Pages 1-76 - Springfield-Greene County Library

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Pages 1-76 - Springfield-Greene County Library

ILLINOIS WATCHES ARE BETTER THAN THEY HAVE TO

- - -- -- -.

lride of the %odd

Wherever you go on thc road-when- ments arc thc proving ground of accuracy

ever you hcar railroad inen compare and this estra adjust~i~ent makes the Bunn

watcl~cs, the 23-jewel Bunn Special

will always give you the thrill of leadership

in watch cclnipnient. Its reputation

is justified by daily performance. Its

worcl is the law of thc road, for the Bum

Special offers safety iactors,not Sound in

any other watch.

Special just that much more reliahlc.

The Perfected Watch! ... For before

the long, evcn-plling mainspring could

be used, the f anrous Illinois Supcrior

Motor Barrel had to bc developed, as

well as other rciincments to reduce

friction to the very minimum.

More than 60 hours on one winding!

If yon forget lo wind it one clay you can

still take its worcl for the same accurate

The result is the sustained, dependable

accu,acy is tile pri,jc of the

~ ~ to l k jeweler knows railroad

time the next day with perfect confidence. and he ,,,ill you how

Adjusted to six positions, it has one

degree keener accuracy! Position adjustyou

can own a B~mn Special and be a

leader in watch equipment.

Bc~nn Special, 23 jewels, jeweled Mo~or Barrel, 10k yellow gold-filled case .................. $70

l%unn Special, 23 jewels, jeweled Alotor Barrel, 14k white or green gold-filled case .... 75

1311tln SlwAal, 21 jewels, 10k gol~l-lillcd vase ...................... . ......................... 60

Bunn Special, 21 jewels, Ilk while or green goltl-filletl rase .................... . ................ 65

Any of' these watches tuith engraved-back case, S2.00 arlditiorral


National Expanding Anchor, Dirt set, Angle S tee1

End and Corner Fence Posts

A NEW STEEL FENCE POST for RAILROADS

Can Be Set and Ready for Use in 20 Minutes

NO LARGE POST HOLES TO DIG . . . NO CONCRETE NEEDED

'latin# post- Opening An- Progressive views showing how anchor is folded Tamping

Anthor folded chor by turn- to fil in small post hole and opened by turning

ins post post which oushes anchor olates

into undisturbed soil

Driving large brace plate into

undisturbed soil-post is

now ready for use

h'ATIONAI, I3sl)antling Anchor Dirt Set Angle F,nd and Corner Posts were tlesignetl espcc-

idly for railronds to save time antl expense when I)uiltling right-of-way fence and have already

been tested antl put into use by many of the large railway systems. I7risco employees, charged

with the protection of their right-of-way, will he interested in this new post. It fills a long

felt want for a strong, durable steel post which can be quickly, easily, and inexpensively set.

These new posts take all the delay out of fence building as the fence can be attached and

stretched as soon as the post has been set. No stone, gravel, sand, cement or water to haul -

DO large holes to dig - no waiting for cement to set or hartlcn - no return trips to finish the job.

HOM' IT WORKS. Illustrations above show how easily the Kational Poqt can be set. With

a post hole augcr, or digger, make a hole ahout 8" in diameter and 37" decp. Place post in

liole with anchor folded and with aid of lmce turn post clockwiw which will open anchor plates

under untlisturbctl soil. Fill up hole around post and tamp. Drive large brace plate into undis-

torbed soil and post is ready for use. Can he sct in 20 minutc5 or lcss. Nothing could bc

ea~ier. 'T'his is just thc post railroad men havc heen longing for. Ask your officials to let yo11

install a few for testing antl be convinced. 'I'hey will saw time and money and, of coursc,

they will not Imrn.

WRITE to nearest Imnch office for free folders tlescrihing following products for railroads:

Sntional Expantling Anchor Dirt Set Angle End antl Corner Posts.

Ranner Steel Pence Line Posts.

Railroad \Vovcn Wire Fencing antl Fence Building Instructions.

