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Contents - HKU Libraries

UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG

LIBRARY

Hong Kong Collection

Gift from

Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police Fordje


Contents

i »

Contents

Acknowledgement 2

Messages

Her Royal Highness Princess Alexandra 3

Honorary Commandant-General RHKAPF

His Excellency the Governor Sir Edward Youde 4

The Hon. D.G. Jeaffreson, Secretary for Security 5

Mr. R.T.M. Henry, Commissioner of Police 6

Mr. Leonard Nylon Ts'o, Commandant, RHKAPF

History of the RHKAPF 8

Headquarters Order 11

A new role in fighting crime 12

Land and sea 14

Princess Alexandra at a "family" gathering 16

Mrs. Thatcher thanks police 17

The Annual Training Camp 18

The Passing Out Parade 20

Auxiliary way of life — in photographs 22

Annual Ball 26

Dining in &L dining out — a tradition 28

Sporting life 29

Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police Band 30

Comfort and condolences 32

The tartan 33

Courage earns Queen's Commendation 34

Brave Auxies meet the Queen 35

The veteran 36

The man who is always first 38

Gazetted officers of the RHKAPF 1984 39

A list of auxiliaries awarded with medals 40

The establishment, organization and structure 42

of the RHKAPF

Annex A — The establishment of the RHKAPF 44

Annex B - Organization of the RHKAPF 46

Commanding officers 48

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Acknowledgement

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Silver Jubilee Publication Committee

Chairman: Hon.Yeung Po-kwan, CPM, SSP (Aux)

Secretaries: Miss A. Osman, Ex-EO AUX

Mr. Wong Man-sun, EO AUX

Members: Mr. Lee Kwan-tat, SO AUX

Mr. Albert Poon Cho-kee, A/SSP

(Aux)

Mrs. Betty Tsang, WSP (Aux)

Mr. Arthur Kwok Chi-shun, CIP (Aux)

Mr. Albert S. Ts'o, CIP (Aux)

Mr. Ho Ting-kwok, IP (Aux)

Advisor: Mr. Tarn Sik-yeung, SIO

The Committee acknowledges with thanks the contributions

from the following outside bodies and serving/

ex-Auxiliaries, without which the publication could not

have been a success:

The Force Library

The Police Public Relations Branch

Information Services Department

Mr. Mok Hing-wing, ex-SSP (Aux)

Mr. Chung Man-sun, ex-Sgt(A) 23

Mr. Wong Kang-chow, CPM, ex-SP

(Aux)

Mr. Peter Chau Cham-chiu, CPM, CSP

(Aux)

Mr. Wong Che-choy, CPM, SP (Aux)


Her Royal Highness Princess Alexandra,

Honorary Commandant-General

Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police Force

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Message from His Excellency the Governor

Sir Edward Youde , GCMG, MBE

GCMG, MBE

I send my best wishes to all members

of the Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary

Police Force on the occasion of its Silver

Jubilee.

The Force includes men and women

from all walks of life and from all

sections of the community. It has a fine

record of loyal and distinguished service

to Hong Kong over the past twenty five

years. Its purpose — to assist the regular

Force in carrying out its duties — has

not changed during that time, but the

importance and value of its contribution

have grown significantly.

I know I speak for all law abiding citizens

when I thank you for all that you have

done and are doing to keep Hong Kong

a place where people can live, work and

play in safety.

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Governor

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Message from the Hon. D.G* Jeaffreson, CBE, JP

Secretary for Security

I am honoured to have been asked to

write this message to celebrate the 25th

anniversary of the Royal Hong Kong

Auxiliary Police Force.

As Secretary for Security, I am in a

privileged position to know and

appreciate the importance of the role

the Auxiliaries play in helping to

maintain the overall security of Hong

Kong.

Apart from their contribution in

helping the regular Force to uphold law

and order on a day-to-day basis, they

also help to contain the problems

created by illegal immigrants.

To the Commandant and all officers

of the Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary

Police Force, I offer my sincere con-'

gratulations on reaching your Silver

Jubilee. I am confident that you will

continue to contribute substantially

to the well being of the people of

Hong Kong.

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D. G. Jeaffreson

Secretary for Security


Message from Mr* R.T.M. Henry, CBE, MVO, QPM, CPM

Commissioner of Police

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It is with particular pride and pleasure

that I offer my sincere congratulations

to all the officers of the Royal Hong

Kong Auxiliary Police Force on

reaching such an auspicious milestone

in your history.

For 25 years you have stood side-by-side

with your colleagues in the regular Force

and, at all times and under all

conditions, you have served the people

of Hong Kong with honour, courage

and dedication.

No one more than I appreciates the

importance of the role played by the

Auxiliaries in helping to keep Hong

Kong a secure and safe society. This

applies both to your regular watch and

ward duties and to your invaluable

support in times of emergency.

The history of the Royal Hong Kong

Auxiliary Police Force is littered with

examples of outstanding individual and

collective bravery, and I know all of

your friends in the regular Force will

join with me in thanking you for

helping us to police Hong Kong and in

wishing you continued success in the

years ahead.

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R.T.M. Henry,

Commissioner of Police

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Message from Mr. Leonard Nylon Ts'o, QPM, CPM

Commandant,

Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police Force

My family has been closely connected

with volunteer policing in Hong Kong

for over sixty years, and it gives me a

deep sense of honour to be your

Commandant at the time of our Silver

Jubilee.

Although the Royal Hong Kong

Auxiliary Police Force was first created

in January, 1959, the history of ordinary

men and women offering their services

to help the Regular Police stretches back

to 1914 when a Police Reserve was

formed to replace officers who had

volunteered for military service in

World War I.

We can be justly proud of all those who

have served with the Police Reserve, the

Special Constabulary and now the

Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police.

Throughout all those years the

volunteers have been epitomised by a

great esperit de corps and an abiding

sense of responsibility towards the many

and varied duties they have had to

perform.

This is the first publication of its kind

to be produced about the Force. It is a

review of our history — past, present

and future — and I trust its significance

will be recognised by all who read it.

Through it, I hope, future Auxiliary

Police officers will appreciate the

contribution their predecessors have

made to upholding law and order and

maintaining security in Hong Kong.

On this, our 25th anniversary, I am

confident we are in good heart and that,

QPM, CPM

for many years to come, the Royal

Hong Kong Auxiliary Police Force will

continue to provide a service which is

essential to the well being of all members

of the community.

