether to have surgical

treatments, such as mastectomy or removal of their ovaries.

In their decision making, women balance the effects of

the treatment against what is known about the risk that their

cancer will progress or recur in the future. The more information

providers have about the risks associated with different types

of breast cancer, the more information women will have to

make their decisions. By identifying differences at the level

of modifications in specific genes, providers may be able to

help women make more informed treatment decisions.

Through the use of epigenetics, Swift-Scanlan seeks to

identify different breast cancer subtypes and to explore the

relationship of those subtypes to environmental and behavioral

exposures. She studies breast tissue from women with cancer

to analyze molecular modifications to specific strands of DNA.

She also collects information on the women’s exposure to a

broad range of risk factors, such as age at menarche, smoking

and alcohol consumption. Through her research, she hopes to

identify molecular and environmental predictive factors that

nurses and physicians may eventually use to guide screening,

therapeutic and prevention practices for breast cancer.


Faculty Awarded External Funding to

Begin Five New Research Studies

During the 2006-2007 academic year, School of Nursing (SON) received its first grant from the National Library of Medicine. In

faculty were awarded funding for five new research studies. The addition, the Alzheimer’s Association awarded the school funding

National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of for a faculty member’s research project. As described below, the

Health (NINR, NIH) funded two new studies, and the Agency for five new studies explore a broad range of topics of importance to

Healthcare Research and Quality funded one. The school also nursing.

Protecting the Privacy of Participants in Genetics Research

Every year, thousands of people volunteer to participate in clinical

trials and medical studies to advance science and improve

healthcare. Most of these individuals expect that their health

information will be shared but their identities will remain private.

However, with the completion of the Human Genome Project

and advances in genome sequencing techniques, scientists can

now share whole genome sequence data online instantly. In this

data interchange, a person’s own genetic code can betray him or

her. Some elements of the genome, such as single nucleotide

polymorphism (SNPs), provide just enough information to void a

study participant’s privacy.

SNPs are inherited genetic variations that can occur in a

person’s DNA. They are ubiquitous and stable in the human

genome, making them very good markers in understanding the

genetic basis of disease and drug responses. Yet a handful of

them can lead to an accurate identification between samples.

Zhen Lin, PhD, MS, RN, SON research assistant professor

with funding from the National Library of Medicine, is currently

developing a database that includes the location of SNPs that

pose a risk to privacy and information about how frequently they

occur. Scientists can use this “risk map” to identify SNP datasets

that pose a privacy threat and treat them with extra caution when

releasing data to the public, Lin said.

De-identified data sets in which “high risk” SNPs have been

scrubbed can be made freely available in the public domain.

“To achieve personalized medicine in the future, we need a

better way to share information for research today,” Lin said.

“With increasing computing power, it is much easier to link

information and more difficult to keep data private. In terms of

genomic sequences, we are handing over the natural fingerprints

of someone’s identity and much more.”

Some groups who gain access to shared genetic information

could use it in harmful ways, such as insurance providers who

may seek to deny coverage based on a preexisting genetic marker

or disease tendency. Implementing the risk map, Lin said, could

reduce the risk of information abuse.

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Nurse Staffing levels, Hospital Financial Performance and Quality of Care

Nurse staffing has become an important

topic in a number of states, with

California leading the way as the only

state with legislation requiring minimum

staffing levels for registered nurses and

licensed vocational nurses.

Barbara Mark, PhD, RN, FAAN, with

funding from the Agency for Healthcare

Research and Quality, is analyzing data from California and 12

other states to determine the effect that minimum staffing levels

have on the quality of care, hospital financial performance,

amount of uncompensated care provided and educational programs.

The study will also assess the impact that minimum staffing

laws have on nurse wages.

The data come from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization

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Project and from California’s Office of Statewide Health Planning

and Development. California instituted its minimum staffing law in

2004. Mark and her colleagues are analyzing data from 2001

through 2006 to paint a before and after comparison of the effect

of mandated nurse staffing levels.

Many states are currently considering nurse staffing legislation,

and Mark said she hopes lawmakers will find the outcomes of the

study useful when designing such laws or even when deciding

whether to enact legislation.

“This study will help legislators make the determination if minimum

nurse staffing level laws will improve quality of care while

not having a negative impact on hospital financial performance,”

said Mark, the Sarah Frances Russell Professor in the SON. “It will,

hopefully, provide information to help those making these decisions

balance nurse pay levels with other hospital financial expenditures.”

Intervention Aims to Help Parents and Children Manage Weight Together

Obesity is an epidemic in the United States, affecting both adults

and children. Roughly 65 percent of adults are either overweight

or obese, and 16 percent of children between ages 6 and 19 are

overweight with another 15 percent at risk for becoming overweight.

This battle against excess weight has placed today’s children

in line to be the first generation in several decades that has a

lower life expectancy than the previous generation.

The findings of other researchers suggest that tackling exercise

or weight loss with a partner increases the odds of success. Diane

Berry, PhD, CANP, SON assistant professor, is banking that the

same positive outcomes will occur if parents and children help

each other manage their weight and exercise more.

“Parents influence children by serving as role models, and we

can see this in the close correlations between the health behaviors

and weight status of children and their parents,” she said. “But

parents often lack the coping skills necessary to change their own

behavior, so we need to give them the knowledge and capacity

to change their behaviors along with their children’s.”

Berry developed an intervention delivered in community settings

that targets overweight or at-risk for overweight African

American, Latino and Caucasian children, as well as their overweight

or obese parents. The NINR, NIH funded the study.

Families in the

study learn new

nutrition, exercise

and coping skills

from an interdisciplinary

team, and

they practice the

new skills during

weekly meetings for

three months.

Advanced practice Parents and children participate in Diane Berry’s study to

learn how to manage their weight together.

nurses stay in close

contact with the families for an additional nine months, giving

them an opportunity to discuss problems they encounter. Berry’s

team checks in with the families six months after the intervention

ends to gauge how well they’ve maintained the new behaviors.

Berry hypothesizes that families involved in the intervention

will experience significant improvements in health behaviors and

weight loss. Seeing their parent’s dedication to practicing healthy

behaviors will help children determine if they want to change their

behaviors to manage their weight, she said.


Exploring Certified Nursing

Assistants Provision of

Emotional Care

With funding from the Alzheimer’s

Association, Mary Lynn Piven, PhD, APRN,

BC, is studying the emotional care that

certified nursing assistants (CNAs) give to

nursing home residents with dementia.

“Even though we don’t have very

clear ideas about the emotional needs of

patients with dementia, we operate on the

assumption that they have the same emotional

needs as the rest of us,” Piven said.

CNAs provide up to 80 percent of

the day-to-day care for nursing home

residents, but little is known about the

emotional care they provide. In an effort

to better understand the emotional

care provided by CNAs, Piven is studying

videotaped interactions between

CNAs and nursing home residents to

Above: Mary Lynn Piven reviews video with a reseach assistant. Observational software helps identify

develop a coding system to operational-

behavior/response patterns in this study of the emotional care CNAs give to nursing home residents.

ize emotional care. Using a computerized

coding system in the Biobehavioral

Piven said she hopes, over the long term, to develop

Lab, Piven and a research assistant are

and test interventions to improve emotional care e in nurs-

analyzing 50 tapes to capture CNAs’ verbal and nonverbal

ing homes. She plans to use the coding system she

behaviors that communicate connection, concern and caring, as

develops to measure the effect her interventions ns

well as behaviors that maximize resident function and control.

have on the emotional care CNAs provide.

“In addition to CNA verbalizations, we are looking at

nonverbal behaviors, specifically touch, smiling and eye contact,”

Piven said. “We are looking for the times when the Younger Breast Cancer Survivors:

CNA strokes the residents arm or pats them on the shoulder

as a way of connecting with them on a nonverbal level, Managing Uncertainty

letting them know they are there, they are present.”

School of Nursing faculty members Merle Mishel,

Based on her previous research, Piven said that CNAs pro- PhD, RN, FAAN, and Barbara Germino, PhD, RN, FAAN, AAN

vide emotional care that is not formally recognized by the nurs- are testing an intervention for women under age 50 who have suring

home. “Unlike physical care, they are providing emotional vived breast cancer. Their study is described in greater detail in the

care without direction or supervision of that care, which is what article on the School’s programs of cancer research, page 9.

caused me to want to study what they are doing,” she said.

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SON Faculty Research Advances

Health, Health Care and Nursing Practice

This past year, School of Nursing (SON) faculty published more

than 115 articles, books and book chapters. Through their publications,

faculty are continually advancing nursing education, prac-

Nurse staffing levels make a difference to the health of hospitalized children

In a recent article in the journal Policy, Politics, & Nursing Practice,

Barbara Mark, PhD, RN, FAAN, and colleagues report the

findings from their research on the relationship between nurse

staffing and adverse events in hospitalized children. They note

that children, especially infants, are particularly vulnerable during

hospitalizations due to their “dependence on adult caregivers,

their inability to voice concerns about their care and their need for

close supervision.”

When staffing levels are sufficient, nurses can monitor

children’s medical conditions and intervene early, playing a critical

role in averting adverse events. Mark’s study is the first large-scale

research study examining the relationship between nurse staffing

and quality of care

for hospitalized

children.

Funded by the

Agency for

Healthcare

Research and

Quality, Mark and

her team analyzed

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL SCHOOL OF NURSING

RESEARCH CHRONICLE 2006–2007

tice and research. Four recent publications by SON faculty exemplify

the contributions that the school’s faculty are making to both

research and practice.

data on 3.65 million pediatric patients cared for in 286 California

hospitals. After controlling for differences in levels of patient risk

and a range of other factors across hospitals, Mark and colleagues

found that more hours of registered nurse staffing were

associated with lower rates of postoperative cardiopulmonary

complications, post-operative pneumonia and post-operative

septicemia and other infections.

Increases in staffing had the greatest potential to reduce

complications at hospitals with the lowest levels of staffing. The

findings indicate that with increased staffing hours at the

California hospitals included in the study, between 425 and 596

children could have avoided a cardiopulmonary complication after

surgery. In addition, between 719 and 787 could have avoided

septicemia and between 95 and 124 might not have gotten

pneumonia.

“The results provide evidence that children, like adults,

experience more positive results when registered nurses provide

more care,” Mark said. “Steps should be taken to ensure that

hospitals have enough nurses to provide optimal care to our

youngest patients.”

When staffing levels are sufficient, nurses can monitor

children’s medical conditions and intervene early, playing a

critical role in averting adverse events… Increases in staffing

had the greatest potential to reduce complications at hospitals

with the lowest levels of staffing.


Exploring what Certified Nursing Assistants know about depression in nursing home residents

As the U.S. population ages, the number of older adults living in

nursing homes will continue to grow. Depression is one of the

most treatable mental disorders in later life, but the prevalence of

undetected and undertreated depression among nursing home

residents is high.

Certified Nursing Assistants (CNAs)

provide most of the direct care to

nursing homes residents and may be

an important resource for detecting

depression. However, little is known

about how CNAs understand depression

in nursing home residents and how

they communicate their concerns

to supervising staff. To address this

knowledge gap, Mary Lynn Piven,

PhD, APRN, BC, conducted a qualitative

study with 18 CNAs at two nursing

homes to learn how they conceptualized

depression in residents. She conducted

her research as part of a post-doctoral

fellowship funded by the National

Institute of Nursing Research, National

Institutes of Health (NINR, NIH). Together

with co-authors Cathleen Colon-Emeric,

MD, Ruth Anderson, PhD, RN, FAAN

and Margarete Sandelowski, PhD, RN,

FAAN, Piven’s findings will be published

in an article in the Western Journal of

Nursing Research.

Piven’s research findings suggest that

nursing home CNAs have the capacity to

play a key role in identifying residents

with depression. The CNAs accurately

identified the following symptoms of

depression: crying, loss of appetite,

irritability, withdrawal from others, not

Piven’s research findings suggest that

nursing home CNAs have the capacity

to play a key role in identifying

residents with depression.

The findings further suggest that

CNAs could benefit from additional

training about depression and the

range of resident responses to

life in a nursing home.

wanting to do anything and sleep changes. The signs CNAs

identified correspond to several mood screening and diagnostic

criteria that signal the presence of depression.

Although, the findings suggest that CNAs can identify

depression symptoms, they indicate that CNAs may have difficulty

referring residents for additional

evaluation and treatment. CNAs perceived

that some nursing staff were unresponsive

to their input.

“They don’t come and look at the

situation at the time,” said one CNA,

describing nurses’ reactions to her concerns

about residents. “Maybe later, down the

road they’ll notice it themselves. It’s like

you didn’t say anything. You know the

things the CNA says don’t matter.”

The findings further suggest that CNAs

could benefit from additional training

about depression and the range of

resident responses to life in a nursing

home. A number of the CNAs viewed

depression as a “normal” response to

nursing home placement, and others

described it as transient, lasting only

minutes or hours. Either perception could

lead CNAs to discount their observations

and not share them with nursing staff.

CNAs hold potential to provide

observations important to depression

assessment, as well as help meet residents’

emotional needs. Educating CNAs could

help unlock the capacity of CNAs to

influence depression assessment and

subsequent care.

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RESEARCH CHRONICLE 2006–2007 NURSING

RESEARCH CHRONICLE 2006–2007

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Measuring Quality from the Nursing Perspective

Recent reports have identified serious concerns with the quality of

the care delivered in U.S. hospitals. In response to these reports,

nurses nationwide are leading efforts to improve the way care is

delivered. In order to assess the impact of these efforts, nurses

need tools to fully capture what constitutes quality nursing care.

In a Journal of Nursing Care Quality article, Mary Lynn, PhD,

RN and colleagues report a new instrument they developed to

measure nursing care quality. The measure Lynn introduced is

unique – it measures quality from the perspective of the nurse

who delivered the care. Prior measures of nursing care quality

assessed patients’ perceptions of quality or audited the process of

care recorded in the medical record.

While the patients’ perspective is critical, patients often lack

the expertise necessary to evaluate the technical skill of the care

provided. Medical record audits capture only those processes the

nurse recorded and do not assess how the work team and environment

affect care quality. In assessing quality, nurses can speak to both

the interpersonal and technical aspects of care, as well as the

effect of the broader environment in which care was delivered.

Self-Care Education Improves Outcomes for Adults with Arthritis

In a recent article in the journal Arthritis & Rheumatism, Jean

Goeppinger, PhD, RN, FAAN, and colleagues report the findings

from a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention-funded study,

comparing the effectiveness of two community-based arthritis selfcare

interventions—the Arthritis Self-Help Course and the Chronic

Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP).