Stcel Gates for Iiailroatls.

AMERICAN STEEL WIRE COMPANY

Subsidiary of United States Steel Corporation

CHICAGO NEW YORK ST. LOUIS KANSAS CITY MEMPHIS BIRMINGHAM

ATLANTA OKLAHOMA CITY DALLAS DENVER SALT LAKE CITY

UNITED STATES STEEL PRODUCTS CO.

San Francisco Los Angeles Portland Seattle


Pnge 2

We HORACE WILLIAMS CO., INC.

ENGINEERS AND GENERAL CONTRACTORS

I 1 ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD

Specializing in Design and/or C o n s t r u c ti o n of D o c k

Wharves, Piers, Breakwaters, Dams, and Jetties, Bridges,

Railways, Highways, Industrial Plants. All classes of

Building Construction, Building Foundations.

Maintaining an Engineering Department for Consultation,

Investigation, Reports, Surveys, Designs. I

I I HOME OFFICE BRANCHES

I/

Fifth Floor Southern Building Pensacola, Fla. Mobile, Ala. Houston, Tex,

833 Howard Avenue NEW ORLEANS, LA. Representativ" in Principal ties of AII Southern strtns

FRlSCO TERMINALS at PENSACOLA, FLORIDA, WARRlOR RlVER BRlDCE

and Other Important Works for Frisco Lines

RTJILT BY THIS COMPANY

OXWELD RAILROAD SERVICE CO.

REPRESENTING :

LINDE AIR PRODUCTS CO. The PREST-0-LITE CO., Inc.

(Linde Oxygen) (Prest-o-Lite Acetylene)

OXWELD ACETYLENE CO.

(Oxweld Apparatus)

UNION CARBIDE SALES CO.

(Union Carbide)

CARBIDE & CARBON RAILWAY EXCHANGE

BUILDING BUILDING

NEW YORK CITY CHICAGO, ILLS.


I' 7 E FRISCO EMPLOYES' MAGAZINE

ROQMS 73 7- 738 FRISCO BUILDING . .

. ST. LOUIS

WM. L. HUCCINS, Jr.. Editor

'HA C. MOORE. Assaclate Edltor WM. McMILLAN. Adontlslng Manager

1 ' Vd VlI OCTOBER. 1929 No. I

Permission is given to reprint with or without credit.

in part or in full, any article appearing in this Magazine

Contents of This Issue

Pages

St. Mary's, Mo., Wins First Garden Prize ................................................................................................ 4

Western Division Passenger Trains 100 Per Ccnt on Timc ................................................................ 5

Present Radio to Invalid Veteran ..................... . ...................................................................... 6

Car Damage Decreases 23.8 Per Cent ...................... . ........................................................................... 7

Change Operating Policies September 1 ...................................... A

A Page of Cartoons-By John L. Godsey ................................................................................................ 9

News of the Frisco Clubs ................................................................................................................... 10-11

Newspaper Editorial Comment on Locomotive 171ltlurance Run ................... . .................. 12-13

Inaugurate Air Capital Limited September 8 ..................................................................................... 15

Xew Methods of Claim Prevention-By C. F. Smith ........................................................................ 17

Locomotive Fuel Performance Records ............................................................................................ 20-22

Flashcs of Merriment .......... . ........................................................................................................ 23

The Pension Roll ............................... . ........................................................................................................ 24

For Meritorious Service ............................................................................................................................... 25

Homemakers' Departmelit ...................................................................................................................... 26-27

The Twilight Hour ..................................................................................................................................... 2%

Frisco Babies ..................................... L .................................................................................................. 29

The Frisco Mechanic ............... . ................................................................................................. 30-39

Pictures of Honorable Mention Flower Gardens ............................................................................ 36-37

Frisco Family News ................................................................................................................................ 39-72

r--

THE FRISCO EMPLOYES' MAGAZINE

The Prlsco Eluployes' Magazine Is a monthly publication devoted prfmarlly to the interesls

of the more Ulan 25,000 active aud retlred employes of the Frisco Lines. It contains stories,

Items of current news, personnl notes nbout ernploses t111d their famllle, articles denling

wllb rarlow phsspa of rallroad work, poems, cartoons and notices regarding the servlce. Good

dar phdograpl~s suitable for reproduction nre especially desired, and will be returned gnly

ahen reauested. All cnnoous and drasvlncs must be In black India draw5ng Ink.

