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Edition 7 - The City Buzz Magazine

Edition 7 - The City Buzz Magazine

SISTER SUZZETTE’S

SISTER SUZZETTE’S RECIPE CORNER Amish Friendship Bread Give your friends a sample taste and some starter that made it! Your friends can make their own and pass it along . This is why the bread is called "friendship bread". Bread Starter Recipe: Special Note/ It is very important to use plastic or wooden utensils & plastic or glass containers, Do not use metal, it kills the yeast! [ 1 pkg. active dry yeast, 1/4 cup warm water (110 degrees F), 1 cup all-purpose flour, 1 cup white sugar, 1 cup warm milk (110 degrees F) 1. In a small bowl, dissolve the yeast in warm water for about 10 minutes. Stir well. 2. In a 2 quart glass or plastic container, combine 1 cup sifted flour and 1 cup sugar. Mix thoroughly or the flour will get lumpy when you add the milk. 3. Slowly stir in warm milk and dissolved yeast mixture. Loosely cover the mixture with a lid or plastic wrap. The mixture will get bubbly. Consider this Day 1 of the cycle, (or if given starter from a friend, the day you receive the starter is Day 1). For the next 10 days handle starter according to the instructions below. Day 1 - receive the starter Day 2 - stir Day 3 - stir Day 4 - stir Day 5 - Add 1 cup of each flour, sugar and milk. Day 6 - stir Day 7 - stir Day 8 - stir Day 9 - stir Day 10 - Add 1 cup flour, 1 cup sugar and 1 cup milk. Divide into 4 containers, with 1 cup each for three of your friends and 1 cup for your own loaves. Give friends the instructions for Day 1 through Day 10 and the following recipe for baking the bread. Now, combine your starter in a large bowl with the following ingredients: [ 2/3 cup oil, 3 eggs, 1/2 tsp. Salt, 1 tsp. Vanilla, 1 to 1 1/2 tsp. Cinnamon, 1 cup sugar, 2 cups flour, 1-1/4 tsp. baking powder, 1/2 tsp. baking soda ] Using a fork beat by hand until well blended. You can add 1 cup raisins and 1 cup nuts (optional). Grease two loaf pans with butter, sprinkle with sugar instead of flour. Bake at 325 degrees F for 45 minutes to 1 hour (individual oven temperatures vary). Cool 10 minutes, remove from pans. Makes two loaves. Green Tomato Pie Crust: [ 2 cups self rising flour, 1/4 teaspoon salt, 1 teaspoon sugar, 3/4 cups of shortening- butter flavored, 1/2 cups cold water ] Sift together flour and salt into a bowl. Cut shortening into flour mixture with fork until resembles cornmeal. Stir in 1/4 cup of cold water, then add remaining 1/4 cup and mix until combined. Cover dough and allow it to rest in refrigerator for 30 minutes. Divide dough in half. Place on a lightly floured board and add more flour, and knead until the dough comes together. Using a rolling pin, roll out 1 piece of dough to the size of a 9'' pie pan. Put crust in pan and trim off excess dough around the edge. Roll out the second ball of dough for pie crust top. Filling: [ 5-6 green tomato's, chopped, 2 tablespoons of cider vinegar, 1-1/2 cups of white sugar, 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon, 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg, 1/4 teaspoon ground cloves, 1/2 teaspoon salt, 1/4 cup flour ] Preheat oven to 350*. Place tomatoes and vinegar in a large bowl. In a medium bowl mix together sugar, cinnamon, nutmeg, salt, and flour. Sprinkle over tomatoes and toss to coat evenly. Pour into crust and cover with criss-cross lattice crust. Bake at 350* for 35-45 minutes, until bubbly and crust is brown. P 8 ―This Old House is Still Standing‖ by Mary Riggs LeBus This Week: Waveland Our ongoing summer tour of Kentucky's historic homes lands us at Waveland this week, six miles south of downtown Lexington. The gracious antebellum mansion was completed in 1848 by Joseph Bryan, a grandnephew of Daniel Boone. Waveland represents a way of life that has long since vanished. According to family tradition, Boone surveyed the original 2000+ acre grant for his nephew, Daniel Boone Bryan; a renowned frontiersman, historian & poet. On this land, Daniel Bryan built a stone house & equipped his estate with a number of innovations that proved to be profitable. He built a gun shop that employed 25 men, operated a gristmill, manufactured saltpeter for gunpowder, ran a blacksmith shop, a distillery, & a paper mill. He also built a Baptist Church here & established a school for females. Two years after Bryan's death, his son, Joseph tore down the old stone house & began construction on the Waveland mansion. He named the estate from the way the wind blew or waved the fields of grain & hemp surrounding the building site. The classic Greek Revival structure was inspired by the work of Lexington architect John McMurtry & was built by Washington Allen, a well known Lexington contractor. Lumber was cut from trees on the property, bricks from clay dug & burned on site, & the estate's blacksmith wrought the iron needed in construction. Stone for foundations was quarried & dressed at Tyrone on the KY River & hauled to the property. 5 huge Ionic columns grace the portico & frame the front entry. The doorway is considered to be an exact copy of the north entrance to the Erechtheum at the Acropolis in Athens. The Bryan family lavished time & money on Waveland, making it one of the showplaces of Central KY. The rooms have high ceilings for relief from the hot summer months, a wide hall, & long porches on either side of the house providing views of the countryside. Joseph Henry Bryan inherited Waveland from his father in 1887 & established the estate as one of the premier thoroughbred & trotter farms in KY. In1894, Waveland was sold to Sallie A. Scott, who sold to James A. Hulett, Sr. in 1899. In 1956, the Commonwealth of KY purchased the house & less than 200 of the original 2000 acres for the UK College of Agriculture as an experimental farm & in 1957, Waveland became a KY Life Museum. In 1971, UK deeded Waveland to the KY Dept. of Parks. Today, the mansion & outbuildings are situated on 10 acres depicting KY life on a KY plantation during the 1840's. The mansion is decorated in antebellum style & the outbuildings include a 2 story brick servants quarters, an icehouse, smokehouse & barn. Waveland State Park is open for tours Apr 1-Dec 15, Mon-Sat 10-5 pm, Sun 1-5 pm. For more information call (859) 272-3611. ***Above info is condensed from source http://parks.ky.gov/findparks/histparks/wl/ P 17

