Province of Romblon - UNDP in the Philippines

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Province of Romblon - UNDP in the Philippines

Province of ROMBLON

Philippines Fourth Progress Report on the Millennium Development Goals using CBMS Data - Province of Province of Marinduque

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Status Report on the

Millennium Development Goals

(MDGs)

Using CBMS Data

Province of Romblon


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Province of Romblon

Foreword

Republic of the Philippines

PROVINCE OF ROMBLON

OFFICE OF THE VICE-GOVERNOR

I personally take recognition of the work and dedication spent by our

Community-Based Monitoring System (CBMS) Provincial Team in making this

document, the Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using

CBMS Data (Province of Romblon).

This report gives every reader the 2007 general situation of the province of

Romblon and its municipalities vis-à-vis their achievement of the Millennium

Development Goals. It presents not only the threats and weaknesses we have

as a community, but also the equivalents strengths and the opportunities we can pursue.

Specifi cally, this report pictures to us how have we specially faired in the following eight (8) development

goals set by the United Nations:

1. Eradication of extreme poverty and hunger

2. Achievement of universal primary education

3. Promotion of gender equality and women empowerment

4. Reduction of child mortality

5. Improvement in maternal health

6. Combat of HIV/AIDS, malaria and other diseases

7. Ensuring environmental sustainability, and

8. Developing a global partnership for development

Towards the end of this report, the reader is led to the proposed programs, projects and activities,

and their equivalent project costs. It also strongly suggests for the continuous updating of our CBMS.

This document therefore can be a great resource for all development institutions, workers, and

specially our local and national leaders whose love for the development of Romblon and its people

is real, sincere and overfl owing. This can help them decide what programs, projects and activities will

they commit to fund and undertake; how much fund and when will they give.

Then we can be able to project what of these plans are achievable fi rst, until 2015, and then beyond.

Again, sincere thanks to our Provincial Team, Dr. Celia Reyes and the PEP-CBMS Network, UNDP,

NEDA-SDS, the municipal governments in the province, the provincial offi ces and agencies, and to

all those who supported the preparation of this document.

ALICE CAPA-FETALVERO

Vice Governor

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Preface

The province of Romblon is blest with abundant natural resources yet has difficulty

harnessing development due to limiting factors such as being archipelagic in nature.

Foremost in the agenda of the Local Development Councils is the eradication of poverty

and upliftment of the socioeconomic conditions of all Romblomanons. To achieve this

goal, we need massive financial resources and technical inputs to overcome our geophysical

constraints. In our pursuit of the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals

(MDGs), aligning our meager resources in support of the universal development thrust

will enable the province to respond meaningfully to the challenge. We particularly need

to strengthen local governance and pass local legislations to effectively implement

national policies.

This report aims to present the status of the province and its component municipalities

in terms of the MDG targets based on data generated from the first implementation of

the Community-Based Monitoring System (CBMS). The data revealed that we have a

very good performance in combating malnutrition and promoting gender equality. We

need to maintain or even surpass what we have achieved so far while devising innovative

strategies to improve on the other indicators which are lagging behind. There is a need

for a concerted effort to engender a paradigm shift regarding the environment including

climate change if we want an immediate response to reverse environmental loss.

Poverty continued to be our vulnerability as majority of the population is below poverty

threshold. This is our greatest challenge. With the MDG report, we believe that the Local

Chief Executives and the Local Development Councils would realize the necessity to act

now by prioritizing plans/programs/activities that would enable us to make a decent

improvement in the lives of the people and make headways in achieving the MDG targets.

OSCAR VICENTE L. YLAGAN, JR.

Provincial Government Department Head

Provincial Planning and Development Office

Provincial Development Council Secretary

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data Province of Romblon

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Province of Romblon

Acknowledgments

It has been a great honor and opportunity that Romblon was among the nine provinces in

the country chosen to participate in this laudable endeavor and come up with this document

that shows our status on the Millennium Development Goals. The preparation of this report is

made possible by the PEP-CBMS Network through the support of the United Nations Development

Programme (UNDP) and the National Economic and Development Authority-Social

Development Staff (NEDA-SDS).

We would like to express our deepest gratitude to Dr. Celia Reyes and her Team in conceptualizing

this project. We are also thankful for them in relentlessly providing us with technical

assistance and coaching sessions in generating the MDG indicators. For their patience and

understanding, and for being with us all the way, until we fi nish the report, we are heartily

grateful.

A million thanks also goes to the UNDP for supporting this undertaking and for the unique

experience we encountered in preparing the report.

Finally, we would also like to acknowledge the contributions of the Municipal Planning and

Development Coordinators (MPDCs), the Municipal Health Offi cers (MHOs) and other provincial

offi ces and agencies, in sharing with us their insights regarding data analysis at their

areas of concern as well as their best practices.

OSCAR VICENTE L. YLAGAN, JR.

Provincial Government Dept. Head – PPDO

CBMS Provincial Lead Person

jylagan_ppdo@yahoo.com

The CBMS Provincial Team

EVELYN M. MAGAYAM GEMMA M. ETIS

Planning Officer IV Project Evaluation Officer IV

CBMS Focal Person CBMS TWG Member

billy_ppdo@yahoo.com gem_ppdo@yahoo.com

MELODINA M. VILLALUZ LIANY G. ROMERO

Project Evaluation Officer III Planning Officer II

CBMS TWG Member CBMS TWG Member

mellie_ppdo@yahoo.com gian_phil@yahoo.com

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Message

The preparation of provincial MDGs reports is a critical step that Local Government

Units (LGUs) have taken in the overall effort to localize the MDGs. As it is

often said, the MDGs will be ‘won or lost’ at the local level given the conditions

of uneven progress and disparities across regions and provinces in the country.

Beyond the national averages, one can see wide disparities on the gains

in poverty reduction, universal education, child mortality and maternal health.

This situation reinforces the notion that the progress of each province is just as

important as the achievements of the country as a whole. After all, the Philippines’

progress towards the MDGs, is the sum of the efforts and gains of all LGUs.

By preparing provincial reports, LGUs are provided vital information on

the status of the MDGs in their areas of infl uence. These reports are important

sources of information for planning, resource allocation and priority setting that LGUs are tasked

under their mandate of effective local governance. Likewise, in the course of the preparation of the

reports, the capacity of LGUs to collect, monitor and use data for decision making has been greatly

enhanced. The reports also show how far the Community Based Monitoring System (CBMS) that

UNDP has supported can go in terms of its use.

Against the backdrop of renewed optimism emanating from the new political leadership, this fi rst

set of nine Provincial Reports on the MDGs is a timely and important milestone. The reports provide

crucial insights on how to overcome the constraints in achieving the MDGs locally as the country

gears towards the last stretch to attain the eight goals by 2015. They also emphasize the important

role of active collaboration of political leaders, stakeholders, and donors in achieving the MDGs.

I wish to commend the nine Provincial Governments that prepared their reports – the Agusan

del Norte, Agusan del Sur, Biliran, Camarines Norte, Eastern Samar, Marinduque, Romblon, Sarangani,

and Siquijor Provincethe Community-Based Monitoring System (CBMS) Network and

the National Economic and Development Authority (NEDA) for working together in bringing about

this important accomplishment.

With this initiative, it is hoped that other provinces will follow suit to attain nationwide support

for the need to accelerate the pace of the achievement of the MDGs s by 2015.

Dr. Dr Jacqueline Badcock

UN Resident Coordinator and

UNDP Resident Representative

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data Province of Romblon

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Province of Romblon

Message

Republic of the Philippines

PROVINCE OF ROMBLON

OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR

The Declaration of the Millennium Development Goals

(MDGs) by member states of the United Nations including the

Philippine Government (PG) has posed a great challenge to the

country and to the Local Government Units (LGUs) as well. At

the onset, the absence of baseline data at the grass-root level

and the lack of local monitoring tool to determine the status of

the LGUs in terms of the MDG targets has been a hindrance

in setting local targets.

The Regional Development Council (RDC) Region IV-B (MIMAROPA) initiative to implement a

common database system in the region and the subsequent implementation of the Community-

Based Monitoring System (CBMS) in the Province of Romblon has proven to be a very provident

endeavor. With CBMS, the availability of data at each geo-political level—barangay, municipality

and province—has been a great help in our assessment of the demographic and socioeconomic

condition of the province and its 17 component municipalities as well as the indicators monitored

under the MDG.

Since this is the first round of CBMS implementation in the province, we still cannot track our

progress in attaining the MDGs. What we can offer instead is a glimpse of where we stand at

present, and strive to contribute to the achievement of the national target. Our current status can

also be our benchmark in monitoring the impacts of projects being implemented and gauge the

effects of the general services provided aimed at improving the general welfare of our people.

The province and its 17 component municipalities have agreed to update the CBMS database

this 2010 and we are very optimistic that the data generated will provide us insights as to our

response to MDG challenge as well as the impact of our services to the lives of our constituents.

This will help us a lot in focusing our interventions to where and whom it is most needed.

Hopefully, the preparation of the provincial MDG report can provide us with meaningful

analysis not only on the MDG indicators but also on our general situation and shall be the

basis in formulating development plans and strategies that would be responsive to achieve our

objectives as well as the MDGs. The MDG Report will steer us s to our quest for a better fut future

and will further aid us in our quest for a unified, self-reliant and ecologically-balanced ecologically-balanced province. provi

v n

NATALIO F. BELTRAN

III

Gover Governor

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Table of Contents

Foreword Vice-Governor Alice Capa-Fetalvero ....................................

Preface Provincial Government Department Head

Oscar Vicente L. Ylagan, Jr. ..................................................

Acknowledgments ......................................................................................

Messages UN Resident Coordinator Dr. Jacqueline Badcock .................

Governor Natalio F. Beltran III ..................................................

Table of Contents .......................................................................................

List of Acronyms ........................................................................................

List of Tables ..............................................................................................

List of Figures ............................................................................................

Executive Summary .............................................................................

Part I. Provincial Profile

1. Brief Historical Background ...............................................................

2. Geo-Physical Environment .................................................................

3. Population & Social Environment .......................................................

4. Local Economy ...................................................................................

5. Infrastructure/Utilities/Facilities ..........................................................

6. Local Institutional Capability .............................................................

Part II. Status Report on the

Millennium Development Goals (MDGs)

1. Goal 1 - Eradicate Extreme Poverty and Hunger ....................................... 30

2. Goal 2 - Achieve Universal Primary Education ..........................................

3. Goal 3 - Promote Gender Equality ..........................................................

..

4. Goal 4 - Reduce Child Mortality .............................................................

5. Goal 5 - Improve Maternal Health .........................................................

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data Province of Romblon

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4

5

6

7

9

11

13

14

22

23

24

26

27

28

41

48

55

61

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Province of Romblon

Table of Contents

6. Goal 6 - Combat HIV / AIDS, Malaria and Other Diseases ....................................

7. Goal 7 - Ensure Environmental Sustainability .....................................................

8. Goal 8 - Develop Global Partnership for Development ........................................ 79

Part III. Meeting the 2015 Challenge

1. Priority Programs and Policy Responses ........................................................ 85

2. Financing the MDGs ..................................................................................... 88

3. Monitoring the MDGs ...................................................................................

90

Explanatory Text .............................................................................................. 91

66

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Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


ADP Annual Development Plan

AHYD Adolescent Health & Youth Development

AICS Aid in Crisis Situation

ALS Alternative Learning Service

BBB Buntis Baby Bank

BEMONC Basic Emergency Obstetric and Newborn Care

BHS Barangay Health Station

BHW Barangay Health Workers

BLR Botika ng Lalawigan ng Romblon

BNB Botika ng Barangay

BNS Barangay Nutrition Scholar

CBFM Community-Based Forest Management

CBMIS Community-Based Management Information System

CBMS Community-Based Monitoring System

CDA Cooperative Development Agency

CEMONC Comprehensive Emergency Obstetric and Newborn Care

DepEd Department of Education

DMFDH Don Modesto Formilleza District Hospital

DOLE Department of Labor and Employment

DSWD Department of Social Worker and Development

EC European Commission

ECCD Early Childhood Care & Development

F1 FOURmula One

FIC Fully Immunized Children

GAD Gender and Development

IAD/U Internal Audit Department/Unit

ICMRM Integrated Coastal and Marine Resources Management

IRA Internal Revenue Allotment

IRS International Reference Standard

ISF Integrated Social Forestry

IT Information Technology

LCE Local Chief Executive

LDC Local Development Council

LGU Local Government Unit

MDG Millennium Development Goals

MDH Malipayon District Hospital

MHO Municipal Health Office

MIMAROPA Mindoro, Marinduque, Romblon and Palawan

MOA Memorandum of Agreement

MPDC Municipal Planning and Development Coordinator

List of Acronyms

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data Province of Romblon

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List of Acronyms

NEDA National Economic and Development Authority

NGO Non Government Organization

NPC National Power Corporation

NSCB National Statistical Coordination Board

OPT Operation Timbang

OTELCO Odiongan Telephone Corporation

PCS Provincial Communication System

PEP Progressive Economic Policy

PG Philippine Government

PHIC/Phil-Health Philippine Health Insurance Corporation

PHO Provincial Health Office

PIPH Provincewide Investment Plan for Health

PNAO Provincial Nutrition Action Officer

PNC Provincial Nutrition Committee

PPAN Philippine Plan of Action for Nutrition

PPDO Provincial Planning and Development Office

4Ps Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program

PTWG Provincial Technical Working Group

RDC Regional Development Council

RDH Romblon District Hospital

RHU Rural Health Unit

RIC Rural Improvement Club

ROMELCO Romblon Electric Cooperative

RPH Romblon Provincial Hospital

RSU Romblon State University

RW3SP Rural Water Supply Sanitation Sector Program

SEDIP Secondary Education Development & Improvement Program

SEF Special Education Fund

SPED Special Education

SWMP Solid Waste Management Plan

SUC State University/College

SWMP Solid Waste Management Plan

TB DOTS Tuberculosis Directly Observed Treatment Scheme

TEEP Third Elementary Education Program

TELOF Telecommunication Office

TIDH Tablas Island District Hospital

TIELCO Tablas Island Electric Cooperative

UN United Nations

UNDP United Nation Development Programme

VAWC Violence Against Women and their Children

Province of Romblon

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


List of Tables

Table 1. Summary of Findings of MDG Indicators, Province of Romblon, 2007

Table 2. Demographic Features, by Municipality, 2007

Table 3. Number of Schools and Enrollment, SY 2007 – 2008

Table 4. Participation and Completion Rate, SY 2007 – 2008

Table 5. Magnitude and Proportion of Households and Population Living Below Poverty Threshold, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Table 6. Magnitude and Proportion of Households and Population Living Below Food Threshold, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Table 7. Poverty Gap Ratio, by Urbanity, by municipality, 2007

Table 8. Employment Rate, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Table 9. Magnitude and Proportion of Households and Population who Experienced Food Shortage, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Table 10. Magnitude and Proportion of Underweight Children Under 5 years of Age, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Table 11. Magnitude and Proportion of Children Aged 6-12 Years Old Enrolled in Elementary School, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Table 12. Magnitude and Proportion of Children Aged 13-16 Years Old Enrolled in High School, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Table 13. Magnitude and Proportion of Children Aged 6-16 Years Old Enrolled in School, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Table 14. Literacy Rate of 15-24 Year-Olds, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Table 15. Ratio of Girls to Boys in Primary Education, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Table 16. Ratio of Girls to Boys in Secondary Education, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Table 17. Ratio of Girls to Boys in Tertiary Education, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Table 18. Ratio of Literate Females to Literate Males (15-24 years old), by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Table 19. Proportion of Seats Held by Women in Municipality and Province, by Municipality, 2007

Table 20. Magnitude and Proportion of Children Aged 0 to Less than 5 Years Old who Died, by sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Table 21. Magnitude and Proportion of Infants who Died, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Table 22. Magnitude and Proportion of Children Aged 1 to Less than 5 Years Old who Died, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Table 23. Magnitude and Proportion of Women Deaths Due to Pregnancy-Related Causes, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Table 24. Magnitude and Proportion of Couples who Use Contraception, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Table 25. Magnitude and Proportion of Couples Using Condom Among Those who are Practicing Contraception, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Table 26. Magnitude and Proportion of Deaths Associated with Malaria, by Sex, by Municipality, 2007