Emdoyes are lnvlted lo wrlte artlclea for the mapazine. Contrlbutlons should be tpperrlltea,

on one slde of the slieet only, and should be addressed to the Editor, Frlsco Building,

81. Louls. Mo.

Dhtrlbuted free among Frlseo Employes. To others. prloe 15 cents a copy; subscrlptlon rate

$1.50 r year. Advsrtlsin~ rates wlll be made known upon appllcntlon.

Page 3


ST. MARY'S, MO., WINS GARDEN PRIZl

w HILE winter snows blan- (See Pages 36-37) "We have every reason In

lieted a qood part of the tremendously gratified by

Frisco Lines during the FY isCO Flo we r Ca p a i g n showing made." Florist Fel

cold months just passed, Frisco

~lorist Don B. Fellows, at Spring- C~OSCS With Thayer, Mo., in

said, in reviewing the se:

"Nine hundred gardens -

field, Mo., sent out the first annouucement

of his 1929 campaign

for beautification of Frisco station

properties. To mauy persons the Entered Contest

planted this year. We distril~

7,000 nrol


:- prctlicst stutiorr park oir Frisco J~rrcs uppears

' .ir. It is located a! St. .lltrry's, Mo., arid wolr

Page 5

, I-ardrrlnrr Saw CVoolridyc of Thoyer. Mo., is re-

sporrsible for thc Brorr!y of the Tlruyer stutiori

rlarderr, showrr below. 7'his yordcrc peon secod prizr

Over on the Northern division ex- Stephenville, BlufPdale, Tolar, Celina, Sherman, Dora, Tupelo, Hamilton,

..llent beds were grown - at Rosedale, Frisco, Plover and Paris. Pratt City, Cordova, Hillard and Guin..

"trriam, Olathe Bonita, Paola, Fort

Wl Kenoma. Golden City, Bois

, 1 Arc and Nichols.

I The severe drought in Texas conc'i~:ably

handicapped the flower

Besides its second-prize winning

garden at Thayer, the Southern division

attracted attention with attractive

gardens at Rogersville, Bay. Herman,

Clarkdale, Byhalia, Red Banks,

And the River division, besides its

prize winner at St. Nary's, had other

attractive beds at Gravois, Ten Brook,

Fest,ls, Crystal City, Ste. Genevieve,

id^, 3lenfro, ~ ~ ~ Witten- ~

berg, Charfee, Brooks Junction, poplar

apign on the Texas Lines, but ex- Aniory, Columbus. Holly Springs, New Bluff, Kennett, Sikeston, Hayti, Car-

, I~mt gardens were grown at Dublin,

1 --

Albany, Wallerville, Blue Springs, uthersville, Lilborne and Portageville.

Western Didision Passenger Trains 100 Per Cent on Time in August

JVIITH the record of operating

\V la 185 passenger trains 100

states the monthly report on passenger

train performance issued Sepon

all divisions were 96.6 per cent on

tirne as compared the, 95.5 per

per cent on time the Western

I 14ion led all other divisions during

SUB^. The Texas Lines were sectember

10 by the office of F. H. Shalfer,

Springfield, Mo., general manager.

cent for August, 192S, and the 95.3

for August, 1927.

-3 and the River Division third, The 5054 passenger trains operated The report:

DIVISION

Total

Trains Operated

Total Trains Maintained Per Cent Trains .

Sehedule or Made Maintained Schedule

UP Time or Made UP Time

Standlng of

Divislonr

Auu. Aug. Auu. Aug. Aug. Aug. Aug. Aug. Aug. Auu. A . Aug.

