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HONOLULU - eVols

HONOLULU - eVols

HONOLULU -

7S - ", JKJ r rv, - ap .'& cr ' i PC - 0fr- p part i. , THE Part I. HONOLULU Pages i to . REPUBLICAN. Pages i to 8. ... . . . """' II - VOLXTMB BX 2JO. 323. HOHOIiTJIiTF, H. T., STJHIXflLY, JUitK 23, 190L JBICE FIVE CENTS 7 M RECORD OF Iffi H ilfl Judge Little's Charge to Special Term Guand Jury. l VAHY PEOPLE ARE 60IKG 18 DAD CONDITIONS OF 8USINE5S AND CROPS IN VARIOUS DISTRICTS. Preparations for Fourth of July Sub-seripUa-m for Street Sprinkler-M- ew Lighthouse Wanted Gover-ne-r and Mrs. Dole's Movements. HTLO. June 2L The following named people arc either gtm or going to the mainland l steam and sail Hastings Holland. Mrs. H. E. Kel-w- f, William McCluskey. Her. J. A. Crusjjn, mad wife aad MiS Cruzan. Mius was. manager of the Pioneer News Co., Miss Esther Pomeroy. Miss Potter. Mies Dillon of Pepeekeo, sis--- r of J. K. dtlkm; Dr. and Mrs. Philip KW. to reside in New York perma- nently, the parents of Drs. Milton and Philip Rice, Miss Anna Rico and Master Paul Rice: Captain and Mrs. H K Soole. Miss Sainuer ot the Kin--l rgarten. to be absent ror a year; Miss Wolfeaden. who has been teach- - r at tb Bllo Hoarding School for i wo years, wfll remain away perma- nently Mrs. Albert OuIW Curtis of otaa, to complete the course in elo-mtio- Business and Social. & C. Smith aad wife, parents of Mtoraey Carl Smith, and his sister, Miss W. Smith, arrived In Honolulu in the Peking and came to Hilo in the Ktnau test night It was their first meeting for several years. A littie Portuguese child at the MounUlnview school fJl from a seo--n. last Monday ai morning Th Httle fellow showed no sign of being Injured by the fall, but n is supposed he died from the shock. Attorneys Itldgway and Bitting win more for a new trial for Fuji-har- a under death sentence for mur-le- r If It ie overruled the case will be again appealed to the Supreme art Hilo has been suffering from lack of Illumination for several nights owing to Hcaroity of water to run the marhtnen of the Bloctrlc Light Co. There are about thirty Honolulu ladles nd gentlemen In Walmea en route to Hilo to attend the races. F M Wakefield Is resting at Humu-ul- a sheep ranch and, will return to Hilo in time for the July torm. rr and Mrs. Hoary Hayos are ex- ported here about July 1. W D Schmidt fonuorly book- keeper at Honorau plantation. Is vis-I- t. ng Hilo . Six men employed on a wilder s steamer recently hired by the com- pany at Laupahoohoe, took a boat ..hnr at Knkatau and deserted. Mrs Henry Una. xosldlng on the Peck road. OIa. "as made seriously m Friday week by eating tinned lams that she had kept In the house fur $ months. Br. Blaka was called and found Mrs. Iten In a dangerous from ptomaine poisoning. She is now out of danger. Mr aad Mrs A. W. Hoydtmann and daughter at Naaleha who have been visiting Mr. and Mrs. von Grneve-nvne- r at their reeidenco at Piihonul left by the Roderick Dhu for the states" Mr Heydtraann's health of tat- - has been poor and he goes to the mainland to recuperate tor an Indef- inite period. Hfe address for the present will be 308 college Avenue. KImlra. X Y The Fourth of July ball committee has pretty definitely decided to erect pavilion on the Hotel grounds, in-t.a- d of utilising tho hall at Hooulu Park The cost r the proposed struc-tar-e with the other necessary ex- penses will be about $300. of which J1S5 will be met by appropriation fwm the general FVrerth of July tuna, ad tb balance bv sale of tickets. Mr. and Mrs. P. Peck and family liar mened frost tle Hilo Hotel to their new Puneo residence. Hon Sanford B. Dole and Mrs. Dole leave Hilo by today's Kiaau for the hone of Kben Low in Kohala. Mtnry West Is circnlaUng a sulh scriptlon aar among buslnessunen and other residents of Hilo for the purpose of seenriag suSlclcnt pledges to instlfv puttias on a street sprinkler during HWo's &TY spells. The present one will prohsbly te pau about tho hoe the sprinkler is available. The marrlase of D. W. Marsh to M Laura I. Vestal of San Jose, ralif.. wt tak place next Wednes-l- r evening. The ceremony will be trfcUy ndvate. Mr. Marsh and Ills bride wltt taake their home for the nreeeat at the residence of A. "W. Richley t Hlvorslde Park. Hlto is bound 40 have the Terri-trl8- l uaad come h&r for tho Fourth of Jlv. The committee oa celebra- tion