Table 27. Magnitude and Proportion of Deaths Associated with Tuberculosis, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Table 28. Magnitude and Proportion of Households and Population with Access to Safe Drinking Water, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Table 29. Magnitude and Proportion of Households and Population with Access to Sanitary Toilet Facility, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Table 30. Magnitude and Proportion of Households and Population who are Informal Settlers, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Table 31. Magnitude and Proportion of Households and Population Living in Makeshift Housing, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Table 32. Magnitude and Proportion of Households and Population Living in Inadequate Housing Conditions, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data Province of Romblon

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Province of Romblon

List of Tables

Table 33. Magnitude and Proportion of Households with Landlines/Telephone Lines, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Table 34. Magnitude and Proportion of Households with Cellphones, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Table 35. Magnitude and proportion of Households with Computers, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Table 36. Estimates of Funding Requirements

Table 37. The CBMS-MDG Indicators and their Definition

Table 38. Poverty and Food Thresholds

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Figure 1. Location of Romblon Province

Figure 2. Proportion of Population Living Below Poverty Threshold

Figure 3. Proportion of Population Living Below Food Threshold

Figure 4. Poverty Gap Ratio

Figure 5. Employment Rate

Figure 6. Proportion of Population Who Experienced Food Shortage

Figure 7. Prevalence of Underweight Children Under 5 Years of Age

Figure 8. Proportion of Children Aged 6-12 Years Old Enrolled in Elementary School

Figure 9. Proportion of Children Aged 13-16 Years Old Enrolled in High School

Figure 10. Proportion of Children Aged 6-16 Years Old Enrolled in School

Figure 11. Literacy Rate of 15-24 Years Olds

Figure 12. Ratio of Girls to Boys in Primary Education

Figure 13. Ratio of Girls to Boys in Secondary Education

Figure 14. Ratio of Girls to Boys in Tertiary Education

Figure 15. Ratio of Literate Females to Literate Males Aged 15-24 Years Old

Figure 16. Proportion of Seats Held by Women in Municipality and Province

Figure 17. Proportion of Children 0 to Less than 5 Years Old who Died

Figure 18. Proportion of Infants who Died

Figure 19. Proportion of Children Aged 1 to Less than 5 Years Old who Died

Figure 20. Proportion of Women Deaths Due to Pregnancy-Related causes

Figure 21. Proportion of Couples who Use Contraception

Figure 22. Proportion of Couples Using Condom Among Those who are Practicing

Contraception

Figure 23. Death Rates Associated with Malaria

Figure 24. Death Rates Associated with Tuberculosis

Figure 25. Proportion of Population with Access to Safe Drinking Water

Figure 26. Proportion of Population with Access to Sanitary Toilet Facility

Figure 27. Proportion of Population who are Informal Settlers

Figure 28. Proportion of Population who are Living in Makeshift Housing

Figure 29. Proportion of Population Living in Inadequate Housing Condition

Figure 30. Proportion of Households with Landlines/ Telephone Lines

Figure 31. Proportion of Households with Cellphones

Figure 32. Proportion of Households with Computers

Figure 33. CBMS Coverage in the Philippines (as of May 12, 2010)

List of Figures

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data Province of Romblon

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Province of Romblon

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

The endeavor to prepare a provincial

MDG report was a result of a collaborative

effort of the PEP-CBMS Network Coordinating

Team, the Provincial Government of

Romblon and the UNDP-Philippines which

aims to track progress towards the achievement

of MDGs in the province and create a

document that would increase awareness of

local stakeholders regarding the universal

development thrust.

The report utilized the result of the 2007

CBMS survey and other administrative data.

The result presented in this report suggested

that there has been some good news,

and not so good news in some indicators

but there are those that pose a great

challenge for the remaining five years until

the 2015 target. Without doubt, there is

a need for a concerted effort among all

stakeholders, from the national down to

the local level, to make urgent response to

achieve the MDG targets that would make

a better life for every person in the province.

Good news:

• Prevalence of underweight children

under 5 years old was 8.12 percent which is

already below the national target of 17.25

percent by 2015.

• Literacy rate among the 15-24 years

old was high at 97.7 percent and was only

2.3 percentage point away from the 100

percent target.

• Ratio of girls to boys in elementary is

0.9 but this is due to the higher population

of boys than girls. In high school and

college, ratio is higher in favor of girls

attending higher education at 1.0 and 1.1

respectively.

• Ratio of literate females to males age

15-24 years old is lower at 0.9 accounting

for the higher male population than females

in this age group.

• No HIV/AIDs case in the province.

• The proportion of informal settlers in

the population was low at 1.3 percent and

those living in makeshift housing was 2.1

percent.

Not so good news:

• Proportion of population who experienced

food shortage was minimal at 3.0

percent.

• Employment rate was high at 97.7

percent although employment opportunities

provide low economic returns.

• Poverty gap ratio was moderate at 0.3.

• Proportion of children’s death at age 0

to less than five years old was 0.6 percent,

infants at 1.8 percent and those 1 to less

than 5 years old was 0.8 percent.

• Proportion of women deaths due to

pregnancy related causes was 0.2 percent.

• Proportion of population with access to

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


safe drinking water was 76.3 percent and

the proportion of population with access

to sanitary toilet facilities was 71.4 percent.

• Proportion of households with landlines/

telephone lines was a meager 1.2 percent

but this is due to the province’s geophysical

characteristics.

• Proportion of population with cellular

phones was 27.0 percent but increasing.

• Proportion of population with computers

was low at only 3.34 percent because of the

difficulty in obtaining internet connection.

Posing great challenge:

• Proportion of population below poverty

threshold was staggering at 68 percent

and those below food threshold was

55.7percent.

• Proportion of children 6-12 years old

enrolled in elementary education was 77.1

percent, those 13-16 years old enrolled in

high school was 78.4 percent and those

children aged 6-16 enrolled in school

was 88.5 percent which is more than 10

percentage points short of the 2015 target

of universal education.

• Only 26.4 percent of women held

elective positions in the province at the

barangay, municipal and provincial levels.

• Contraceptive prevalence rate

was 32.0 percent while the proportion of

couples using condom among those who

are practicing family planning was only 1.4

percent.

• Prevalence of death rates associated

with tuberculosis was high at 46.68

percent.

• Proportion of population under

inadequate living condition was 43.1

percent because of the water and sanitation

component.

Here is the summary of the status of the

MDG indicators based on the 2007 CBMS

result.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data Province of Romblon

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Table 1. Summary of findings of MDG indicators, Province of Romblon, 2007

Province of Romblon

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Table 1. (Contrinued)

Source: CBMS Survey 2007

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To achieve the MDG targets, the convergence

of service providers from the national

down to the local level is required. Likewise,

the concerted efforts of all stakeholders,

including participation of NGOs is

necessary to overcome the great challenge,

particularly on poverty and education.

The prioritization of our meager financial

resources to engender the desired results

will help in the realization of our targets but

we still need to seek outside fund sources to

be able to implement the myriad strategies

and projects essential for the attainment of

the MDGs.

Recommendations

1. Eradicate Extreme Poverty and Hunger

To make an inroad in conquering poverty,

the national and provincial governments

together with the LGUs must align provision

of interventions needed to uplift the

socioeconomic conditions. Microfinancing

and small scale industries could trigger

progress coupled with strengthening of

marketing linkages, particularly for the

marble and coconut based products. It

would be advantageous if each LGU can

put up one industry to boost and increase

the earning power of the people.

Due to our geophysical characteristics, it

is desirable to promote the tourism industry

that could create job opportunities. To

provide alternative sources of income we

should encourage our students to take

technical/vocational courses. To enhance

agricultural production, our Agricultural

Technologists must go out of their way to

teach the marginalized farmers with innovative

farming techniques, including use of

modern farm inputs. Likewise, we should tap

Province of Romblon

the potential of our vast surrounding seas

and develop industries based on marine

resources.

2. Achieve Universal Primary Education

It is noted that completion rate for both

elementary and high school is quite low.

Strengthening the Early Childhood Care

and Development (ECCD) program/

daycare services and expanding the

pre-elementary education services of the

Department of Education (DepEd) would

help the students for the transition into the

elementary education system including their

readiness; hence will reduce dropouts.

Intensify the Alternative Learning Service

for the areas very far from educational

institutions and provide additional Special

Education (SPED) classes for those children

with special needs. The Tuloy Aral Walang

Sagabal (TAWAG) program of the Department

of Social Welfare and Development

(DSWD) should be expanded to cover

all municipalities. Improvement of school

facilities including provision of books and

instructional materials will also inspire

children to study. We also need to provide

scholarship programs for deserving but

poor students. Local School Boards should

look deeper into the issue of low participation

in both elementary and high school.

Reasons for dropouts must be evaluated

for proper strategies and solutions to be

implemented.

3. Promote Gender Equality and Women

Empowerment

There is a pronounced trend that fewer

males attend secondary and tertiary

education. Provision of livelihood projects

to augment family income and short term

technical and practical courses would

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


encourage some of them to at least finish

high school. To address this concern, a

study must be made to determine the real

reasons so that adequate policies and

interventions could be put in place.

For women empowerment, provision

of livelihood skills training with gender

advocacy could increase their self-esteem

and will enable them to be productive

members of the community. The establishment

of a One-Stop-Shop for victims

of abuse and the Women’s Desk will

encourage more women to report cases

of atrocities. Information and dissemination

of the VAWC law will help decrease

marital abuses including maltreatment

of children. To encourage more women

to seek elected position and serve their

communities, women’s success stories in

the area of governance could make them

realize that they could also make a difference

and contribute to the well being of the

community.

4. Reduce Child Mortality

Institutionalizing the facility based birthing

through upgrading of health facilities into

standard Comprehensive Emergency

Obstetric and Newborn Care (CEMONC)

facility in the case of hospitals and for the

Rural Health Units (RHUs) into a standard

Basic Emergency Obstetric and Newborn

Care (BEMONC) facility. Improve services

of RHUs to include regular weekly/monthly

visit to remote barangays. Implementation

of the Responsible Parenting Movement

(RPM) through parents association could

generally encourage couples to practice

birth spacing using whatever method is

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data Province of Romblon

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acceptable to them. Provision of Adolescent

Health and Youth Development

programs would also address the issues of

teenage pregnancies.

5. Improve Maternal Health

Involvement and active participation of

all stakeholders, particularly the Municipal

Health Officers (MHOs) can make a lot of

difference, particularly in service delivery

and implementation of innovative program

interventions. Utilize the Barangay Nutrition

Scholars (BNS) to monitor pregnant women

in their areas and encourage them to

submit themselves for prenatal check-ups.

Replicate the innovative practices like the

Buntis Baby Project of LGU Cajidiocan

that encourages mothers to seek prenatal

consultations through a savings scheme

for use at birth. Continuous information,

education, and communication (IEC) on

Reproductive Health and encourage would

be mothers to submit for prenatal checkup.

6. Combat HIV/AIDs, Malaria and other Diseases

Be vigilant to maintain the situation by

providing the much needed information

dissemination campaign on the prevention

as well as providing medical examination to

suspected carrier or infected individual. On

tuberculosis, encourage all RHUs to seek

accreditation to be a Tuberculosis Directly

Observed Treatment Scheme (TB DOTS)

facility to better respond to the challenge

of providing treatment and cure to TB

positive patients. Provision of a sustained

IEC campaign to encourage client to submit

for sputum test and take complete treatment

coupled with advocacy for a tuberculosis-free

LGU.

7. Ensure Environmental Sustainability

Strict implementation of environmental

Province of Romblon

laws must be adhered to stop the degradation

of our environment and start reversing

the process. Approval of the Sangguniang

Panlalawigan of the proposed Environmental

Code is a priority to guide us in our quest

for environmental sustainability.

Expansion and establishment of fish

sanctuaries, rehabilitation of mangroves

and regular coastal cleanup can improve

our marine resources. Reforestation of all

forest lands, including Mt. Guiting-guiting

Natural Park and support the Integrated

Social Forestry (ISF) and Community-

Based Forestry Management (CBFM)

programs to hasten the recovery of our

forest cover. Immediate attention must

be made to rehabilitate our watershed

areas to improve current water sources.

Strengthen the implementation of the

Integrated Coastal and Marine Resources

Management (ICMRM) to cover all areas

so that all economic activities could be

monitored. Proper mobilization of “Bantay

Dagat” agents to apprehend encroaching

commercial fishing vessels in municipal

waters and strict implementation of fishery

laws and fines to discourage them.

For the informal/illegal settlers, establishment

of housing projects for their relocation

including provision of livelihood

opportunities will dramatically improve their

socioeconomic condition. For waterless

families, improvement of water system

facility and provision of toilet bowls for

those without sanitary latrines would ensure

their health.

For those living in makeshift housing,

expanding the core shelter assistance of

the DSWD would address some of them

together with the provision of skills training

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


and livelihood assistance. Expansion of the

4Ps (Pantawid Pamilyang Pilipino Program)

would significantly improve the conditions

of the poorest of the poor.

8. Development for Global Partnership

Provision of career options particularly

for our younger generation could bring in

development because of a highly educated

labor force. Priority is the establishment of a

Research Facility for research studies in any

field, particularly, on the endemic species

and biodiversity found in Sibuyan Island,

and high value agricultural products suited

to the province’s unique land characteristics.

Improvement of internet access including

relay stations for cell signal to increase

communication within and even outside

the country is a must. Encourage all High

School Principals provincewide to include

computer literacy in their academic curriculum

for students to be ready for college and

their chosen field in the future.

Funding Requirements

The province including the component

LGUs are highly dependent on the

Internal Revenue Allotment (IRA), hence,

the 20 percent allocation for development

projects of the provincial government

is a meager P80M yearly which is

further allotted to social services sector,

economic services sector and general

public sector, including payment for loan

obligations.

The estimated funding requirement for

the proposed plans/programs/activities

for the next six years for the achievement

of the MDG targets in 2015 is around

P560M which partly has to be sourced

out from funding agencies including

Official Development Assistance (ODA)

for the province to realize local targets.

For the health reform program, the

province received a grant from the

European Commission amounting

to P77M and an additional P35M

from the Department of Health (DOH)

counterpart for a total of P112M health

package under the Province-wide

Investment Plan for Health (PIPH) for a

four-year implementation period which

is not reflected in the proposed plans/

program/activities found in the latter

part of this report under Financing the

MDGs.

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1. History

Province of Romblon

Part 1.

Provincial Profile

The Negritoes were the aborigines of the

islands comprising the province of Romblon.

The Mangyans were the fi rst settlers. Today,

these groups of inhabitants are almost extinct

with only a few of their descendants living in

the mountain of Tablas and in the interior of

Sibuyan Island. A great portion of the present

population descended from the Nayons and

the Onhans who immigrated to the islands

from Panay and the Bicols and Tagalogs who

came from Luzon as early as 1870.

Romblon was created as a regular

province in 1901 but due to insufficient

income, it became a subprovince of Capiz

in 1907 until December 7, 1917, when Act

No. 2724 reestablished the former province

of Romblon. Under Commonwealth Act No.

581, enacted without executive approval on

June 8, 1940, the province was reorganized

with four towns, namely: Tablas (embracing

Odiongan, Looc, Badajos, Santa Fe and

Despujols), Romblon (comprising Logbon,

Cobrador and Alad), Banton (involving

Simara and Maestre de Campo), and

Sibuyan (with the towns of Cajidiocan,

Magdiwang and San Fernando).

The Japanese Imperial Forces maintained

a garrison in Romblon during World

War II from 1942 until the Naval Battle

of Sibuyan on October 25, 1945. The

islands became the center of considerable

resistance movement under the direction of

General Macario Peralta, Jr. from his Panay

headquarters. One of the most exciting

incidents of the Pacific War took place

in the waters of Romblon, the Naval Air

Battles between Japanese Admiral Kurita’s

Fleet from Singapore and Admiral Halseys’

carrier planes from the American Third Fleet

then stationed east of the Philippines.