Finally, on behalf of all Auxiliaries, I

would like to thank the Commissioner

of Police for the encouragement and

support we receive from him and all

members of the Royal Hong Kong

Police Force.

Congratulations! Let's make the second

twenty five years of our service as

successful and meaningful as the first

twenty five.

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L. Nylon Ts'o

Commandant,

Royal Hong Kong

Auxiliary Police Force

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History of the Royal Hong Kong

Auxiliary Police Force

While 1984 celebrates the Silver Jubilee

of the Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary

Police Force, the history of volunteer

policing in Hong Kong goes back

exactly seventy years to the start of the

First World War.

When the "war to end all wars" first

shattered the peace of 1914, many of the

young men then serving as regular

Police officers made it clear they wanted

to be part of the action on the

battlefields of Europe.

As their applications to volunteer for

military service began to pour in, it was

decided to form a volunteer Police

Reserve to replace them.

Within a few months 352 men, both

Chinese and resident expatriates, were

sworn in and, by 1916, the Force had

grown to a total strength of 575.

Companies were formed by nationality

Chinese, British, Indian and

Portuguese — and were supported by

specialised machine gun, mounted and

ambulance units.

One of the first commanding officers of

the Police Reserve was Dr. Ts'o Seenwan,

CBE, JP, grand-uncle of the

present Commandant. This was to be

the start of a family connection that has

endured unbroken for sixty years.

In 1925, the Police Reserves were once

again mobilised to meet the challenges

posed by a local seaman's strike and the

effects of thousands of people trying to

reach Hong Kong to escape a wave of

violence in southern China.

In the immediate pre-war years, more

and more men from all walks of life

joined the Police Reserve, which had

reached a strength of 1 000 by 1941. At

this time it was decided to form a second

auxiliary Force -- the Special Constabulary.

Both Forces performed with

great bravery and dedication during the

Japanese invasion. Several of their

officers died in action during those

tumultuous days.

A year after the end of the war, the

Special Constabulary was disbanded

but was reformed to meet the constabulary

demand of a changing city in

1949.

It was a time of bitter unrest and

nobody would be certain of the

sudden influx of newcomers over at

the border. Political turmoil spread

throughout the territory. At Kai Tak,

seven aircraft, whose ownership was in

dispute, were blown up and Police

officers were murdered for their

revolvers.

In 1959, both Forces were amalgamated

and became the Hong Kong Auxiliary

Police Force under the command of Sir

Michael Turner, who had been

commanding officer of the Special

Constabulary.

During its early years the Auxiliary

Force was mobilised to deal with a series

of riots and disturbances. Its greatest

Police Reserve Annual Review in

1953 at Happy Valley

challenge came in 1967 when, along

with its regular counterparts, it was

called upon to deal with riots which had

emanated from the Cultural Revolution

in China.

For almost a year, regular and auxiliary

Police officers stood side-by-side and

eventually contained the riots which

had played havoc with everyday life in

Hong Kong.

Both Forces were awarded the title

"Royal" in recognition of their loyalty

and stalwartness during that very

difficult period in Hong Kong's long and

turbulent history.


Deployment of auxiliary Police

during the 1967 disturbances

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Police Reserve/Regular shooting

competition in 1954

Police Reserve Annual Camp in

1955 at P.T.S.

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HONG KONG POLICE

SPECIAL CONSTABULARY.

II&ADQUA.RTER3 ORDER NO. 14 of 1951.

BY

MR. D.W. MACINTOSH, C.M.G., O.B.E., COMMISSIONER OP POLICE.

I1. Resignations.

III. Postings.

V Duty Hotter.

S/Insp. Cook, J.A. from 19.11.51 to 25.11.51.

S.C. ?2 Chung Hoi Sing - 2 months w.e.f. H.11.51.

S.C.131 Cheng Kok Kwong - 2 months " 20.11,51.

S.C.475 Mottram, D. w.e.f. 14.11.51 (On being conscripted into

H.K.V.H.A.F.)

S.C.261 Gurney, II.G.A. " 24.11.51 (On leaving the Colony)

S.C. 135 Ccssford, P. " 24.11.51 (On leaving the Colony)

S.C.256 oo Kai Joe " 16.11.51.

S.C.157 ZKE CHING DONG to Yaumati Division w.e.f. 16.11.51.

S.C.33C CHAN CHIN YING from Eastern to Kovloon City ./.e.f.

20.11.51.

S.C.341 Ko Fun .from 'Y 1 to '£' Division w.e.f. 24.11.51.

SPECIAL CONSTABULARY

I. COMMISSIONS'S HSU YEAH GR^'ETIKG

Headquarters Order No. 1 of 1957

By

r. A.C. HAXI.ELL, COtfl«SSIONEK OP KJLICE

: had ample opportunity to put our polic

words of praise from His ixccll^ncy the Governor at the Poll

II. CaiGRATULATIONS TO THE COf.B.-i.J-IDjJJT FOR THE AWARD OF T1K CULONIAL

Sp.cial Constabulary,

Hongkong & Shan.ijhni Banking Corp. ,

Hong Kon.j.

i I would

express the hope 1

has rcpeitudly attenleJ our vari.-.d extrimu'-.il nc

our -issemblios on numerous occasions. We o fer

Mrs. Turner our best ./ishcs for the fulurt and o

of the season.

10.10.51.

Headquarters Order

HONG KONG POLICE

SPEGIiAL CONSTABULARY

HEADQUARTERS ORDER

Nc.1/1951 - NO..18 OF 1957

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HONGKONG POLICE

;

POLICE RESERVE 6- SPECIAL CONSTABULARY

Headquarters Combined! Order

No. 1 of 1957 to No. 2 of 1959

: Special Constabulary

Mr. A.C. M/OCV/ELL, C.M.G., COiviilSSIONER OF POLICE

OCTOBER POLICE PRECAUTIONS, 1937

(Reproduced from H.O. 122/5? Part II)

During the Police Precautions on the 1st and 10th of October,

1957, the Force proved its ability to mobilise efficiently and effect-

value of previous training and exercises was much in evidence and the

manner in which all ranks have rapidly and competently assimilated

The keenness and efficiency displayed by the Auxiliary Police

was most gratifying. Their role is vital on these occasions ajid their

integration with the Regular Force was done smoothly and with the utmost

cordiality.