will nay all xoaaseS. North Hilo and Hamakta hare uf-fe- t4 far saw severely trom the present dronckl tian has South Hllo, Young case is beginning to ihow the I effects of Its long-- continuance, Tbile wsler r doniestif purposes even is sed with extreme economy. The . doat in the vicicity of Hosokaa is I about aix inches deep on the average. I The Tribune says: "Judge little 1 is suggested in many quarters as one j eminently fitted to succeed ifr. Dole as uovernor oi me lemiory. tie woaM without doubt hare many strong supporters to his claims for sach an appointment-- " A petition for a lighthouse at Le-lei-wi Point which has been circulated by A. B. Loebenstein among the Cap- tains of vessels coming to this port has been signed by the latter unlver- - sally, so far as they have had oppor tunity. Lcleiwi Point Is about sfven miles down the coast. Made &o4 Trip. H. Vicars, of the Economic Shoe Co, and W A. McXenney, of the Owl Drug Co.. returned last Saturday from a ten days trip to Hamakuo, says the Herald. Both gentlemen re- port good trade and speak highly of the hospitality of the people they met on the road. "We round them de- lightful and anxious to do business," remarked Mr. McKenney. "The only drawback Is the matter of transpor- tation which, if it could be establish- ed so that it might be depended upon, would be of great value to every busi- ness roan in Hilo. In my opinion the future of Hilo will be brightened by the completion ot the Kohala-Hll- o railway." The Coming Races. Stall room is being prepared at the race track for 21 horses that will go Into training for the July races. Dur- ing the absence of Manager McKen-zi-e In Honolulu Mr. Wright has had the track wet down and rolled every night and the result Is highly satis- factory. Last Sunday several of the local racers, among them O'Rourke's and Humburg's, did some good work. Lyman's Twinkle was put around and made a great rush to the three-eighth- s. Next Sunday should be a lively day at the track, as a number of Honolulu horses will be worked out. Getting Warm. Manager Waldron of the Kilauea Volcano Honse says, as reported in a Herald supplement, he has never seen the large crater as warm as it Is now. A portion of the trail across the lava in the vicinity of old Hale-mauma- u is so warm as to be impas- sable, and a dense volume of sulphur smoke Is being emitted from the small crater, in many of the cracks fire is plainly visible. This condition of the crater may continue Indefinitely or it may end in" an outbreak at any time. Distinguished Visitors. Dole and Mrs. Dole, who arrived by the Klnau, are spend- ing some time at the Volcano House, says the Tribune, for the benefit of the health of Mr. Dole, who Is not. it Is understood, altogether well. The will spend some months on Hawaii, as his physicians have recommended a country life and vig- orous out of door exercise. Pending the acceptance of Mr. Dole's resigna- tion of his office it Is understood that the Secretary of the Territory, H. E. Cooper, Is performing the duties Inci- dent to the position. All acts per- formed by him In this capacity are of course voidable, but so far as they are unobjectionable will perhaps be ratified by tho Federal Executive to prevent unnecessary complications. Mr. Dole has visited Hilo once before. This was during his Presidential career In 1S95. The Federal Judge. The Tribune says: Judge Estee will come to Hilo for July 4th, pro- vided he can arrange his Court Cal- endar so that he is able to get away from Honolulu for a few days. He is quite willing to come and deliver the oration without any charge or ex- pense to the Fourth of July Commit- tee, says Mr McKcnzie. who inter- viewed the Judge relative to the mat- ter at the request of the Committee on Literary Exercises. By the mall of next Kinau he will send a definite answer to the request. All who know Judge Estee. either personally or by reputation, sincerely hope he will be able to make the trip. , Special Term Opens. The June special term ot the Circuit Court Fourth Circuit opened oa Mon- - j . in ni.V ,. Ifco tmrpose of hearing divorce cases, pro bate matters and jury-waive- d cases, and setting in motion the work of the Grand Jury for the purpose ot com- pleting the criminal calendar for the July term. Thus far the following "business has been transacted: Divorce cases Yel Hamsda vs. Manje