The province of Romblon was liberated on

March 12, 1945 by units of the 24th Infantry

Division under the command of a Colonel

Clifford. On January 1, 1947, Romblon

regained her Provincial Status through the

passage of Republic Act No. 38, which

was sponsored by Congressman Modesto

Formilleza. The law not only repealed C.A.

581 but also restored the regular provincial

government and the Municipalities of

Romblon and created the municipality of

Santa Fe.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Figure 1. Location of Romblon Province

2. Geo-Physical Environment

The province of Romblon is strategically

situated at the center of the Philippine

Archipelago. It is composed of three major

islands (Tablas, Sibuyan and Romblon)

and seventeen minor and small islands.

It is surrounded by deep waters, and is

bounded by the islands of Masbate in the

east, Mindoro in the west, Marinduque

in the north and Panay in the south. It

is approximately 187 nautical miles and

169 air miles south of Manila. The islands

are dispersed and accessible only by sea

transportation except for Tablas Island

where a domestic airport is located in the

municipality of Alcantara.

The total land area of the province is

approximately 1,355.9 sq. km. representing

about 5.30 percent of the total land

area of Region IV-B (MIMAROPA). Of

its 17 municipalities, nine are located in

Tablas Island (San Agustin, Calatrava,

San Andres, Odiongan, Ferrol, Santa Fe,

Looc, Alcantara and Santa Maria), three

in Sibuyan Island (Magdiwang, Cajidiocan

and San Fernando) and five (Romblon, San

Jose, Banton, Concepcion and Corcuera)

are island municipalities.

The province is generally mountainous

with about 40 percent of its land area

having slopes greater than 50 percent. Only

4 percent of the total area has 3 to 8 percent

slopes while a sparse 10 percent has 0 to 3

percent inclination. Narrow strips of coastal

lowlands, low hills and plains typify the

topography of some of the islands.

The major locations of areas that are

highly productive and buildable are

basically in Tablas and Sibuyan Islands. In

Tablas, these maybe found in Odiongan,

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San Andres, Looc and Santa Fe. All three

municipalities in Sibuyan Island on the

other hand, have substantial level to gently

sloping lands. Overall, good developable

lands represent only about 13 percent of

the province’s total area.

The province of Romblon falls under Type

III of the Corona’s climatic classification

system. It is characterized by no pronounced

wet and dry seasons. Generally, the wet

season is from June to November and

sometimes extends up to December when

the southwest monsoon is predominant.

The dry season is from January to May that

is sometimes interrupted by erratic rainfall.

3. Population and Social

Environment

Population

As of Census 2007, Romblon has a

population of 279,774. It ranked 4th

among the five provinces of Region IV-B

(MIMAROPA) and had about 11 percent

share of the total regional population. The

most populous municipalities in the province

are Odiongan, Romblon and San Fernando.

Combined, these three municipalities

accounted for 36 percent of the provincial

population.

The municipalities with the least population

are Concepcion and Ferrol with only

4,166 and 6,595 population, respectively.

Population growth rate for the province

was registered at 0.78 for the period 2000 to

2007, the second lowest in the MIMAROPA

region. The municipalities that showed the

highest population growth rates are Santa

Fe and San Jose with 1.99 and 1.90. Two

municipalities registered a negative growth

rate, Concepcion with -1.60 and Corcuera

with -0.90, both island municipalities.

Province of Romblon

How Romblon Got Its Name

A legendary tale tells of how Romblon got its

name. When Loarca’s expedition touched sand

in Romblon, one of the soldiers rumbled in the

beach. Tired of strolling, he felt thirsty, went

up a house and asked for a drink. Th e low-built

hut where he went up was a primitive one-room

shelter. Inside it was a hen’s nest somewhere at

the top of a post near the window. A hen was

hatching eggs therein. Th e Castillan soldier inquired

if he could get the chicken for free. Th e

house occupant, a young woman, did not comprehend

what the visitor said so she answered in

the dialect “nagalomlom”, meaning the chicken

was brooding. Perplexed, the Spanish soldier left

the house muttering in disgust the word “nagalomlom”.

Th en when he returned to the ship he

was asked where he had been and he answered

mockingly - “nagalomlom”.

When the Iberians left, they named the island

“Nagalomlom” until it was corrupted to Domblon,

and later on modifi ed to Romblon.

Since then, the group of islands scattered in

the surrounding water area was named Romblon.

Population density for the province stood at

around 206 persons per sq. km. Population

density is highest in the island municipalities

of Corcuera with 465 and San Jose with

326 persons per sq. km. The least densely

populated municipalities are Calatrava and

Magdiwang with 112 and 115 persons per

sq. km. respectively.

Health Services

There are eight hospitals in the province,

all of which are government-owned. The

hospitals in Tablas Island are the following:

Romblon Provincial Hospital (RPH) in

Odiongan (75 beds), Tablas Island District

Hospital (TIDH) in San Agustin (25 beds)

Don Modesto Formilleza District Hospital

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Table 2. Demographic Features, By Municipality

Source: NSO, 2007 Census of Population

(DMFDH) in Looc (25 beds) and San Andres

District Hospital (6 beds). In Sibuyan Island,

the Sibuyan District Hospital in Cajidiocan

can accommodate 25 in-patients. In the

island municipalities, the San Jose District

Hospital in San Jose has 10 beds, the

Malipayon District Hospital in Corcuera has

10 beds and the Romblon District Hospital

in the capital town of Romblon has 75

beds. The total bed capacity of the eight

hospitals is 251 or a bed to population ratio

of 1:1,115.

Table 3. Number of Schools and Enrollment Data, SY 2007-2008

3.3 Education

Based on the report from the

DepEd Division of Romblon for

CY 2007-2008, there are 477

schools offering pre-elementary,

elementary and secondary

education in the province. For

pre-elementary, a total of 200

schools of which 18 are private

and 182 are public serves the

province. For elementary, a total

of 226 schools, 11 of them private

and 215 public schools. For

secondary, a total of 51 schools

are available, 10 are private, 38

are public and 3 are under State

University/College (SUCs). Enrollment

for the same schoolyear totals 8,307

for pre-school, 51,995 for elementary and

27,122 for secondary. The report further

shows that almost 95 percent of the basic

education enrollees in the division are in

public schools, as can be gleaned from the

table below.

For elementary school participation rate,

Gross Enrollment Ratio (GER) or those

enrolled in elementary regardless of age

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for CY 2007-2008 is 98.7 percent while Net

Enrollment Ratio (NET) or those enrolled in

elementary age 6-12 is only 80.22 percent.

For the same year, elementary completion

rate is recorded at 68.05 percent. For

secondary participation rate for the same

period, the division recorded a GER of 72.8

percent while NET or those enrolled in high

school aged 13-16 is only 52.3 percent.

Completion rate for secondary school

for the same period is recorded at 72.22

percent.

4. Local Economy

Agriculture and Livestock

Agriculture is the main industry in the

province. Coconut is the number one crop

with a total planted area of 58,270.44

hectares. San Agustin has the most

extensive area with coconut plants followed

by Romblon and Cajidiocan. Rice is the

next crop being produced particularly in

Odiongan, Looc, Cajidiocan and Santa

Fe. Other crops grown include root crops,

vegetables and fruits. Odiongan, Banton

and Magdiwang have the greatest areas

planted with root crops and correspondingly,

with the highest volume of production.

Vegetable production is mostly for home

consumption and grown in small scale.

Livestock development and poultry

production is a viable smallscale enterprise

for farmers in the province. The provincial

government maintains breeding facilities

in strategic locations provincewide to

encourage farmers to engage in livestock

and poultry production to augment their

income. Livestock and poultry management

training and seminars is provided to

interested clients.

Province of Romblon

Due to the geographical condition of the

province, crops and livestock production is

generally deficient as compared to the food

requirements of Romblon population. To

meet the rice requirements, Romblon relies

on imports from the neighboring provinces

where vegetables, poultry meat, vegetables

and fruits are supplied mostly by Luzon.

Coastal Marine Resources

Fishing industry can be a major enterprise

as Romblon is surrounded by bodies of

water. The fishing ground of Romblon is

a migratory path of fishes from Sulu and

Visayan Seas passing Tablas Strait, Sibuyan

Sea and Romblon Pass. The waters also

abound with demersal fishes due to the

coral reefs surrounding the islands.

Because the province has a great potential

for aqua/marine development, the province

implemented a coastal and resource

management program. Each municipality

established a fish sanctuary and passed

laws on fishery. The use of compressor in

the municipal waters was regulated and

banned altogether in some municipalities.

Mineral Resources

Marble is the most significant mineral

deposit of Romblon and is the most

renowned product of the province. Based

on statistics, Romblon is the second biggest

provincial marble producer of the country

next to Bulacan. Romblon marble is of very

high quality and comes in shades of white,

green, pink, red and black. The Mines

and Geosciences Bureau has estimated

that Romblon is endowed with about 150

million metric tons of marble. At current

rates of extraction, the supply may last for

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


three more centuries. Tablas Island is also

believed to have vast reserves of marble.

Marble quarrying and processing are

major activities in Romblon. Among the

most common marble products are categorized

into the following: novelty items (gifts,

ashtray, table bars), furniture (dining tables,

baptismal fonts) and construction materials

(tiles, balusters, marble chips).

Other mineral resources with considerable

quantity include nickel ore and gold

mostly to be found in Sibuyan Island.

Gold panning and smallscale mining is a

lucrative undertaking in the municipality of

Magdiwang.

Tourism

Romblon’s exotic blend of sun, sea and

forest, together with its peaceful and friendly

people make it an enchanting destination for

nature and adventure travelers. Both local

and international tourists can have their pick

of diverse and interesting places and activities

they can fi nd in our 20 islands and islets.

The province has white sand beaches, secret

coves and serene islets, waterfalls, historic

sites, old churches and caves believed to

be ancient burial sites. Mt. Guiting-Guiting

Natural Park in Sibuyan Island is a famous

site for mountain climbing. Moreover, it is a

center for plant diversity and home to many

native, endangered and rare and vulnerable

birds, mammals and reptiles.

5. Infrastructure/Utilities/Facilities

Road Network

The coastal roads traversing the major

islands of Romblon, Sibuyan and Tablas

Island form the backbone of the road

network of the province. Roughly 70

percent of these road networks are located

in Tablas Island. By road category, majority

are national roads with total length of

311.046 kilometers, followed by provincial

roads with 239.005 kilometers. There is no

available data for municipal and barangays

roads. By surface type, most of the roads

were paved by gravel/earth, portions of

circumferential roads are also concrete as

well as most roads in Poblacion.

The primary modes of land transportation

in the province are jeepneys, motorcycles,

mini-buses and tricycles that serve

inter-municipal movements and linkages.

Motorized bancas provide transport means

from island to island. At present, there is

an available domestic flight in Tablas Island

to and from Manila three times a week.

Roll-on/roll-off (RORO) ships facilitate

movement outside the province via the port

of Batangas.

Water Supply

Out of 17 municipalities, 14 have Level III

water supply systems serving about 32.57

percent of the total provincial households.

Level III has a reservoir with house-to-house

connections. Majority of households in the

province were serviced by Levels II and I

water system. Level I category is a common

facility where the community members get

their water supply from shallow wells and

deep wells while Level II has a reservoir

with communal faucet. Based on the 2007

CBMS report, the proportion of population

with access to safe drinking water is 76.28

percent.

Power Supply

Power supply is generated by the National

Power Corporation (NPC) and serviced by

two electric cooperatives.

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Tablas Island Electric Cooperatives

(TIELCO) serves the power needs of Tablas

Island including the island municipality of

San Jose. As of 2006, TIELCO has a total

of 21,097 house connections.

Romblon Electric Cooperative

(ROMELCO) supplies the capital town of

Romblon as well as Sibuyan Island. As

of the year 2007, ROMELCO has 5,288

house connections in Romblon and 5,150

house connections in the three municipalities

located in Sibuyan Island or a total of

10,438 house connections in their franchise

area.

The Islands of Banton, Concepcion and

Corcuera are attended to by the National

Power Corporation (NPC) through the

municipal governments.

Telecommunications

The province has several operating

telecommunication exchanges, namely:

Kayumanggi, Romblontel, Odiongan

Telephone Corporation (OTELCO), the

Telecommunication Office (TELOF),

Telegram System, Liberty Phone, Public

Calling Stations under the DOTC and the

Provincial Communication System (PCS)

radio transceivers and receivers. SMART

and GLOBE telecommunications have

relay stations in the three urban centers of

Romblon, Odiongan and Cajidiocan. Most

areas in the province are already connected

through cellphones except in some places

were the signal is weak or non-existent

because of towering mountains that block

the signal. The triple peak in Santa Maria

has a relay station for GMA, PLDT and

Liberty Phones.

Province of Romblon

6. Local Institutional Capability

Romblon has been reclassified as a third

class province as of CY 2002. A lone

congressional district, it is made up of 17

municipalities and 219 barangays. Below

is a list of the municipalities, the number of

barangays and income classification.

1. Romblon – 3rd class, the capital town

comprising 31 barangays

2. Alcantara – 5th class municipality with

12 barangays

3. Banton – 5th class municipality with 17

barangays

4. Cajidiocan – 4th class municipality with

14 barangays

5. Calatrava – 5th class municipality with

7 barangays

6. Concepcion – 6th class municipality

with 9 barangays

7. Corcuera – 5th class municipality with

15 barangays

8. Ferrol – 6th class municipality with 6

barangays

9. Looc – 4th class municipality with 12

barangays

10. Magdiwang – 5th class municipality

with 9 barangays

11. Odiongan – 2nd class municipality

with 25 barangays

12. San Agustin – 4th class municipality

with 15 barangays

13. San Andres – 5th class municipality

with 13 barangays

14. San Fernando – 4th class municipality

with 12 barangays

15. San Jose – 6th class municipality with

5 barangays

16. Santa Fe – 5th class municipality with

11 barangays

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


17. Santa Maria – 5th class

municipality with 6 barangays

There are several banking

facilities in the municipalities of

Odiongan and Romblon. Rural

banks facilitate loans and savings

account in the municipalities

without commercial banks like San

Agustin, Looc, Alcantara, Santa Fe,

Cajidiocan and San Fernando.

Based on the latest report from

the Romblon Police Office, the

province is considered one of

the most peaceful in the country

with a minimal volume of crimes.

It has maintained the peace and

tranquility of the place and never

contributed to the destabilization

of the country. The local

communist movement is hardly

felt in any part of the province

with no atrocity committed

against government personnel

or establishment. Syndicated

crime groups and criminal gangs

continue to be non-existent and

crime incidents are more often

non-index crimes.

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Province of Romblon

Part 2. Status Report

on the Millennium

Development Goals

Goal 1: Eradicate Extreme

Poverty and Hunger

Target 1.A : Halve between 1990 and

2015, the proportion of people whose

income is less than one dollar a day.

A. Status and Trends

Proportion of Population Below Poverty Threshold

The province of Romblon belongs to the 10

poorest provinces in the Philippines in 2000.

Based on the report from the National Statistical

Coordination Board (NSCB), Romblon

ranked 10th poorest in 2000 (52.2%), 25th in

both 2003 (37.5%) and 2006 (41.9%) among

the 81 provinces of the country. According

to the 2007 CBMS data, the proportion of

population below poverty threshold is a

staggering 68.00 percent. The underlying

cause of widespread poverty in the province

is due to low economic returns as majority

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


of the people are marginal farmers

and fi shermen with very little income

generated in traditional farming and

fi shing.

By municipality, the LGU that

posted the highest proportion of

population below poverty threshold

is Ferrol with 80.47 percent followed

by Magdiwang with 78.93 percent.

Ferrol is a 6th class municipality and

most of the employees working in the

LGU are residents of the neighboring

more prosperous town of Odiongan.

The municipality that recorded the

lowest proportion in this indicator

is Odiongan with 56.27 percent.

Odiongan is the only municipality

classified as second class LGU, and

where the only SUC in the province

is located.