Hong Kong

22nd October, 1957

(3d) A.C. MAXWELL

COMMISSIONER OF POLICE

17th Octobc-r, 1957.

\

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3d: D.F. Slevin (S.O. Aux.)

for Commissioner of Police


A new role in fighting crime

\Vhen government decided to launch

Hong Kong's first ever "Fight Violent

Crime" campaign in 1973 they changed

the primary role of the Royal Hong

Kong Auxiliary Police Force.

Until then the main job of the

auxiliaries had been to aid the regular

Force in times of emergency and in

matters of internal security.

With the launching of the campaign,

which brought government, police and

the public into the front-line as crime

fighters, the auxiliaries were given a

greater part to play as watch and ward

policemen.

More and more auxiliaries appeared on

the streets; patrols were increased;

manpower support for the regular Force

covered most of its duties and

commitments. In short, the auxiliaries

were now playing an increasingly

important role in helping to prevent

and curb the crime wave which was

causing concern to all members of

the community.

The form and amount of such support

depends on the operation policies and

priorities in existence at any particular

time and are determined and declared

by the Commissioner of Police.

The R.H.K.A.P.F. is established and

regulated under the provisions of the

Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police

Force Ordinance, Cap. 233, the

Auxiliary Forces Pay and Allowances

Ordinance, Cap. 254, and related

subsidiary legislation.

The Commissioner of Police, with the

prior approval of the Governor, may

order a full call-out of the Force under

Section 16(1) of the Royal Hong Kong

Auxiliary Police Force Ordinance, Cap.

233. He may also order a limited callout

under Section 16(2); such authority

may extend to the call-out of individual

members of the Force for specified active

The number of personnel required for

active service duty (Section 16(2)) in

support of the regular Force will be

determined annually by the Commissioner

of Police and will normally be

related to the overall policing commitments

and the deficiency in the

establishment of the regular Force.

Such duties may include watch and

• — .-..

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ward, crime prevention, neighbourhood

policing, traffic control and

enforcement, marine policing,

communications and community

relations. Attendance at such duties will

be in accordance with the remuneration

provisions of Section 7 or the Auxiliary

Forces Pay and Allowances Ordinance,

Cap. 254.

The Force when mobilized in times of

emergency on full or limited call-out

will provide personnel for internal

security duties in accordance with the

Force Mobilization Plans.

When members of the Force are

performing duty, they are authorized to

perform all or any of the duties of a

regular Police officer as declared under

Section 10 of the Royal Hong Kong

Police Force Ordinance, Cap. 232.


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10


Land and sea

The auxiliary Force is an integral

part of the regular Force. Auxiliary officers

work alongside their regular colleagues

providing assistance in day-today

constabulary duties and internal

security support during times of

emergency.

Its members serve in 30 formations including

land divisions, emergency

units, special duty companies, marine

divisions, communications unit, traffic

formation and headquarters unit.

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Princess Alexandra

at a "family" gathering

A representative cross section of Police

personnel attended a reception held by

the Force on October 17,1982 in honour

of Her Royal Highness Princess

Alexandra, Honorary Commandant-

General of the Royal Hong Kong

Police Force.

On a private visit to Hong Kong with

her husband, the Honourable Angus

Ogilvy, the Princess took the opportunity

to meet 80 senior and junior

officers and civilians at the reception,

held at Kam Tsin Lodge, home of Lady

Clague, wife of the late Sir Douglas

Clague, former Commandant of the

Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police

Force.

Among the guests was His Excellency

the Governor Sir Edward Youde and

Lady Youde.

Music was provided by the Force band,

under the baton of Director of Music

Mr. Colin Wood and catering staff

from the Police Tactical Unit kept the

occasion "in the family" by serving as

waiters and barmen.

Senior officers from all regions and

districts of the regular and auxiliary

Forces plus representatives from other

formations and staff associations attended.

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Princess Alexandra congratulates

Queen's Gallantry Medal recipient

PQA) 88 Chan Kwan-fai and wife.

Princess Alexandra meets Mr

Trevor Bedford, Commandant,

RHKAPF, and Mrs Shirley Bedford.

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Mrs. Thatcher thanks police

Prime Minister, Mrs. Margaret Thatcher,

did not forget the work of the

Royal Hong Kong Police during her

two day whirlwind visit to Hong Kong

last year.

At a reception at Government House,

hosted by His Excellency the Governor

Sir Edward Youde, Mrs. Thatcher

made a point of thanking the Police for

all the work they had done to ensure

that her visit went off smoothly.

She told acting Commissioner of

Police, Mr. Peter Moor, and Commandant

of the Auxiliary Police, Mr.

Trevor Bedford, that she was delighted

with the way the Police had handled

the visit.

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The Annual Training Camp

One of the highlights of the year is the

series of 31 training camps held annually

at Auxiliary Police Headquarters

in Harbour Road, Wanchai.

All auxiliary Police officers are required

to attend the camps which are

held between May and December.

Attendance at the seven-day

residential camps averages about 160

persons.

The training syllabus includes new legislation,

traffic, internal security,

Police practice and procedures, Police

role and functions, weapon training,

lectures on various aspects of the law

and Police community relations.

Each year two camps are devoted to

Marine training, with special emphasis

being given to maritime law and

navigational skills.

There are also three camps for women

officers which are normally held in

August. Average attendance is about

120.

Women trainees are taught on communications,

use of visual aid displays,

legislation relating to women and

juveniles, crowd control and the role of

women officers in an internal security

situation.

Said a member of the Auxiliary Police

Headquarters staff:

"The training is of a very high standard


and because the camps are residential

they also help create a great feeling of

esprit de corps."

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The Passing Out Parade

\Vhen he addressed an auxiliary passing

out parade shortly before his recent

retirement Mr. Alistair McNiven,

Chief Staff Officer, Auxiliaries told

the recruits that by remaining cool,

calm and in command of a situation

they would go a long way towards

achieving their aims and gaining the

confidence and support of the public.

Said Mr. McNiven:

"Your training has prepared you for

duty on the streets of Hong Kong.

Once you put on your uniform you will

be very much in the public eye and no

allowances will be made for the fact

that you are new to the job. You must

be seen to be acting decisively and

without fear or favour when the

occasion demands."