Although both interventions have been tested previously,

Goeppinger is one of a few researchers to compare their

effectiveness with African Americans. Arthritis is the leading cause

of disability among adults in the United States, and the rates of

disability are disproportionately higher among African Americans.

African Americans have a higher prevalence of most chronic

diseases, and many live with multiple chronic conditions.

The practice of developing disease-specific interventions, such

as the Arthritis Self-Help Course, may not be the most effective or

efficient way to provide community-based support for individuals

with multiple different chronic illnesses and conditions. Therefore,

Goeppinger compared the effectiveness of the disease-specific

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Therefore, Lynn used funding from the NINR, NIH to create a

measure of how nurses evaluate the care delivered. She first asked

nurses to define quality. In interviews with 20 nurses, she learned

that nurses identify caring, technical skill and characteristics of the

care team and environment as the central components of quality

nursing care. In describing the importance of caring, nurses talked

about the value of getting to know their patients, being mindful

of their distinct needs and nurturing them.

Nurses described the technical aspect of nursing as being both

organized and skillful. Lynn used the information from the

interviews to develop a 138-item questionnaire that she tested

with nurses in seven hospitals. To create the final measure, she

analyzed questionnaires completed by 923 nurses from 46 general

and specialized medical-surgical units. The final measurement tool,

The Nurse’s Assessment of Quality Scale - Acute Care Version

(NAQS-ACV), has 87 items. As nurses work together to improve

care and work environments, the NAQS-ACV will provide a tool to

assess how their efforts affect the way nurses evaluate the quality

of their work.

Arthritis Self-Help Course to the CDSMP, which helps individuals

manage many different chronic illnesses.

Two trained, chronically-ill lay persons co-led both programs

over a series of six two-hour group sessions held in a community

setting. The 416 participants in the study were predominantly older,

rural African Americans. Goeppinger and colleagues found that

both interventions led to significant improvements at four months,

but not at 12 months. They also found that participants in the

CDSMP experienced improvements in their pain and disability,

while participants in the disease-specific intervention did not.

Participants and

organizers in

Jean Goeppinger’s

study, comparing

the effectiveness of

two interventions

with older African

Americans who

have arthritis.


Funding the Future of Nursing Research:

Doctoral Student Grants

The School of Nursing (SON) doctoral students had a banner year for

funding awards. Support for the studies comes from a variety of

places – the American Nurses Foundation, Aspect Medical, Inc., the

National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health

Study On When Medication Errors Occur Yields Interesting Results

As many as 98,000 people die in U.S. hospitals each year due to

medical errors, according to the 2000 report from the Institute of

Medicine, “To Err is Human: Building a Safer Health System.” Two

out of every 100 hospital admissions experiences a medicationrelated

mistake, the report’s results also state, and these medication

errors account for roughly 7,000 error-related deaths annually.

Protecting patients’ safety is a high priority. Yun Kyung Chang,

PhD, MPH, a recent doctoral graduate, conducted an American

Nurses Foundation-funded study on the circumstances that lead

nurses to identify and report medical errors.

Accurate identification and reporting of errors is essential to

improving care systems and reducing future errors. Chang found

that more medication errors were reported in work environments

where nurses believed they could admit their mistakes without fear

than in those workplaces where they faced reprisal. Medication

errors also were reported more frequently in work environments

where nurses faced fewer distractions.

“Rather than just seeing underreporting of errors when nurses

keep their mistakes secret, I believe we are seeing underdetection

where nurses can’t report a mistake because they aren’t aware

they’ve made one,” Chang said. “Substantial underdetection could

be possible when nurses are working in busy, stressful environments.

This is something we need to monitor.”

Chang analyzed data from the Outcomes Research in Nursing

Project (ORNA-II), a study funded by the NINR, NIH that identifies

critical hospital and nursing unit variables that must be considered

when organizing and delivering care. The information collected

comes from 286 nursing units in 146 randomly selected JCAHOaccredited

hospitals across the country. SON faculty member

Barbara Mark, PhD, RN, FAAN, is the principal investigator on the

ORNA-II project.

(NINR, NIH), the American Association of Critical Care Nurses, Sigma

Theta Tau, and the Center for Innovation in Health Disparities

Research (CIHDR). This plethora of grants funds work in intensive

care, palliative care, cancer care and medication error research.

The findings are important,

Chang said, because they highlight

the need to rethink how medication

errors are classified and measured

and the need to develop better

reporting systems. With new

classifications and measurements in

place, there can be better analysis of

the causes of and factors related to

medication mistakes.

Chang blended portions of two

different theoretical models, the human error model and the

organizational learning model, for her study. The human error

model focuses on fixing systems that both permit mistakes and

make them more difficult to detect and correct. The organizational

learning model concentrates on managing mistakes after they

happen, and a part of this model looks at the learning climate.

Chang integrated part of the organizational learning model with the

human error model to create a new model that tests the role the

learning environment plays in the relationship between work

environment and medication errors.

Assessing How Women Live Based on Their

Perceived Risk of Breast Cancer

SON doctoral student, Denise Spector, BS, MS, MPH, is looking

at how white and African American women with close female

relatives who have breast cancer view their own risk for the

disease. She is also studying what, if any, lifestyle behavior

changes they make to potentially reduce their risk. Her work is

described in greater detail on page 13.

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL SCHOOL OF NURSING

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Ramsay Tool Found to be an Undependable Scale for Evaluating Sedation Levels

Almost every intensive care nurse

has stories about patients who

they thought were fully sedated

suddenly pulling out their intravenous

medications or jumping out of bed

to leave the unit. The tales make for

great storylines in television medical

dramas, but these incidents also make

a strong case for knowing how well a patient is sedated.

Oversedation can prolong the time patients need

intensive interventions, but undersedation can increase

pain and discomfort. Nurses must be able to accurately

gauge whether a patient’s level of sedation is optimal.

Hospice Services Underutilized by Racial and Ethnic Minorities

Hospice is considered the gold standard in end-of-life care. Across

the country, however, the patient population in most hospices

is predominately white. Very few racial and ethnic minorities

utilize this end-of-life option, and scant data exist detailing why

this is the case and what can be done to reverse this trend.

Only about 40 percent of terminally-ill patients use hospice, and

Jill Forcina Hill, BSN, RN, OCN, a SON doctoral student, recently

discovered possible barriers that could prevent non-white groups

from entering the system. Through her analysis, Hill, who is funded

through a National Research Service Award from the NINR, NIH,

determined that non-whites are often referred to hospice at an

inappropriate time during their illness or they refuse the services.

Hill gathered three years of data from two hospices in

North Carolina – one large, privately-operated facility and

another affiliated with a tertiary-care hospital – to determine

what patient, contextual and institutional factors were

associated with a patient enrolling in hospice after a referral.

According to her research, non-white patients are

frequently referred either too late to benefit from the services

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL SCHOOL OF NURSING

RESEARCH CHRONICLE 2006–2007

Unfortunately, according to recent SON doctoral

graduate, DaiWai Olson, BSN, RN, CCRN, the most widelyused

tool to evaluate a patient’s sedation level, the Ramsay

Sedation Scale, is unreliable. It is based on a nurse’s personal

perception of how actively a sedated patient responds to

stimuli. However, the Ramsay Scale does not come with

a standardized guide to help nurses determine to what

degree sedated patients respond to those stimuli.

“The Ramsay Sedation Scale doesn’t give any concrete

information about what constitutes a fully-alert patient and what

constitutes one that is properly sedated for their condition,” said

Olson, who received funding from Aspect Medical, Inc. “We have

to make sure we’re not under- or over-medicating people, and

or too early to qualify based on hospice’s

strict six-month prognosis criteria.

“If we do have a prognostic problem – if

non-whites are being referred too late or

too early – it could be a result of racial and

ethnic disparities in health and healthcare use

in general,” Hill said. “Minority groups don’t

utilize the healthcare system at the same rate

whites do, and we need to make sure they’re

able to take advantage of these services if they want or need to.”

Once her data analysis is complete, Hill said she plans

to develop an intervention that will help African Americans

and Latinos find hospice care more attractive and make it

an option they will more readily consider, even if it means

modifying hospice in some yet-to-be determined way that

makes it a more acceptable choice for those groups.


ight now, we don’t have a good system for making that call.”

To test the six-level scale’s reliability, Olson and his colleagues

first videotaped patients in intensive care units to create six

30-second tapes that experts agreed represented each of the

six sedation levels. More than 240 nurses each viewed one of

the six videos three times and rated the patient’s sedation level

based on the Ramsay Scale, the Sedation Agitation Scale (a

derivative of the Ramsay Scale) and the Global Scale (a scale

created for this study). Results varied widely, Olson said.

“Evaluations were all over the board – there was no

uniform rating for any of the six videos,” he said. “Nurses

would score the same video at any of the six levels. We had

to conclude that the Ramsay scale tells us almost nothing

End-of-Life Care in the Intensive Care Unit

Making decisions about care at the end-of-life is always hard. It

often involves negotiations among family, care providers and the

individual who is nearing death. Twenty percent of Americans

die in an intensive care unit (ICU), a setting that adds further

challenges to end-of-life decision making.

The ICU can be a noisy, frenetic and

seemingly disorganized place. Families

feel isolated from relatives in the ICU who

are often unresponsive, on mechanical

ventilation and surrounded by monitors.

Many also believe that the nurses do

not offer them much support. Nurses

who work in the ICU are well trained

to provide highly-technical, life-saving care. However, they

traditionally have not been taught to deliver palliative care.

To lessen the frustrations some families feel over ICU experiences,

nurses need guidance on how to provide quality nursing care in

an end-of-life situation. Having that information could increase

a nurse’s confidence that he or she is meeting both hospital and

family expectations for providing dying patients with the best care.

School of Nursing doctoral student Meg Zomorodi, BSN,

RN, is developing an instrument to measure the attitudes,

knowledge and skills of ICU nurses related to providing

about how well sedation is working on a patient.”

Olson said he hopes that this research will eventually lead to

the Ramsay scale being abandoned as a tool for observing and

evaluating sedation. In the meantime, however, he said other

tools based on the Ramsay Scale must also be critiqued for their

reliability, as they are rooted in a flawed observation instrument.

Physician Communication and Relationship

Building with Minority Patients

SON doctoral student, Yolanda Wall, MSN, RN, BC, is

using transcripts from doctor-patient interactions to

determine if doctors treat patients differently based on

race. Her work is described in greater detail on page 12.

end-of-life care. The American Association of Critical Care

Nurses (AACN) and Sigma Theta Tau funded her research.

“One of the main goals for nurses working with dying patients

in the ICU is to provide a peaceful death through compassionate

care of the patient and the family,” Zomorodi said. “Right now,

there is a huge gap between what the family sees as good care and

what the nurse believes. We need to find a way to close that gap.”

To develop her instrument, Zomorodi interviewed nine critical

care nurses about their experiences providing end-of-life care in the

intensive care setting. She analyzed the interview data to identify

nurses’ attitudes, knowledge and perceptions of skill. Over the next

two years, up to eight experts from academic medical centers and

hospitals will review those nurse responses and select the attitudes

and behaviors they view as most important to quality end-of-life care.

Zomorodi will incorporate the interview findings and expert

recommendations into an instrument that she will test online

with 20 participants from UNC Hospitals, Duke University

Medical Center, Durham Regional Hospital and Duke Raleigh

Hospital and with up to 400 active ICU nurses through the

AACN. The responses gleaned from these tests will help

Zomorodi fashion her final assessment tool. Ultimately, Zomorodi

plans to use the instrument to guide and test interventions to

improve the end-of-life care that nurses provide in ICUs.

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL SCHOOL OF NURSING

RESEARCH CHRONICLE 2006–2007

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24

Carolina Summer Research Institutes

Join J other faculty members, post-doctoral fellows, doctoral

students, s practitioners and healthcare professionals who

come to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing N every year to either brush up on old research skills

or learn new ones. Check out the research institutes offered every summer and get a taste for the continuing education the

School of Nursing has to offer. Nationally and internationally-known faculty lead these sessions, offering their expertise to

all attendees. As an additional benefit, attending counts for AACN hours and /or UNC-Chapel Hill CEUs!

Get Guidance on Developing Instruments and Measuring Outcomes.

Outcomes Measurement: Want to develop outcome measures or design outcome studies? Mary Lynn, PhD, RN, and Richard Redman, PhD, RN, teach

doctorally-prepared researchers and educators, postdoctoral fellows and doctoral students to develop and test outcome measures. Attendees also learn to

create outcome models, linking delivered care to outcomes measurement and other issues that affect outcomes measurement.

Instrument Development: Mary Lynn, PhD, RN, teaches classical measurement theory, traditional instrument development and adaptation, scaling methods

and other tactics used to create instruments suited for specific studies. Attending doctorally-prepared researchers, post doctoral fellows and doctoral students

will also discuss exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, the concepts of reliability and validity and critiques of existing instruments.

Gain Expertise in Qualitative Analysis.

Qualitative Analysis 1: Empirical/Analytical Methods: Margarete Sandelowski, PhD, RN, FAAN, focuses on the general principles of and generic

techniques for qualitative analysis in this workshop. In addition, she emphasizes empirical/analytical and naturalist methods. Faculty and doctoral students in

nursing, medicine and public health who attend will practice techniques associated with these methods, using a provided data set.

Institute in Qualitative Research: Mixed Methods Research: Margarete Sandelowski, PhD, RN, FAAN, continues her workshops by teaching course

participants the contemporary landscape of mixed methods research and how to choose the appropriate research design to fit their research objectives.

Participants, including nursing, medicine and public health faculty and doctoral students, will learn to use techniques for combining sampling and data

collection strategies and for analyzing data.

Qualitative Analysis 2: Phenomenological & Narrative/Discourse Methods: In her third qualitative research institute, Margarete Sandelowski, PhD, RN,

FAAN, focuses on phenomenological/hermeneutic and narrative discourse methods of analysis. Faculty and doctoral students in nursing, medicine and public

health will practice techniques associated with these methods with a provided data set.

Learn Effective Writing Skills for Research Proposals and Publication.

Asian Scholars Writing for Publication: SeonAe Yeo, PhD, RN, FAAN, and Elizabeth Tornquist, MA, FAAN, conduct this workshop that

addresses specific problems non-native English speakers face when writing in English. Yeo and Tornquist prepare participants to write and

edit effectively in English, as well as use literature productively. The seminar is designed for faculty, practitioners and post-doctoral fellows

who are native Asian-language speakers.

Writing Research Grants: Sandra Funk, PhD, FAAN, and Elizabeth Tornquist, MA, FAAN, teach nursing faculty, post-doctoral fellows and others interested

in executing successful National Institutes of Health-style grant applications how to write competitive proposals and successfully navigate the NIH grant

submission process.