1929 1928 1927 1929 1928 1927 1929 1928 1927 I929 1928 IYzr

T+iern .................. . .......... 185

! :?r .......................................... 914

(.._ . rhern ....................... . .... 116

:.:ihwesteru ............................ 845

:.~!nl ...................................... 310

?~thern ................................. 909

kern ....................................... 589

186

819

1054

743

248

679

494

215

922

132.2

S64

620

837

651

185

896

1091

816

299

868

544

185

800

1010

707

229

632

430

210

909

1243

821

602

806

594

100.0

98.0

97.8

96.6

96.5

95.5

92.4

99.4

97.7

95.8

95.2

92.3

93.1.

87.0

97.7

98.6

94.0

95.0

97.1

96.3

91.2

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

. 1. 2

2 1

3 6

4 5

6 3

5 . ..4

7 .. 7

C

?slOperated ........................ 4868 4223 5431 4699 3993 5185

':r Cent Operated ................ 96.5 94.5 95.5

:-sas Lines ............................. 186 248 248 184 246 229 98.9 99.1 95.4

-., 11 System ......................... 5054 4471 5679 4883 4239 5414

1 Cent Operated ..............., 96.6 95.5 95.3


PRESENT RADIO TO INVALID VETERA\

I T is problematical which brought the most pleasure to Charles

Swingler, crippled and blind

veteran or nisro Lines - t11e

gathering of his oldest and best

railroad friends around his bedside

on ~ugust 22, or the radio

Chas. Sw ingle K, Bedridden

En g in ee r, Entertained by

Friends at 'pringfieZd

Gathe ring

Robi~oll, and many other Irk -

The greetings lasted for r I

an hour and then a program :

music ancl readings \vs pre

ed. Misses Catherine, Isab ;

a d ,fa, An11 Dlvyer~ 1

"Dream Train", and Miss rill- ,

which they left with him to cheer Osburn and Mrs. Irene Osbhim

in the hours while they were gave an instrumental duet

"on their runs". grasped Swingler's hand and the tears titled "Slumber Song". bliss &-

He is still astounded, still turning rolled d o his ~ cheeks. ~

dine Heyhurn presented a delig'l

the big party over in his mind. and " Howdy - howdy - Well. Murph!" reading and XIiss Annette McCur

the amazing thing to him is the fact said Mr. Swingier. "Why, Murph, are Mr. Swingler's granddaughter, ;

that he has so many loyal, steadfast sou here, you old scoundrel!" sented a piano solo. which ~lpi !

friends, who, during his years of con- him especially.

finement have not visited his bedside It wax a study to watch his err. I

weekly as a duty, but as a nions and his delight. He ,

pleasure. plauded as each uurnber-

Today, instead of waiting announced and insisted

for a visit, he touches the , encores. His face I

dial of his new Atwater- wreathed In smiles.: ,

Kent radio and strains

from a metropolitan

opera fill the room.

He is living again,-

living in a new world.

an his highly devel-

oped imagination trav-

els with each new sta-

tion which he finds on

the dial.

Bob Sherry. one of 11

most steadfast friends ar

Frisco engineer, who has

it a practice to bring che

ins", is the original sponsor or rne

party. It was he mlfo gave the tip to

the Magazine Department ahout Mr.

Swingler's condition. which resulted

in the story which appeared in the

August issue.

Following the interview. Miss

Martha Moore of the Tlrc I:i-irr-o .lloc/rr-

cirr[, and Mr. Sherry made plans to

bring together all the old enrineer

friends of this fine, old veteran. As

the plans progressed, the sl~ggestioll

was made that they leave a gift \\ it11

him in memory of the. visit, and the

opinion of all was that a radio would

be the most acceptable.

Accordingly a subscription list mas

sent to his many friends ovrr the

entire road, and a sun1 of $350.00 was

raised quickly.

Invitations were broadcast, accept-

Clrrrs. S'~i~i~rqlr,i-, of Sprirrgficld, tnlrcs irt

Iris rrcz~~ rtrdio, the gift of his

I;risro Jricrrtis.