Passing out parades are important occasions,

both for the recruits on parade

and for the inspecting officer.

Said Mr. McNiven:

"I have attended a great many such

parades during my service and one is

always impressed by the smartness and

eagerness of those on parade. After a

long and arduous training programme

they are always determined to put on a

good show."

Police Reserve Recruits Passing HHfl

Out in 1959 flffljis

EU NT (Aux) Passing Out

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Marine Passing Out

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Passing Out Parade reviewed by

CoL The Hon. Douglas Clague,

Commandant, RHKAPF 1962-

1980

Passing Out Parade reviewed by

Mr. Ramon Young Chun-sheung,

Commandant, RHKAPF 1980-

1981

Passing Out Parade reviewed by

Mr. Trevor Bedford, Commandant,

RHKAPF 1981-1983


Auxiliary way of life —

in photographs

In this section we have tried to show

the many and diverse activities which

make up the life of auxiliary policemen

and women.

From the serious to the light-hearted;

duty to play; the pomp of ceremony to

the fun of a barbecue; the talent of our

colleagues to the seriousness of goldsmith

shop patrol duty.

Life as an auxiliary Police officer

demands much from those who volunteer

for service but it also adds many

new dimensions to their way of life.

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Mr. Chau Cham-chiu, CSP NT (Aux) presented

with the CPM by H.E. the Governor on 9.4.1984.

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Mr. Arthur Kwok Chi-shun, CIP (Aux) as

Honorary ADC to H.E. the Governor. The

photograph was taken in the Government House

on 9.4.1984

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IP(A) Ho Ting-kwok and Sgt (A)

333 Neh Man-shui on goldsmith

patrol duty.

An auxiliary Police officer's wedding

in uniform


Mr. Roy Henry, Commissioner of

Police and his Personal Assistant,

Mr. Jimmy Ma, CIP at the Annual

Christmas Party, 1983 of Auxiliary

Police Headquarters.

Mr. Raymon Anning, Deputy

Commissioner of Police, Operations

and Mr. Eric Blackburn,

Deputy Commissioner of Police,

Management conversing with Mr.

Peter Chau Cham-chiu, CSP NT

(Aux) at the Annual Christmas

Party, 1983 at Auxiliary Police

Headquarters.


Annual Ball

One of the events of the year on Hong

Kong's social calendar is the Auxiliary

Ball which, for the last few years, has

been held in the Furama Hotel.

Traditionally, His Excellency the

Governor has always graced the

occasion with his presence.

This year's ball, to be held on 8th June,

is being combined with the Silver

Jubilee celebrations.

Last year's ball was no exception and

to bring back some happy memories

we feature below some of the

photographs taken at that event.


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27

Annual Ball 1980

Annual Ball 1981

Annual Ball 1983


Dining-in & dining-out — a tradition

Dining-in and dining-out a senior officer

is a tradition that stretches back in

the annals of history of the armed services—and

of both the regular and

auxiliary police forces. It is an evening

of mess kits, good speeches, good food

and, above all else, great camaraderie.

Dining-in at RHKAPF Officers'

Mess

Dining-out of Mr. Brian Slevin at

RHKAPF Officers' Mess

Dining-out of Mr. Ramon Young

at RHKAPF Officers' Mess

Dining-out of Mr. Peter Moor at

RHKAPF Officers' Mess


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Sporting life

Physical fitness is an important part of

a Police officer's life and, as a

consequence, a wide variety of sports

are enjoyed by many of those serving

with the auxiliaries.

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Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary

Police Band

Music runs in the family in the band

of the Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary

Police with ten brothers from four

families either beating a variety of

drums or blowing bagpipes.

They are the Chung brothers, Benze,

Allan and Gary; the Chans, Berry,

Karry and Felix; the Tarns, Eric and

Chesson and the Laws, Ming-tat and

Ming-yiu.

Although they all hold down a variety

of jobs in government and the private

sector they all share a common interest

in and enthusiasm for music.

The band, led by Auxiliary Senior

Inspector Christopher Yeung has

regular and intensive rehearsals and

performs at all auxiliary parades and

other functions.


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Comfort and condolences

Memorable events in the life of a

Police Force are not always happy and

the Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary

Police Force is of no exception.

It is always a tragic event when a

colleague is hurt or dies in the course

of his duty. While every effort is made

to sustain and comfort the family, one

always feels it is never quite enough.

Death, in any circumstances, is always

a time of great sadness for family,

friends and colleagues. This was

particularly so in the case of our

friend and Commandant Sir Douglas

Clague, who guided and directed the

fortunes of the Auxiliary Force for

eighteen years.

The Force remembers and honours all

officers who have died in service —

especially those who gave their lives in

the line of duty. The photographs

below are our way of paying tribute to

them.

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The tartan

The blue, yellow and green tartan of

the Isle of Man adopted for the dress

uniform of the pipe and drum band of

the Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police

Band was chosen to mark the memory

of former auxiliary Commandant and

Manxman, the late Sir Douglas

Clague.

The uniforms and instruments for the

band were made possible by total

donations of $200,000 by Sir Shiu-kin

Tang, well known local philanthropist

and a great supporter of both the

regular and auxiliary forces.

The idea for the Manx tartan came

from Mr. Richard Quine, recently

retired Director of Operations. He is

also a Manxman.

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Courage earns

Queen's Commendation

At a special ceremony held at the

Auxiliary Police Headquarters on

Friday 16th March 1984, Chief Staff

Officer, Auxiliaries, Mr. Alistair

McNiven presented to PC Yan a letter

signed by the Governor notifying him

that a Queen's Commendation for

Brave Conduct would be awarded to

him in recognition of his singlehanded

arrest of two robbers.

Although Auxiliary Police Constable

Yan Ping-Kuen only carries out a

policeman's duties 16 hours a week, his

vigilance and courage displayed in

foiling a robbery last year were more

than comparable to those of his regular

colleagues.

The case occurred in the afternoon of

March 6th last year when PC Yan had

just finished lunch and was resuming his

duties of patrolling the streets in Tsz

Wan Shan.

Upon hearing the burglar alarm of a

goldsmith shop in Fung Tak Street, PC

Yan immediately rushed to the scene

where he saw two masked men, one

armed with a pistol and the other with

a knife, inside the shop. A van was

waiting outside.