Writing for Publication: Learn how to write for publication correctly the first time. Elizabeth Tornquist, MA, FAAN, teaches health professions faculty and

clinicians how to prepare and write a manuscript, how to use literature productively and how to revise and edit for resubmission. Participants who come to the

workshop with an idea for a manuscript will have the chance to write the manuscript and receive critiques and edits.

Develop New Methods for Designing and Conducting Research.

Longitudinal Methods & Analysis: Mark Weaver, PhD, will instruct participants on longitudinal study design and provide an introduction to the analysis of data

from longitudinal studies. Attendees will learn about the appropriate choice of design for the research question, power, randomization, missing data and data

management. Weaver will also cover linear mixed model, generalized estimating equations and survival analysis methods.

Developing Theory-Based Interventions: Merle Mishel, PhD, RN, FAAN, and Sue Thoyre, PhD, RN, help doctorally-prepared nurses understand the relationship

between the theory of a problem and the theory of the intervention that targets the problem. Two days of this workshop will focus on a theory of a problem, and

three days will focus on the intervention. Attendees will address the connection between these theories and also how to identify mediators and moderators of the

intervention.

Legal Research Methods: Diane Kjervik, JD, RN, FAAN, leads workshop attendees through the analysis of qualitative aspects of legal research and the

examination of legal research methods that address the intersection of nursing phenomena and the law. Participants will synthesize legal and nursing phenomena

and apply legal research methods to work on their dissertation or other research projects.

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL SCHOOL OF NURSING

RESEARCH CHRONICLE 2006–2007


Faculty Research Grants 2006–2007 Academic Year

PREVENTING AND MANAGING MAJOR

HEALTH THREATS AND CHRONIC ILLNESS

Beeber, L., Principal Investigator; Canuso, R., Holditch-Davis,

D., Mishel, M., Schwartz, T., Co-Investigators. Reducing

Depressive Symptoms in Low-Income Mothers. National

Institute of Mental Health, National Institutes of Health,

2003-2008.

Beeber, L., Principal Investigator; Schwartz, T., Statistician.

Xtria E-PRIC Common Dataset Ancillary Study. Xtria, LLC,

Administration for Children and Families, Administration for

Children, Youth, and Families, 2007.

Berry, D., Principal Investigator; Ammerman, A., McMurray,

R., Schwartz, T., Co-Investigators; Skelly, A., Senior Research

Advisor. Children and Parents Partnering Together to Manage

Their Weight. National Institute of Nursing Research, National

Institutes of Health, 2007-2012.

Berry, D., Co-Investigator; Ammerman, A., Principal

Investigator. Primary Care and Communities Tackling Obesity

in Kids. National Institute of Child Health and Human

Development, National Institutes of Health, 2005-2010.

Black, B., Scholar; Sandelowski, M., Mentor. Perinatal Care

Options Study. Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in

Women’s Health (BIRCWH), National Institute of Child Health

and Human Development, National Institutes of Health,

2006-2007.

Fogel, C., Principal Investigator; Adimora, A., Weaver, M.,

Fishel, A., Stephenson, B., Co-Investigators. Helping Women

Prisoners Reduce HIV Risk After Release. National Institute of

Mental Health, National Institutes of Health, 2003-2008.

Fogel, C., Principal Investigator; Wohl, D., Sandelowski, M.,

Co-Investigators; Weaver, M., Statistician. Reducing Sexual

Risk in Southern HIV-Positive Women. Centers for Disease

Control and Prevention, 2005-2009.

Fogel, C., Principal Investigator; Wohl, D., Scheyett, A.

M., Weaver, M., Co-Investigators. Incarcerated Women,

Parenting and HIV Risk. National Institute of Mental Health,

National Institutes of Health, 2006-2008.

Goeppinger, J., Principal Investigator; Lorig, K., Co-

Investigator; Schwartz, T., Gizlice, Z., Statisticians. Mail-

Delivered Arthritis Self-Management Education. Centers for

Disease Control and Prevention, 2004-2007.

Goeppinger, J., Principal Investigator; Lorig, K., Co-

Investigator; Schwartz, T., Biostatistician; Ritter, P.,

Statistician. Arthritis Self-Management Education – Dose

Response. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,

2005-2008.

Harrell, J., Principal Investigator; McMurray, R., Bangdiwala,

S., Hackney, A., Beese, J., Co-Investigators. Physical Activity

in Youth -- Preventing Type 2 Diabetes. National Institute of

Diabetes & Digestive & Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of

Health, 2002-2009.

Holditch-Davis, D., Principal Investigator; Miles, M.,

Co-Principal Investigator; Beeber, L., Thoyre, S., Co-

Investigators; Weaver, M., Statistical Investigator; Pedersen,

C., Biddle, A., Consulting Investigators; Hubbard, C.,

Wereszczak, J., Clinical Investigators. Nursing Support

Intervention for Mothers of Prematures. National Institute of

Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health, 2001-2007.

Miles, M., Co-Investigator; Docherty, S., Principal Investigator.

Maternal Caregiving of Children Post Stem Cell Transplant.

National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of

Health, 2004-2007.

Mishel, M., Principal Investigator; Germino, B., Porter, L.,

Co-Principal Investigators; Weaver, M., Gil, K., Baucom, D.,

Co-Investigators. Younger Breast Cancer Survivors: Managing

Uncertainty. National Institute of Nursing Research, National

Institutes of Health, 2006-2010.

Mishel, M., Principal Investigator; Germino, B., Co-Principal

Investigator; Beeber, L., Gollop, C., Mohler, J., Weaver,

M., Co-Investigators. Decision Making Under Uncertainty

in Prostate Cancer. National Institute of Nursing Research,

National Institutes of Health, 2002-2006.

Mishel, M., Principal Investigator; Interventions for

Preventing and Managing Chronic Illness. Institutional

National Research Service Award, National Institute of Nursing

Research, National Institutes of Health, 1996-2011.

Palmer, M., Principal Investigator; Hardin, S., Madigan, C.,

Co-Investigators; Carlson, J., Co-Investigator, Statistician.

Urinary Incontinence and Overactive Bladder in Chronic Heart

Failure Patients: An Exploratory Study. Pfi zer, Inc. 2005-2007.

Palmer, M., Site Principal Investigator & Co-Investigator;

Baumgarten, M., Principal Investigator. Locus of Care and

Pressure Ulcers After Hip Fracture. University of Maryland,

National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin

Diseases, National Institutes of Health, 2002-2006.

Pletsch, P., Principal Investigator; Schwartz, T.,

Biostatistician. A Smoking Resumption-Prevention

Intervention for Pregnant and Postpartum Women. Robert

Wood Johnson Foundation, 2005-2007.

Pletsch, P., Site Principal Investigator and Co-Investigator.

Pharmacological Therapies for Pregnant Smokers. Duke

University, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of

Health, 2003-2005.

Skelly, A., Principal Investigator; Burns, D., Carlson, J.,

Hoerger, T., Leeman, J., Co-Investigators. Symptom

Focused Diabetes Care for African American Women.

National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes

of Health, 2003-2007.

Yeo, S., Principal Investigator; Neelon, V., Leeman, J.,

Weaver, M., Co-Investigators. Effect of Walking and

Stretching Exercise on Oxidative Stress in Women at Risk for

Preeclampsia and Pregnancy Induced Hypertension: A Pilot

Study. Faculty Research Opportunity Grant, School of Nursing,

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2007-2008.

REDUCING HEALTH DISPARITIES

Barksdale, D., Principal Investigator. Enhancing Knowledge

of Cardiovascular Research in Black Americans. Junior Faculty

Development Award, The University of North Carolina at

Chapel Hill, 2007.

Beeber, L., Principal Investigator; Holditch-Davis, D., Perreira,

K., Schwartz, T., Co-Investigators. EHS Latina Mothers:

Reducing Depression and Improving Infant/Toddler Mental

Health. Administration for Children and Families, Department

of Health and Human Services, 2002-2007.

Color Key

Preventing and Managing Major

Health Threats and Chronic Illness

Reducing Health Disparities

Improving Healthcare Quality and

Patient Outcomes

Understanding Biobehavioral and

Genetic Bases of Health and Illness

Developing Innovative Approaches

to Enhance Science and its Translation

to Practice

Beeber, L., Principal Investigator; Holditch-Davis, D.,

Schwartz, T., Co-Investigators. Alumbrando El Camino/

Bright Moments: A Curriculum for Staff Working with EHS

Parents with Depressive Symptoms. Administration for

Children and Families, Department of Health and Human

Services, 2005-2008.

Berry, D., Principal Investigator; Balderas, B., Colindres, C.,

McCurley, M., Co-Investigators. A Feasibility Study to Test

a Community Based Participatory Weight Management

Intervention for Latina Mothers and Their 3 to 10 Year Old

Children. The Center for Innovation in Health Disparities

Research, School of Nursing, The University of North Carolina

at Chapel Hill; National Institute of Nursing Research,

National Institutes of Health, 2006-2007.

Lunsford, V., Principal Investigator. A Faith-Based Program

for Cardiovascular Risk Factor Reduction. The Center for

Innovation in Health Disparities Research, School of Nursing,

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; National

Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health,

2007-2008.

McQuiston, C., Site Principal Investigator; Parrado, E.,

Co-Investigator. Gender, Migration, and HIV Risks Among

Hispanics: A Trinational Study. Duke University, National

Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health,

2005-2009.

Miles, M., Principal Investigator; Roland, J., Campbell, L.,

Co-Principal Investigators; Rowsey, P., Goeppinger, J.,

Berry, D., Core Directors. Center for Innovation in Health

Disparities Research. National Institute of Nursing Research,

National Institutes of Health, 2002-2007.

Miles, M., Co-Investigator; Campbell, L., Principal

Investigator. Development of a Self-Care and Parenting

Intervention for African American Grandmothers Rearing

Grandchildren. Center for Innovation in Health Disparities

Research, School of Nursing, The University of North Carolina

at Chapel Hill, National Institute of Nursing Research,

National Institutes of Health, 2006-2007.

Miles, M., McQuiston, C., Garrett, J., Wohl, D., Co-

Investigators; Corbie-Smith, G., Principal Investigator.

Increasing Access to HIV Trials for Rural Minorities. National

Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease, National Institutes

of Health, 2006-2010.

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL SCHOOL OF NURSING

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Mishel, M., Principal Investigator; Mohler, J., Consortium

Director. Cultural and Demographic Predictors of Interaction

with the Health Care System and Prostate Cancer

Aggressiveness. In: Racial Differences in Prostate Cancer:

Infl uence of Health Care and Host and Tumor Biology. School

of Medicine, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,

Department of Defense, 2003-2009.

Waldrop, J., Principal Investigator. Factors affecting the

decision of Hispanic/Latino Mothers to Both Breastfeed and

Formula Feed Their Infants. Faculty Research Opportunity

Grant, School of Nursing, The University of North Carolina at

Chapel Hill, 2007-2008.

IMPROVING HEALTHCARE QUALITY

AND PATIENT OUTCOMES

Eaves, Y., Principal Investigator; Dilworth-Anderson,

P., Palmer, M., Co-Sponsors; Carlson, J., Statistician.

A Caregiving Intervention for Rural African Americans.

National Institute on Aging, National Institutes of Health,

2005-2010.

Havens, D., Principal Investigator. Building Hospital Capacity

for Better Work and Better Care. Health Resources and

Services Administration, 2004-2009.

Jones, C., Principal Investigator; Mark, B., Holmes, M.,

Co-investigators. A Model of Access for Nursing Care.

Southeastern Regional Center for Health Workforce Studies,

Cecil G. Sheps Center for Health Services Research, The

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Health Resources

and Services Administration, 2005-2007.

Jones, C., Principal Investigator; Mark, B., Belyea, M.,

Gates, M., Co-Investigators. Population Characteristics and

Nursing Employment Patterns. Southeastern Regional Center

for Health Workforce Studies, Cecil G. Sheps Center for

Health Services Research, The University of North Carolina at

Chapel Hill, Health Resources and Services Administration,

2004-2007.

Jones, C., Principal Investigator; Mark, B., Co-Investigator.

The Intersection of Nursing and Health Services Research.

Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, 2003-2006.

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL SCHOOL OF NURSING

RESEARCH CHRONICLE 2006–2007

Lin, Z., Principal Investigator. Protecting Genetic Privacy

through Risk Assessment. National Library of Medicine,

2006-2009.

Lynn, M., Principal Investigator; Mark, B., Nursing Systems

Analyst; Bollen, K., SEM Analyst; Morgan, J., Data Analyst.

Testing a Model of Quality Care in Home Health. National

Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health,

2002-2007.

Mark, B., Principal Investigator; Berman, W., Harless,

D., Pink, G., Reiter, K., Spetz, J., Co-Investigators. Nurse

Staffi ng, Financial Performance, and Quality Care. Agency for

Healthcare Research and Quality, 1999-2010.

Mark, B., Principal Investigator; Jones, C., Belyea, M., Co-

Investigators. A Model of Patient and Nursing Administration

Outcomes. National Institute of Nursing Research, National

Institutes of Health, 1995-2007.

Mark, B., Principal Investigator; Leatt, P., Carey, T.,

Co-Investigators. Research Training in Quality Health Care

and Patient Outcomes. Institutional National Research Service

Award, National Institute of Nursing Research, National

Institutes of Health, 2004-2009.

Piven, M. L., Principal Investigator; Sloane, P.,

Zimmerman, S., Co-Investigators. Developing a Measure

of Emotional Care in Nursing Homes. The Alzheimer’s

Association, 2006-2008.

Travers, D., Co-investigator; Wetterhall, S., Principal

Investigator. The BioSense Initiative to Improve Early Event

Detection. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention,

2005-2008.

Travers, D., Co-investigator; Waller, A., Principal Investigator.

Evaluation of the Emergency Severity Index for Pediatric Triage.

Health Resources and Services Administration, 2005- 2008.

Travers, D., Principal Investigator. Analysis of Vital Sign Data

for Prediction of Pediatric Patient Acuity in the Emergency

Department. University Research Council, The University of

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2007-2009.

Travers, D., Co-Investigator; Haas, S., Principal Investigator.

Chief Complaint Symposium. National Library of Medicine,

National Institutes of Health, 2005-2007.

UNDERSTANDING BIOBEHAVIORAL

AND GENETIC BASES OF HEALTH AND ILLNESS

Barksdale, D., Principal Investigator; Clarke, M., &

Light, K., Co-Investigators; Skelly, A., Advisor. Stress and

Cardiovascular Responses in Black Men. Program on Ethnicity,

Culture, and Health Outcomes, The University of North

Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2004-2007.