An then another-and another, and

tinally George Hasler, IWsco fireman.

who used to fire for Mr. SM-ingler on

his Ft. Smith run, cmne and grasp4

his hand.

"How are you, C!llarlie," said Mr.

FIasler, as he took his hand in hot11

his own and pressed it.

"George: Is that you. (ieorge?"

And for a nlomeut neither of them

spoke. Then Mr. Swingler burst fort11

in a laugh. "Well, George, me won't

forget the little old 248, will we, with

her leakv Hues'? Remember when we

had such a time gettin' up enough

ances received and the number antic- steam to go o\er the Bostou bIoun-

ipated necessitated securiue; Eagle's ' tainss"

Hall on Commercial Street, Spring- One of the remarkable things to

field. At 4:00 o'clock on the after- those who crowded near Mr. Swing-

noon of August 22. Mr. Swingler was ler's cot was the fact that he could

wheeled into one of the spacious call ,the name of each nlan who

rooms and his friends crowded around grasped his hand. He hadn't forgot-

his bedside. ten one of them and he called them

"Howdy, Charlie,": said Mr., M. J. familiarly as old "Tug" Dwyer. "Herb"

Murphy, a 46-year-old veteran, as he Miller. "Little Billy" Carter, "Jud"

he kept time to

nlusic with hiy

which he contlnu

moved under

covers.

"Bob" S h e rry

nounced each of'

above numbers and '

lowing the enterlainm,

le called on Miss Mar

oore for an address.

lis time he had no h

?re was a radio await

ome. It was Installed

.v~r. A. L. ~eynold~, of the Springt

CRY and Electric Company, of Spri

field, distributors of the Atwater&

Radio.

In presenting the radio, Miss Jib

expressed the appreciation of both

Sherry and herself at the spleur

representation of Mr. Swingler's

friends.

'We thought that we would likp

leave with you a little gift by wb

vou could remember this gatherll!

she said. "and so we bought you c.

"It \$as too big to bring to I

party," she said "and it isn't a I'

locon~otive-it's a radio! "

Mr. Swingler. in a hushed and

to~~ishecl whisper. repeated the av

-"a radio! A radio!"

"We wanted to give you ¬

pair of ears-another pair of eyes.

it' this radio brings you onetent![ I

the l~appiness which you have so fr.

given to those who come to your I

side for cheer, then it will h

served its purpose."

"1 have never seen a radio," '

Swingler said, in response, "but I h

listened to one, aud to think t'

these kind friends have given me I

(NO= ttrr~f to t~cxf Page# PIC'O,~~,'


Car Damage Decreases 23.8 Per Cent First Eight Months

Pnge 7

D

URISG the first eight months of

1929 the number of freight

cars on the Frisco Lines dam-

September 12 by the car accountant

at Springfield, Mo. The number of

cars handled per car damaged indan~aged

on this division. Springfield

holds first place among the terminals,

having damaged but four

.rl by roogh halldling creased 34. per cent. The monetary cars.

. ' per cent and the

-mt of this damage decreased

'7 per cent as compared with the

-1 ~ight months of 1928, states the

amount of damage per car handled

decreased 36,09 per cent,

Western Division hokls first place

Following is a comparative statement

covering rough handling on the

Frisco Lines during the period under

~parative monthly report issned anlong the divisions. So cars were consideration.

- -

OIVISIO~ NUMBER CARS

PER CENT

DAMAGED

STANDING

DIVISION

OR

TERMINAL

DAMAGED

1929 1928 1927

AMOUNT DAMAGE

1929 1928 1927

NUMBER CARS HANDLED

1929 1928 1927

TO TOTAL

HANDLED

1929 1928 1927

0 R

TERMINAL

'29 28 '27

1:

.-ringfield ....... :. ,I

:wlngham ...... 13

1'-rnphla ............. 31

..Louis ............. 47

(:q?sz$ City ....- 40

l_!?a ................... 64

Total .............. 208

11

17

70

'io

81

:jY

2S7

i

19

73

63

84

70

306

61.082.00

317.00

1.102.00

1.466.00

2.209.00

5.i21.50

11.977.50

$1,120.00

1.080.00

4.562.50

2.273.00

4.003.00

4.620.00

17.55S.50

TERMINALS

:! 865.00 521.556 527.964 515,614 .0008 ,0021 .Opl4

969.50 i71.476 479.681 488.79; .no28 .oo:jr, . o o ~

2.262.00 .i98.364 513,161 tj06.212 ,0078 .012fi ,0120

931.00 :39.613 530.3.56 bn9.881 .oos,i ,0132 .0104

2.039.50 520.079 514,612 470.379 .009.1 ,0157 ,0179

4.740 639.530 618.559 565.953 ,0100 ,0061 .0124

- _ _ _ _ _ _ - -

11.241.50 3.113.618 3,184,333 3,156,836 ,0067 ,0090 .0097

UIVISIONS

--- - - P

-

-

.~ . -- - .

;,l?.I ..............., 175 220 200 l(1.460.00 16.367.00 7.007.16 3.467.966 3,301,608 5,283,507 ,0050 ,0067 ,0061

- -A - - < _---__-

F eF?m Belt .... R 2 - 261.00 110.00 - Sl.560 32.409 -- ,0098 .0093

7-r.?r Llnes ...... 13 20 17 276.00 1.172.00 313.00 96.412 !)S,191 89,441 .01::6 ,020.1 ,0190

- - - - - . . - - . - - . - -

T :.System ...... ,404 530 523 22.974.50 35.207.50 18,561.66

1928 Comoland With 1928 , .

Ihr wnt decrease in number CR~S dnrna~ed. ..... . .. .... ... .2X.8 Per cent increasc in nurnher of cars hRndled ger car

" - ~~rnt decrease in amount of damarre ...................... ... .... 34.': danm~ed . ..... .... .. ...... ............ ................................ .. . . .... 34.0

-

Per cent drcrcztse in :~niount of damaRe per c!nr

handled .. .............................................................. . .... .. . ..36.09

-

( . ,I# .. mean eyes and ears and limbs

1 me. and oh, how it will cheer me

I

',lr7s the long days and nights. 1

,:,., loo, that it will be an incentive

.- $me of you old-timers to come

and we'll radio for an IIOW or

( blhen recited n hit of verse. dedi-

-';I to his dd friend, George Hasler.

, I : l ahich he had composed himself.

?doring Pis talk, letters sere

i iron1 the following officials, who

,r.-oqsed their regret at being unable

.I ?!PII~ the gathering, and each let-

.,: inng true vith the sincere wish

Y rhe radio would bring Mr. Swing-

-mxhhapptness. These letters were

'iiili out among his friends, and

.- : md one when called upon. They

":-.a horn J, 11. Kurn, president of

:-:PO Lines, J. E. Hutchison, vice-

-.;iden1 operation, F. H'. Hamilton.

--president - secretary - treaswer. L.

f Martin, assistant to President

r13 . , .. C. J. Stephenson, assistant gen-

I

.Y! manager, W. D. Bassett, secretary

.:TI\ of pensions. J. L. McCormack,


CHANCE OPERATING POLICY SEPT. FIRST

S

TEADILY increasing traffic

over Frisco Lines with a con- Two D is t i t C a t d-

cific and Detroit, Toledo r

Ironton. He has been a&:.

sequent increase in operating

problems has brought about an C. J. Stephenson Promoted to

superintendent and later r

president and general sup?.

importa~it change in the operating tendent of Texas Lines, assbt

~~olicv

of the railroar1 accorrling to Assistgnt General Manager to the president 0, ,is, ,,-

an announcement September 1.

b) F. H. Shaffer, general manager, the general manager in February of

Effective September 1, two oper- 1912. In 1913 he became assistant

ating districts were created, each un- chief cIerlz to the general manager,

der the direction of an assistant gen- and in February, 1914, he was ap-

era1 manager. pointed chief clerk to the general

The first district, coinprising the superintendent of the Frisco's second

A'ortl~ern, Southern and River di- operating district. The general super-

visions and the Kan-

sas City, Memphis

and Birmingham

terminals, is mder

the jurisdiction of M.