Hamada; libel disaalssed on the ground of the non-residen- of tho llbellant in Hawaii for the period required by the Organic Act: two years. Anna Petersen ts. T. 1. Petersen; divorce granted, aad custody ot minor child giver to petitioner. Probate matters Estate of Okaaiu- - ra. bond of administration, $5,MH); PDroved. Estate of Sam Kaulola; petition to grant sale of real estate; coart granted petition. H. B. Naitna ts. Kaa Laa, suit for annulment of marrise; decision reserved. Deputy Attorney General Cnthcart arrived by the Klnau to prosecute criminal cases for the snecinl aad regular terras of Court kJd here this month and next, and to assist the Grand Jury in their !nvsiign4les. This bodr was accordingly impaneled on yesterday morales chose K. X. Holmes as Its foreman. Jadge Ut- ile delivered his chary- - aad the Jary sot to work, is the VsWlWm Fam MfHsn 5 13 st. us sinms MAKE IRE! Ill Musical and Dramatic Performance Well Carried Out NULLA IXiHE FEATURE EFFORTS OF YOUNG AMATEURb SHOW FINE TALENT AND GOOD TRAINING. College Hall Crowded With Friends of School Pleasing, Musical Se lections Troubles of the Irish Landlord Very Laughable. Pupils of St. Louis College did themselves proud in their musical and dramatic entertainment given yesterday evening at the College hall. Before a large concourse of friends and well-wishe- rs who filled every available nook and corner of the com- modious auditorium ,the youthful en- tertainers presented a varied and In- teresting program which met with Instant and hearty approval, if the spontaneous applause which attend- ed their efforts was a proper crite- rion. In the pretty and romantic operetta in two acts, "The Bell in the Forest," the participants displayed much abil- ity which resulted from careful and thorough training. The three-ac- t play. "Whistling at Landlords," kept the audience in an uproar from the rise to the fall of the curtain. The operetta, followed by the farce, was pleasingly interspersed with selections from the College orchestra under the leadership of Brother Francis. The entire cast of characters In both productions was taken from the ranks of the students. Each in his Indi- vidual part made a most favorable Impression. In many instances the work of"the"students was far above the average. Shortly after eight o'clock the cur- tain arose upon a pretty picture. Some two score of SL Louis College Minims, stationed upon the stage with pret- tily decorated hoops in hand, stood ready for a callsthenic hoop drill. The orchestra struck up a lively air and the lads proceeded with the ex ercise. The company were put through a wide variety of maneuvers which were executed with a precision truly astonishing. The marching and counter-marchin- g were also a unique feature of the drill. More music from the orchestra and the first act of the operetta was launched. The scene opened with the subjects of Prince -- Perclval gathered around him, the entire company en- tering violent protest at the treat- ment they had received at the hands of the game poachers, in the center of the Tillage square were gathered the townspeople. A tuneful recital of the troubles was followed by the commands of the Prince to go forth and capture the poachers dead or alive. James B. Laing as Prince Per- clval sang In clear voice. The part of Alexis Foster, muchly misjudged by his fellow-townsme- was accept- ably taken by Geo. WrighL E. Mc-Can- n made a clever "Poacher and No- torious Character." B. Smith, as Bluster the Policeman, made a" hit with his German dialect. W. L. Welsh, arrayed In a garment made from dally papers, played the part of Town Crier to perfection. The tailor, the butcher the shoemaker, the baker. In the person of V. Osorio, P. Burns, Jno. P. Bento and Win. Heine, re- spectively, added their share to the eniovment of the entertainment. John Spaulding as "The Wanderer" played his part without fault, as did BerHemann and m Hardv. as Sfl . "ieuu ui H.UI.V: 1WIWH. "The Flower Song" cleverly render- ed on the violin by Master Walter Gough elicited great applause. The young man displayed a surprising mastery ot the bow. Preceding the farce. Master Walter Klein's vocal solo, "Where Are. the Friends of My Youthr was received with merited appreciation, "Whistling at Landlords" kept ev- eryone nresent la the best ot good humor through the three acts. The students injected considerable