Barksdale, D., Principal Investigator; Carlson, B., Co-

Investigator. Assessing Central Aortic Blood Pressure Using

SphygmoCor: Methodology and Feasibility. University

Research Council, The University of North Carolina at Chapel

Hill, 2007-2009.

Brunssen, S., Principal Investigator. Alterations in Myelin and

GABA Receptors Gene Expression in Mouse Cortex Following

Exposure to Hyper-Interleukin-6. Junior Faculty Development

Award, IBM Fund Distinguished Prize, The University of North

Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2006.

Brunssen, S., Principal Investigator. Exploring the Effects of

Perinatal Exposure to Hyper-Interleukin-6 on Developmental

Regulation of Neurotransmitter Receptors in the Mouse

Cerebral Cortex. University Research Council, The University of

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2005-2007.

Carlson, B. W., Principal Investigator; Neelon, V., Hartman,

M., Dogra, S., Carlson, J., Co-Investigators. Respiratory

Periodicity and Cognitive Decline in Elders. National

Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health,

2002-2007.

Rowsey, P., Carlson, B., Brunssen, S., Principal

Investigators. A Pilot Study of the Effect of Hypertension and

Ambient Room Temperature on the Degree of Brain Injury

During Intermittent Hypoxemia in Rats. Faculty Research

Opportunity Grant, School of Nursing, The University of

North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2006-2007.

Van Riper, M., Co-Principal Investigator; Bailey, D., Principal

Investigator. ELSI Scale-up: Large Sample Gene Discovery

and Disclosure. The Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications

Research Program, National Human Genome Research

Institute, National Institutes of Health, 2004-2007.

Van Riper, M., Principal Investigator; Bailey, D., Henderson,

G., Nelson, D., Rothschild, B., Skinner, D., Co-Investigators.

Researching ELSI Research Training. National Human Genome

Research Institute, National Institutes of Health, 2006-2008.

Van Riper, M., Principal Investigator. Minority Families Being

Screened for and Living with Genetic Conditions. Center

for Innovation in Health Disparities Research, School of

Nursing, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, National

Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health,

2003-2006.

Van Riper, M., Bailey, D., Co-Principal Investigators. ELSI

Scale-up: Large Sample Gene Discovery and Disclosure.

Ethical, Legal, and Social Implications Research Program,

National Human Genome Research Institute, National

Institutes of Health, 2004-2007.

DEVELOPING INNOVATIVE APPROACHES

TO ENHANCE SCIENCE AND ITS

TRANSLATION TO PRACTICE

Leeman, J., Co-Investigator; Ammerman, A., Principal

Investigator. Center of Excellence in Training and Translation

for the Wisewoman and Obesity Prevention Programs.

Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 2004-2009.


Sandelowski, M., Principal Investigator; Barroso, J., Voils,

C., Co-Principal Investigators. Integrating Qualitative &

Quantitative Research Findings. National Institute of Nursing

Research, National Institutes of Health, 2005-2010.

Schwartz, T., Biostatistician; Jordan, J., Principal Investigator.

NIAMS Multidisciplinary Clinical Research Center for

Faculty Publications 2006–2007 Academic Year

Alden, Kathryn, Clinical Associate Professor

Alden, K. R. (2007). Newborn nutrition and feeding. In D. L.

Lowdermilk & S. E. Perry (Eds.), Maternity and women’s

health care (9th ed., pp. 709-742). St. Louis, MO: Mosby/

Elsevier.

Alden, K. R. (2007). Nursing care of the newborn. In D. L.

Lowdermilk & S. E. Perry (Eds.), Maternity and women’s

health care (9th ed., pp. 662-708). St. Louis, MO: Mosby/

Elsevier.

Alexander, Rumay, Clinical Associate Professor

Alexander, G. R. (2007) Nursing sensitive databases: their

existence, challenges and importance. Medical Care

Research and Review, 64(2 Suppl.), 44S-63S.

Barksdale, Debra, Assistant Professor

Barksdale, D. J., & Blevins, L. (2007). The clinical portfolio. The

Journal for Nurse Practitioners, 4(6), 420.

Prussian, K., Barksdale-Brown, D. J., & Dieckmann, J. (2007).

Racial and ethnic differences in the presentation of

metabolic syndrome. The Journal for Nurse Practitioners,

3(4), 229-239.

Beeber, Linda, Professor

Bartlett, R., Holditch-Davis, D., Belyea, M., Halpern, C. T., &

Beeber, L. (2006). Risk and protection in the development

of problem behaviors in adolescents. Research in Nursing

& Health, 29(6), 607-621.

Beeber, L. S., Chazen-Cohen, R., Squires, J., Harden, B. J.,

Boris, N., Scott-Heller, S., et al. (2007). The early

promotion and intervention research consortium (E-PIRC):

Rheumatic Diseases: Methodology Core. National Institute

of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases, National

Institutes of Health, 2003-2007.

Sherwood, G., Co-Investigator; Thomas, E., Principal

Investigator. Centers of Excellence for Patient Safety Research

and Practice: Translating Safety Practices from Aviation to

Educational and Professional Grants and Activities 2006–2007 Academic Year

Beeber, L. (Principal Investigator). Psychiatric Nurse

Practitioners: Meeting the Needs of the Underserved in

NC. Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau

of Health Professions, 2004 – 2007.

Beeber, L. (Principal Investigator). Psychiatric Mental Health –

MSN/PMSN Student Support, North Carolina Department

of Health and Human Services, 2005-2009.

Cockroft, M. (Principal Investigator). Clinical Site

Development Grant: Orange County Schools. Greensboro

Area Health Education Centers, 2006 – 2007.

Cronenwett, L. (Principal Investigator), Sherwood, G.

(Co-investigator). Quality and Safety Education

for Nurses: Phase I, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation,

2005-2007.

Cronenwett, L. (Principal Investigator), Sherwood, G.

(Co-Investigator) Quality and Safety Education for Nurses:

Phase II. Robert Wood Johnson Foundation,

2007 – 2008.

Cronenwett, L. (Project Director); Gilliss, C., Co-Project

Director. Duke/Carolina Visiting Professorship in Geriatric

Nursing, Blue Cross/Blue Shield of North Carolina,

2004 – 2010.

Dieckmann, J. (Principal Investigator). Clinical Site

Development Grant: Clinical Education Using a Small

Group Model: Health Promotion for University Students

(Part II). Wake Area Health Education Centers, 2

006 – 2007.

Dieckmann, J. (Principal Investigator). Clinical Site

Development Grant: Clinical Education Using a Small

Group Model: Prevention of Alcohol and Substance

Abuse for Children, Youth and Young Adults (Part II).

Wake Area Health Education Centers, 2006 – 2007.

Dillon, R. (Principal Investigator). Clinical Site Development

Grant: Council for Senior Citizens/Center for Senior Life.

Wake Area Health Education Centers, 2006 – 2007.

Foster, B. (Principal Investigator). PRIDE in Nursing,

Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau of

Health Professions, 2004-2007.

Hawthorne, N. (Project Director). Interdisciplinary Service

Trip. Strowd Roses, Inc, 2006 – 2007.

Miller, M. (Project Director). Advanced Education Nurse

Traineeship. Department of Health and Human Services,

Bureau of Health Professions, 2006 – 2007.

Miller, M. (Project Director). Nurse Faculty Loan Program.

Department of Health and Human Services, Bureau of

Health Professions, 2006 – 2007.

Five approaches to improving infant/toddler mental

health in early head start. Infant Mental Health Journal,

28, 130-150.

Beeber, L. S., Cooper, C., Van Noy, B. E., Schwartz, T. A.,

Blanchard, H. C., Canuso, R., et al. (2007). Flying under

the radar: Engagement and retention of depressed

low-income mothers in a mental health intervention.

Advances in Nursing Science, 30(3), 221-234.

Malik, N., Boris, N., Scott-Heller, S., Jones-Harden, B., Squires,

J., Beeber, L. S., et al. (2007). Risk for maternal

depression and child aggression in early head start

Families: A test of ecological models. Infant Mental

Health Journal, 28, 171-191.

Berry, Diane, Assistant Professor

Berry, D. (2006). Linking theory, research and clinical practice

in weight management. In C. Roy & D. Jones (Eds.).

Nursing knowledge development and clinical practice

(pp. 287-294), New York: Springer.

Berry, D., Grey, M., Savoye, M., & Melkus, G. (2007). An

intervention for multiethnic overweight and obese

parents and their overweight children. Applied Nursing

Research, 20(2), 63-71.

Berry, D., & Melkus, G. (2006). Epidemiological perspectives

and risk for developing diabetes. Nursing Clinics, 41(4),

487-498.

Black, Beth, Assistant Professor

Black, B. (2007). Nursing theory: The basis for professional

nursing. In K. Chitty & B. Black (Eds.), Professional

nursing: Concepts and challenges (pp. 328-348). St.

Louis, MO: Saunders/Elsevier Press.

Healthcare. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality,

2001-2006.

Zimmerman, S., Palmer, M., and Busby-Whitehead, J.,

Principal Investigators. ICARUS, Interdisciplinary Center for

Aging Research: Uniting Scientists. The Hartford Foundation,

2006-2008.

Oermann, M. (UNC-CH Project Team Leader) Evaluating the

Outcomes of Nursing Education: Accelerated Bachelor

of Science in Nursing. (Hays, J., Principal Investigator).

Helene Fuld Health Trust, 2007 – 2008.

Oppewal, S. (Principal Investigator). Nursing Student

Summer Externships in Rural and Underserved Settings,

Kate B. Reynolds Charitable Trust, 2005 – 2007.

Oppewal, S. (Project Director). Durham Senior Life:

Coordinating Council for Senior Citizens and Community

Life Adult Day Care Center, Council for Senior Citizens,

2006 – 2007.

Palmer, M. (Principal Investigator). Improving Nursing Care

for Acutely Ill Elders. Department of Health and Human

Resources, Division of Nursing, 2006 – 2009.

Soltis-Jarrett, V. (Principal Investigator) Educational Mobility

Grant: Off Campus Post Masters Certifi cate Program:

Advanced Practice Registered Nurse in Psychiatric

Mental Health Nursing, Mountain Area Health Education

Centers, 2006 – 2008

Wagner, J., (Project Director). North Carolina Nurse Refresher

Program Contract. Friday Center for Continuing

Education and Statewide Area Health Education Center

Program, 2007 – 2008.

Black, B. (2007). The science of nursing and evidence-based

practice. In K. Chitty & B. Black (Eds.), Professional

nursing: Concepts and challenges (pp.270-290). St.

Louis, MO: Saunders/Elsevier Press.

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL SCHOOL OF NURSING

RESEARCH CHRONICLE 2006–2007

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28

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Nursing

Annual Level of Extramural Research Funding

$6,256,523

Black, B. & Chitty, K. (Eds.) (2007). Becoming a nurse:

Defi ning nursing and socialization into professional

practice. In K. Chitty & B. Black (Eds.), Professional

nursing: Concepts and challenges (pp. 139-160). St.

Louis, MO: Saunders/Elsevier Press.

Black, B. & Chitty, K. (2007). Critical thinking, the nursing

process and clinical judgment. In K. Chitty & B. Black

(Eds.), Professional nursing: Concepts and challenges (pp.

188-210). St. Louis, MO: Saunders/Elsevier Press.

Black, B. & Chitty, K. (2007). Professional nursing:

Concepts and challenges (5th ed.). St. Louis, MO:

Saunders/Elsevier Press.

Black, B., Holditch-Davis, D. Schwartz, T., & Scher, M. (2006).

Effects of antenatal magnesium sulfate and corticosteroid

therapy on sleep states of preterm infants. Research in

Nursing and Health, 29, 269-280.

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL SCHOOL OF NURSING

RESEARCH CHRONICLE 2006–2007

$10,196,079 $9,919,474

$8,572,823 $8,622,870

’01–’02 (n=45) ’02–’03 (n=48) ’03–’04(n=48) ’04–’05(n=61) ’05–’06 (n=64) ’06–’07(n=59)

For the Period 2001–Present [State Fiscal Year July 1– June 30]

Holditch-Davis, D., Schwartz, T., Black, B., & Scher, M. (2007).

Correlates of mother-premature infant interactions.

Research in Nursing and Health, 30(2), 333-346.

Bush, Tom, Clinical Assistant Professor

Bush, C. T. (2006). The new model for medicine is nursing.

NP News, 15(4), 3.

Bush, C. T. (2007). NP, PA, MD - What’s the difference?

NP News, 16(1), 3.

Bush, C. T. (2007). NP practice changes lives, lives change

NP practice. NP News, 16(2), 3.

Canuso, Regina, Research Instructor

Beeber, L. S., Cooper, C., Van Noy, B. E., Schwartz, T. A.,

Blanchard, H. C., Canuso, R., et al. (2007). Flying under

the radar: Engagement and retention of depressed

low-income mothers in a mental health intervention.

Advances in Nursing Science, 30(3), 221-234.

Carlson, Barbara, Assistant Professor

Carlson, B. W., Neelon, V. J., Carlson, J. R., Hartman,

M., & Dogra, S. (2007). Respiratory periodicity and

electroencephalogram arousals during sleep in older

adults. Biological Research for Nursing, 8(4), 249-260.

Carlson, John, Research Associate Professor

Carlson, B. W., Neelon, V. J., Carlson, J. R., Hartman,

M., & Dogra, S. (2007). Respiratory periodicity and

electroencephalogram arousals during sleep in older

adults. Biological Research for Nursing, 8(4), 249-260.

Cronenwett, Linda, Dean & Professor

Aspden, P., Wolcott, J. A., Bootman, J. L., & Cronenwett, L.

R. (Eds). (2007). Preventing medication errors: Quality

chasm series. Washington, DC: Institute of Medicine of

the National Academies, Committee on Identifying and

Preventing Medication Errors.

Cronenwett, L., & Sherwood, G. (2007). Quality and safety

education for nurses. Leader to Leader, Spring 2007: 1-2.

Available online at: www.ncsbn.org.

Cronenwett, L., Sherwood, G., Barnsteiner, J., Disch, J.,

Johnson, J., Mitchell, P., et al. (2007). Quality and safety

education for nurses. Nursing Outlook, 55(3), 122-131.

Lynn, J., Baily, M. A., Bottrell, M., Jennings, B., Levine, R.

$7,926,625

J., Davidoff, F., et al. (2007). The ethics of using quality

improvement methods in health care. Annals of Internal

Medicine, 146(9), 666-673.