Source: CBMS Database 2007

Figure2. Proportion of Population Living Below Poverty Threshold

Table 5: Magnitude and Proportion of Households and Population Living Below Poverty Threshold, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data Province of Romblon

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Figure 3. Proportion of Population Living Below Poverty Threshold

Table 6: Magnitude and Proportion of Households and Population Living Below Food Threshold

Source: CBMS Database 2007

Province of Romblon

Proportion of Population Living

Below Food Threshold

More than half (55.68%)

of the Romblon’s population

are living below food

threshold. Ferrol ranked

highest with 71.67 percent

followed by Magdiwang

with 68.96 percent.

Odiongan has the lowest

with 43.55 percent.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Poverty Gap Ratio

The poverty gap ratio or the

mean distance separating the

population from poverty line is only

0.34. This suggests that the people

of the province are not without

hope of overcoming poverty if

they were to be given a perfectly

targeted intervention to improve

their economic status. On this

indicator, San Andres posted the

highest ratio of 0.6 while Corcuera

and Santa Fe posted the lowest

ratios of .26. San Andres is basically

an agricultural area with farmers

and tenants. On the other hand,

Corcuera is an island municipality

where most inhabitants engage in

fishing activities.

Figure 4. Poverty Gap Ratio

Table 7: Poverty Gap Ratio, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Source: CBMS Database 2007

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Figure 6. Employment Rate

34

Table 8: Employment Rate, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Source: CBMS Database 2007

Province of Romblon

Target 1.B: Achieve full and productive

employment and decent work for all,

including women and young people

Employment Rate

Based on the 2007 CBMS data, employment

rate for the period is high at 97.73

percent for the province. Although most of

the people in the province are employed,

their jobs offer very little economic return.

The LGU that posted the highest employment

rate is Banton with 99.70 percent followed by

Corcuera with 99.39 percent. Both are island

municipalities whose major economic activities

are farming and fi shing. San Andres has

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Table 9: Magnitude and Proportion of Households and Population who Experienced Food Shortage, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Source: CBMS Database 2007

the lowest employment rate with 84.78

percent and posted the highest poverty

gap ratio in the entire province. Majority

of the people employed in San Andres

are tenant farmers with very low income.

Target 1.C: Halve between 1990 and

2015, the proportion of people who

suffer from hunger.

Proportion of Population Who

Experienced Food Shortage

Based on the 2007 CBMS data, the

province recorded a proportion of

3.02 percent of population who experienced

food shortage. Considering

Figure 6. Proportion of Population who Experienced Food Shortage

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Table 10: Magnitude and Proportion of Underweight Children Under 5 Years of Age, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Source: CBMS Database 2007

the high proportion of poverty incidence,

it is interesting to note that only a scant

proportion of the population experienced

food shortage. This is due to the fact that

Romblon is blest with abundant natural

resources. One can get food in the forest,

rivers and the vast surrounding seas.

The LGUs that posted a two digit proportion

in this particular indicator are Magdiwang

with 16.19 percent and San Fernando with

10.32 percent, both in Sibuyan Island. These

two municipalities have indigenous people

living in the mountains and are dependent

on traditional farming. The rest of the LGUs

posted zero or a low proportion of below

5 percent.

Province of Romblon

Prevalence of Underweight Children

Under 5 years of Age

In the case of the province of Romblon, the

indicator on the prevalence of underweight

children under five years old shows a

very promising trend. Based on the data

from the Office of the Provincial Nutrition

Action Officer (PNAO), the malnutrition

prevalence rate in 1991 for the province

was recorded at 20.02 percent. The figure

had steadily gone down since. However,

with the implementation of the International

Reference Standard (IRS), a high 19.04

percent was recorded in 2003. Data from

the PNAO record of the yearly Operation

Timbang (OPT) has shown a gradual

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Figure 7. Proportion of Underweight Children Under 5 Years of Age

decrease on the malnutrition prevalence

rate since then.

Based on the 2007 CBMS data, prevalence

of underweight children under five years old

is recorded at 8.15 percent. The national

baseline data on this particular indicator

is 34.5 percent and the national target for

2015 is 17.3 percent. The current statistics

shows that the province’s data is below the

national target and will likely maintain this

trend. At the municipal level, Magdiwang

registered the highest prevalence of

underweight children under five years old

based on the 2007 CBMS data with 16.93

percent. It was followed by Alcantara with

16.53 percent and Ferrol with 16.07 percent.

The municipality with the lowest prevalence

rate is San Jose with only 1.52 percent.

B. Current Policies and Programs

The elected officials of the province are

very much aware that Romblon is among

the poorest provinces in the country.

Hence, most plans, program and activities

prioritized in the 20 percent Annual

Development Fund (ADF) were geared

towards the upliftment of the socioeconomic

condition of the people. The province and

the LGUs have targeted the marginalized

sector and provided them assistance in the

form of livestock dispersal, vegetable seeds

distribution and other livelihood opportunities

to help eradicate extreme poverty and

hunger. For those people in crises situation

and those affected by disaster or calamities,

the provincial and municipal governments

provided them with financial assistance

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data Province of Romblon

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38

and materials to help them overcome their

dire situation. However, due to financial

constraints, the provincial and local governments

can only provide very minimal

intervention and cannot really sustain the

effort as other priority needs have also to

be given preference.

The National Government has also

launched the Hunger Mitigation program

which the provincial and local governments

is trying to institutionalize in their local

programs to help achieve national target.

C. Challenges

The primary challenge for economic

development and the eradication of poverty

and hunger is basically our geo-physical

environment. Being archipelagic in nature,

accessibility to some island municipalities

is very diffi cult particularly during inclem-

Province of Romblon

ent weather. Coupled with the fact that the

province is generally mountainous, development

initiatives are limited to smallscale

economic enterprises, not enough to spur

massive economic growth. Because of these

limitations, the province does not attract

outside investment that could generate more

job opportunities for our people.

Another hindrance in our efforts to alleviate

poverty is the meager income derived

from local sources. The province has no

tax base to generate income aside from

real property taxes which is scant; hence

the province is very much dependent on

its share of the Internal Revenue Allotment

(IRA). Because there are not enough funds

to pursue relevant economic initiatives or

even provide pump priming activities for

short term relief, the province and most

LGUs are hard pressed to make do of what

they can with their limited resources.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Supplemental Feeding Program for Malnourished Children

Mrs. Gloria Elizabeth M. Merida –Nutrition Officer IV while holding the pot, while Mrs. Ara M. Magallon-Engineering Aide and Mrs. Estrella

M.Galindez-office helper , watching.

Although the province is technically poor

because of the low income of most people, it is

very pleased to report that malnutrition is an

area given priority and attention resulting to

low prevalence. Th is can be attributed to the

relentless eff orts of the provincial government,

LGUs, as well as barangay offi cials in providing

supplemental feeding for malnourished children.

Feeding programs in the province are a concerted

eff ort among stakeholders, thus, usually achieving

the desired eff ect. Th e annual Nutrition

Month celebration has proven to be an eff ective

advocacy mechanism that provides information

on health and nutrition related issues. Th e local

Mr. Joey B. Morale-PNAO, watching the children falling in line to get „lugaw‰

implementation of the seven (7)

Philippine Plan of Action for Nutrition

(PPAN) impact programs and

its facilitating activities were operationalized

provincewide. Under this

program, the Provincial Nutrition

Committee was formed. Some of

the facilitating factors that helped

improve the malnutrition situation are:

1. Deployment of Barangay Nutrition

Scholars (BNS) in all barangays

2. Provision of prescribed salter-type

weighing scales to all BNS province-wide

3. Active involvement of PNC members

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data Province of Romblon

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Mrs. Gloria Elizabeth Madali Merida (holding the banner)-Nutrition Officer IV, Mr. Joey B. Morales-PNAO (peach uniform) and others who cooperated/helped

during the Mass Feeding

Children eating „lugaw‰ as prepared by the nutrition committee and staff

Province of Romblon

including NGOs like the Red Cross and the

Rural Improvement Clubs (RICs) in the activities

4. LGUs initiative to provide supplemental

feeding to target pre-school children and provision

of fi nancial assistance/income generating

project materials to prioritized families

with malnourished children

5. Annual monitoring and evaluation of local

level plan implementation in all municipalities

6. Active organization of Rural Improvement

Clubs

7. Provision of Nutri-noodles, GRO biscuits

and iodized salt to underweight pre-school

children in all municipalities

8. The parents of nutritionally deficient

children were taught how to prepare simple

yet nutritious food using locally available

vegetables like malungay and camote tops. to

correct imbalance diet.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Goal 2: Achieve Universal

Primary Education

Target 2.A: Ensure that, by 2015,

children everywhere, boys and girls

alike, will be able to complete a full

course of primary schooling.

A. Status and Trends

Proportion of Children Aged 6-12 Years Old Enrolled

in Elementary School

Education data for Romblon has been

erratic as the fi gure tends to go up and down

and vice versa for the past two decades.

In 2007, data from CBMS reveals that the

proportion of children aged 6-12 years old

enrolled in elementary education is 77.06

percent. The low proportion could be due

to the specifi c age group, hence, those in

elementary school whose age are above

12 years old were not captured. The male

proportion is slightly lower at 76.12 percent

compared to the 78.08 percent for girls. This

means that more boys than girls do not attend

primary education. There is no pronounced

difference on data based on urbanity when it

comes to elementary education. The municipality

that registered the highest proportion

of children enrolled in elementary schools

are Looc and Alcantara with 81.40 and 81.08

percent respectively. Both municipalities

are located in Tablas Island with relatively

flat to gently rolling terrain. The lowest

proportion was recorded by Cajidiocan with

73.6 percent, a mountainous municipality

in Sibuyan Island. The diffi culty of going to

school by those living far from school is one

of the reasons for the low participation rate

in this municipality.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data Province of Romblon

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Table 11: Proportion of Children Aged 6-12 Years Old Enrolled in Elementary School, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Source: CBMS Database 2007

Figure 8 .Proportion of Children Aged 13-16 Years Old Enrolled in Elementary School

Province of Romblon

Proportion of Children Aged 13-16 Years Old

Enrolled in High School

For high school education, the proportion

of children going to school age 13-16

is very low at 62.52 percent. Even if we

consider those in high school whose age

are more than 16 years old, the data is still

low. Males in high school comprised 56.16

percent compared to the 69.49 percent

females. Based on this data, a considerable

number of males in the province

do not attend secondary education. The

reason could be due to poverty - they

opt to find work early to contribute to the

family income, rather than continue higher

education. In urban areas, there are 70.18

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Table 12: Proportion of Children Aged 13-16 Years Old Enrolled in High School, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Source: CBMS Database 2007

percent of 13-16 years old youth who go to

school while in rural areas, there are only

60.79 percent. This data also shows that

more 13-16 years old in the rural areas

do not attend secondary education. One

reason could be the distance of secondary

schools in the rural areas as each school

serves about an average of 4 barangays

(only 51 secondary schools serve the 219

barangays provincewide). The accessibility

to the schools coupled with lack of pocket

money could be the deterring factors for

most 13-16 years old to attend secondary

education in the rural areas. The municipality

that registered the highest proportion of

participation rate is Concepcion with 81.67

percent, an island municipality farthest from

Figure 9 .Proportion of Children Aged 13-16 Years Old Enrolled in High School

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data Province of Romblon

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Table 13: Proportion of Children Aged 6-16 Enrolled in School, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Source: CBMS Database 2007

Figure 10 .Proportion of Children Aged 6-16 Enrolled in School

Province of Romblon

the provincial capital with gently rolling

terrain. Four municipalities registered less

than 60 percent participation rate in this

age bracket, Calatrava (52.66%), San Jose

(55.10%), San Fernando (56.04%) and

Cajidiocan (56.33%). With the exception

of San Jose, the three LGUs are generally

mountainous while the former is very near

Boracay Island, hence, some youths are

drawn to peddling goods to the tourists in

the area, rather than continue their secondary

education.

Proportion of Children Aged 6-16 Enrolled in School

The proportion of 6-16 years old children

enrolled in school is 88.86 percent. There

are more schooling children in the urban

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Table 14: Literacy Rate of 15-24 Year-Olds, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Source: CBMS Database 2007

areas (90.86%) compared to the 87.93

percent in the rural areas. Accessibility to

school is a factor causing the disparity of

enrollment. The town of Banton has the

highest percentage (94.51%) of 6-16 years

old schooling children. This is an island

municipality with gently rolling terrain. The

municipality with the least proportion is San

Fernando with 84.54 percent, a mountainous

municipality south of Sibuyan Island.

An indigenous community is present in the

island.

Literacy Rate of 15-24 Year-Olds

For ages 15-24 years old, the province

recorded a 97.71 percent literacy rate, a

bit higher than the national baseline and

Figure 11. Literacy rate of 15-24 year-olds

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data Province of Romblon

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46

2003 figure of 96.6 percent. There is no

pronounced disparity for the urban and

rural areas when it comes to the literacy

indicator. The municipality of Alcantara

registered the highest proportion for 15-24

years literacy rate with 98.73 percent. A

trade school, Alcantara National Trade

School (ANTS) is present in the municipality.

Meanwhile, Concepcion hit the lowest

proportion with 93.36 percent.

B. Current Policies and Programs

The education program in the country

is national based. However, with the

implementation of the Local Government

Code of 1991 (RA 7160) the Local

Government Units were given authority to

implement education related programs by

giving them authority to levy funds in the

form of the Special Education Fund (SEF)

which is taken from real property taxes.

With the national policy for free education

for both elementary and high school and

the augmentation of funds from SEF for the

local government units, the national and

local government units are empowered

to provide the necessary intervention to

achieve universal primary education.

To achieve this goal, numerous national

and local initiatives were implemented.

There was the Third Elementary Education

Program (TEEP) which includes construction

of new classroom, renovation of dilapidated

elementary school buildings, procurement

of tables and chairs including provision of

textbooks. There was also the Secondary

Education Development and Improvement

Program (SEDIP) which likewise provided

for construction and improvement of

secondary schools with counterpart from

the LGU.

Province of Romblon

On education services, the Department

of Education also provides specialized

programs that cater for those with special

needs, such as Special Education (SPED)

for children with disabilities. However, SPED

classes are only given in major urban areas

and not all special children can avail of the

service. Another program of the DepEd

Division of Romblon is the Alternative

Learning System (ALS) which cater to those

children that cannot really go to school for

some reasons.

C. Challenges

The major challenge in achieving

universal education is poverty. Parents

who cannot buy the necessary needs of

the children such as bags, notebooks,

papers and pencils, are more prone to

defer sending their children to school.

More likely, the children themselves

would not like to go to school if their

parents themselves do not encourage

them to enroll. With this kind of environment,

the children are discouraged to

study and if they skip school for a year,

most likely, they would not go to school

anymore. There is also the problem of

great distance from school. Some parents

are reluctant to send their small children

to school because they have to walk

great distances and have to wake up by

dawn to prepare so that they will not be

late. There are instances that they have

to climb mountains and cross rivers in

order to reach school. This is usually the

case for secondary education where one

institution caters to around 4 to 5 remote

barangays. These aggravating circumstances

sometimes led to negative attitude

towards going to school and eventually

led to school dropouts.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


School-Community collaboration reduces student dropouts

and improves academic performance

Initiatives on policies and programs aimed to

reduce dropouts and improve academic performance

are being sustained by the DepEd Division

Offi ce of Romblon. Initial gains in the improvement

of student academic achievement as measured

by the National Achievement Test (NAT)

Mean Percentage Score and in the reduction of

student absences and eventual dropouts are attributed

by the teachers to the much-improved

learning environment. Modest initial gains include

6.2 and 0.6 incremental improvements of

MPS in the second year and fourth year NAT

results respectively in 2006 and 2007. Reduction

of student dropouts on the other hand is initially

indicated by a 2.27% dropout rate in SY 2005-

2006 from 5.0% in SY 2004-2005.

“Pagpasok mo, bantay ko” (PMBK) is an attendance

tracking mechanism where a student

leader is assigned as an attendance monitor of a

particular group of students in a particular subject

area. Th e attendance report is consolidated by the

attendance monitor and submitted to the class

adviser who addresses observed problems on absences

or cutting of classes. When needed, a case

is a subject of a teacher-parent dialogue during

the quarterly homeroom PTCA meeting. PMBK

was introduced in 2006 and has been sustained

over the last two years.