Realising a robbery was going on, the

young policeman at once took cover

and radioed for assistance. But after

hearing a shot fired, he knew he had

to take action against the thugs.

When PC Yan confronted the two

robbers and ordered them to drop their

weapons, they ignored his repeated

warnings and pointed a gun at him. He

then fired two shots from his service

revolver, both of which hit the robbers.

They finally gave up and were arrested

but the driver of the van managed to

escape.

The two men were later charged with

attempted robbery, shooting with

intent and possession of firearms and

offensive weapons. They were subsequently

sentenced to 10 and 13 years'

imprisonment.

'

f* o £ftHfflK£JKtt£


>u

MIS

Mr. Alistair McNiven, Chief Staff

Officer, Auxiliaries, handing a

letter from the Governor to PC(A)

5066 Yan Ping*kuen of EU KE

(Aux) informing him of his award

of the Queen's Commendation for

Brave Conduct.

-«£«*£$£•


PC(A)88 Winston Chan Kwan-fai

(left) and PC(A)5810 Kenneth

Tung Chi-kan outside Buckingham

Palace.

88R3IV ( ft ) ffl 5810«S»

55

Brave Auxies meet the Queen

Mr. Winston Chan and Mr. Kenneth

Tung were the first auxiliary police

officers to receive the Queen's Gallantry

Medal and the only Chinese

among the 160 honoured from Commonwealth

countries at the palace

investiture.

The pair were honoured for their brave

conduct in a gun fight at Kimberley

Road, Tsim Sha Tsui, in June last year.

After the investiture, the Hong Kong

Government Commissioner in London,

Mr. David Ford, held a reception

at the Hong Kong Government Office

in honour of the brave pair.

' 1


The veteran

One man who knows more than most

about life as a volunteer policeman in

Hong Kong is Mr. Chung Man-sun

who retired in July last year as auxiliary

Police Sergeant 23 after more than forty

years of unbroken service.

Mr. Chung, who looks much younger

than his sixty plus years, was back

making one of his regular visits to

former colleagues at Wanchai Police

Station when a reporter from the Silver

Jubilee Magazine interviewed him.

Mr. Chung was studying at St. Paul's

College when he first joined the

volunteers in 1940. He said: "Our vice

headmaster, who was a volunteer

inspector, encouraged myself and some

of my classmates to join. I was also

encouraged by my family because they

felt it would teach me discipline and

good manners."

Ex-Sergeant 23 then reflected on life in

Hong Kong in 1940 and the difference

between the volunteers then and the

auxiliary Police now.

"It was very different then," he said.

"Things were very cheap. We could

have a dish of noodles for as little as 80

cents. The standard of living was not

as good as it is now but, on the other

hand, the pace of life was very much

quieter. In those days Wanchai Police

Station was perched right on the water's

edge.

"There was a great difference between

policing then and now. In 1940 we were

just a ramshackle volunteer team. We

had no standard uniform and we even

had to buy our own service boots.

"The training was much simpler than it

is today. We just studied the laws and

ordinances of Hong Kong and spent a

lot of time being taught how to use our '

revolvers.

"We used to practise at the Kennedy

Road range, but were only allowed to

use old weapons.

"The training today is much more

intense and professional. In the past ten,

or twenty, years auxiliary training has

been stepped up to a point where it can

now equate with that given to the

regular Force. It is all very well planned

and carried out. Recruits spend a lot of

time on physical training, learning all

about the law and improving our

relations with the public. At first we

went to training camp for two weeks,

but that has now been reduced to one

week.

"In the old days the routine at the

training camp was quite simple. We

started at 0700 hours and much of the

time was spent on law and the use of

weapons. Every year there would be a

special subject to which we paid a great

deal of attention."

Mr. Chung who spent 27 years working

for the Post Office, much of it

as a supervisor in the international mail

section, never found any conflict

between his full'time job and his part-

36

time auxiliary activities. He said: "We

were always allowed time off for camps

and that sort of thing and, if for any

reason that was not possible, we used

our own annual leave to attend."

He also spoke of life during the Japanese

invasion and occupation of Hong Kong.

"It was pretty frightening," he said. "I

was quartered with the troops at

Wanchai and saw the Japanese landing

in rubber boats. The Wanchai Station

was shelled but we were lucky to escape

injury."

Mr. Chung saw some of his colleagues

killed and others injured during the war

and in the riots which followed in postwar

years but he was lucky enough

never to suffer any serious injuries.

Both the regular and the auxiliary

Forces have great family traditions and

Mr. Chung is no exception. His eldest

daughter was in the auxiliary Police

for seven years and only resigned

when she had to spend more time

looking after her two young children.

His first son-in-law is in the regular

Force and his second is an auxiliary

officer.

During his long service Mr. Chung

was awarded a great many medals —

perhaps a record for the auxiliary

Force. In 1943 he was awarded the

Star Medal; in 1945 the Pacific Medal

and, immediately after the war, the

British War Medal and the Defence

Medal. He is also one of the few


auxiliaries to have the Colonial Police

Long Service Medal, with clasp.

Since his retirement he has been helping

his son to look after his trading

company. But, he still finds time to

maintain contact with his police

colleagues. His final message:

"I have enjoyed a good and happy life,

particularly in my service with the

auxiliary Police. I would like to wish all

my ex-colleagues a joyous Silver Jubilee

and even greater success in the years

ahead."

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Mr. Chung Man-sun

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The man who is always first

Mr. Mok Hing-wing is particularly

proud to be part of the Silver Jubilee

celebrations because he was the only

Chinese Police officer to be a member

of the working group which planned

the organisation of the Royal Hong

Kong Auxiliary Police Force.

Mr. Mok, now 75 and the oldest

surviving senior auxiliary officer,

served in the 1941 Special Constabulary,

the Police Reserve and

Auxiliary Police between April, 1941

and January, 1964. When he retired he

was Commanding Officer of Hong

Kong Island District.

The sprightly veteran has maintained

his close connections with the Force by

being the first Honorary life member

of the Auxiliary Police Mess, of which

he was also the first president. Among

Mr. Mok's other firsts are:

First auxiliary officer to be awarded

the CPM (1959);

First chairman of the Auxiliary

Police Club (1962);

First auxiliary officer to command

the first ever Auxiliary Police Guard

of Honour (1962);

First Chinese to reach the rank of

Senior Superintendent (Aux) (1963).