Smith, E. L., Cronenwett, L., & Sherwood, G. (2007). Current

assessments of quality and safety education in nursing.

Nursing Outlook, 55(3), 132-137.

D’Auria, Jennifer, Associate Professor

Christian, B., & D’Auria, J. P. (2006). Building life skills for

children with cystic fi brosis: Effectiveness of an

intervention. Nursing Research, 55(5), 300-307.

Cole, K., Waldrop, J., D’Auria, J. P., & Garner, H. (2006). An

Integrative research review: Effective school-based

childhood overweight interventions. Journal for

Specialists in Pediatric Nursing, 11(3), 166-177.

D’Auria, J. P. (2006). Nonspecifi c signs & symptoms. In

J. Fox (Ed.), Pediatric and Family Practitioner

Online Review. St. Louis: Mosby/Elsevier. Available

online at EVOLVE Web: http://evolve.elsevier.com/

productPages/s_848.html.

Dieckmann, Janna, Assistant Professor

Dieckmann, J. L. (2006). The history of public health and

community health nursing. In M. Stanhope & J.

Lancaster (Eds.), Foundations of nursing in the

community: Community-oriented practice (92nd ed., pp

17-35). St. Louis: Mosby/Elvsevier.

Prussian, K., Barksdale-Brown, D. J., & Dieckmann, J. (2007).

Racial and ethnic differences in the presentation of

metabolic syndrome. The Journal for Nurse Practitioners,

3(4), 229-239.

Dix, Dustine, Clinical Instructor

Dix, D. (2007). Hypertension in pregnancy. In D. Lowdermilk

& S. Perry (Eds.), Maternity & Women’s Health (9th ed.,

pp. 784-803). St. Louis, MO: Mosby/Elsevier.

Dougherty, Molly, Professor

Gesler, W., Arcury, T., Skelly, A., Nash, S., Soward, A., &

Dougherty, M. (2006). Identifying diabetes knowledge

nodes as sites for a diabetes prevention program. Health

and Place, 12, 449-464.

Liao, Y. M., Dougherty, M. C., Boyington, A. R., Lynn, M. R.,

& Palmer, M. H. (2006). Developing and validating a


Chinese instrument to measure lower urinary tract

symptoms among employed women in Taiwan. Nursing

Outlook, 54, 353-361.

Durham, Carol, Clinical Associate Professor

Durham, C. F. (2006). Medication Administration. In

G. Mazzocco, J. Roth, J., & R. Dillon (Eds.), Medical-

Surgical Nursing Review (pp. 8-69). Chapel Hill, NC:

University of North Carolina Chapel Hill.

Durham, C. F. (2006). On-line Simulation Module: Sexuality

in the geriatric cardiac patient. Improving the nursing

care of acutely ill elders: A case library. Department

of Health and Human Services: Health Resources

and Services Administration (HRSA) # D62HPO1913.

Retrieved online at: http://nursing.gero.unc.edu

MacMillan, J. S., Davis, L. L., Durham, C. F., & Matteson, E. S.

(2006). Exercise and heart rate recovery. Heart & Lung,

35(6), 383-390.

Esposito, Noreen, Assistant Professor

Johnston, M. & Esposito, N. (2007). Barriers and facilitators

for breastfeeding among working women in the United

States. Journal of Obstetric, Gynecological, and Neonatal

Nursing, 36, 9-20.

Fishel, Anne, Clinical Professor

Fishel, A. (2007). Mental health disorders and substance

abuse. In D. Lowdermilk, & S. Perry, (Eds.), Maternity

and women’s health care (pp. 900-924). St. Louis, MO:

Mosby/Elsevier.

Fogel, Cathie, Professor

Fogel, C. I. (2007). Sexually transmitted diseases and other

infections. In D. Lowdermilk & S. Perry (Eds.), Maternity

& women’s health care (9th ed., pp. 174-206). St. Louis,

MO: Mosby/Elsevier.

Foster, Beverly, Clinical Associate Professor

Foster, B. (2006). Legal Aspects of Nursing. In K Chitty & B.

Black (Eds.), Professional Nursing: Concepts and

Challenges (5th ed. pp. 551-578). St. Louis, MO:

Saunders/Elsevier.

Germino, Barbara, Beerstecher-Blackwell Professor

Gil, K. M., Mishel, M. H., Belyea, M., Germino, B., Porter,

L. S. & Clayton, M. (2006). Benefi ts of the uncertainty

management intervention for African American

and White older breast cancer survivors: 20-month

outcomes. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine,

13(4), 286-294.

Granger, B. B., Moser, D., Germino, B., Harrell, J. & Ekman,

I. (2006). Caring for patients with chronic heart

failure: The trajectory model. European Journal of

Cardiovascular Nursing, 5, 222-227.

Gingrich, Patricia, Clinical Assistant Professor

Ginrich, P. (2007). Evidence-based practice boxes for all 41

chapters. In D. Lowdermilk & S. Perry (Eds.), Maternity

and women’s health care. St. Louis, MO: Mosby/Elsevier.

Halloran, Edward, Associate Professor

Halloran, E. (2007). Remembering Virginia Henderson. In

K. Chitty & B. Black (Eds.), Professional nursing: Concepts

and challenges, (5th ed., pp. 332-333). St. Louis, MO:

Saunders/Elsevier Press.

Welton, J., Halloran, E., & Zone-Smith, L. (2006). Nursing

intensity: In the footsteps of John Thompson. Studies in

health technology and informatics, 122, 367-371.

Welton, J., Unruh, L., & Halloran, E. (2006). Nurse staffi ng,

nursing intensity, staff mix, and direct nursing care

costs across Massachusetts hospitals. Journal of Nursing

Administration, 36(9), 416-425.

Harlan, Christina, Clinical Assistant Professor

Bender, D., Harlan, C., Ko, L., & Stern, I. (2006). Spanish

for mental health professionals: A step by step

handbook. Albuquerque, NM: University of

New Mexico Press.

Harrell, Joanne, Fox Professor

Granger, B. B., Moser, D., Germino, B., Harrell, J. & Ekman,

I. (2006). Caring for patients with chronic heart

failure: The trajectory model. European Journal of

Cardiovascular Nursing, 5, 222-227.

Havens, Donna, Professor

Havens, D. S., Wood, S., & Leeman, J. (2006). Improving

nursing practice and patient care: Building capacity

with appreciative inquiry. The Journal of Nursing

Administration, 36(10), 463-470.

Hawley, Jennifer, Clinical Assistant Professor

Hawley, J. (2007). Forward. Straight A’s in fl uids &

electrolytes: A review series(pp. 13-14). Philadelphia:

Lippincott Williams & Wilkins.

Hughes, Linda, Research Associate Professor

Chang, Y. K., Hughes, L. C., & Mark, B. A. (2006). Fitting in

or standing out: Nursing workgroup diversity and unit-level

patient outcomes. Nursing Research, 55(6), 373-380.

Jones, Cheryl, Associate Professor

Boyington, A. R., Jones, C. B., & Wilson, D. L. (2006).

Buried alive: The presence of nursing on hospital

websites. Nursing Research, 55(2), 103-109.

Finkler S. A., Kovner C. T., & Jones, C. B. (2007). Financial

Management for Nurse Managers and Executives (3rd

ed.). St Louis, MO: Saunders/Elsevier.

Kaufman, Jane, Clinical Associate Professor

Kaufman, J. S. (2007). Nursing assessment: Respiratory

system. In S. L. Lewis, M. M. Heitkemper, S. R. Dirksen, &

P. G. O’Brien (Eds.), Medical-surgical nursing: Assessment

and management of clinical problems (7th ed., pp.

509-532). St. Louis, MO: Mosby/Elsevier.

Kaufman, J. S. (2007). Nursing management: Obstructive

pulmonary diseases. In S. L. Lewis, M. M. Heitkemper, S.

R. Dirksen, P. G. O’Brien (Eds.), Medical-surgical nursing:

Assessment and management of clinical problems (7th

ed., pp. 607-663). St. Louis, MO: Mosby/Elsevier.

Kjervik, Diane, Professor

Collins, S. E., & Kjervik, D. K. (2007). 25 years of advocating

excellence. Editorial column in Journal of Nursing Law,

11(2), 67-68.

Kjervik, D. K. (2007). Intentionality and the evolution of

nursing law. Editorial column in Journal of Nursing Law,

11(1), 3.

Kjervik, D. K. (2007). Nursing law scholarship: Past, present

and future. Journal of Nursing Law, 11(2), 69-74.

Walker, P., Kjervik, D., Thompson, L. & Mazzocco, G. (2006).

Module 2: Legal and ethical aspects of nursing. In G.

Mazzocco, J. Roth, & R. Dillon (Eds.), Medical-surgical

nursing review (pp. 2.1–2.62). Chapel Hill, NC:

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Leeman, Jennifer, Research Assistant Professor

Havens, D., Wood, S., & Leeman, J. (2006). Improving nursing

practice and patient care: Building capacity with

Appreciative Inquiry. Journal of Nursing Administration,

36, 463-470.

Leeman, J. (2006). Interventions to improve diabetes

self-management: Utility and relevance for practice.

The Diabetes Educator, 32, 571-583.

Leeman, J., Baernholdt, M., & Sandelowski, M. (2007).

Developing a theory-based taxonomy of methods for

implementing change in practice. Journal of Advanced

Nursing, 58, 191-200.

Leeman, J., Jackson, B., & Sandelowski, M. (2006). An

evaluation of how well research reports support the use

of fi ndings in practice. Journal of Nursing Scholarship,

38, 171-177.

Leeman, J. & Mark, B. (2006). The Chronic Care Model versus

disease management programs: A transaction cost

analysis approach. Health Care Management Review, 31,

18-25.

Lin, Zhen, Research Assistant Professor

Lin, Z., Altman, R.B., and Owen, A.B., (2006) Letter:

Confi dentiality in genome research. Science, 313(5786),

441-442.

Lowdermilk, Deitra, Clinical Professor

Lowdermilk, D. L. (2007). Anatomy and physiology of

pregnancy. In D. Lowdermilk & S. Perry (Eds.), Maternity

and women’s health care (9th ed., pp. 333-352). St

Louis, MO: Mosby/Elsevier.

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL SCHOOL OF NURSING

RESEARCH CHRONICLE 2006–2007

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Lowdermilk, D. L. (2007). Infertility. In D. Lowdermilk &

S. Perry (Eds.), Maternity and women’s health care (9th

ed., pp. 235-254). St Louis, MO: Mosby/Elsevier.

Lowdermilk, D. L. (2007). Labor and birth processes. In

D. Lowdermilk & S. Perry (Eds.), Maternity and women’s

health care (9th ed., pp. 448-466). St Louis, MO: Mosby/

Elsevier.

Lowdermilk, D. L. (2007). Postpartum complications. In

D. Lowdermilk & S. Perry (Eds.), Maternity and women’s

health care (9th ed., pp. 975-990). St Louis, MO: Mosby/

Elsevier.

Lowdermilk D. L. (2007). Structural disorders and neoplasms

of the reproductive system. In D. Lowdermilk, & S. Perry

(Eds.), Maternity and women’s health care (9th ed., pp.

276-312). St Louis, MO: Mosby/Elsevier.

Lowdermilk, D., & Perry, S. (2007). Maternity and women’s

health care (9th ed). St Louis, MO: Mosby/Elsevier.

Lynn, Mary, Associate Professor

Lynn, M. R., McMillen, B. J., & Sidani, S. (2007).

Understanding and measuring patients’ perceptions of

quality nursing care. Nursing Research, 56(3), 159-166.

Liao, Y. M., Dougherty, M. C., Boyington, A. R., Lynn,

Major Research Project Sites July 2006 –June 2007

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL SCHOOL OF NURSING

RESEARCH CHRONICLE 2006–2007

M.R., & Palmer, M. H. (2006). Developing and validating

a Chinese instrument to measure lower urinary tract

symptoms among employed women in Taiwan. Nursing

Outlook, 54(6), 353-361.

MacMillan, Julie, Clinical Instructor

MacMillian, J. S., Davis, L. L., Durham, C. F., & Matteson

E. S. (2006). Exercise and Heart Rate Recovery. Heart &

Lung, 35(6), 383-390.

Mark, Barbara, Russell Professor

Chang, Y. K., Hughes, L. C., & Mark, B. A. (2006). Fitting in

or standing out: Nursing workgroup diversity and

unit-level patient outcomes. Nursing Research, 55(6),

373-380.

Leeman, J. & Mark, B. (2006). The Chronic Care Model versus

disease management programs: A transaction cost

analysis approach. Health Care Management Review, 31,

18-25.

Mazzocco, Gail, Clinical Associate Professor

Walker, P., Kjervik, D., Thompson, L., & Mazzocco, G.

(2006). Module 2: Legal and ethical aspects of nursing.

In G. Mazzocco, J. Roth, & R. Dillon (Eds.), Medicalsurgical

nursing review (pp. 2.1–2.62). Chapel Hill, NC:

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

Miles, Margaret, Professor

Enriquez, M., Witt, J., Miles, M. S., Gore, P., & Lackey,

N.(2006). A pilot self-care group intervention for lowincome

women living with HIV in the Midwestern U.S.

Journal of Health Disparities Research and Practice, 1,

1-18.

Lee. T., Holditch-Davis, D., & Miles, M. S. (2007). The

infl uence of paternal support and maternal and child

characteristics on maternal parenting of medically fragile

infants. Research in Nursing & Health, 30, 17-30.

Miles, M. S. (2007). Grieving and the loss of a newborn. In

D. L. Lowdermilk & S. E. Perry (Eds), Maternity &

women’s health care (pp. 1090-1114). St. Louis: Mosby/

Elsevier.

Miles, M. S., Holditch-Davis, D., Pedersen, C., Eron, J., &

Schwartz, T. (2007). Emotional distress in African

American women with HIV. Journal of Prevention and

Intervention in the Community, 33(1-2), 35-50.


Miles, M. S., Holditch-Davis, D., Schwartz, T. A., & Sher, S.

(2007). Depressive symptoms in mothers of prematurelyborn

children. Journal of Developmental and Behavioral

Pediatrics, 28(1), 36-44.

Polzer, R., & Miles, M. S. (2007). Spirituality in

African Americans with Diabetes: Self-Management

Through a Relationship with God. Qualitative Health

Research, 17(2), 176-188.

Miller, Margaret, Clinical Assistant Professor

Miller, M. (2007). [Review of book] MEDLINE: A guide to

effective searching in PubMed and other interfaces.

Nursing Education Perspectives, 28(2), 99.