Quarterly Homeroom PTCA meetings.

Each homeroom organizes a homeroom PTCA.

A quarterly meeting is conducted in time with

the release of student report cards as a forum for

parents to get feedback on their children’s school

performance and for the homeroom adviser to

take up concerns with a

parent whose child needs

special follow up.

Adopt a Student Program.

LGU offi cials, teachers

and generous community members help

avert students from dropping out by providing

miscellaneous fees, school supplies or lodging

house especially for needy students from outlying

barangays. Since the program’s introduction in the

early years of Calatrava National High School

when it was still Calatrava Community High

School, on the average, 25 student benefi ciaries

are assisted annually.

Supplementary Values Teaching. To reinforce

regular values education classes, religious groups

are accommodated to conduct 30-minute teachings

off ered to students on voluntary basis during

lunch break. Th is school year, the Lamp Foundation

has sustained its Monday to Th ursday teachings

particularly off ered to First Year students.

Class Enhancement Program. Additional

20 minutes of daily enhancement activities

except on Fridays are spent to reinforce earlier

developed competencies in Science, Math

and English. Th e intention is to reinforce the

identifi ed least learned competencies based on

formative and summative tests. Th ese are on

top of the regular teaching to introduce and

develop new competencies in the three subject

areas. Th e program was introduced as a Division

initiative in June 2002 and has been sustained

over the last six years.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data Province of Romblon

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Goal 3: Promote Gender Equality

Target 3.A: Eliminate gender disparity

in primary and secondary education,

preferably by 2005, and in all levels of

education no later than 2015.

A. Status and Trends

Ratio of Girls to Boys in Primary Education

With regards to gender equality, the

data for Romblon shows that for the ratio

of girls to boys in primary education, it is

0.90 because of the higher male population

Province of Romblon

and enrollment in the 6-12 age bracket as

compared to the female data. The municipality

of San Jose recorded the highest ratio

of 0.98 percent while Concepcion the lowest

with 0.80 percent. There is no discernable

disparity for the data based on urbanity.

Ratio of Girls to Boys in Secondary Education

On the other hand, the ratio of girls to

boys in secondary education is 1.03 despite

the higher male population in the 13-16

age group compared to female population.

The data reveals that there are more

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Figure 12. Ratio of girls to boys in primary education

female students in high school, suggesting

that more males in the 13-16 age bracket

does not enroll in secondary education or

more males are dropping out of school. The

municipality that registered the highest ratio

is Santa Maria with 1.17 while the lowest is

Banton with 0.80. The data for Banton is

understandable as there is a considerable

number of male population (284 males

against 225 females) and enrollment (201

males as against 173 females) in the 13-16

age bracket. There is no discernable disparity

in the urbanity data for this particular

indicator.

Ratio of Girls to Boys in Tertiary Education

Likewise, the ratio of girls to boys in

tertiary education is 1.14 for the province.

Table 15: Ratio of Girls to Boys in Primary

Education, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Source: CBMS Database 2007

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Figure 13. Ratio of girls to boys in tertiary education

Table 16: Ratio of Girls to Boys in Secondary

Education, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Source: CBMS Database 2007

Province of Romblon

The data shows that more females are

enrolled in tertiary education than males.

This further reiterates the trend that more

boys stayed out of school as they grow

old. The municipality that recorded the

highest ratio is Santa Maria with 1.86 while

Concepcion recorded the least ratio of 0.43.

Ratio of Literate Females to Literate Males Aged

15-24 Years Old

Another indicator on gender equality is

the ratio of literate females to males age

15-24. On this indicator, the ratio is 0.88 for

the province. The reason for the lower ratio

is the much higher male population for the

15-24 age bracket which is 22,381 males

against 19,573 females. The municipality

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Figure 14. Ratio of Girls to Boys in Tertiary Education

that registered the highest ratio is Santa

Maria with 0.97 while Corcuera registered

the lowest ratio of 0.74. The data for urban

area is slightly higher at 0.94 compared to

the rural area at 0.86.

Proportion of Seats Held by Women in the Municipality

and Province

When it comes to the proportion of seats

held by women in the province, the proportion

is only 26.37 percent. The municipality

that registered the highest proportion is

the municipality of San Agustin with 36.92

percent while the lowest was registered

by San Jose with a scant proportion of 18

Table 18: Ratio of Literate Females to Literate Males Aged

15-24 Years Old, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Source: CBMS Database 2007

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data Province of Romblon

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Figure 15. Ratio of Literate Females to Literate Males Aged 15-24 Years Old

percent. In the political arena, the data

reveals that in the province, it is dominated

by male politicians. The reason for this is

that majority of our women still believe

that holding public office is more of a male

occupation and that women’s first priority

is the home and family.

B. Current Policies and Programs

Although the current national policy

is education for all, there seems to be a

gender bias in favor of girls attending

education in the province. The preceding

indicators showed that more males are

dropping out of school and not pursuing

higher education, particularly in the 13-16

Province of Romblon

Table 19: Proportion of Seats Held by Women in the

Municipality and Province 2007

Source: DILG

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Figure 16. Proportion of Seats Held by Women in the Municipality and Province

age group and in the tertiary education.

In the province, this is due to the fact that

more males opt to work rather than continue

to a higher education to contribute to the

income of the family. Provision of livelihood

projects to augment family income and

short term technical and practical courses

would encourage some of them to at least

finish high school. However, studies must

be made to determine the real underlying

causes of this trend so that adequate

interventions or policies can be made to

address this problem.

The concept of more males wielding

power, be it at home or in the work

place, has been the practice in the

past century. While equal rights is

enshrined in the Philippine constitution,

in practice, women submit to men as

the country adheres to the Christian

teaching that wives should submit to

their husbands. To promote Gender

Equality and Women Empowerment,

both the national and local government

units have implemented Gender

and Development (GAD) projects. The

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data Province of Romblon

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Gender Sensitivity Training Seminar has

been streamlined in the DSWD Program

and all their services have gender

component. Aside from this, various

Gender Advocacy Activities are in place,

in order to orient the women on their

rights. Gender Advocacy is a bit slow

due to accessibility problems in remote

areas that post a challenge to provide

this type of service. However, currently,

massive efforts to promote Gender

Equality can be gleaned in government

initiatives such as the Women’s Desk

and the Violence Against Women and

their Children (VAWC) seminars, up to

barangay level. During yearly convention

under the DSWD and Kalipunan

ng Liping Pilipina (KALIPI) program,

symposium about Gender Sensitivity is

continually made part of the featured

activities. This is the ultimate direction of

our LGU to combat the existing manifestations

of gender bias to wit:

1. lower wages, last hired-first fired policy,

little or no access to loans

2. women concentrated in low positions in

bureaucracy, few women in policy-making

level

3. child care and household responsibilities

shouldered mainly by women on top

of regular working hours outside the home

4. women portrayed either as homemak-

Province of Romblon

ers/virgins or as temptress/sinners in most

advertisement

5. wife beating, rape, incest, and sexual

harassment

C. Challenges

Filipinos being God-fearing people and

steep in patriarchal tradition posed the

major challenge in achieving the goal. In

most of the rural areas, it is still the men

who are the head of the family, meaning,

they decide for the family even if it is the

women who earn the family income. This

has been the practice of past generations

and the concept of gender equality is

still novel. There are still plenty of cases

of women’s abuse such as battered

women and rape cases all throughout the

province, hence, there is still a need to

vigorously disseminate gender laws and

advocate for women to assert themselves,

particularly housewives who do not earn

a living. It is also a big challenge how

to reach these marginalized women

and another bigger challenge how to

empower them in order for them to be

able to enjoy parity rights with their male

counterparts. All of these forms of gender

bias are hindrances to development, thus,

the challenge is to address these issues in

every program implementation.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Goal 4: Reduce Child Mortality

Target 4.A: Reduce by two-thirds,

between 1990 and 2015, the under-five

mortality ratio

A. Status and Trends

Proportion of Children Aged 0 to Less Than 5 Years

Old Who Died

Out of the total 29,728 children aged 0 to

less than 5 years old in the province, there

were 166 who died giving a 0.56 percent

proportion. The data for the province is a

bit high because of cases of diarrhea and

some communicable or infectious diseases

with acute respiratory infection as among

the top leading cause of morbidity, followed

by bronchitis and diarrhea. Magdiwang

has the highest proportion of 0 to less

than 5 years old who died with 24 deaths

(1.63%) followed by Ferrol with 8 deaths

(1.10%). These two municipalities have

no hospitals and only a Rural Health Unit

provides health services to the people. The

municipalities that registered the lowest

proportion of 0 to less than 5 years old who

died is San Jose with a proportion of 0.16

percent and San Andres with a proportion

of 0.18 percent or a magnitude of 2 and

3 deaths, respectively. Male deaths are

slightly higher at 0.63 percent than the

female deaths at 0.47 percent. In terms of

urbanity, rural areas registered a higher

proportion of 0.58 percent compared to

urban areas of 0.45 percent. This could be

due to the accessibility of health facility in

the urban areas.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data Province of Romblon

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Table 20: Magnitude and Proportion of Children aged 0 to Less Than 5 Years Old who Died, by Sex,

by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Source: CBMS Database 2007

Figure 17. Proportion of Children Aged 0 to Less than 5 years old who Died

Province of Romblon

Proportion of Infants who Died

On the proportion of infant deaths, the

province reported a magnitude of 96 out

of the 5,221 children aged 0 to less than 1

year old or a proportion of 1.81 percent.

Based on the report from the Provincial

Health Office, Sepsis Neonatorum and

Sudden Infant Death are among the top

leading causes of infant mortality. Again,

the municipalities that recorded the highest

proportions are Magdiwang with 19 deaths

out of 280 children aged 0 to less than 1

year old or a staggering proportion of 6.35

percent, followed by Ferrol with 7 deaths

out of 144 or a proportion of 4.64 percent.

The municipality that registered the lowest

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Table 21: Magnitude and Proportion of Infants who Died, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Source: CBMS Database 2007

infant death is San Andres with 1 death out

of 225 or a proportion of 0.44 percent. On

gender, male proportion of infant death

is higher at 2.09 percent compared to the

female data of 1.50 percent. On urbanity,

rural areas registered a slightly higher

proportion of 1.73 percent as compared to

the 1.6 registered by the urban areas.

Proportion of Children Aged 1 to Less than 5 Years

Old who Died

On the proportion of children aged 1 to

less than 5 years old who died, the province

registered 70 deaths out of 24,507 populations

or a proportion of 0.28 percent. The

Figure 18. Proportion of Infants who Died

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Table 22: Magnitude and Proportion of Children Aged 1 to Less Than 5 Years Old who Died, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Source: CBMS Database 2007

Figure 19. Proportion of Children Aged 1 to Less than 5 Years Old Who Died

Province of Romblon

municipality that registered the highest

death for this particular age group is Santa

Fe with 11 deaths out of 1,603 population

or a proportion of 0.68 percent followed

by Alcantara with 0.45 and Magdiwang

with 0.43 percent. Two municipalities

registered no deaths aged 1 to less than

5 years old: Concepcion and San Jose.

Meanwhile, there is a slightly higher proportion

registered for male at 0.31 percent

compared to the female proportion of 0.26

percent. For urbanity, the proportion for

rural area is higher at 0.31 percent while

only 0.18 percent in urban area. Again, the

proximity of the health facility in the urban

area could be the reason for the much lower

proportion of deaths in urban areas.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


B. Current Policies and Programs

The provincial officials have prioritized

health services as evidenced by the many

health related programs and projects being

implemented provincewide. Currently, the

Provincial Government is implementing the

Provincewide Investment Plan for Health

(PIPH) with a grant from the European

Commission (EC) to finance the much

needed Health Reform Program. The LGUs

are also aggressively advocating for the

enrollment of indigents to the Philippine

Health Insurance Corporation (PhilHealth).

Under the PIPH, priority programs are

the upgrading of health facilities into a

Comprehensive Emergency Obstetric and

Newborn Care (CEMONC) and Basic

Emergency Obstetric and Newborn Care

(BEMONC) facilities. Municipal Health

Officers (MHOs) are also advocating for

facility-based birthing to avoid unnecessary

birth complications that could reduce, if not

eliminate, neonatal deaths.

C. Challenges

The provincial government operates 8

hospitals in the province. Because the

province is dependent on the IRA, there

is a budgetary constraint particularly in

the provision of medicines and health

personnel. The province has to divide

its meager resources in the operation

of the 8 hospitals. At the LGU level, the

rural health units are having difficulty in

providing basic health care because of

inadequate health facilities.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data Province of Romblon

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Province of Romblon

Cajidiocan Barangay Health

Station (BHS) Full Fix Project

The project seeks to revitalize and refurbish

all BHSs into full functional facilities

which are able to provide complete basic

health services to the community as well as

birthing facilities in identified barangays.

Key elements of the project are as follows:

1. Establishment of functional BHS that

meets the health needs of community members;

2. Better health outcomes, specially improved

maternal and child health indices;

3. Health-empowered, educated and selfreliant

community;

4. Institution of better, efficient, organized

health and referral system within

communities.

The project brings into light the importance

and usefulness of integrating a primary

health care approach, bringing healthcare as

close as possible to the people and ensuring

availability, accessibility and affordability

of promotive, preventive, curative and rehabilitative

services. Health workers and barangays

leaders are now empowered as they

are trained and are mainly involved in this

endeavor. It promotes maximum community

and individual self reliance and participation

in the planning, organization, operation and

control of health programs in the barangay.

Ultimately, it will contribute to the attainment

of MDG targets of reducing child mortality

and improving maternal health.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Goal 5: Improve Maternal Health

Target 5.A: Reduce by three quarters,

between 1990 and 2015, the maternal

mortality ratio

A. Status and Trends

Proportion of Women Deaths Due to Pregnancy-

Related Causes

Based on CBMS data, the province

recorded a magnitude of 12 women deaths

due to pregnancy-related causes in 2007,

registering a proportion of 0.23. The reason

for the high occurrence of maternal deaths

is due to lack of adequate health facility and

apparatus, such as life support system and

other modern technology that could prevent

loss of lives.

The municipality that registered the

highest proportion of women deaths due

to pregnancy related causes is Concepcion

with a proportion of 1.72 percent while

the municipality that registered the highest

number of deaths is San Fernando with a

magnitude of three deaths. Nine municipalities

registered no deaths due to pregnancy

related causes. On urbanity, there is no

pronounced disparity between the rural and

urban area when it comes to this indicator.

Target 5.B: Achieve by 2015, universal

access to reproductive health

Proportion of Couples Who Use Contraception

On contraceptive prevalence rate, the

provincial data for the same period showed

a proportion of 32.08. This shows that

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data Province of Romblon

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Figure 20. Proportion of Women Deaths due to Pregnancy-Related Causes

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Table 23: Magnitude and Proportion of Women Deaths due to Pregnancy Related Causes, by Urbanity,

by Municipality, 2007

Source: CBMS Database 2007

Province of Romblon

majority of the couples in the province do

not practice any family planning method.

The provincial data is much lower than

the national benchmark of 40 percent

prevalence rate in 1993 and 50.7 percent

in 2008. The municipality that registered

the highest contraceptive prevalence rate

in the province is Odiongan with a proportion

of 46.43 while San Fernando registered

the lowest proportion of 19.64 percent.

The municipality of Odiongan is a 2nd

class municipality with the most number of

population as well as the most urbanized

municipality in the province. San Fernando

on the other hand is relatively parochial with

remote barangays.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Table 24: Magnitude and Proportion of Couples who Use Contraception, by Urbanity,

by Municipality, 2007

Source: CBMS Database 2007

B. Current Policies and Programs

The national government together with

the local health functionaries is implementing

the policy of facility-based birthing

to address maternal health concerns.