M. Sisson, assistant

general manager.

The second district,

including the Eastern,

Central, Southaesterli

and Western divis-

ions, and the St.

Louis, Springfield and

Tulsa terminals, was

assigned to C. J.

Stephenson, who was

promoted from assist.

ant to the general

manager, to assistant

general manager.

General M a n a ger

Shaffer explained that

the work of directing

the operation of the

5,800 miles of line

comprising the Frisco

had become too great

a task for the present

official staff, and the CL.\IJDE I,. K I ~ G

promo t i o 11 of Mr.

Stephenson to an assistant general

managership is expected to greatlv

facilitate present operating proble~ns

and conditions.

The newly promoted assistant gen-

eral manager is a Frisco veteran of

thirty years' contiiiuous service in the

mechanical and operating depart-

ments. On July 1, 1899, C. J. Stephen-

son, then a boy of 17, entered Frisco

employ as a clerk in the office of the

superintendent of machinery at

Springfield. During the next ten years

he worked on various desks in the

office of the superintendent of motive

power, and in 1909 was promoted to

chief clerk to the shop superintendent

at the time the Frisco opened its new

$1,600,000 shops in Springfield. He

became assistant chief motive power

clerk January 1, 1911, and was again

promoted to special representative of

intendent at that time was Mr. J. E.

Hutchison, now operating vice-presi-

dent.

On March 1, 1917. Mr. Stephenson

became chief clerk to the assistant

general manager and in July, 1918, he

became chief clerk to the general

manager, at that time Mr. J. M. Kurn.

On March 1, 1920, when the rail-

roads were returned to their owners

following federal control, he became

assistant to the general manager at

Springfield, the position he held at

the time of his promotion to assistant

general manager.

M. 31. Sisson, who continues ari

assistant general manager in charge

of the first district, came to tho

Frisco in 1918 as chief dispatcher a:

Sapulpa, Okla., after eighteen years

railroad service with the Santa Fe.

Chicago and Northwestern. Union Pa-

and was promoted to assist

general manager on Jme 1, 1923

Claude P. King, assistant chieic'

to the general manager was promi

to assistant to the general manin

the place of Stephenson. Kine:

been with Frisco Lines since :

when he entered service as a stv

rapher in the -

chanical deparln ,

He has been a r

ber of the Kern

manager's stafl :

1912, and was lor

ly secretary Lo

general 8np7

tendent.

Other changes

the operating der

ment which folloo

change in policy '

t h e promotion

Messrs. Stenher

and King place '

D. E. Gelnix, for

ly maintenance

sistant to gen.manager,

as diri.

engineer of the E

ern division, the ,

sition he had B

prior to jolning

general manae

staff. Mr. E. L. I

derson who had .

ceeded Mr. Qelru

division engineer

the Eastern. retur

to his former position as assistant

vision engineer.

J. M. Connelly who had the tit%

chief maintenance clerk, becv +

senior clerk in the general manaz

office and Z. M. Dunbar, former c

train clerk becomes chief ma!

nance clerk.

Paul Krueger, widely known on

Eastern division through his por'l

for several years as secretary to

perintendent J. A. Moran, was eh~

by assistant general manager C

Stephenson as his secretary, 7

headquarters in SpringfieId.

City Visitor (noticing bow ir

trious the farmer's wife is): Mr. F

kins, you have a very hard ror'

wife.

Mr. Perkins: You're right, I r

had a couple more like her.


1

'rr, 19.3

.

t;

e

0

'C

! (

I

\

f

$

I


T

NEWS of the FRISCO CLUBS

Wichita, Kans.