Mishel, Merle, Kenan Professor

Bailey, D. E., Wallace, M., & Mishel, M. H. (2006). Watching,

waiting and uncertainty in prostate cancer. Journal of

Clinical Nursing, 16(4), 734-741.

Gil, K. M., Mishel, M. H., Belyea, M., Germino, B., Porter,

L. S., & Clayton, M. (2006). Benefi ts of the uncertainty

management intervention for African American and

Caucasian older breast cancer survivors: 20-month

outcomes. International Journal of Behavioral Medicine,

13(4), 286-294.

Neelon, Virginia, Associate Professor

Bond, S. M., Neelon, V. J., & Belyea, M. B. (2006). Delirium in

hospitalized older cancer patients. Oncology Nursing

Forum, 33, 1075-1083.

Carlson, B. W., Neelon, V. J., Carlson, J. R., Hartman,

M., & Dogra, S., (2007). Respiratory periodicity and

electroencephalogram arousals during sleep in older

adults. Biological Research for Nursing, 8(4), 249-260.

Palmer, Mary, Umphlet Professor

Baumgarten, M., Hawkes, W., Langenberg, P., Magaziner,

J., Margolis, D., Orwig, D., et al. (2006). Pressure ulcers

in elderly hip fracture patients across the continuum of

care: Preliminary results. The Gerontologist, 46 (special

issue), 545.

Gray, M., Bliss, D., Doughty, D., Ermer-Seltun, J.,

Kennedy-Evans, K., & Palmer, M. (2007). Incontinence

associated dermatitis: A consensus. Journal of Wound,

Ostomy and Continence Nursing, 34(1), 45-54.

Liao, Y. M., Dougherty, M. C., Boyington, A. R., Lynn, M.

R., & Palmer, M. H. (2006). Developing and validating

a Chinese instrument to measure lower urinary tract

symptoms among employed women in Taiwan. Nursing

Outlook, 54(6), 353-361.

Palmer, M. (2007). Palmer, M. (2007). Managing urinary

incontinence after prostate cancer surgery, Coping with

Cancer, 21(2), 32.

Palmer, M. & Newman, D. (2007). Urinary incontinence and

estrogen. American Journal of Nursing, 107(3), 35-37.

Piven, Mary Lynn, Assistant Professor

Colón-Emeric, C., Lekan-Rutledge, D., Utley-Smith,

Q., Ammarell, N., Bailey, D., Piven, M. L., et al. (2006).

Connection, regulation, and care plan innovation: A case

study of four nursing homes. Health Care Management

Review, 31(4), 337-346.

Piven, M. L., Ammarell, N., Lekan-Rutledge, D.,

Utley-Smith, Q., Corazzini, K., Colón-Emeric, et al.

(2007). Paying attention: a leap toward quality care. The

Director, 15(1), 58-63.

Rodgers, Shielda, Clinical Associate Professor

Rodgers, S. (2007). Ethical aspects of nursing. In K. Chitty &

B. Black (Eds.), Professional nursing: Concepts and

Challenges (pp. 112-138). St. Louis, MO: Saunders/

Elsevier Press.

Rodgers, S. (2007). The history and social context of nursing.

In K. Chitty & B. Black (Eds.), Professional nursing:

Concepts and Challenges (pp. 29-68). St. Louis, MO:

Saunders/Elsevier Press.

Rodgers, S. (2007). Thomson Delmar Learning’s medicalsurgical

nursing care plans. Clifton Park, NY: Thomson

Delmar.

Rowsey, Pam, Associate Professor

Gordon, C. J., Rowsey, P. J., & Mack, C. M. (2006). Toxicology

of organophosphates and carbamate pesticides. In C.

Gupta (Ed.), Temperature regulation in experimental

mammals and humans exposed to organophosphate

and carbamate agents (pp. 549-566). San Diego, CA:

Academic Press/Elsevier.

Sandelowski, Margarete, Boshamer Professor

Leeman, J., Baernholdt, M., & Sandelowski, M. (2007).

Developing a theory-based taxonomy of methods for

implementing change in practice. Journal of Advanced

Nursing, 58, 191-200.

Leeman, J., Jackson, B., & Sandelowski, M. (2006). An

evaluation of how well research reports support the use

of fi ndings in practice. Journal of Nursing Scholarship,

38, 171-177.

Sandelowski, M., & Barroso, J. (2007). Handbook for

synthesizing qualitative research. New York: Springer.

Sandelowski, M., Barroso, J., & Voils, C. I. (2007). Using

qualitative metasummary to synthesize qualitative and

quantitative descriptive fi ndings. Research in Nursing &

Health, 30, 99-111.

Sandelowski, M., Voils, C. I., & Barroso, J. (2007).

Comparability work and the management of difference

in research synthesis studies. Social Science & Medicine,

64, 236–247.

Schwartz, Todd, Research Assistant Professor

Abbate L. M., Stevens J., Schwartz T. A., Renner J. B., Helmick

C. G., Jordan J. M. (2006). Anthropometric measures,

body Ccmposition, body fat distribution, and knee

osteoarthritis in women. Obesity, 14, 1274-1281.

Beeber, L. S., Cooper, C., Van Noy, B. E., Schwartz, T. A.,

Blanchard, H. C., Canuso, R., Robb, K., Laudenbacher,

C., Emory, S.L. (2007). Flying under the radar:

Engagement and retention of depressed low-income

mothers in a mental health intervention. Advances in

Nursing Science, 30, 221-234.

Black B., Holditch-Davis D., Schwartz T., Scher M. (2006).

Effects of antenatal magnesium sulfate and corticosteroid

therapy on sleep states of preterm infants. Research in

Nursing and Health, 29, 269-280.

Holditch-Davis, D., Schwartz, T., Black, B., & Scher, M. (2007).

Correlates of mother-premature infant interactions.

Research in Nursing and Health, 30(2), 333-346.

Miles, M.S., Holditch-Davis, D., Pedersen, C., Eron, J., &

Schwartz, T. (2007). Emotional distress in African

American women with HIV. Journal of Community and

Preventive Psychiatry, 33(1-2), 35-50. and HIV: Issues

with mental health and illness (ed: M.B. Blank & M.M.

Eisenberg). Haworth Press, Inc. (pp. 35-50).

Miles, M. S., Holditch-Davis, D., Schwartz, T. A., & Scher, M.

(2007). Depressive symptoms in mothers of prematurelyborn

children. Journal of Developmental and Behavioral

Pediatrics, 28 (1), 36-44.

Schwartz T. A., Denne J. S. (2006). A two-stage sample size

recalculation procedure for placebo- and activecontrolled

non-inferiority trials. Statistics in Medicine,

25, 3396-3406.

Sherwood, Gwen, Professor

Cronenwett, L., & Sherwood, G. (2007). Quality and safety

education for nurses. Leader to Leader, 1-2. Available

online at: www.ncsbn.org.

Cronenwett, L., Sherwood, G., Barnsteiner, J., Disch, J.,

Johnson, J., Mitchell, P., et al. (2007). Quality and safety

education for nurses. Nursing Outlook, 55(3), 122-131.

Freshwater, D., Sherwood, G., & Drury, V. (2006).

International research collaboration: Issues, benefi ts, and

challenges of the global network. Journal of Research in

Nursing, 11(4), 295-303.

Sherwood, G. (2006). Appreciative leadership: Building

customer driven partnerships. Journal of Nursing

Administration, 36(12), 551-557.

Sherwood, G. (2006). Resource review: Management and

leadership in nursing and health care: An experiential

approach (2nd Ed.) by E. Rigolosi. Journal of Continuing

Education in Nursing, 37(4), 191.

Smith, E. L., Cronenwett, L., & Sherwood, G. (2007). Current

assessments of quality and safety education in nursing.

Nursing Outlook, 55(3), 132-137.

Skelly, Anne, Professor

Gesler, W., Arcury, T., Skelly, A., Nash, S., Soward, A., &

Dougherty, M. (2006). Identifying diabetes knowledge

nodes as sites for a diabetes prevention program. Health

and Place, 12, 449-464.

Skelly, A. (2006). Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Nursing Clinics of

North America, 41(4), 531-547.

Smith, Elaine, Clinical Assistant Professor

Day, L., & Smith, E. L. (2007). Integrating quality and safety

content into clinical teaching in the acute care setting.

Nursing Outlook, 55(3), 138-143.

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL SCHOOL OF NURSING

RESEARCH CHRONICLE 2006–2007

31


32

Smith, E. L. (2007). Choosing the right graduate school for

you. MODRN Nurse Career Guide, 230-234.

Smith, E. L. (December, 2006). Finding a healthy work

environment-let the forces of magnetism be your guide.

MODRN Nurse Career & Guide. Electronic publication

available at: www.modernnurse.com/coverstories/article/

healthywork-env.aspx .

Smith,E. L. (2007). Thinking about a Career in Nursing

Education: It is Never Too Soon to Get Started. MODRN

Nurse Career Guide, 130-134.

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL SCHOOL OF NURSING

RESEARCH CHRONICLE 2006–2007

Smith, E. L., Cronenwett, L., Sherwood, G. (2007) Current

assessments of quality and safety education in nursing.

Nursing Outlook, 55(3), 132-137.

Thoyre, Suzanne, Associate Professor

Olson, D. M., Thoyre, S. M., Turner, D. A., Bennett, S., &

Graffagnino, C. (2007). Changes in intracranial pressure

associated with chest physiotherapy. Neurocritical care,

6(2), 100-103.

Pridham, K., Steward, D., Thoyre, S., Brown, R., & Brown, L.

(2007). Feeding skill performance in premature infants

during the fi rst year. Early Human Development, 85(5),

293-305.

Travers, Debbie, Assistant Professor

Tanabe, P., Gilboy, N., & Travers, D. (2007). Emergency

Severity Index Version 4: Clarifying common questions.

Journal of Emergency Nursing, 33(2), 182-185.

Travers, D. A., & Haas, S. (2006). The Unifi ed medical

language system© coverage of emergency department

chief complaints. Academic Emergency Medicine, 13,

1319-1323.

Vann, Julie, Clinical Assistant Professor

Jacobson Vann, J. C. (2006). Measuring community-based

case management performance: Strategies for

evaluation. Lippincott’s Case Management, 11(3),

147-157.

Wagner, Jennie, Clinical Instructor

Wagner, J., Jenkins, B., & Smith, J. (2006). Nurses’ utilization

of parent questionnaires for developmental screening.

Pediatric Nursing, 32(5), 409-412.

Grant Review Activities 2006–2007 Academic Year

Berry, Diane, Assistant Professor

Reviewer, The Netherlands Organisation for Health Research

and Development (ZonMw, The Hague, The

Netherlands), 2007.

Reviewer, United Kingdom Diabetes Association

(London, UK), 2006.

Brunssen, Susan, Assistant Professor

Reviewer, Sigma Theta Tau International, 2006.

Germino, Barbara, Beerstecher-Blackwell Professor

Ad Hoc Member, Nursing Science: Adults and Older Adults

Study Section (NSAA), Center for Scientifi c Review,

National Institutes of Health, 2007.

Harrell, Joanne, Professor

Reviewer, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Center

Supplemental awards, 2007.

Reviewer, Center for Disease Control and Prevention

K01 awards, 2007.

Leeman, Jennifer, Research Assistant Professor

Reviewer, United Kingdom Diabetes Association

(London, UK), 2006.

Mark, Barbara, Russell Professor

Member, Health Systems Research Study Section, Agency for

Health Research and Quality, 2005-2009.

Mazzocco, Gail, Clinical Associate Professor

Reviewer, Model AHEC Grant Review/Curriculum

Development, Bureau of Health Professions, Health

Resources and Services Administration, Department of

Health and Human Services, 2007.

Reviewer, AHEC Nursing Panel, North Carolina AHEC, 2007.

Palmer, Mary, Umphlet Professor

Ad Hoc Member, Nursing Science: Adults and Older Adults

Study Section (NSAA), Center for Scientifi c Review,

National Institutes of Health, 2006.

Sandelowski, Margarete, Boshamer Professor

Member, Special Emphasis Panel, Center for Scientifi c Review,

National Institutes of Health, 2007.

Sherwood, Gwen, Professor

Reviewer, National Patient Safety Foundation, Research

Program, 2004-present.

Reviewer, Global Health Frameworks Panel, University of

North Carolina School of Public Health, 2006-present.

Travers, Debbie, Assistant Professor

Reviewer, Emergency Nursing Association Foundation,

2006-2007.

Waldrop, Julee, Clinical Associate Professor

Cole, K., Waldrop, J., D’Auria, J. P., & Garner, H. (2006). An

integrative research review: Effective school-based

childhood overweight interventions. Journal for

Specialists in Pediatric Nursing, 11(3), 166-177.

Vaughn, K. & Waldrop, J. B. (2007). Parent education key to

beating early childhood obesity. The Nurse Practioner,

32(3), 37-41.

West, E. & Waldrop, J. (2006). Risperidone use in the

treatment of behavioral symptoms in children with

autism. Pediatric Nursing, 32(6), 545-549.

Weaver, Mark, Research Assistant Professor

Raymond, E. G., Stewart, F., Weaver, M., Monteith, C., & Van

Der Pol, B. (2006). Impact of increased access to

emergency contraceptive pills: A randomized controlled

trial. Obstetrics and Gynecology, 108, 1098-1106.

Yeo, SeonAe, Associate Professor

Yeo, S. (2006). A randomized comparative trial of the effi cacy

and safety of exercise during pregnancy: design &

methods. Contemporary Clinical Trials, 27, 531-540.

Yeo, S., & Kim, E. (2006). Need for more foreign educated

nurses in faculty position in the United States, Nursing

Research. Available online at http://www.nursingresearch-editor.com/documents/lte.php.

Yeo, S., Ronis, D., Antonakos, C., Roberts, K., & Hayashi, R.

(2006). Need for population specifi c validation of a

portable metabolic testing system: a case of sedentary

pregnant women. Journal of Nursing Measurement,

13(3), 241-252.

Yeo, S., Wells, P. J., Kieffer, E., & Nolan, G. (2007).

Preeclampsia among Hispanic women in a Detroit health

system: a paradox or conundrum? Journal of Ethnicity &

Disease, 17, 118-121.