Measures have been undertaken to ensure

that all deliveries should be attended by

trained health personnel. Efforts to train

all “hilots” provincewide were facilitated

by the Center for Health Development

(CHD) IV-B and the Provincial Health Office

(PHO) to reduce maternal deaths as well

as neonatal deaths. All hospitals under

the provincial government are equipped

to handle obstetric emergencies including

caesarean operations. With the European

Figure 21. Proportion of Couples who Use Contraception

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data Province of Romblon

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Commission (EC) grant under the FOURmula

One (F1) for Health program, the provincial

government is currently implementing

a provincewide health investment plan

designed to upgrade health facilities including

the Rural Health Units (RHUs). Under the

program, all hospitals will be upgraded into

a standard CEMONC facility and the RHUs

into a standard BEMONC facility. Currently,

the province has started an initiative on

massive training of medical staff as well as

non-health personnel to enhance delivery

of health services in the province.

Local initiatives to improve maternal

health care includes the deputizing of

Barangay Health Workers (BHWs) to

monitor pregnant women in their areas

and make sure that they submit themselves

to pre-natal check-ups. The MHOs and

midwives schedule area visits to barangays

to conduct examinations on a regular basis.

Both provincial and municipal local government

units are also pursuing Philhealth

accreditation of health facilities so that

health services will be more accessible to

the poor members of the community. Enrollment

to the Philhealth Sponsorship Program

for indigents are also given attention so that

the less fortunate can readily avail of health

services/facilities through the Philippine

Health Insurance Corporation (PHIC).

C. Challenges

Despite the efforts of both the national

and local governments to provide basic

maternal health care services, there are

still cases of maternal deaths as well as

Province of Romblon

neonatal deaths. This can be attributed to

the inadequacy of modern facilities in the

province, particularly diagnostic facilities

and life support system for dire conditions.

Moreover, the absence of specialized

medical practitioners in times of complicated

situations is another concern as the

province cannot afford to employ them.

On the side of the populace, there are

still pregnant women who refuse to seek

prenatal check-up and engage untrained

hilots during delivery. There is still a need

for massive information dissemination to the

community on the risk involved regarding

maternal health in order to achieve a 100

percent prenatal/post-partum consultations

and facility based deliveries. High-Risk

pregnancies, including old age and short

birth spacing also pose a challenge.

Although the concept of family planning

has been institutionalized in the maternal

health care packages and reproductive

health services, acceptance of the program

continued to be lukewarm. In the province,

most people, particularly the members of

the marginalized sector, still believe that

children are wealth, hence, the more the

better, without giving thought on how to

feed them and provide them proper health

coverage and education. On the other

hand, for those people who wanted to avail

of certain family planning commodities,

shortage of supply are also noted in certain

Family Planning Centers because of limited

funds of the LGUs to procure these goods.

There is also the issue of the church against

contraceptives and some elective officials

are reluctant to go against the church.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


With the implementation of the Provincewide

Investment Plan for Health (PIPH),

there is a massive promotion of innovative

practices that may be replicated in the province.

The doctors and health practitioners in

the province participated in several “Lakbay

Aral” to see the best practices and innovative

approaches on health related initiatives

of other provinces. Some MHOs are trying

to duplicate these undertakings in their respective

areas of responsibilities.

Cajidiocan Buntis Baby Bank Project

Th e Buntis Baby Bank (BBB) Project aims

to achieve better maternal health outcomes by

encouraging mothers to avail of complete and

quality maternal care thru prenatal check-ups as

well as facilitate postnatal visits.

BBB functions by assigning a “baby bank” made

of bamboo to all pregnant mothers seeking prenatal

care at the RHU. Every visit to the RHU,

the mother is reminded to drop their savings to

their bank. Relatives, friends, RHU staff , LGU

offi cials or any person willing to drop any amount

are encouraged to do so until delivery date. Th e

mother is required to deliver either at the RHU

or hospital. Home deliveries forfeit the mother’s

withdrawal of the savings.

Th e project encouraged more prenatal visits

especially from mothers in their 1st trimester.

Risk of maternal mortality and neonatal mortality

has been decreased through implementation

of facility-based deliveries. Th e health fi nancing

scheme has assisted the mothers fi nancially to

prepare for a safe delivery.

With the success of the project in the municipalities,

other LGUs are also signifying their

intent to replicate the BBB scheme. In the municipality

of Cajidiocan, four (4) barangays also

adopted the Buntis Baby Bank Project.

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Goal 6: Combat HIV/ AIDS,

Malaria and Other Diseases

Target 6.A: Have halted by 2015 and

begun to reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS

A. Status and Trends

Proportion of Couples Using Condom Among Those

who are Practicing Contraception

HIV/AIDS cases in the province is

basically nil or non-existent as there

is no case recorded by the Provincial

Health Office. With regard to data

on the proportion of couples using

condom among those who are practicing

contraception, the province recorded

a very negligible proportion of 1.45

percent or a magnitude of 194 out of a

Province of Romblon

total 13,379 couples practicing family

planning based on CBMS 2007 data.

The national statistic is 1.6 percent in

2006. The municipality that recorded

the highest proportion of couples using

condom among those who are practicing

contraception is Magdiwang with

3.93 percent while the municipality

that registered the lowest proportion is

Calatrava with 0.20 percent. Couples in

the province are basically not worried

about being infected with Sexually-

Transmitted Disesases (STDs) since most

of them are faithful to their partners. For

urban areas, the proportion of couples

using condom among those practicing

family planning is visibly higher at a

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Table 25: Magnitude and Proportion of Couples Using Condom Among Those who are

Practicing Contraception, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Source: CBMS Database 2007

2.17 percent proportion compared to

the proportion of 1.29 percent for rural

areas.

Target 6.C: Have halted by 2015 and

begun to reverse the incidence of malaria

and other major diseases

Death rates associated with malaria

Based on the report from the Provincial

Health Office, the province has been

declared malaria-free for several years

already. However, CBMS data recorded

a magnitude of 5 deaths—3 males and

2 females—out of the total population of

Figure 22. Proportion of Couples Using Condom Among Those who are Practicing Contraception

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Table 26. Magnitude and Proportion of Deaths Associated with Malaria, by

252,690 or a proportion of Sex, by Municipality

1.98 percent. The reason

for this is that, local folks

have no knowledge regarding

the disease and may

have associated chills and

high fever with malaria and

responded to the survey

with such belief. According

to the MHOs, since it is not

an ordinary illness but rather

a technical term and needs

thorough medical examinations,

caution should be

exercised in asking them

survey questions. Death

certificates that state the Source: CBMS Database 2007

cause of death need to be

presented to avoid misunderstanding.

Death Rates Associated with Tuberculosis

Figure 23. Death rates associated with Malaria

On prevalence and death rates associated

with tuberculosis, the province registered

a total magnitude of 118 deaths—79 males

and 39 females—out of the 252,690 population

or a very high proportion of 46.68

percent. The high proportion of deaths

associated with tuberculosis is attributed

Province of Romblon

to the attitude of the people of ignoring the

symptoms and not seeking early treatment.

Santa Maria had the highest proportion with

8 out of 7,163, or a staggering proportion of

111.56 percent followed by Alcantara with

12 deaths out of 12,330 (97.23%). Only

San Andres did not register any deaths

associated with tuberculosis.

On this particular indicator, data shows

that there are more male deaths associated

with the disease at a proportion of 61.83

percent, almost double the proportion of

31.19 percent registered by female deaths.

This is probably due to the fact that more

males drink alcohol and take cigarettes

than females, and cause to aggravate

the illness, resulting to more cases and

eventually may lead to mortality. The

current status shows that there is a considerable

magnitude of people infected with

tuberculosis as the proportion of deaths

implied. But the LGUs/RHUs need to verify

these findings so as to properly document

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Table 27: Magnitude and Proportion of Deaths Associated with Tuberculosis, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Source: CBMS Database 2007

the cases—from containing the disease to

curing those infected—and considerably

lower the prevalence and death associated

with tuberculosis by 2015. For urbanity, the

proportion for rural areas is much higher

at 48.00 percent compared to the urban

proportion of only 40.10 percent. This

could be due to the fact that cases in the

urban areas are easily monitored than in

the rural areas.

B. Current Policies and Programs

The national government has a long

term policy on treatment and cure of

communicable diseases including malaria,

tuberculosis and dengue. The Center for

Health Development provides medicines

Figure 24. Death rates associated with tuberculosis

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and logistics support to local governments

to combat these diseases. The LGUs on the

other hand implement these programs and

try to contain cases and provide curative

treatment. The RHUs conduct sputum and/

or x-ray tests and provide treatment to those

with positive results.

C. Challenges

Although tuberculosis is now a curable

disease, it is sad to note that there are

still plenty of cases of death associated

with the disease. One major hindrance in

fully implementing the tuberculosis control

program is the attitude of the people

themselves, particularly those in remote

barangays, of ignoring the symptoms

associated with tuberculosis. Unless the

patient actually coughs blood, most people

showing symptoms of the disease do not

seek consultation and just go on with their

daily lives, as if everything is fine. Hence, if

the disease is already at its worst stage with

complications, even if they seek treatment at

LGU Health Scorecard

With the implementation of the PIPH, there

is a massive information campaign on improving

health statistics through LGU scorecards

that shows each municipality’s past and current

standing on program implementation. Th is encourages

those that do not fare well to improve

their standing by closely scrutinizing the causes

and reasons for such lower accomplishments and

exploring ways to improve them. RHUs are also

encouraged to seek accreditation to be a Tuberculosis

Directly Observed Treatment Scheme

(TB DOTS) center to better provide rehabilitative

intervention to patients with tuberculosis.

Province of Romblon

this stage, it is already too late. At this point,

sometimes death is inevitable because the

body’s resistance is already gone. The

“bahala na” (come what may) attitude that

consigns their fate to God sometime hinders

the immediate provision of treatment that

can prevent loss of life. This is one of the

tough challenges for the LGUs and the

province to surmount, and to effectively

provide the necessary intervention to those

in need of medical attention.

Another challenge relative to the issue

is how to encourage the people to submit

themselves for sputum test. People in

remote areas tend to be unaware of the

varied health services provided by the

government. Likewise, poverty also played

a major role in their choice of not availing

the services as they really have to spend

money for transportation expenses and

minimal amount for the sputum test. These

reasons discourage the really poor people

to seek medical intervention even if they

suspect that they are ill.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Goal 7: Ensure Environmental Sustainability

Target 7.C: Halve by 2015, the

proportion of people without sustainable

access to safe drinking water and basic

sanitation

A. Status and Trends

Proportion of Population With Access to Safe

Drinking water

CBMS database 2007 reveals that the

magnitude of population with access to safe

drinking water in the province is 192,647

(76.28%). For urbanity, accessibility to safe

drinking water is better at the urban areas

(89.07%) compared to the 73.37 percent

recorded for the rural areas. Available data

at the national level is 80.2 percent in 2004.

The municipality that registered the highest

proportion is Alcantara with a proportion of

92.19 percent. On the other hand, Banton

registered the lowest proportion with only

46.63 percent, showing that more than

half of its population has no access to safe

drinking water, followed by Cajidiocan

with a proportion of 53.41 percent, or a

population magnitude of 2,379 and 10,591

respectively. The scarcity of water in the

island municipality of Banton is a perennial

problem while Cajidiocan has some water

sources but needs massive logistics support

to tap them for household consumption.

With careful allocation of resources to

finance water development initiatives, the

province has a big chance in attaining the

national target of 86.5 percent come 2015.

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Table 28: Magnitude and Proportion of Households and Population With Access to Safe Drinking Water, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Source: CBMS Database 2007

Figure 25. Proportion of Population with Access to Safe Drinking Water

Province of Romblon

Proportion of Population With Access to Sanitary

Toilet Facility

On access to sanitary toilet facility, the

provincial data revealed that there are

180,268 magnitude of population with

access to sanitary toilet facility representing

a proportion of 71.38 percent. Available

national data for 2004 is 86.2 percent. Like

in water access, the data for the proportion

of population with access to sanitary toilet

facility is more than 10 percent higher in

the urban areas with a proportion of 81.47

percent compared to the 70.03 percent

proportion for the rural areas. The municipality

that posted that highest proportion

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Table 29: Magnitude and Proportion of Households and Population With Access to Sanitary Toilet Facility, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Source: CBMS Database 2007

is Concepcion with 89.36

percent followed by Banton

with 80.60 percent. Lowest

proportion was posted

by San Jose with 58.02

percent and Corcuera with

58.36 percent. With massive

information campaign on

the importance of having

sanitary toilet facility to

avoid diseases, there is

a possibility that we can

improve on this indicator to

contribute to the national

target of 83.8 percent come

2015.

Figure 26. Proportion of Population With Access to Sanitary Toilet Facility

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Table 30: Magnitude and Proportion of Households and Population Who Are Informal Settlers, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Source: CBMS Database 2007

Figure 27. Proportion of Population who are Informal Settlers

Province of Romblon

Target 7.D: By 2020, to have achieved a

significant improvement in the lives of at

least 100 million slum dwellers

Proportion of Population Who are Informal Settlers

Categorically, there are no slum dwellers in

the province. What it has instead are informal

settlers. The CBMS definition of informal

settlers are those living in houses without

permission from the land owner. Based on the

data, there are 2,854 Romblomanons (1.13%)

in 601 households considered as informal

settlers. There is a discernable difference in

urbanity with the proportion in urban areas

slightly higher at 1.48 percent compared to

the 0.97 percent proportion for rural areas.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Table 31: Magnitude and Proportion of Households and Population Lliving in Makeshift Housing, by Sex, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Source: CBMS Database 2007

Magdiwang registered the highest proportion

of informal settlers with 6.39 percent,

followed by Santa Fe with a proportion of

2.38 percent. Majority of the informal settlers

in Magdiwang can be found along the wharf

and surrounding the coastal areas. The local

chief executive (LCE) of Magdiwang has

already provided intervention of relocating

some of these families in a housing resettlement

area. Corcuera is the only municipality

with no informal settlers.

Proportion of Population who are Living in

Makeshift housing

Makeshift housing refers to those houses

built from scrap or salvage materials. On

Figure 28. Proportion of Population who are Living in Makeshift Housing

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Source: CBMS Database 2007

Figure 29. Proportion of Population Living in Inadequate Housing Conditions

Province of Romblon

this particular indicator, there are 5,344

members (2.12%) in 1,173 households

living in makeshift housing. Concepcion

registered the highest proportion with

households living in makeshift housing

with 4.66 percent. Concepcion is an

island municipality and farthest from the

provincial capital. Most of these people

are marginal farmers and fishermen with

no alternative or additional sources of

income, hence, cannot really afford to

buy durable materials for their houses.

The lowest proportion in this indicator

was recorded at Banton with a meager

proportion of 0.37 percent. The reason

for this is that there are a lot of members

living abroad who send remittances to

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


their relatives in the province as well as

the many professionals in the municipality,

particularly teachers.

Proportion of Population Living in Inadequate

Housing Conditions

People living in inadequate living

conditions are in one or more of the

following conditions: without access to

safe drinking water, without access to

sanitary toilet facility, living in makeshift

housing and without security of tenure.

The 2007 CBMS data revealed that

108,901 of the Romblomanons (43.12%)

are having inadequate living conditions

of which more of them are found in rural

areas (46.18%) as against the 26.45

percent in the urban areas. Due to the

problem of water access in Banton,

the municipality likewise registered the

highest proportion of population living in

inadequate situation (58.96%), followed

by Corcuera with 56.94 percent and

Cajidiocan with 55.57 percent. The three

municipalities showed that more than half

of their population is living in inadequate

living condition. However, if accessibility

to water and sanitation is addressed,

this indicator would greatly improve. The

municipality that registered the lowest

proportion in this indicator is Alcantara

with 25.01 percent.

B. Current Policies and Programs

The local governments in the province

have always prioritized programs and

projects that would have a direct impact

on the three targets under environmental

sustainability as can be gleaned in the

projects implemented under the Annual

Development Plan.