fun in- to the skit nrhich seldom failed In its mission to produce a laugh. The trials and tribulations of the average Irish landlord and owner of a large estate was carried through from the uprising: ot the tenants to the final conclusion in the courts. E. McCann made & stern and unrelenting land- lord. Lord Drlve-em-c- ut was his name. James B. Laing, as the evic- tion agent of the Irish landlord, made things lively. Master S. Salter took the part ot Tim McGarty. the boy ot lx years who whistled at a landlord. McCarty was. charged with having-give- his kotskip a severe attack of heart failure hecaase ot his shrill pip- ing. Henry 0"Su!Uvan. axe la hand. carried ot the part of Lord Coraiag-ha- His estorU to restore peace among the tenants proved fanny. W. L. Weiss, as Mr. Hapnyrock, .Ja. J Benin as Lord Stopper. Jao. K. Sparilar as Karl et Uplands. Jas Ward, as THrite KHteaasts, Jc CaMttt as 9fr laOr 4 A. Wat- - son as Sir Very Very, drew forth I hearty applause bj their antics. The audience dispersed to the tune- ful air of "The Merry -- American." march by the College orchestra. The program in detail was as fol- lows; Part L Overture "The EIephaat".Fred. Whhe S. L. a Orchestra. Calisthenics Hop DrHLSX.OMiniins The Bell In The Forest. Romantic Operetta la Two Acts. Characters; Prince Percivai Jas. B. Laing Coaat Rupert fFriend of the Prince) .?. . Chris. Bertelmann Count Leopold (Friend of the Frince.:rjf .....ML Hardy Alexis tForster The Gaiae-Keep- f er's Son Geo. Weight Karl Krag A Poacher and Notori- ous Character- - E. McCann Bluster A Police Commissioner... B. Smith Old Screetch The Town-Crie- r W. L. Welsh Eranz Staub A Wanderer Jno.. Spaulding Stitchem Tailor (Village Trades- man) V. Osorio Chopem Butcher (Village Trades- man) P. Burns r..., Waxem Shoemaker (Village Tradesman) ..Jno. P. Bento Kneadem Baker (Village Trades- man) Wm. Heine Attendants. Villagers. Hunters. Etc. After First Act: Violin Solo "Flower Song" Walter Gough Part fl. Gavotte "Duchess of Albany" S. L. C. Orchestra. Vocal Solo "Where Are the Friends of My Youth" Barker Walter Klein. Whistling at Landlords. A Play in Three Acts. Characters: Lord Drive-me-o- ut Irish Landlord Living in England E. McCann Mr. Evlctem Lord Drive-me-out'- s Agent Jas. B. Laing Tim Cartv Boy of six years, who whistled at a Landlord S. Salter Mr. Happy rcck,. W. L. Welsh Lord Stopper. . ?7l Jno. P. Bento Earl of Uplands. ...Jno. K. Spalding Duke of Kiltenants Jas. Ward Sir Little Emly ,.Jos. Cullen Sir Verv Verv A. Watson Lo-- d Corningham. Henry, O'Sullivan Judge Police. Jurv. Crowd "of Ten- ants, etc., ete. March "Merry American' --Wheeler S. L. C Orcftestra. POSTMASTER O&T RECEIVES BftD HEWS SOON AG&IH Postmaster J. Mort Oat received in the Gaelic's mail news of the death of his sister-in-la- widow of his brother Lewis A. Oat who died only on the 14th of March last. Thl3 latest sad event the Norwich, Conn., Even- ing Record of June 1, reports as hav- ing taken place at 4 o'clock that mor- ning. The late Mrs. Oat's maiden name was Jane M. Colby and she was born In New London on July 23, 1S43. The Record says: "Mrs. Oat was an estimable wom- an, who had many friends who will mourn her loss. The family have the sympathy of all jBho know them, in their sad affliction. Mrs. Oat was a kind mother, and, during the life ot her husband, uid all she could for him. She was a member of Sedgwick Woman's Relief Corps, Tb. 16, and was the first president of the corps." Some time after tho death of his brother Lewis, Mr. Oat learned the cause of it was a all, In which he struck his head, when overtaken by an epileptic fit to which he .was sub- ject Such attacks were caused by an injury he received serving in the na- vy in the civil war. THE MURPHY CONCERT. Largest Audience Last Night Since the Sociable Campaign Began. Last night's concert under the aus- - pices or tne trancis aiurpny uospei Temperance League drew the largest audience that has yet appeared in the hall in Waverley block. An en- tertaining program rewarded the at- tendance. There were excellent songs by Messrs. Kelley and Bradley. Mr. Piver gave some of his inimitable reci- tations. Mr. Kelley also favored the auditors with elocutionary as well as musical efforts. Mr. Felton ac- ceptably manipulated the pianoforte. Franklin H. Austin confined his ad- dress to a review of the work being carried out by