Mr. MOK, who is also a Charter

Monarch of the Lions Club, is still a

regular visitor to Auxiliary Police

Headquarters in Wanchai. When I met

him there recently he told me: "The

Auxies have been my life. 1 am proud

to have served with them."

gK£££8*HHftie;l:KAtt9Ji&

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Mr. Mok Hing*wing

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Gazetted officers of the Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police Force 1984

Mr. Leonard Nylon Ts'o, QPM, CPM

Mr. Chan Tai-wing, CPM

Mr. William Chan Kang-po, CPM

Mr. A.M. da Costa, CPM

Mr. Peter Chau Cham-chiu, CPM

Mr. Cheng Yiu-kwong, CPM

Mr. Tommy Kimmon Choy, CPM, JP

Mr. Wong Peng-kuen, CPM

Mr. G. Hyder, CPM

Hon. Yeung Po-kwan, CPM

Mr. D.M. Claassen, CPM

Mr. Albert Poon Cho-kee

Mr. A.L. Cassumbhoy, CPM

Mr. Wong Che-choy, CPM

Mr. Lui Ching-po, CPM

Mr. G.C.H. Cooper

Mr. Lau Hon-tin

Miss Esther Hung Man -y an, CPM

Mr. Chan Cheuk-ming

Mr. Ng Hon-wing, CPM

Mr. Yeung Tai, CPM

Mr. Chung Hon

Mr. Liu Chi-yuen

Mr. Yuen Siu-lau

Mr. Sun Kam-wing, CPM

Mr. Lau Siu-cheung, CPM

Mr. Cheung Man-pan, CPM

Mr. Albert Poon Bing-lit

Mr. Yu Sheung-chi

Mr. W.S. Ogley, CPM

Mr. Lawrence Lee, CPM

Mr, Cheng Pui-keung

Mr. Lee Hon-hing

Mr. Lee Kam-chung

Mr. D.M. Wright

Miss Wendy Patricia Hall

Mrs. Tsang Chang Hawk-shu

Mr. Wong Tung

Mr. Lai Chun-wing

Mrs. Paula K.Y. Stanley

Mr. Fung Kim -chow

Mr. Chan Ping-kwong

Mr. Wilson Young Wai-huen, CPM

Mr. Cheng Koon-kwan

Mr. Chan Kwok-kan

Mr. Wong Ho-hap

Mr. Tsang Nim-tong

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Commandant (Aux)

Deputy Commandant (Aux)

CSP (Aux)

CSP (Aux)

CSP (Aux)

CSP (Aux)

SSP (Aux)

SSP (Aux)

SSP (Aux)

SSP (Aux)

SSP (Aux)

A/SSP (Aux)

A/SSP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

WSP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

WSP (Aux)

WSP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

WSP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

SP (Aux)

»W|


A list of auxiliaries awarded with medals

Queen's Police Medal for Distinguished Service

1968 The Hon. J.D. Clague, CBE, JfiJf H

MC, CPM, TD, Commandant,

SACP(A)

1973 Mr. M. Gotfried, MBE, CPM,

ACP(A)

1977 Mr. Ramon, Young Chunsheung,

MBE, CPM, JP, ACP(A)

1981 Mr. Leonard Nylon Ts'o, CPM,

ACP(A)

Colonial Police Medal for Meritorious Service

1956 The Hon. Michael W. Turner,

ACP(A)

1959 Mr. E.C. Van Helden, SP(A)

Mr. Mok Hing-wing, SP(A)

1960 Mr. M.A. Da Souza, SP(A)

Mr. Chau Chun-kow, IP(A)

1961 Mr. Ramon Young Chunsheung,

ASP(A)

Mr. J. Lapsky, IP(A)

Mr. M. Gotfried, SP(A)

1962 Mr. R.S. Hownam-Meek,

ASP(A)

Mr. L. Nylon Ts'o, ASP(A)

Mr. Lo Ka-hing, ASP(A)

1963 Mr. Bert Hope, ASP(A)

Mr. J.H. Xavier, IP(A)

1964 Mr. E.A. Aiers, ASP(A)

Mr. Tsan To-piu, ASP(A)

Mr. Ng Wah-kee, IP(A)

1965 Mr. Karlum Shum, SP(A)

Mr. E.G. Yourieff, ASP(A)

1966 Mr. Ko Fook-chuen, SP(A)

The Hon. J.D. Clague, CBE, MC

TD, Commandant, ACP(A)

Jfe

40

Mr. Yu Ki-leung, SP(A)

1967 Mr. Wong Kang-chow, IP(A)

Mr. T.W. Carr, CSP (A)

Mr. J.C. Wiser, ASP(A)

1968 Mr. K.W. Catton, ASP(A)

Mr. F.J.M. Goldberg, ASP(A)

Mr. A.P. Mohideen, ASP(A)

Mr. Wong Chi-choy,

ASP(A)

Mr. Chow Kim-hung,

ASP(A)

Mr. Chau Ping-ming, SIP(A)

Mr. L.V. Da Rosa, SIP(A)

Mr. W.F. Hunt, SIP(A)

Mr. J.W. Devonshire, SSP(A)

Mr. Hui Chun-keung, SSP(A)

1969 Mr. Tse Man-cheung, SIP(A)

Mr. S.F. Harvey, SIP(A)

Mr. G. Hyder, SIP(A)

1970 Mr. Chan Tai-wing, SP(A)

Mr. Tai Chung-ling, ASP(A)

Mr. Leung Kwok-wing,

Sgt(A)

1971 Mr. William Chan Kang-po,

SP(A)

Mr. Chiu Kwong-yung, SP(A)

Mr. Sa Hin-li, ASP(A)

Mr. Lo Ying-wu, SIP(A)

Mr. T. Schofield, SIP(A)

Mr. Andrew Siu, IP(A)

1972 Mr. A.M. Da Costa, SP(A)

Mr. D.G. Neal, SIP(A)

Mr. H.J. Woodthorpe, ASP(A)

Mr. L. Clark, SIP(A)

1973 Mr. D.C. Lyth, SP(A)

Mr. Cheng Yiu-kwong,

CIP(A)

Mr. Wei Chun-ki, SP(A)

ft

sta OT


Mr. Young Wai-huen,

SIP(A)

Mr. Lau Siu-cheung, SIP(A)