Editorial and Abstract Review Activities 2006–2007 Academic Year

Barksdale, Debra, Assistant Professor

Member, Editorial Board and Reviewer,

The Journal for Nurse Practitioners

Reviewer, Journal of the American Psychiatric

Nurses Association

Reviewer, North Carolina Medical Journal

Reviewer. The Journal of Clinical Outcomes Management

Reviewer, Western Journal of Nursing Research

Reviewer, The American Journal for Nurse Practitioners

Reviewer, The Journal of the American Academy of

Nurse Practitioners

Barlow, Jane, Clinical Assistant Professor

Reviewer, Journal of Early Intervention

Beeber, Linda, Professor

Reviewer, Research in Nursing & Health

Reviewer, Nursing Outlook

Berry, Diane, Assistant Professor

Reviewer, Evidence-Based Nursing

Reviewer, Public Health Nursing

Reviewer, British Journal of Health Psychology

Reviewer, Journal of School Health

Reviewer, Applied Nursing Research

Reviewer, Journal of American Psychological Nurses Associate

Reviewer, Preventing and Identifying, Overweight in

Childhood Clinical Practice, Guidelines for National

Association of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners, 2006

Black, Beth, Assistant Professor

Reviewer, Health Care for Women International

Abstract Reviewer, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Women’s Health Research Day, 2007

Brunssen, Susan, Assistant Professor

Reviewer, NeuroToxicology

Reviewer, Research in Nursing and Health

Reviewer, Sigma Theta Tau International

Carlson, Barbara, Assistant Professor

Member, Editorial Board, Biological Research in Nursing

Reviewer, Gerontological Society of America,

Clinical Medicine Section

Reviewer, Geriatric Nursing

Reviewer, Heart & Lung: The Journal of Acute and

Critical Care

Reviewer, Medical Science Monitor, International

Scientifi c Literature

Reviewer, Biological Research for Nursing

Reviewer, Physics in Medicine and Biology

Reviewer, Physiological Measurement

Abstract Reviewer, Southern Nursing Research Society

Cronenwett, Linda, Professor

Special Editor, Nursing Outlook

Reviewer, Nursing Outlook

D’Auria, Jennifer, Associate Professor

Reviewer, Research in Nursing & Health

Reviewer, Journal of Pediatric Nursing

Dieckmann, Janna, Assistant Professor

Reviewer, Research in Nursing & Health

Reviewer, Journal of Women’s History

Esposito, Noreen, Assistant Professor

Reviewer, Research in Nursing & Health

Reviewer, Qualitative Health Research

Reviewer, Advances in Nursing Science

Fishel, Anne, Clinical Professor

Reviewer, American Journal of Nursing

Reviewer, Journal of American Psychiatric Nurses Association

Fogel, Cathie, Professor

Reviewer, Western Journal of Nursing Research

Foster, Beverly, Clinical Associate Professor

Reviewer, Public Health Nursing

Funk, Sandra, Professor

Reviewer, Research in Nursing & Health

Reviewer, Western Journal of Nursing Research

Goeppinger, Jean, Professor

Member, Advisory Board, Journal of Family and

Community Health

Reviewer, Arthritis Care and Research

Reviewer, American Journal of Public Health

Harrell, Joanne, Professor

Reviewer, Pediatrics

Reviewer, Research in Nursing & Health

Reviewer, Journal of Adolescent Health

Reviewer, Nursing Research

Havens, Donna, Professor

Reviewer, The Journal of Nursing Administration

Reviewer, Medical Care

Reviewer, Nursing Outlook

Reviewer, Implementation Science

Reviewer, Western Journal of Nursing Research

Hughes, Linda, Research Associate Professor

Reviewer, Medical Care

Reviewer, Journal of Nursing Scholarship

Reviewer, Nursing Research

Kjervik, Diane, Professor

Member, Editorial Board, Journal of Nursing Law

Member, Board of Review, Issues in Mental Health Nursing

Reviewer, Research in Nursing & Health

Reviewer, Journal of Advanced Nursing

Reviewer, Image: Journal of Nursing Scholarship

Reviewer, Nursing Outlook

Reviewer, Journal of Professional Nursing

Leeman, Jennifer, Research Assistant Professor

Reviewer, Research in Nursing & Health

Reviewer, Journal of Nursing Scholarship

Reviewer, Health Policy

Reviewer, Implementation Science

Reviewer, Patient Education and Counseling

Lowdermilk, Deitra, Adjunct Professor

Reviewer, Mosby Elsevier

Lynn, Mary, Associate Professor

Reviewer, Research Nursing & Health

Reviewer, Social Science & Medicine

Reviewer, Public Health Nursing

Reviewer, Western Journal of Nursing Research

Mark, Barbara, Russell Professor

Member, Editorial Board, Medical Care Research and Review

Reviewer, Western Journal of Nursing Research

Reviewer, Nursing Research

Reviewer, Journal of Nursing Scholarship

Reviewer, Nursing Economics

Reviewer, Inquiry

Reviewer, Health Services Research

Miles, Margaret, Professor

Member, Editorial Board, Advances in Neonatal Care

Member, Editorial Board, Journal of Pediatric Nursing

Reviewer, AIDS Care

Reviewer, Advances in Neonatal Care

Reviewer, Health Care for Women International

Reviewer, Journal of Developmental and Behavioral Pediatrics

Reviewer, Journal of Pediatric Nursing

Reviewer, Journal for Specialists in Pediatric Nursing

Reviewer, Nursing Research

Reviewer, Parenting

Reviewer, Research in Nursing & Health

Mishel, Merle, Professor

Reviewer, Journal of Consulting & Clinical Psychology

Reviewer, Journal of Psycho-social Oncology

Palmer, Mary, Umphlet Professor

Associate Editor, Journal of the American Geriatrics Society

Co-Editor, American Journal of Nursing,

Bladder Matters Column

Member, Advisory Board, American Journal of Nursing

with the Gerontological Society of America

Member, Editorial Board, Research in Nursing & Health

Member, Editorial Board, Journal of Aging, Humanities,

and the Arts

Member, Editorial Board, Clinical Geriatrics

Member, Panel of Reviewers, Geriatric Nursing

Reviewer, Journal of Wound, Ostomy and

Continence Nursing

Reviewer, Journal of International Older Persons Nursing

Piven, Mary Lynn, Assistant Professor

Reviewer, Western Journal of Nursing Research,

Reviewer, Journal of Public Health Nursing,

Sandelowski, Margarete, Boshamer Professor

Associate Editor, Research in Nursing & Health

Member, Editorial Board, Sage Encyclopedia of Qualitative

Research Methods

Member, Editorial Board, Advances in Nursing Science

Member, Editorial Board, Field Methods

Member, Editorial Board, Journal of Mixed Methods Research

Member, Editorial Board, Nursing Inquiry

Member, Editorial Board, Qualitative Health Research

Sherwood, Gwen, Professor

Member, Editorial Board, International Journal

for Human Caring

Member, Editorial Board, Journal of Holistic Nursing

Reviewer, Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing

Reviewer, Nursing Outlook

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL SCHOOL OF NURSING

RESEARCH CHRONICLE 2006–2007

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34

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL SCHOOL OF NURSING

RESEARCH CHRONICLE 2006–2007

Reviewer, Journal of Clinical Nursing

Reviewer, Research in Nursing and Health

Reviewer, International Journal of Nursing Education

Schwartz, Todd A., Research Assistant Professor

Reviewer, Research in Nursing & Health

Skelly, Anne, Professor

Editor, The Diabetes Educator, Continuing

Education Department

Reviewer, Western Journal of Nursing Research

Reviewer, Diabetes Care

Reviewer, Sage Publications

Reviewer, F. A. Davis

Reviewer, C. V. Mosby, Inc.

Smith, Elaine, Clinical Assistant Professor

Member, Editorial Advisory Board, MODRN

Reviewer, Journal of Continuing Education in Nursing

Invited Section Editor, Core Curriculum in Nursing Staff

Development 3rd ed., 2006

Thoyre, Suzanne, Associate Professor

Reviewer, Journal of Early Intervention

Reviewer, Journal of Perinatology

Reviewer, Health Care for Women International

Reviewer, Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic, and

Neonatal Nursing

Reviewer, American Journal of Maternal Child Nursing

Tonges, Mary, Clinical Professor

Reviewer, Nursing Spectrum

Reviewer, Nurse Leader

Reviewer, Advance for Nurses

Faculty Distinguished Professors 2006–2007 Academic Year

Germino, Barbara, Carol Ann Beerstecher-Blackwell

Distinguished Professor in Thanatology

Harrell, Joanne, Frances Hill Fox Distinguished Professor

of Nursing

Mark, Barbara, Sarah Frances Russell Distinguished Professor

in Nursing Systems

Mishel, Merle, William R. Kenan Jr. Distinguished Professor

Honors and Awards 2006–2007 Academic Year

Alden, Kathryn, Clinical Associate Professor

Selected North Carolina Great 100 Nurses, 2006

Allen, Lindsay, Clinical Assistant Professor

National Student Nurses Association Leader of Leaders

Award, 2007

Undergraduate Nursing Faculty Appreciation Award, 2007

Barksdale, Debra, Assistant Professor

American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, Inductee, 2007

National Organization of Nurse Practitioner Faculty,

Board of Directors, 2007

Beeber, Linda, Professor

American Academy of Nursing, Inductee, 2006

Berry, Diane, Assistant Professor

UNC-Chapel Hill, School of Nursing, Excellence in Graduate

Teaching Award, 2007

Brunssen, Susan, Assistant Professor

UNC-Chapel Hill, School of Nursing, Excellence in Graduate

Teaching Award, 2007

Bush, Tom, Clinical Assistant Professor

UNC-Chapel Hill, School of Medicine Class of 2007,

Carolina Cup Award, 2007

Davison, Jean, Clinical Assistant Professor

National Health Service Corp, Elected Ambassador, 2006

Dieckmann, Janna, Assistant Professor

UNC-Chapel Hill Carolina Women’s Leadership

Council Mentoring Award for Faculty-to-Faculty

Mentorship, 2007

Fogel, Cathie, Professor

Alumni of the Year, School of Nursing, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2006

Kelly, Maureen, Clinical Assistant Professor

UNC-Chapel Hill, School of Nursing, Excellence in Graduate

Teaching Award, 2007

Jones, Cheryl, Associate Professor

UNC-Chapel Hill, School of Nursing, Excellence in Graduate

Teaching Award, 2007

Moore, Katherine, Clinical Assistant Professor

Helping Other People Excel (HOPE) Award, School of Nursing,

UNC-Chapel Hill, 2007

UNC-Chapel Hill, School of Nursing, Undergraduate Nursing

Faculty Appreciation Award, 2007

Travers, Debbie, Assistant Professor

Member, Editorial Board, International Society for

Disease Surveillance

Van Riper, Marcia, Associate Professor

Reviewer, Journal of Genetic Counseling

Reviewer, Clinical Genetics

Reviewer, Genetics in Medicine

Reviewer, Journal of Family Nursing

Waldrop, Julee, Clinical Associate Professor

Editor & Member, Editorial Board, NP News, Offi cial

Newsletter of the NCNA Council of Nurse Practitioners

Contributing Editor, The Clinical Advisor

Member, Editorial Board, Ear Clinic

Case Study Reviewer, Sigma Theta Tau International

Honor Society

Weaver, Mark, Research Assistant Professor

Reviewer, The Annals of Occupational Hygiene

Woodley, Lisa, Clinical Assistant Professor

Textbook Reviewer, Kyle Essentials of Pediatric Nursing,

chapters 2, 3, & 15, First Edition,

Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins Publishing.

Textbook Reviewer, Osborn: Medical Surgical Nursing -

Preparation for Practice, Chapters 7, 8, 44, & 52,

Pearson Publishing/Prentice Hall.

Textbook Reviewer, Pearson’s Osborn - Surgical Nursing:

Preparation for Practice, First Edition, New York:

Prentice Hall.

Yeo, SeonAe, Associate Professor

Reviewer, Ethnicity & Disease

Palmer, Mary H., Helen W. and Thomas L. Umphlet

Distinguished Professor in Aging

Sandelowski, Margarete, Cary C. Boshamer

Distinguished Professor

McCarthy, Regina, Clinical Assistant Professor

UNC-Chapel Hill, School of Nursing, Excellence in Graduate

Teaching Award, 2007


Page, Julie, Clinical Assistant Professor

UNC-Chapel Hill, School of Nursing, Award for Advising

Excellence, 2007

Pierce, Susan, Professor

Board of Trustees of the American Nurses’ Foundation

(ANF), 2007

Sherwood, Gwen, Professor

President’s Appointment: Accreditation Panel,

Macau Polytechnic Institute, Macau, 2006

Skelly, Anne, Professor

UNC-Chapel Hill, School of Nursing, Excellence in Graduate

Teaching Award, 2007

Doctoral Student and Post-Doctoral Fellow Activities

2006–2007 Academic Year

INDIVIDUAL GRANTS

Beeber, A., Principal Investigator; Zimmerman, S., Clipp, E.,

Mark, B., Mentors. Use of Community Based Long-term Care

Service by Elders and Families. John A. Hartford Foundation,

2005-2007.

Chang, Y., Principal Investigator; Mark, B., sponsor. Testing

a Theoretical Framework for Severe Medication Errors. Sigma

Theta Tau, 2007-2008.

Forcina-Hill, J., Principal Investigator; Germino, B., sponsor.

Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Hospice use After Referral.

National Research Service Award, National Institute of Nursing

Research, National Institutes of Health, 2006-2008.

Giscombe, C., Principal Investigator. Superwoman Schema

Emotional Suppression in African American Women. Center

for Innovation in Health Disparities Research, School of

Nursing, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,

National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of

Health, 2006-2007.

Greene, N., Principal Investigator; Miles, M., sponsor. The

Infl uences of Family Function on Dietary Intake. National

Research Service Award, National Institute of Diabetes and

Digestive and Kidney Diseases, National Institutes of Health,

2004-2006.

Jessup, A., Principal Investigator; Harrell, J., sponsor.

Adiponectin and Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease and

Diabetes in Youth. National Research Service Award, National

Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of Health,

2005-2007.

Jessup, A., Principal Investigator; Harrell, J., sponsor.

Adiponectin and Risk Factors for Cardiovascular Disease and

Diabetes in Youth. Small Grant Award, Alpha Alpha Chapter,

Sigma Theta Tau, 2005-2006.

Kao, H., Principal Investigator; Lynn, M., sponsor. Family

Caregiving for Mexican American Older Adults. Sigma Theta

Tau, 2007-2008.

Mortimer, M., Principal Investigator; Mishel, M., sponsor.

A Brief Intervention to Improve Illness Perception and

Medication Adherence in Hypertensive Older Black Women.

Center for Innovation in Health Disparities Research, School

of Nursing, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,

National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of

Health, 2005-2006.