the League, which was quite encouragins. For the past week those voluntarily resigning the dubi- ous joys of stimulating beverages numbered 23, Mr. Austin will give a talk again this evenings The free and jpasy concerts will he held every night this week. I HfHi I "DONT CRY, HONEY-- " The Papular El!efns Given an En- thusiastic Aloha Upcft Departure. The Ellefords were given a rousing reception previous to thvlr departure for San Francisco In the Zealaxulfa yesterday afternoon. All members of the- - popular company of entertain ers, including the little dots, were fairly buried in icis. Friends ia le- gion "were at the steamer's side to extend a parting; aloha. "Don't cry, honey, we ttIU be with tou again ia the flowery month of May," was the parting; shot which was wafted, over the water frosa ge- nial Tom Bates, the manager,, a the good, snip Zealand! pointed herce toward, the nsta C the harbor. Walter F. DilMn0as retars Srasn-th- e other felns hi the Kinax. ,V DiEftT HIS X1S ICE II WHK Every Dollar Is Voted Away for Salaries and .Expenses. X3T A IEAX M IETTEI MK NEARLY A MILLION DOLLARS IS WANTED BY ISLAND OF HAWAII ALONE. Members Base Claims for Their Con- stituencies on Taxes They Pay Mons'arrat and Makekau are Sar- castic Toward the Mentor. Hawaii faces a condition of things that is alarming to say the least If the income Tax should be declared uuconstitutional not one cent for road work will be available in. the next two years. " If such a thing should happen it not only means a postpone- ment for two years of many neces- sary improvements, but also the prob- able bankruptcy of the majority of the local street construction companies. Dickey sprung this sensation on the House in considering the Island of Hawaii committee report, handing out a few solid facts which were feazers. The report from the Hawaii com- mittee was modest In the extreme, desiring the paltry little sum of $919,-12- 5. Following is the report hy dis- tricts: Hamakua. $144,000; Puna, $44,800; Olaa. ?G7.ST5; North and South Kona, $54,800; Kau. $99,150; North and South Kohala. $79,900; Hilo. $503,000; grand total, $919,125. The report Is signed by R. H. Makekau, J. Monsar-rat- . J. Ewaliko. W. B. Nailima. J. K. Kekaula. H. M. Kaniho, J. W. Kelil-ko- a. S. H. Haaheo. ' Makekau did not see where the great extravagance of the report came in. Hamakua gave in taxes $198,000. whne her appropriations amounted to but $114,000. Out of the balance the band might be paid for. and the "C. H. Dickey" bought Dickey said: "We face a condition of things which is to say the least alarming. Every cent of possible revenue for the next two years has already been appropriated for sala- ries and general expenses. Not one cent now remains for road work. "Our only hope is the Income Tax, a thing which Is now hanging in the balance. I expect that the Income Tax will amount to $700,000. If that is the case that revenue will have to be distributed in proportion to the amount of taxes from each island. The taxes from the different islands are as follows: Oahu. $1,861,400; Hawaii. JSSS.SOO; Maul. $516,500; Ka- uai $432,000. "The percentage of taxes for this Island is as follows: Oahu. 50 per cent; Hawaii, 24 per cent; Maui. 13A per cent; Kauai. 11 per cent "With these proportions as a basis the Income Tax would be appropriat- ed as follows: Oahu. $350,000;. Ha- waii. $171,500; Maui. $94,500; Kauai, $80,500. "You can see what the trouble is for vourselves. gentlemen. I move that this be referred back to- - the commi- ttee' Monsarrat thought that Dickey was trying: to serve two masters, God. and MxnjEon. that Is Maui and Honolulu. The honorable gentleman had ira nacrtalired his name hy casting; the deciding vote for the "C. H. Dickey." He had. also voted for the military, a thing; which was an absolute nuisance. Monsarrat then told, how badly Kas. had been treated in the past Kaa never had received, her just dues, the majority of her taxes going: to satiate Honolulu's greed. Kan's only boon was $50,000 for a new road, which was a great necessity to the country, hut he doubted if Kau would ever get it After more talk the report was re- ferred, back to the committee for re- vision. The Kauai report was also intro- duced, but showed more modesty In. its requests. Kauai's report was as follows: Waimea, $50,000; Hanalet, $S.6Q0; Kawaihou, $10,000; Lihue. $15,000; Koloa, $4,000; for