1974 Mr. Ng Kwan, IP(A)

Mr. Fan Kwok-choi, SIP(A)

Mr. Wong Peng-kuen, SP(A)

Mr. Un Man-wai, Sgt(A) 275

Mr. So Wing-sum, PC(A) 368

1975 Mr. Luke Yan-keung, CIP(A)

Mr. Kwong Kin-on, CIP(A)

Mr. Wan Yip-hung, S/Sgt(A)

1976 Mr. Tsao Kwong-yung,

SP(A)

Mr. Chester H. Wong, SP(A)

Mr. Leung Tak-kwong,

SIP(A)

Mr. Wong Yiu-ming,

S/Sgt(A)

Mr. Pang Oi-ling, Sgt(A) 67

1977 Mr. R.F. Garcia, SIP(A)

Miss Esther Hung Man-yan,

WCIP(A)

Mr. D.M. Claassen, SP(A)

Mr. Loo Shiu-kwong, SIP(A)

Mr. A.M.M. De Souza,

S/Sgt(A)

1978 Mr. Ng Cheuk-yee, SP(A)

Mr. A.L. Cassumbhoy, SP(A)

Mr. T.K. Choy , SP(A)

Mr. R.B. Rocha, CIP(A)

Mr. Yuen Tai, CIP(A)

1979 Mr. Yeung Po-kwan, SP(A)

Mr. Cheung Man-pan,

CIP(A)

Mr. Lui Ching-po, SP(A)

Mr. Lee Kwong-ming, CIP(A)

1980 Mr. W.S. Ogley, CIP(A)

Mr. Ng Hon-wing, SP(A)

Mr. Wong Wai-ho, Sgt(A) 1429

$ * ^

41

1982 Mr. Lawrence Lee, SP(A)

Mr. Fung Chi-huen, SP(A)

Mr. Sun Kam-wing, SP(A)

1983 Mr. LJ. Harteam, CIP(A)

Mr. Ling Pui, Sgt(A) 1387

1984 Mr. Peter Chau Cham- chiu

A/CSP(A)

Mr. Chan Yip-kun, CIP(A)

The Queen's Silver Jubilee Medal

1977 The Hon. J.D. Clague, CBE,

MC, QPM, CPM, TD,

Commandant, SACP(A)

1977 Mr. Ramon Young Chunsheung,

MBE, QPM, CPM, JP,

ACP(A)

1977 Mr. Chung Man -sun,

Sgt(A) 23

The Queen's Gallantry Medal

1980 Mr. Tung Chi-kan,

PC(A) 5810

1980 Mr. Chan Kwan-fai,

PC(A) 88

SlfS*

The Queen 1 s Commendation for Brave Conduct

1980 Mr. Leung Kam-chu,

PC(A) 562

1983 Mr. Chan Chung-hing,

PC(A) 2405

1984 Mr. Yan Ping-kuen,

PC(A) 5066


The establishment, organization and structure of the

Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police Force

The Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary

Police Force has a current

establishment of 5 435 (all ranks),

details of which are shown in Annex

'A'.

The Force establishment is reviewed

annually to take account of any

increase in the establishment of the

Regular Force.

The organization and structure of the

Force is tabled in Annex ( B'.

Basically, the Force consists of the

following 30 formations:—

(a) 16 Land Divisions

(4 in HK, 6 in K, 6 in NT)

(b) 4 Emergency Units

(1 in HK, 2 in K, 1 in NT)

(c) 5 Special Duty Companies

(2 in HK, 2 in K, 1 in NT)

(d) 2 Marine Divisions

(1 in Harbour, 1 in Islands)

(e) 1 Communications Unit

(f) 1 Traffic Formation and

(g) 1 Headquarters Unit

The basic structure of a Land Division

comprises:—

Superintendent

Chief Inspector

Senior Inspectors/Inspectors

Station Sergeants

Sergeants

Woman Sergeants

Constables

Woman Constables

1

1

9

2

20

2

127

14

Total: 176

The basic structure of the Marine

Islands Division comprises:—

Superintendent 1

Chief Inspector 1

Senior Inspectors/Inspectors 7

Station Sergeants 3

Sergeants 42

Woman Sergeants —

Constables 152

Woman Constables —

Total: 206

The basic structure of the Marine

Harbour Division comprises:—

Superintendent 1

Chief Inspectors 2

Senior Inspectors/Inspectors 8

Station Sergeants 6

Sergeants 50

Constables 188

42

Total: 255

The basic structure of an Emergency

Unit comprises:—

Superintendent 1

Chief Inspector 1

Senior Inspectors/Inspectors 12

Station Sergeants 2

Sergeants 27

Constables 169

Total: 212

The basic structure of a Special Duty

Company comprises:—

Superintendent 1

Chief Inspector 1

Senior Inspectors/Inspectors 9

Station Sergeants 2

Sergeants 22

Constables 127

Total: 162

The basic structure of the

Communications Unit comprises:—

Superintendent 1

Chief Inspectors 4

Senior Inspectors/Inspectors 13

Woman Sergeants 41

Woman Police Constables 259

Total: 318


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Annex A The establishment of the

Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police Force

DIV/

UNIT

RANK HQ Training Traffic

SACP (AUX)

ACP(AUX)

CSP(AUX)

«ffp|(tlff )

SSP(AUX)

SP(AUX)

ff *!(«»)

CIP(AUX)

(mm)

SIP/IP (AUX)

S/SGT (AUX)

( tiff )

SGT(AUX)

ff ^ (tiff)

PC (AUX)

*ft (tiff)

W/SIP/IP (AUX)

£-§11 (tiff)

W/SGT(AUX)

W/PC (AUX)

TOTAL

ttlt

48

Res. of

officers

HEADQUARTERS (AUX)

( tiff )

Marine Women Police (Comms Unit)

HONG KONG ISLAND

DISTRICT (AUX)

Band H I HQ HKI K NT M Res HQ W C Wch E

m& «& ati?

1 1 1

2 1 1 1 1

6 3

21 188 152

3 3 3 1 3

8 13 8 4 8

11 65 85 31 15 52

4 1 1 1 1

1 1 1 1

1 7 9 9 9 9

2 2 2 2

20 20 20 20

127 127 127 127

2 2 2 2

14 14 14 14

24 255 206 13 77 102 43 20 63 24 176 176 176 176

-


HK ISLAND

DISTRICT (AUX) KOWLOON DISTRICT (AUX)

AMU: ( m )

NEW TERRITORIES DISTRICT (AUX)

EST.