124 S. Walnut St. OPEN: Cynthiana, Ky. Friday & Saturday 859-234-7179 10:00 am. until 5:00 pm. Come & live your History or by appointment. Paris Cemetery Gatehouse "Located at the southern end of town, the Paris Cemetery Gatehouse is a significant illustration of a Gothic Revival structure. The 1 1/2 story brick edifice consists of a 3 bay Tudor arcade flanked by cubiform blocks, the southern one housing the superintendent's office & the other originally serving as a reception area. 4 piers that arise above the battlemented parapet support the arcade. Castiron pinnacles of 2 designs cap the piers. The facades of the cubiform blocks are delineated by paired rectangular windows on the lower level & paired square windows on the upper level, & there are brick pilasters at each corner. Under the continuous wooden cornice are corbelled tables on all sides. Castiron gates enhance the arches, & a late Victorian cast-iron fence defines the cemetery are south of the gatehouse. This imposing structure was constructed ca. 1847 for the Paris Cemetery Co., incorporated on January 30, 1847. The well executed & highly functional gatehouse was designed by John McMurtry, a self-trained architect/ builder from Lexington." (Historic Architecture of Bourbon County, KY) The structure was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1978. Several years after the Paris project, McMurtry was commissioned by the Lexington Cemetery to design a similar gatehouse. In October, 1849, he completed his part of the construction for Lexington Cemetery at a cost of $ 2735.23. The next month, H. Moore received $ 14 for cutting stone sills for the gateway & in December W.H. Newberry, a blacksmith was paid $ 254.15 for making the 3 iron gates. The structure was more than a mere gateway. The central vehicular entrance was flanked by narrower pedestrian gates & on either side of these were reception & office rooms. Above the east gate was inscribed "Lexington Cemetery Founded A.D. 1849" and over the west gate were the words "The City of the Dead." This name was frequently used for many years by the newspapers & in burial records. In 1890, the original Gothic gatehouse was torn down and replaced with the present day Romanesque gatehouse. This not only provided larger office space but chapel seating for 125. A new gateway with entrance/exit drives & heavy iron gates was erected and still in use today. ***John McMurtry was the architect for Waveland (following page) P 16 DeSha Point Unique home lots Call: 859-588-2696 Starting @ 22-K August 18, 2011-2011 Antiques and Artwalk Downtown Georgetown. 5-8 p.m. Contact Annie Brady at 316-1958 or anniebrady.anniemals@gmail.com Sometimes you know not what you ask for !!! Two Aussies, Frank and Steve, were adrift in a lifeboat. While rummaging through the boat's provisions, Frank stumbled across an old lamp. He rubbed the lamp vigorously and a genie came forth. This genie, however, stated that he could only deliver one wish, not the standard three. Without giving much thought to the matter, Frank blurted out, "Turn the entire ocean into beer. Make that Victoria Bitter!" The genie clapped his hands with a deafening crash, and immediately the sea turned into the hard-earned thirst quencher. The genie vanished. Only the gentle lapping of beer on the hull broke the stillness as the two men considered their circumstances. Steve looked disgustedly at Frank whose wish had just been granted. After a long, tension-filled moment Steve said, "Nice going Frank! Now we're going to have to whiz in the boat." P 9

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