To reverse the loss of environmental resources,

the provincial government implemented

several programs, such as the Romblon

Integrated Coastal and Marine Resources

Management for Sustainable Development

(RICMRM). Under the program, each local

government unit is encouraged to provide

for a marine sanctuary and rehabilitate the

mangroves to sustain marine life. Likewise,

LGUs are encouraged to implement a Solid

Waste Management Program to make sure

that waste are properly disposed and does

not pose a threat to the community and

the environment. In addition, the province

continuously support the Community Forest

Resource Management Program and discouraged

the “kaingin system” (slash and

burn) way of farming to preserve the water

resources and watershed areas.

On water accessibility, the local governments

have been pursuing spring development

initiatives, including provision of

artesian wells to provide water access to

most of the households. Every year, the

province allocates a certain amount under

the 20 percent ADF for water supply facilities

and monitors the Rural Water Supply

Sanitation Sector Project (RW3SP) program

of the national government to rehabilitate

the facilities. On the other hand, sanitary

toilet facilities are periodically assessed

by local sanitary inspectors and are being

monitored by the Provincial Health Office.

All these programs/projects/activities

are being undertaken by the local governments

to make sure that their constituents

are well provided with the basic services

that would improve the general welfare of

the people and relieve the impoverishment

experienced by the marginalized sector of

the community.

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C. Challenges

Inadequate financial resources is the

major hindrance in providing the basic

services for the people and improving

their situation. The local government can

only prioritize certain programs but cannot

implement all the necessary interventions

to make life easier for everybody. In

the case of island municipalities, water

scarcity is almost a year-round problem,

particularly for those households whose

main water source is rain collector. The

Province of Romblon

Waste Segregation Management

The municipality of Odiongan

heeded the call to give priority to

the environment by implementing a

waste segregation scheme as early as

the late 1990s. Biodegradable and

non-biodegradable waste were collected

separately on specifi c schedules

then brought to a controlled

dumpsite. Later, the LGU was able

to establish a sanitary land fi ll, an

organic fertilizer plant and several

materials recovery facilities. To date,

Odiongan is the only municipality

in the province with a Solid Waste

Management Plan.

local governments cannot afford to

embark into massive infrastructure for

sustainable water facility and this remains

to be the major concerns of the people

in this areas. With water problem comes

the sanitation concern for toilet facilities.

In the absence of water, the local

government cannot implement an effective

campaign for sanitary toilet facilities, as

they go hand-in-hand. For municipalities

with water problem, these two indicators

are the challenges that need to be given

solution.

Th e Sangguniang Bayan of Odiongan

passed several ordinances

to wit:

• SB Resolution No. 2009-13

and Ordinance No. 2009-5 – ordinance

prohibiting plastic bags

on dry goods and regulating its

utilization on wet goods and prohibiting

the use of styrofoam in

the municipality and prescribing

penalties thereof.

• SB Resolution No. 2009-24 –

ordinance creating the Municipal

Waste Management Board

Contributed by: Rosebi Agaloos, MPDC, LGU-Odiongan

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Goal 8: Develop a Global Partnership

for Development

Target 8.a: In cooperation with

pharmaceutical companies, provide

access to affordable essential drugs in

developing countries

A. Status and Trends

Providing accessibility to affordable

essential drugs in the province

is a priority program of the provincial

government. The Sangguniang Panlala-

wigan of Romblon passed Resolution

No. 02-2009-12 embodying Provincial

Ordinance No. 2 series of 2009, institutionalizing

the “Botika ng Lalawigan

ng Romblon” (BLR) to make sure that

affordable essential drugs can be

readily accessed by the poor. In the

LGUs, the establishment of the “Botika

ng Barangay” (BNB) is gaining ground

and is now a very visible presence in

remote and far-flung areas.

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„Staying Alive with

BNB and Running Over‰

People in the municipality of

San Agustin used to depend on

the available medicines that could

be provided for free by the Rural

Health Unit and the adjacent

Tablas T

Island District Hospital.

It has always been a big problem,

especially for poor families, where to get prescription

medicines when it is not available at

the health facilities, or whom to approach for

fi nancial support.

To solve this dilemma, LGU-San Agustin

initiated the establishment of “Botika ng Barangay”

(BNB) through the DOH-CHD IV-B

in 2005. It was piloted in one of the remote

barangays and because of its success it grew to

a total of eight BNB outlets at present. Th e

presence of these BNB Outlets has ultimately

increased the access of the poor people living

in the barrios to commonly bought overthe-counter

generic medicine and selected

prescription drugs, particularly antibiotics at

much aff ordable prices. Th e project also promotes

community involvement in safekeeping,

utilization and fi nancing of medicines, giving

them sense of ownership, thus, making them

more responsive and responsible individuals

accountable to its sustainability and to the

health needs of the community. Th e result, is

that it eliminates unnecessary morbidities and

mortalities resulting from inability to buy or

acquire common medicines. Along with intensifi

ed preventive measures, continued health

advocacies, appropriate lifestyle modifi cations,

and much stronger support for health initiatives

by the LGU as well as cooperation of NGOs

and other worthy organizations, the BNBs will

surely be instrumental in improving the healthseeking

behavior of the poor people and would

pave the way for healthier communities.

Contributed by: Dr. Deogracias S. Muleta, MHO, LGU-San Agustin

Province of Romblon

Target 8.F: In cooperation with the

private sector, make available the

benefit of new technologies, especially

information and communication

Proportion of the Households with Landlines/

Telephone lines

With regard to access to the outside

world, the province has communication

facilities, though only a small percentage

of the population actually utilize them.

Based on CBMS data, the households with

landline/telephone lines in the province is

a meager 1,069 households or a proportion

of only 1.21 percent. Understandably,

majority of these households can be found

in the urban areas. Odiongan posted the

highest proportion of households with

landlines/telephone lines (4.47%), followed

by Romblon with 2.81 percent. These two

LGUs are considered the growth centers

for economic development in the province.

The municipality that posted the lowest

proportion is Ferrol with 0.37 percent.

Understandably, urban areas posted a

higher proportion of 4.27 percent as against

the 1.35 percent proportion for the rural

areas.

Proportion of the Households with Cellphones

Data reveals that there are 15,241

households with cellphones or a proportion

of 26.96 percent. Again, majority of

these households are in the urban areas

with 39.82 percent compared to the 24.02

percent in the rural areas. Looc registered

the highest proportion of households with

cell phones at 34.18 percent, followed

by Odiongan with 33.49 percent. The

low percentage of rural households

with cellphones was due to difficulty in

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Table 33: Magnitude and Proportion of Households with Landlines/Telephone Lines, by Urbanity,

by Municipality, 2007

Source: CBMS Database 2007

accessing network signals. Corcuera

has the least number of household with

cellphones (16.44%).

Proportion of the Households with Computers

There are 2,169 households (3.84%)

with computers. Again, majority of these

households are in urban areas with a (7.28%)

as compared to the 3.05 percent in the rural

areas. Likewise, Odiongan registered the

highest proportion of households with

computer (6.28%), followed by Alcantara

with 5.44 percent. San Jose registered

the lowest proportion of households with

computer at 1.38 percent, then Ferrol with

1.48 percent. San Jose does not enjoy a

24-hour electricity which could account

Figure 30. Proportion of Households with Landlines/Telephone Lines

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data Province of Romblon

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Figure 31. Proportion of Households with Cellphones

Table 34: Magnitude and Proportion of Households with Cellphones, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Province of Romblon

for the low proportion of households with

computers.

On this particular MDG goal, the

province, with its numerous limiting factors,

cannot meaningfully contribute to the

country’s target of developing a global

partner for development. Nonetheless,

the Local Development Councils (LDC)

are doing their best to utilize the meager

resources available to pursue development

projects toward poverty alleviation

as well as enhance the economic and

social condition of the people that could

lay the groundwork for a more empowered

citizenry.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Table 35: Magnitude and Proportion of Households with Computers, by Urbanity, by Municipality, 2007

Source: CBMS Database 2007

B. Current Policies and Programs

The Local Government Code serves as

anchor points for the Provincial Government

of Romblon’s development policies

and programs toward building self-reliant

communities and to further our contribution

to the attainment of national goals. Out of

the Internal Revenue Allotment (IRA), at least

20 percent is earmarked for development

plans, programs and activities. The Local

Development Councils (LDCs) prioritized

the different development initiatives to be

undertaken by the LGUs and most of these

are geared towards the improvement of the

well being of the Romblomanons. Improve-

Figure 32. Proportion of Households with Computers

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data Province of Romblon

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ment of access to communication facilities

and provision of affordable essential drugs

are among the programs financed under the

Annual Development Plan of the province.

C. Challenges

Romblon province is archipelagic in

nature comprising more than 20 major

islands and islets scattered at the center

of the Philippines. Narrow strips of coastal

lowlands, low hills and plains typify the

topography of most of the islands. The

geographic situation of the province is

basically the major challenge in terms of

accessibility. Although communication

facilities are available, some areas are

experiencing internet-access difficulties

and low cellphone signals due to dead

spots. Even after installation of telecom-

Province of Romblon

munication relay stations, still, those areas

blocked by mountain ranges experience

difficulty in accessing better network

signal. The current communication services

are not stable and do not allow full

accessibility for information exchange with

only a few being capable to maximize

access to the wide range of information

available in the world wide web.

Another major challenge for the province

is transportation accessibility. Though it has

ports and motorboats, it is very expensive

to transport goods from island to island.

Bridging the islands together to fully allow

maximum movement within the province

for easier and cheaper accessibility of

products, resources and even job opportunities

is one of the toughest challenges of

the province.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Achieving the MDG challenge is quite

a task that necessitates the convergence

of national and local agencies, including

active participation of the NGOs operating

in the area as well as cooperation of the

community. The inadequacy of logistics,

particularly funding support to spur massive

economic growth will hamper some of our

efforts; nonetheless, with the concerted

efforts of all stakeholders and with proper

prioritization of our meager resources,

the province hopes to ultimately make an

inroad in achieving the MDG targets and

alleviating the poverty situation provincewide.

1. Priority Programs and Policy

Responses

Given the socioeconomic condition of the

province, including its very unique physical

characteristics, the first priority of all LCEs

is to promote economic development while

attempting to expand delivery of basic

services. The latter could not be relegated

to the background as it is the primary duty

of every LGU. The more rampant poverty

is, the bigger the need and necessity for the

provision of these services, particularly on

Part 3. Meeting

the 2015 Challenge

health and sanitation, food and nutrition,

shelter, education, even financial assistance

for those in crises situation in the form of

Aid in Crisis Situation (AICS). Provision of

basics services drains much of the coffers

of any poor LGU and the dilemma of each

LCE is how to go about improving the

socioeconomic condition of the poverty

stricken constituents given the scarce

financial resources. The challenge lies in

the proper management and utilization of

our vast natural resources, particularly our

fishing grounds rich in marine products, as

well as our marble reserves.

A. Poverty Alleviation and Hunger Mitigation

Economic development is the key in

eradicating poverty and mitigating hunger.

To provide a better climate for the establishment

of small scale industries, provision of

incentives such as tax breaks for the first year

of operation could encourage new players.

To feed this new industry, it is imperative to

maximize agricultural production by utilizing

all spare lands. Taxes on idle lands could be

levied so that owners would be encouraged

to make it productive. Modern agricultural

inputs and innovative technologies suited to

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our land should be employed to maximize

production. Marginalized farmers and

fishermen should be given social preparation

to form People’s Organizations (POs)

or cooperatives for them to be able to rise

from economic bondage. Intensify livestock

and poultry production so that the province

will no longer import dressed chickens and

eggs from our neighboring provinces. The

coconut industry must be given attention;

improved varieties should be introduced

to boost copra production that could be a

smallscale industry for oil or soap. Likewise,

the marble industry could need assessment

for new product development and improved

market linkages. Tourism is also a potential

industry to look into.

B. Universal Primary and Secondary

Education

With the implementation of the Local

Government Code, the LGUs were

empowered to address issues and concerns

regarding education through the Local

School Boards (LSB) with finances coming

from the Special Education Fund (SEF).

The national government likewise provides

logistics support for the policy “education

for all”. Though elementary and high

school education is free, the problem of

low participation rate remains. This is the

challenge that needs immediate attention.

Expanding pre-elementary education

services of DepEd would help students in

terms of readiness in transition to elementary.

Strengthening the ECCD and daycare

services and require all 3-5 year old-children

to attend will help instill the habit of going

to school everyday. This could reduce

dropouts in elementary education. For

those who really cannot go to school

for reasons, the DepEd provision of ALS

Province of Romblon

should be intensified including provision of

additional SPED classes for those children

with special needs. Likewise, the “Tuloy

Aral Walang Sagabal” (TAWAG) program

of the DSWD should be expanded to cover

all municipalities. Improvement of school

facilities including provision of books and

instructional materials will also inspire

children to study. Local School Boards

should look deeper into the issue of low

participation in both elementary and high

school, including the case of more boys

not going to school. Reasons for dropouts

must be evaluated for proper strategies and

solutions to be implemented.

C.Gender Equality and Women Empowerment

There is no gender disparity in access

to primary and secondary educational

system in the province. However, there is

a pronounced trend of lower proportion

of males going to schools, particularly

in secondary and tertiary education. To

address this concern, a study must be

made as to the real reasons why, so that

adequate policies and interventions could

be put in place. For women empowerment,

provision of livelihood skills training with

gender advocacy could increase their

self-esteem in order to be productive

members of the community. The establishment

of a One-Stop-Shop for victims

of abuse and the Women’s Desk will

encourage more women to report cases

of atrocities. Information and dissemination

of the VAWC law will help decrease

marital abuses including maltreatment

of children. To encourage more women

to seek elected position and serve their

communities, women success stories in

the area of governance could facilitate

realizations that they could also make a

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


difference and contribute to the well-being

of the community.

D.Health Reform Program

The implementation of the PIPH under the

FOURmula One for Health program has

provided a wide array of health-related

programs and intervention geared toward

the achievement of improving health indices.

To effect the immediate realization of the

program, there is a need to expedite the

implementation of all program components

as well as replicate good practices. To

sustain the program, there is a need to

strengthen the Inter Local Health Zones

(ILHZ), particularly the referral system.

Involvement and active participation of all

stakeholders, particularly the MHOs can

make a lot of difference, particularly in service

delivery and implementation of innovative

program interventions. Most importantly,

the LCEs, being the head of the LGU must

be in the forefront of this programfor the

necessary logistics and leadership to make

the health reform program effective and

successful. In addition, implementation of

the Responsible Parenting Movement (RPM)

through parents’ association could generally

encourage couples to practice birth spacing

using any given method acceptable to them.

Likewise, the Adolescent Health and Youth

Development programs would also address

the issues of teenage pregnancies, drug

addiction, alcoholism and other juvenile

related problems to make the health reform

program into a holistic approach.

E. Environmental Sustainability and Improving

the Lives of Slum Dwellers

The problem of dwindling natural resources

in most cases is irreversible, particularly

coastal and marine ecosystem. Strict

implementation of environmental laws must

be adhered to stop the degradation and

start reversing the process. Approval of the

Sangguniang Panlalawigan on the proposed

Environmental Code of the province is a

priority to guide us in our quest of reversing

the loss of environmental resources.

Expansion and establishment of fi sh sanctuaries,

rehabilitation of mangroves and regular

coastal cleanup can improve our marine

resources. Reforestation of all forest lands,

including Mt. Guiting-guiting Natural Park

and support the ISF and CBFM programs

to hasten the recovery of our forest cover.

Immediate attention must be made to rehabilitate

our watershed areas to improve current

water sources. Strengthen the implementation

of the ICMRM to cover all areas so that

all economic activities could be monitored.

Proper mobilization of “Bantay Dagat”

agents is needed to apprehend encroaching

fi shing vessels in municipal waters. The strict

implementation of laws especially obligations

to comply to fi nes will discourage violators.

For the informal/illegal settlers, establishment

of housing projects for their relocation including

provision of livelihood opportunities will

dramatically improve their socioeconomic

condition. For waterless families, improvement

of water system facility and provision of

toilet bowls for those without sanitary latrines

would ensure their health.