schools, $2S.40O; for hospitals. $9,000; for Walmea Water Works, $37,000; total. $163,000. After some discussion the report was referred to the committee of the whole. The House adjourned at 12 o'clock. Gibson Girls to Highest Bidders. Some clever work is exhibited in the Gibson Posters which have been placed In the show windows of sev- eral business houses. The illustra- tions are intended for the purpose ot advertising the moonlight garden fete which takes place June 2S under the auspices of Oahu College. Ralph Yardley drew the head displayed at Wall. NIchol's. Miss Florenco Hall is given great credit for her artistic production in E. O. Hall & Son's win- dow, and George Fuller contributed the graceful Gibson Girl at Thrum's, The posters will be auctioned at the close of the entertainment. TWO LIVELY GaMES were PLAYED YESTERDAY AFTERMQOM Punahou Beat the Stars by Nine to Eight Honolulu Athletic Did Up Maile llima Eleven to Seven. Punahou defeated the Stars yester- day in a close and exciting game of baseball. Costly errors wtjre tho main cause of the Stars' defeat Bab bit twirled for the Stare, while Castle- - pitched for Punahou. The final score was: Punahou 9, Stars S. The Honolulu Athletic Club won the baseball game from the Maile llima yesterday afternoon, the score being 11 to 7. The H. A. C. stick wlelders got Richardson's measure in the first inning and plastered him all over the field, scoring nine runs on his delivery. After that they were able to score but twice. Lemon, who took Richardson's place In the fifth, proved to be quite a puzzle. Kaai, who twirled for the H. A. C, struck out over a dozen men, and w.as well nigh invincible. He was well supported, thereby gaining an ad- vantage over Lemon and Richardson. The game was very good, barring the first inning. Owing to a doubtful decision in the seventh inning, the game was played under protest by the Maile llima. Lemon while sliding home was declared out while the ma- jority of the crowd thought that he was safe. Commission Resumes Monday. A consideration of Claim No. 5 will be taken up at the meeting of tho Fire Claims Commission walch will re- sume its reguar sessions Monday morning. There was no meeting of the Com mission yesterday. Up to Friday af- ternoon a large per cent of the Chi nese and Japanese claims for dam ages had been filed, with the com mlssioners. AUTHORITIES ii Hill 8If 1 CLOSING Of IV! - - From a Staff Correspondent A: WASHINGTON, June 8. --Trouble is brewing for the Territorial administration of Hawaii oyer a resort for Japanese women of ill-- - fame known as Iwllei. Some two or three months ago complaints were received in Washington about the place, the complaints saying that It was run under police protection and that the Governor and Attorney General, the iyxe as the appointee of the head of the po-- k lire, and the other as the immediate head of the police, all its offi- - cere being under his department are responsible for the existence w of the place. It was asserted la the complaint that Japanese wo-- - men were held as slaves In Iwilel. which is a stockade place like - a cattle pen, and that the morals of the entire city are being cor-- rnpted by its existence. More recently a number ot prominent women over the country, on the strength of letters received from visitors to Hawaii the past winter, have been wxkisg to the Department of the Interior and to the President about Iwilel and demanding that Governor Dole be - removed for not closing the place up. It has been learned, here, that owing to these complaints a secret service agent of the government was seat to Honolulu some time ago to report on Iwilel aad his report shows the place to he fully k as ba( if not worse, than the complaints indicated. Owing to the pressure brought by women reformers of the United k States oa behalf of a suppress io" of the place several members of Congress have signifed their intention of Introducing resolutions in hoth houses next winter calling- - for an. investigation of the moral k and governmental conditions in HawalL This the administration hopes to avoid as It wonld sadoubtedly Jesuit in scandaL Your k correspondent was informed today that positive instructions had k been forwarded to Hawaii within the last ten days informing Gov-- craor Dole that Iwilel afe'ooM be closed, up. This matter together k 'with the