SDC SDC *§#J

HKI HKI EU EU EU SDC SDC EU SDC

(1) (2) HK HQ MK SSPo WTS KT KC Y KW KE KW KE HQ TW KwC YL ST TM NT NT F STR.

1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 47

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 33

9 9 12 20 9 9 9 9 9 9 12 12 9 9 10 9 9 9 9 9 12 9 9 315

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 5 9

22 22 27 20 20 20 20 20 20 27 27 22 22 20 20 20 20 20 27 22 20 647

127 127 169 127 127 127 127 127 127 169 169 127 127 127 127 127 127 127 169 127 127 3752

2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 73

14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14 14

162 162 212 26 176 176 176 176 176 176 212 212 162 162 16 176 176 176 176 176 212 162 176 5435


Annex B Organization of the

Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police Force

TRAINING UNIT

COMMUNICATIONS

COLONY/POL/MIL STAFF OFFICERS

SP/COMMUN1CATIONS SP/HEADQUARTERS

HkTT If VT VI BAND

K N I M MASTFR

ME m& *m

CHIEF SUPERINTENDENT OF POLICE

HEADQUARTERS (AUXILIARY)

ttfg&di*)

I I

DRIVER

RESERVE TRAININi

RESERVE

COMMISSIONER OF POLICE

COMMANDANT (AUXILIARY)

SENIOR ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER OF POLICE (AUXILIARY)

DEPUTY COMMANDANT (AUXLILIARY)

ASSISTANT COMMISSIONER OF POLICE (AUXILIARY)

(m^)

M/POL/M1L STAFF OFFICERS

HKI K NT

DS/HARBOUR DS/ISLANDS

I I

WCH

ifffffrg

CHIEF SUPERINTENDENT OF POLICE

HONG KONG ISLAND (AUXILIARY)

( fit* )

SENIOR SUPERINTENDENT OF POLICE

HONG KONG ISLAND (AUXILIARY)

( fit* )

HKI/POL/MIL STAFF OFFICERS

EMERGENCY UNIT

SPECIAL DUTY COMPANIES


CHIEF STAFF OFFICER AUXILIARIES

AND

AUXILIARY POLICE HEADQUARTERS

CHIEF SUPERINTENDENT OF POLICE

KOWLOON (AUXILIARY)

(HI)

SENIOR SUPERINTENDENT OF POLICE

KOWLOON (AUXILIARY)

SSPo WTS

( fit* )

CHIEF SUPERINTENDENT OF POLICE

NEW TERRITORIES (AUXILIARY)

(M*)

SENIOR SUPERINTENDENT OF POLICE

NEW TERRITORIES (AUXILIARY)

( fit* )

K/POL/M1L STAFF OFFICERS NT/POL/MIL STAFF OFFICERS

I

EMERGENCY UNITS

KwC TW YL ST

EMERGENCY UNIT

SPECIAL DUTY COMPANIES SPECIAL DUTY COMPANY

SDCKE

TT ZrJ I|l8 CT T" 1 fs!£


Commanding officers

Commanding officers of Auxiliary Headquarters

Staff Officers and Senior Superintendents of Police

Mr. G.D. Binstead, MBE

Mr. D.O. Tebbutt

Mr. G.D. Binstead, MBE

Mr. J.A. White, JP

Mr. A.A. Shaw,JP

Mr. W. Segrue

Mr. E.K.I. O' Reilly, JP

Mr. B.F. Slevin, JP

Mr. A.J. Schouten, JP

Mr. W. Todd, JP

Mr. RE Godber

Mr. RT. Moor, JP

Mr. K.W. Farmer, JP

Mr. R.J. Bretherton

Mr. J.H. Grieve, JP

m ra

B ffi

K 8

?G H

E»»G

/lfiz:S

11/1949-5/1950

5/1950-2/1952

2/1952- 2/1953

2/1953-12/1953

12/1953- 2/1955

12/1954- 2/1956

2/1956- 6/1957

6/1957- 6/1959

6/1959-10/1961

10/1961- 4/1964

4/1964- 7/1965

7/1965-12/1967

12/1967- 4/1970

4/1970- 4/1971

4/1971- 5/1972

Chief Superintendents of Police and Chief Staff

Officers

Mr. D.E.W. O' Brien,

MBE, CPM, JP

Mr. P.T. Moor, CPM, JP

Mr. E.R. Moss, CPM

Mr. R.L. Redpath, CPM

Mr. R.C. Smallshaw

Mr. John Turner,

CPM

Mr. Dunn Nai-bun,

Acting CSO, AUX

Mr. A.]. McNiven,

CPM

Mr. D.J. Collins, CPM

5/1972-10/1974

10/1974- - 5/1975

5/1975- - 8/1977

8/1977- - 6/1979

6/1979- - 1/1980

1/1980- -10/1981

10/1981- 1/1982

1/1982-4/1984

4/1984-

48

Police Reserve

Mr. F.C. Jenkin

Dr. Ts'o Seen-wan

CBE, JP

Mr. Ts'o Tsun-on

QBE, JP

Special Constabulary

Mr. Lo Tung-fan

Mr. W. Darkin

Disbanded

Mr. C.A. Johnston

Mr. E.R. Hill

Sir Michael Turner

KT., CBE, LLD

Royal Hong Kong Auxiliary Police Force

Sir Michael Turner

KT., CBE, LLD

Col. The Hon.

J.D. Clague, CBE,

MC, QPM, CPM, TD,JP

Mr. Ramon Young

Chun-sheung,

MBE, QPM, CPM, JP

Mr.T.J. Bedford, MBE,JP

Mr. L. Nylon Ts'o QPM,

CPM

1914-1919

1920-1939

1939-1957

1941-1945

1945 _ 1946

1946-1949

1949-1950

1950-1955

1955 _ 1958

3/1959-3/1962

3/1962-6/1980

6/1980-6/1981

6/1981-9/1983

9/1983

NO

TOG


X0177D6fil

[HKP] 363.2095125 H7 A

X01770flfll

HKP

363.2095125 1339428

Hong Kong. Royal Hong Kong

Auxiliary Police Force

Date Due

1339428

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