F. Development for Global Partnership

With the upgrading of the Romblon State

College into a university, the challenge to

provide a globally competitive education is

within our reach. Provision of career options

particularly for our younger generation

could bring in development because of

a highly educated labor force. Priority is

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the establishment of a Research Facility

that could do research studies in any field,

in particular, on the endemic species and

bio-diversity found in Sibuyan Island, and

high value agricultural products suited to

the Romblon’s unique land characteristics.

Likewise, improvement of internet access

including relay stations for cell signal to

increase intercommunication within and

even outside the country is a must. Encourage

all High School Principals provincewide

to include computer literacy in their

academic curriculum for the students to be

Province of Romblon

ready for college life and for their chosen

field in the future. All these would lead into

a development that is globally competitive.

2. Financing the MDGs

To achieve the MDG targets, a myriad of

interventions has to be institutionalized and

implemented to engender the desired results.

Below are the proposed programs/projects/

activities geared toward achieving the MDG

targets as well as improving the socioeconomic

conditions of the Romblomanons.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


(Continued)

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data Province of Romblon

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Province of Romblon

(Continued)

3. Monitoring the MDGs

The implementation of the CBMS in the

province of Romblon had been a laudable

effort of the provincial government and

its 17 municipalities. The availability of

grassroot data at each geopolitical level—

barangay, municipal and provincial—has

greatly enhanced analysis of the current

situation, providing insights as to the

reasons and underlying causes of the

condition. The Memorandum of Agreement

(MOA) between the provincial government,

PEP-CBMS Network Coordinating Team

and the other provinces in the MIMAROPA

Region indicated the underlying commitment

of the signatories for the updating of

the CBMS database preferably every three

(3) years.

The inclusion of the province in the

preparation of the Provincial MDG

Report and with the technical assistance

provided including the provision of the

license software Stata, the provincial

CBMS-MDG Teams has been capacitated

to prepare this report and in the future can

generate similar documents. The province

will update the CBMS database this year

(2010) and hope to complete the CBMS

cycle in the 2nd quarter of 2011. After the

second round of the CBMS implementation,

the province will spearhead the

preparation of the provincial MDG Report

in 2011 and finally in 2015 to determine

the impact of the programs/projects/

activities implemented in response to the

MDG challenge.

For the yearly monitoring of the MDGs,

the province will have to rely on the

administrative data generated by the different

provincial offices and other agencies to

gauge the progress of the indicators being

monitored. This data will provide us with

information on a yearly basis the status and

trends, particularly the education and health

component of the MDGs.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


A. Preparation of Provincial

Millennium Development Goals

(MDGs) Report Using CBMS Data

1. Background and Justification

The availability of good statistics and the capacity of governments, donors and

international organizations to systematically measure, monitor and report on

progress in all social and economic spheres are at the heart of development

policy and the achievement of the MDGs.

The Millennium Development Goals Report 2007

While progress toward the attainment

of the Millennium Development Goals

(MDGs) is systematically being measured,

monitored and reported at the national

level, clearly, there must be a parallel effort

at the local level to bring the MDGs into

the mainstream of the local development

agenda.

This is especially called for under

decentralized regimes where local government

units (LGUs) are at the forefront of

policy or program execution. Unfortunately,

however, national statistical systems have

yet to respond adequately to the demand

for micro-level statistics that can aid

EXPLANATORY TEXT

LGUs in their poverty alleviation efforts,

as noted in a joint World Bank and Asian

Development Bank report, to wit: “the most

comprehensive and consistent comparative

subnational data (are) is at the regional

level although this is simply an administrative

level of government that has no responsibilities

for delivery of social services. More

data (are) is gradually becoming available

at the provincial level, but not at lower levels

which are at the frontline of efforts to reduce

poverty 1 .”

In response, the Philippine Government

has embarked on an initiative to localize

the MDGs using the Community-Based

Monitoring System (CBMS). In 2005, the

National Statistical Coordination Board

(NSCB) issued Resolution No. 6 “recognizing

and enjoining support to the CBMS

as a tool for strengthening the statistical

system at the local level that will generate

statistics for monitoring and evaluation of

development plans, including the progress

of the local governments in attaining the

Millennium Development Goals.”

Meanwhile, several approaches are

being carried out by the Department of

1 Decentralization in the Philippines: Strengthening Local Government Financing and Resource Management in the Short-Term, 2005 (A Joint Document of the World Bank and

the Asian Development Bank)

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data Province of Romblon

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the Interior and Local Government (DILG)

in capacitating LGUs to contribute to the

attainment of the MDGs and uplifting the

quality of life of their constituents. These

interventions are particularly stated in

DILG Memorandum Circular (MC) No.

2004-152 “Guide to Local Government

Units in the Localization of the MDGs”

dated November 2004, which provides

for the: (a) menu of Programs, Projects

and Activities (PPAs) per MDG goal and

target to guide LGUs in responding to

the MDGs; (b) diagnosis of the local

situation using existing local indicators

and monitoring system; and (c) call for

documentation and replication of good

practices.

The CBMS that is being implemented in

the Philippines is indeed well-positioned

to track progress toward the attainment

of the MDGs at the local level.

For one, a number of indicators being

monitored in the CBMS are included

in the indicators for monitoring the

progress in achieving the MDGs.

Moreover, CBMS is intended to be

done on a regular basis and can

therefore be used for updating MDG

indicators and facilitating preparation

of regular MDG reports. The CBMS

can also be used as basis by national

and local governments for costing and

identifying appropriate interventions

needed to achieve the MDGs as well as

for resource allocation. Finally, given

the large spatial disparities, the CBMS

can help identify where focus has to be

given to achieve the targets.

Province of Romblon

The CBMS’ role in localizing the MDGs

was recognized during an Experts Group

Meeting on Localizing the MDGs held on

November 28, 2006 at the United Nations

Economic and Social Commission for Asia

and the Pacific (UN ESCAP) in Bangkok,

Thailand. The Committee on Poverty

Reduction composed of 24 nation-states

agreed that the CBMS could complement

the official data collection activities of

national statistical offices and improve the

availability of the MDG and other indicators

at the local level. It also agreed that

localizing the MDGs through CBMS would

help integrate the goals into the national

development strategies. It therefore urged

other developing countries to initiate and

implement similar innovative systems that

would help localize the MDGs.

As of May 12, 2010, CBMS is being

implemented in 59 provinces (32 of which

are province-wide), 687 municipalities and

43 cities in the Philippines, covering 17,848

barangays all over the country (see Figure

33). A good number of these LGUs have

already consolidated their CBMS databases

and are well-positioned to generate their

own local MDG Reports. For one thing,

CBMS collects information that reflects the

multi-faceted nature of poverty. In addition,

data generated by the CBMS can be broken

down by municipal, barangay, purok

and even down to the household level,

thereby presenting meaningful information

and enabling deeper analysis of the

poverty situation. Moreover, the CBMS can

generate color-coded maps showing the

poverty status at each geopolitical level.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Figure 33. CBMS Coverage in the Philippines (as of May 12, 2010)

2. Objectives

This technical collaboration aims to capacitate

nine provincial governments to systematically

measure, monitor and report their status

with respect to the MDGs. The operative word

here is status since the provinces used their fi rst

round of CBMS data in formulating this report.

These provinces include Agusan del Norte,

Agusan del Sur, Biliran, Camarines Norte,

Eastern Samar, Marinduque, Romblon, Sarangani

and Siquijor. The abovementioned provinces

were selected since they were among the

fi rst LGUs that were able to consolidate their

CBMS databases at the provincial level. The

CBMS Census was conducted in these prov-

inces between 2005 and 2007 (for detailed

information on census years, see Table 38).

In particular, the technical collaboration was

carried out to meet the following objectives:

(i) to track the status on the attainment of

the MDGs in the identifi ed provinces; (ii) to

assist these provinces in preparing their Provincial

MDG Reports; and (iii) to increase local

awareness on how these reports can bridge

local and national development strategies.

3. Expected Outputs

The technical collaboration is expected to

produce the following outputs: (i) mentored

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technical staff of the nine CBMS-partner

provinces on how to prepare Provincial MDG

Reports, and (ii) Provincial MDG Reports of

the nine provinces.

4. Capacity-Building

The capacity-building of the Provincial MDG

Teams consists of three workshops and oneon-one

mentoring process.

Workshop on Processing of CBMS Data to

Generate MDG Indicators. This 2-day activity

was designed to provide participants with:

(i) a deeper appreciation of the importance

of the CBMS in benchmarking/tracking local

progress toward the attainment of the MDGs;

(ii) a satisfactory level of knowledge in processing

CBMS data to facilitate analyses of

accomplishments versus targets; (iii) some

basic skills on how to incorporate MDG targets

in local development plans and facilitate

corresponding increase in budget allocation

for MDG-responsive PPAs; and (iv) tools and

methodologies in formulating MDG reports.

Preparation of Provincial MDG Reports

Using CBMS Data. This 2-day activity was

designed to build on the gains of the fi rst

workshop by providing technical assistance to

the Project Teams in (i) processing CBMS data

to generate the additional MDG indicators

and consolidating their data at the provincial

level, (ii) benchmarking/tracking their progress

toward the attainment of the MDGs , (iii)

reviewing partial provincial reports based on

the indicators generated using the fi rst workshop

, and (iv) fi nalizing list of indicators to be

included in the report.

Province of Romblon

Presentation and Critiquing of Provincial

MDG Reports. This 3-day activity was

designed to fi nalize the Provincial MDG

Reports and at the same time provide an

opportunity for an exchange of views and

possible harmonization of approaches as

well as for the provision of consistent guidance

to all the Provincial MDG Teams. The

expected output from this workshop was the

complete manuscript of the MDG Report

which already incorporates the comments/

inputs of the assigned mentor and resource

persons who were invited to share their expertise

during the workshop.

Mentor/Mentee Relationship. In order to

ensure a sustained and focused mentoring

program, a mentor from the Research Team

of the CBMS Network was matched to one

Provincial MDG Team.

The assigned mentor was expected to set

a specifi c time each week to interact with his/

her Provincial MDG Team and discuss the

following: (1) review progress in drafting the

Provincial MDG Report, (2) set/identify targets

for the coming weeks, and (3) draw up an action

plan to achieve those targets. In addition,

the mentor was expected to assist his/her assigned

MDG Team in identifying and solving

problem areas.

Meanwhile, Dr. Celia M. Reyes, Anne Bernadette

E. Mandap and Marsmath A. Baris,

Jr. reviewed all partial and fi nal reports. The

technical staff of the NEDA Social Development

Staff headed by Director Erlinda Capones

also reviewed and provided valuable

comments on the reports.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


B. CBMS-MDG Indicators

Unless otherwise indicated, all the statistical

tables, graphs, charts and poverty maps

presented in this report were generated using

the CBMS methodology.

Box 1. Community-Based Monitoring System

The CBMS is an organized way of collecting

data at the local level to be used by

local governments, national government

agencies, nongovernment organizations

(NGOs) and civil society for planning,

budgeting, and implementing local development

programs as well as for monitoring

and evaluating their performance. It is

a tool for improved local governance and

democratic decision-making that promotes

greater transparency and accountability in

resource allocation.

The MDG Indicators, which were estimated using

CBMS data, are presented in Table 37.

It involves the following steps:

Step 1 – Advocacy/organization

Step 2 – Data collection and fi eld editing

Step 3 – Data encoding and map digitization

Step 4 – Data consolidation, database-building

& poverty mapping

Step 5 – Data validation and community consultation

Step 6 – Knowledge (database) management

Step 7 – Plan formulation

Step 8 – Dissemination, implementation, and

monitoring

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Province of Romblon

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Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data Province of Romblon

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Province of Romblon

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


C. Poverty and Food Thresholds

Official poverty thresholds computed by

the NSCB were used and, in some cases,

updated to the reference period for the

CBMS data by inflating these thresholds

using the appropriate Consumer Price Index

(CPI). The poverty and food thresholds used

for each province are presented in Table 38.

D. Authority for the CBMS Census

The NSCB has issued Resolution No.

6 (2005) which recognizes and enjoins

support to the CBMS as a tool for

strengthening the statistical system at

the local level. It also directs the NSCB

Technical Staff to initiate and coordinate

an advocacy program for the adoption

of the CBMS by the LGUs, through the

Regional Statistical Coordination Committees

(RSCCs), the technical arm of the

NSCB Executive Board in the regions.

The NSCB has also approved the CBMS

Survey Instruments through NSCB Approval

No. DILG-0903-01.

E. Survey Operations

All survey operations were undertaken under

the supervision of the CBMS Technical Working

Groups (TWGs) at the Provincial and Municipal

Levels. They identified the local personnel who

were trained as enumerators and field supervisors.

Technical assistance was provided by the

PEP-CBMS Network Coordinating Team, the

Bureau of Local Government Development

(BLGD) and Regional Office IV-B of the Department

of the Interior and Local Government

(DILG), National Anti-Poverty Commission

(NAPC), National Economic and Development

Authority (NEDA) Regional Office IV-B and

the Institute for Democratic Participation in

Governance (IDPG).

Training was mainly conducted at two levels.

The first level training (Training of Trainors) is

conducted for members of the TWGs. This is

usually conducted by members of the research

staff of the CBMS Network and CBMS accredited

trainors from the DILG, NAPC and NEDA.

Meanwhile, a second level training (Training

of Enumerators) is conducted for enumerators

who are usually composed of barangay health

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workers and students. The members of the

TWG acted as trainors in this training.

F. Data Processing System

The data processing software used under

this project includes the CBMS Data Encoding

System, the CBMS-Natural Resources

Database and Stata.

The CBMS encoding system uses CSPro

(Census and Survey Processing), a software

developed by the United States Bureau of

Census for entering, editing, tabulating,

and disseminating data from censuses and

surveys. The CSPro-based (Census and Survey

Processing) Encoding System converts survey

data into electronic data. It produces text

files (ASCII) described by data dictionaries,

which adds flexibility to the output data. This

feature facilitates the interface between the

CBMS data and other database systems and

statistical softwares.

The CBMS Mapping system employs the

Natural Resources Database (NRDB) for

CBMS-based poverty mapping and for storing

and displaying household- and individual-

level information, The CBMS-NRDB is capable

of creating and storing spatial (shapefiles)

and non-spatial (texts and numbers) data as

well as generating maps, reports and graphs

ideal for presentation and analysis of poverty

attributes in the community. This has significantly

addressed the need for a simple yet

powerful and free geographically-oriented

database.

Meanwhile, the CBMS data presented in

this report through tables, graphs, charts and

poverty maps were processed using Stata, a

general-purpose statistical software package

created in 1985 by StataCorp.

Province of Romblon

These softwares were provided for free to

the nine provinces which formulated their

reports under this project.

G. CBMS Poverty Maps

The poverty map for each indicator shows the

provincial map disaggregated by municipality.

A simple color scheme is used (green,

light green, pink and red) to represent the

four ranges of data for each indicator. Each

indicator, however, used a different range

relative to the provincial data.

H. Limitations of the Data

While observations are taken from the

entire population, the user of the data

presented in this report should bear in mind

that the municipalities in two provinces

(Eastern Samar and Biliran) were not able to

collect their data over the same period. For

instance, CBMS was piloted in a number of

municipalities in Eastern Samar and Biliran

in 2005 and was implemented provincewide

in 2006. Moreover, due to some diffi culties,

the CBMS census could not be carried out in

1 barangay in Romblon, and 2 barangays

each in Camarines Norte and Eastern Samar.

Moreover, data from a number of barangays

in Sarangani are still not available.

Estimates on poverty and subsistence

incidence may also be affected by under-

and/or over-reporting of income or

reluctance on the part of the respondents to

reveal their true levels of income. As in other

surveys, the CBMS enumerators may also

have encountered interview non-response

and item non-response.

Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data


Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data Province of Romblon

101


Available in this series:

NATIONAL REPORT

• Philippines Progress Report on the Millennium Development Goals 2010

PROVINCIAL REPORTS

•Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Province of Agusan del Norte

•Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Province of Agusan del Sur

•Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Province of Biliran

•Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Province of Camarines Norte

•Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Province of Eastern Samar

•Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Province of Marinduque

• Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Province of Romblon

• Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Province of Sarangani

•Status Report on the Millennium Development Goals Using CBMS Data

Province of Siquijor

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