Soltis-Jarrett, Victoria, Clinical Associate Professor

UNC-Chapel Hill, School of Nursing, Excellence in Graduate

Teaching Award, 2007

Tornquist, Elizabeth, Editor

American Association of Critical Care Nurses,

Pioneering Spirit Award, 2007

Woodley, Lisa, Clinical Assistant Professor

UNC-Chapel Hill, School of Nursing, Excellence in Course

Instruction, 2006

UNC-Chapel Hill, School of Nursing, Excellence in Clinical

Instruction, 2006

Mortimer, M., Principal Investigator; Mishel, M., sponsor.

A Brief Intervention to Improve Illness Perception and

Medication Adherence in Hypertensive Older Black Women.

American Nurses Foundation, 2005-2006.

Olson, D., Principal Investigator, Thoyre, S., sponsor. A

Psychometric Evaluation of the Ramsay Scale for Routine

Sedation Assessment. Aspect Medical Systems, Inc.,

2005-2006.

Olson, D., Principal Investigator, Thoyre, S., sponsor. A

Psychometric Evaluation of the Ramsay Scale for Routine

Sedation Assessment. Aspect Medical Systems, Inc.,

2006-2007.

Rasmussen, S., Principal Investigator; Dalton, J., sponsor.

Acoustic Parameters of Emotion Expression of Women with

Chronic Knee Pain. Sigma Theta Tau, 2007-2008.

Roberson, T., Principal Investigator; Kjervik, D., sponsor. The

Experiences of Adolescents Consenting to Psychiatric Mental

Health Treatment, Sigma Theta Tau, 2007-2009.

Spector, D., Principal Investigator; Mishel, M., sponsor.

Breast Cancer Risk Perception and Lifestyle Factors in Women

at High Risk. American Cancer Society, 2007-2009.

Spector, D., Principal Investigator; Mishel, M., sponsor.

Breast Cancer Risk Perception and Lifestyle Behaviors

in Women with a Family History of Breast Cancer: An

Exploratory Study with White and African American Women.

Center for Innovation in Health Disparities Research, School

of Nursing, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill,

National Institute of Nursing Research, National Institutes of

Health, 2006-2007.

Wall, Y., Principal Investigator; Germino, B., sponsor.

Physician Partnership-Building Behaviors: Implications in

Health Disparities. Center for Innovation in Health Disparities

Research, School of Nursing, The University of North Carolina

at Chapel Hill, National Institute of Nursing Research, National

Institutes of Health, 2007-2008.

Wallace, A., Principal Investigator; Mark, B., sponsor.

Associations Between Race, Perceived Self-care Management

Support, and Diabetes Outcomes. Center for Innovation in

Health Disparities Research, School of Nursing, The University

of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, National Institute of Nursing

Research, National Institutes of Health, 2007-2008.

Zomorodi, M., Principal Investigator; Lynn, M., sponsor.

Instrument Development: Nurses’ Evaluations of End-of-life

Care in the ICU. Alpha Alpha Chapter, Sigma Theta Tau,

2007-2008.

Zomorodi, M., Principal Investigator; Lynn, M., sponsor.

Instrument Development: Nursing Competence With Endof-Life

Care in the ICU. American Association of Critical Care

Nurses, 2007-2008.

INSTITUTIONAL NRSA PRE-DOCTORAL

AWARD RECIPIENTS

Pre-Doctoral Students

Adams, J. (Jones, C., sponsor). Improving the Effi ciency of

Nurses in the Acute Care Setting, 2006-2008.

Allen, D. (Mishel, M., sponsor). Symptom Cluster

Description of Fatigue, Sleep Disturbances, and Cognitive

Dysfunction in the Adult Neuro-oncology Population,

2006-2008.

Bacon, C. (Mark, B., sponsor). Professional Nursing Practice

and its Impact on Organizational and Patient Outcomes in

Ambulatory Surgery, 2005-2008.

Flanagan, O. (Fogel, C., sponsor). The Stress of Chronic

Restrictive Dieting on Obese Women, 2006-2009.

Gorospe, J. (Palmer, M., sponsor). Translation Science; Use

of Evidence-based Practice, Patient Safety, 2005-2008.

Harris, N. (Fogel, C., sponsor). The Relationship Between

Experiences with Sexual and Physical Trauma and HIV

Management in Incarcerated Women, 2006-2008.

Jakub, K. (Sandelowski, M., sponsor). Nursing Interventions

to Manage Persons with Cardiovascular Disease: Particularly

Those with Cardiac Arrhythmias and Cardiomyopathy,

2005-2007.

Lee, E. (Van Riper, M., sponsor). How Parents Who Have

Undergone BRCA ½ Testing Share the Information They Have

Received With Their Children, 2005-2007.

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL SCHOOL OF NURSING

RESEARCH CHRONICLE 2006–2007

35


Melekwe, O. (Lynn, M., sponsor). Developing Nursesensitive

Patient Outcome Measures Related to Longterm

care, 2005-2008

Nam, K.H. (Lynn, M., sponsor). Nurses’ Job Satisfaction in

Nursing Homes, 2006-2008.

VanDerBergh, D. (Jones, C., sponsor). Patient-centered

Safety Initiatives: The Characteristics of Healthcare

Organizations and Work Environments, Team Braining and its

Impact on Organizational Learning, and Healthcare Culture

Necessary For the Successful Implementation of Rapid

Response Teams, 2006-2008.

Waguespack, L. (Harrell, J., sponsor). Interventions for the

Prevention of Obesity in the School-aged Child, 2005-2007.

Wall, Y. (Germino, B., sponsor). Physician/Patient

Communication under Decision Making, 2005-2007.

Yurek, L. (Havens, D., sponsor). Hospital Systems and

Organizational Behavior, 2005-2007.

Post-Doctoral Fellows

Beeber, A. (Zimmerman, S., sponsor). Communitybased

Long-term Care Service Use by Elders and Families,

2005-2007.

Cho, J. (Neelon, V., and Brunssen, S., sponsors). The Role

of Testosterone in Health, Development, and Temperament

Outcomes of Preterm Infants, 2005-2007.

Giscombe, C. (Beeber, L., and Barksdale, D., sponsors).

Conceptualizing Stress to Examine its Effects on Health in

African American Women: A focus on Stress Appraisal,

Psychological Distress, Coping, and Psychological Markers of

Stress Response, 2005-2007.

Kao, H. (Lynn, M., sponsor). Family Care-giving for Mexican

American Elders, 2006-2008.

Wallace, A. (Mark, B., sponsor). Assessing the Relationship

Between Chronic Care Model, Quality Care, and a Number

of Diabetes-related Structure and Outcome Measures,

2006-2008.

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL SCHOOL OF NURSING

RESEARCH CHRONICLE 2006–2007

PUBLICATIONS

Chang, Y., Hughes, L. C., & Mark, B. (2006). Fitting in or

standing out: Nursing workgroup diversity and unit-level

outcomes. Nursing Research, 55(6), 373-380.

Cobb, S. L, Brown, D. J., & Davis, L. L. (2006). Effective

interventions for lifestyle changes after myocardial infarction

and coronary artery revascularization. Journal of American

Academy Of Nurse Practitioners, 18(1), 31-39.

Colon-Emeric, C., Lyles, K., Levine, D., House, P., Schenck,

A., Gorospe, J., et al. (2007). Prevalence and predictors of

osteoporosis treatment in nursing home residents with known

osteoporosis or recent fracture. Osteoporosis International,

18(4), 553-559.

Colon-Emeric, C., Schenk, A., Gorospe, J., McArdle, J.,

Dobson, L., DePorter, C., et al. (2006). Translating evidencebased

falls prevention into clinical practice in nursing facilities:

Results and lessons from a quality improvement collaborative.

Journal of the American Geriatrics Society,. 54(9), 1414-1418.

Forcina Hill, J. M. (2006). Hospice utilization: Political,

cultural, and legal issues. Journal of Nursing Law, 10(4),

216-224.

King, K. J. & Olson, D. M. (2007). What you should know

about neurogenic shock. American Nurse Today, 2(2), 56-60.

Lynn, M. R., Redman, R. W., & Zomorodi, M. G. (2006).

The canaries in the coal mine speak: Why someone should

(and should not) become a nurse. Nursing Administration

Quarterly, 30(4), 340-350.

MacMillian, J. S., Davis, L. L., Durham, C. F., & Matteson, E.

S. (2006). Exercise and heart rate recovery. Heart and Lung,

35(6), 383-90.

Moyer, P., Ornato, J. P., Brady, W. J., Davis, L. L.,

Ghaemmaghami, C. A., Gibler, W. B., et al. (2007).

Development of systems of care for ST-Elevation myocardial

infarction patients. The emergency medical services and

emergency department perspective. Circulation, 116, 43-48.

Nichols, M., Roux, G., & Harris, N.R. (2007). Primigravid

and multigravid women: Prenatal perspectives. Journal of

Perinatal Education, 16(2), 21-32.

Olson D. M. (2007). Multimodal neurological monitoring. In

R. Kaplow, & S. R. Hardin (Eds.), Critical care nursing: synergy

for optimal outcomes. Sudbury, Massachusetts: Jones and

Bartlett.

Olson, D. M., Halley, N. (2007). Cerebral aneurysm rupture -

Are you prepared? Nursing, 37(3), 64cc1-4.

Olson, D. M., Thoyre, S. M., Turner, D. A., Bennett, S., &

Graffagnino, C. (2007). Changes in intracranial pressure

associated with chest physiotherapy. Neurocritical Care, 6(2),

100-103.

Schumacher, K. S., Beidler, S. M., Beeber, A. S., & Gambino,

P. (2006). A transactional model of family caregiving skill.

Advances in Nursing Science, 29(3), 271-286.

Smith-Miller, C. (2006). Graduate nurses’ comfort and

knowledge level regarding tracheostomy care. Journal for

Nurses in Staff Development, 22(5), 222-229.

Spector, D. (2007). Lifestyle behaviors in women with a

BRCA1 or BRCA2 genetic mutation: An exploratory study

guided by concepts derived from the Health Belief Model

[Electronic version]. Cancer Nursing, 30(1), E1-E10.

Travis, S. S., McAuley, W. J., Dmochowski, J., Bernard, M. A.,

Kao, H. S., & Greene, R. (2007). Predictors of medication

hassles experienced by family caregivers of older adults.

Patient Education and Counseling, 61, 51-57.

THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA AT CHAPEL HILL SCHOOL OF NURSING

RESEARCH CHRONICLE 2006–2007

36


Advancing Nurse Research

at Carolina

Completing doctoral or postdoctoral work at Carolina can be one of the best decisions you

make for your nursing career. It’s never too late to find out about a program that would

work for you. The School of Nursing is offering two programs with nationally-renowned

nurse scientists serving as mentors that can help you advance in the nursing profession.

Interventions to Prevent and Manage Chronic Illness

Predoctoral Fellowship: The two-year award instructs nurses in the theories

and research on chronic illness from related disciplines and in the knowledge

and skills necessary to implement a chronic illness research program. An

annual stipend, tuition assistance, health insurance, allowance for researchrelated

expenses and funds for one conference trip per year are included.

Postdoctoral Fellowship: The two-year award teaches nurses to develop

their skills to conduct complex intervention studies in prevention and

management of chronic illness that require an interdisciplinary perspective,

sophisticated analytic techniques or novel conceptualizations. An annual

stipend, tuition assistance, health insurance, allowance for research-related

expenses and funds for one conference trip per year are included.

Health Care Quality and Patient Outcomes

Doctoral Fellowship: This three-year award prepares fellows to engage

in a theoretically-based program of research designed to improve

health care quality and patient outcomes. A monthly stipend, tuition

assistance, health insurance, funds for one conference trip a year and

an allowance for educational and research expenses are included. After

completing the traineeship, fellows are encouraged to apply for individual

National Research Service Awards to support their dissertation.

Postdoctoral Fellowship: This two-year award prepares postdoctoral

fellows, in a multidisciplinary environment, with knowledge of sophisticated

theoretical frameworks, complex research designs and advanced analytic

techniques that can be utilized in a program of theoretically-based research,

to improve health care quality and patient outcomes. A monthly stipend,

depending upon length of time since the completion of a doctorate,

tuition assistance, health insurance, funds for one conference trip a year

and an allowance for educational and research expenses are included.

Contact

Merle Mishel, PhD, RN

Director of Doctoral and

Postdoctoral Programs

(919) 966-5294

mishel@email.unc.edu

—or—

Office of Admissions

& Student Services

(919) 966-4260

Nursing_applications@unc.edu

Contact

Barbara A. Mark, PhD, RN, FAAN

Training Program Director

(919) 843-6209

bmark@email.unc.edu

—or—

Office of Admissions

& Student Services

(919) 966-4260

nursing@unc.edu


Carolina Summer Research

INSTITUTES AND COURSES FOR 2008 — UNC at Chapel Hill School of Nursing Continuing Education Department

june july august

2nd-5th

Qualitative Analysis 1:

Empirical/Analytical Methods

Margarete Sandelowski, PhD, RN, FAAN

Cost $1500

9th-11th

Writing for Publication

Elizabeth Tornquist, MA, FAAN

Cost $1200

16th-20th

Outcomes Measurement

Mary Lynn, PhD, RN;

Dick Redman, PhD, RN

Cost $1500

23rd-27th

Developing Theory-Based Interventions

Merle Mishel, PhD, RN, FAAN;

Sue Thoyre, PhD, RN

Cost $1500

June 30th –July 2nd

Longitudinal Methods & Analysis

Mark Weaver, PhD

Cost $900

The UNIVERSITY of NORTH CAROLINA

at CHAPEL HILL

CB# 7460 Carrington Hall

Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7460

http://nursing.unc.edu

sonalum@unc.edu

7th-11th

Writing Research Grants

Sandra Funk, PhD, FAAN

Elizabeth Tornquist, MA, FAAN

Cost $1500

14th-18th

13th Annual Institute in Qualitative

Research: Mixed Methods Research

Margarete Sandelowski, PhD, RN, FAAN

Cost $1500

14th-17th

Asian Scholars Writing for Publication

Elizabeth Tornquist, MA, FAAN;

SeonAe Yeo, PhD, RNC, FAAN

Cost $1500

21st-25th

Instrument Development

Mary Lynn, PhD, RN

Cost $1500

28th-31st

Qualitative Analysis 2: Phenomenological al

& Narrative/Discourse Methods

Margarete Sandelowski, PhD, RN, FAAN

Cost $1500

11th-15th

Legal Research Methods

Diane Kjervik, JD, RN, FAAN

Cost $1500

We look forward

to seeing you here!

For more information call

(919) 966-3638

or visit our web site at

http://nursing.ce.unc.edu

Save the Date

2008

Nonprofit Organization

U.S. Postage

PAID

Permit No. 177

Chapel Hill, NC 27599-1110

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