continual blasters of hoth'Dole and Cooper, and their in-- terferencp with the dnties oC United Slates officials, is causing the - oScials here to wis th whofe territorial administration of Hawaii k k was is the "bottom e the Faciftc k 4 JS. S, Lv irk --k it ft 3BESSPS?r -- "S3 SMITH PEBJURY CASE m II COURT Neglected By Attorney General Until the . Last Houi:. -- --a plea ix kmmm mmm JUDGE GEAR DECLINED JO LET THE MATTER BE TREATED PRO FORMA. Mate Johnson of Ship Balaclutha on Plea of Guilty Is Sentenced to Three Months' Imprisonment St ClaTr Divorce. Most of yasteniav amrnimifa & slon of the ClreoH Court, before Judge Goar, was occupied with the piea in abatement of Walter O Smith to indictment tor parjnry. Attorney ueaeral K. P. Dote for Ut prosecution and Lorrin Andrews for the defense had agreed to submit Ut piea without argument. Judge Gear, however, would not have it o. Hs did not care to make a pro forma ruling merely to hav It reviewed bj tho Supreme Court The motion was a serious oue and. if made in good faith, demanded felt argument by counsel and careful consideration by the court Both the grand Jury and the trial Juries were nitacked. as to their validity, by the motion, so that If It prevailed all nendina indict. ments would be quashed. in roply to Mr. Andrews, who said the object of pro forma procedure was to obtain a speedy determination of the case, the Court said It would xpedlte the case ia vwy way pos- sible. Then It came out that the Attorney General had thus far ignoss the plea In abatement having neither answer- ed It nor demurred to It At that mo- ment he said he knew of no reason why the grand Jury was not a legal body, but ho wanted time to prepare his reply to the argument of coun- sel opposite. S. M. Ballou mode th opening ar- gument for tho ploa. The Attorney General entered aa endorsement upon the pleadings of defendant, admitting the truth of al- legations but denying that thay con- stituted grounds for dterafesisg tho indictment Mr. Andrews further argued foe the motion to quash the indictment with Mr. Ballou contending against tho bailiff act passed by the Legislature. The Attorney General replied, argu- ing for the validity of the bafHff aa and the summoning of jurlse there- under. The case was taken under adviss-me- nt by the court eonasel to file briefs by Monday. Strauch vs. Brown, ejectment, was continued from Friday UH tomorrow, giving the Jurors taslr liberty oa Saturday. Bertha St Clair was granted a di- vorce from John St Clair tor failure to support by Judge Gear yesterday. On motion of J. M. Davidson for petitioner. Judge Gear discharged Robert W. Cathcart as executor of the estate of the late JameB Dodd, he hav- ing brought the aduitalBtratfoa to a close. Sarauol Andrews by his attorney. Philip I Weaver, moves to reinstate his trespass cases against Kafkeaa and Wahluenui oa the calendar. The case of Wing Hop Co. against the members of the old Beard of Health was thrown out on demurrer by Judge Gear because there was nothing in the contract to hold them individually, and if they were respon- sible it was as oBkws of th Govern ment In the Federal Court the ease of United States vs. Joseph Johnson. second mate of the ship Bafsclaifes. he acting District Attorney J. J. Dunne. u'f-- a criminal iafarmarfnn rf usault on the high seas a$aasT de fondant Johnson pleaded &iltv ard was sentenced hy Jndge Est? to he imprisoned three months at hard le- - oor In obn utob. In the case of United States vs. Sodergren and Stewart cooaeel mads stipulations regarding: changes 1st transcript of the record for transmis- sion to the Circuit Court of Appeals: for the Ninth District California. Odd Fellows Elect Officers. At a meeting of Polynesian En- campment L O. O. F.. held Friday evening at their hall oa Fort street, the following oSlcors war elected, to serve for the ensuing termi P. C. Martin, Chief Patriarch: C. taariock. High Priest P. C. P.. M. McKechnie, Senior Wanlaa; A. F. Clark, Junior Warden; B. L. Cut- ting. Scribe: F. W. Wood. Troasur. er, P. C. P. Diplomas for Hawalians. Recent advices from Washington, state that 'the Deere of Ra-hftl- Laws will bo conferred npon Charles a. ixms ana isua A. c Long of tho Territory of Hawaii at the commence- ment of the Georgetown. University Law Department Justice Seth She-par- d of the United stsroo rv. Appeals will deliver the diplomas. V v