0 acquaint menlbers with the

new Air Capital Limited and its

schedule. and to stimulate inter-

est among enlployes, were the pur-

poses for which the first meeting of

the fall and winter se~ason for the

Frisco Employes' Club of Wichita.

Kans., was called August 30. The

meeting was held ill a passenger

coach on the tracks near the round-

house. Fourteen members attended.

Mr. Henry E. Morris, general freight

and passenger agent, made all expla-

nation of the schedule of the Air Capi-

tal Limited, which leaves Wichita at

9 p. 111. a~rd arrives in St. Louis at

ll:35 a. m., making connection there

with ten noon trains for all easteri~

points, Chicago. Detroit, Buffalo. In-

dianapolis, Cincinnati, P i t t s 1) 11 r g h.

Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washingtou.

New York and Boston, and for inter-

n~ediate points as well. He urged all

present to acquaint their friends with

this new service which fills a very

definite public need.

A short talk by Mr. E. E. Carter

followed, in which he spoke about

business conditions in Wichita and

about the new train. Business condi-

tions in Wichita were as good as any

place in the territory, he said. He

asked all to help make the new train

n success.

Engineer Jack Halbert made a short

talk OII getting business for the

Prisco, and on making the Air Capital

Limited a big success

The entertaiunlent committee is

planning some amusement and re-

freshments for the near future, but the

plans were not complete at the time

of the meeting. The next meeting

will be held early ill October.

Birnringhanr, ALa.

The swimming party and dance.

given by the Frisco Employes' Club

of Birminghani. at the Birmingham

Athletic Club, September 3, was at-

tended by 300 members and their

friends. A ~run~ber of contests were

held during the evening.

Winners of contests were as follows:

the swimnling balloon race for

women, Mrs. C. H. Vaughn. wife of

revising clerk; the swimming balloon

race for men and umbrella swimming

race, Earl Basham, clerk, Bessemer

Station; bathing beauty contest, first

prize. Mrs. E. T. Boyd, wife of the

proprietor of East Thomas restaurant;

second prize, Mrs. C. .I. Thompson.

wife of assistant superintendent of

ter~ninals; prize waltz, Mr. and Mrs.

.J. E. Milton.

Music was furnished by Bill Shaef-

fer's Country Club Arcadians. Danc-

ing lasted until midnight.

North End Bmumont Sub

X business meeting was held by the

Xorth End Beaumont Sub Frisco Employes'

Club at Atlanta, Kans.. July 17.

Twelve menibers and eight visitors attended.

Secretary J. B. \7asilopus turned in

a tip of three women coutemplating a

trip beyond St. Louis in the near l'uture.

J. E. Jones autl C. H. Cowles

made talks. A discussion of Frisco

freight and passenger xervice and tlfe

possibility oY getting business followed.

The visitors in attendance were: \V.

11. Eastin. conductor; G. C'. Tribble,

brakeman; D. C. Wright. brakeman;

H. R. Vance, engineer; L. R. Phelps.

firenian. C. H. Ammerman. engine

watcl~man, all of Enid; A. S. Murphy,

tlitcher wgineer. Springfield, a ~ ~ Al- d

bert Jewell. ditcher fireman. Pawnee.

Fort Smith, Ark.

The Frisco Employes' Club of Ft.

Smith, Ark., held a picnic at Fine

Springs, near Rudy, 4rk.. August 21.

One hundred and fifty attendecl.

Lunches and punch were served at

8 p. m. Following this, there was

dancing and swimming.

Thayr, Mo.

The Frisco Employes' Club of

Tl~ayrr, No., held a business meeting

in the assembly room of the Y, ivl. C!.

A,, August 15. The attendance was

small, but those present took and ac-

tive Interest ill the meeting.

Secretary T. H. Edmuntlson brought

up the matter of having a Frisco booth

at the county fair in September and

asked all present to lend a hand in

making it a success. Mrs. H. W. Mil-

ler, Jlrs. T. H. Edn~undsou. Mrs. J. E.

Haynes aud Mrs. T. E. King were

present to talk over matters pertain-

ing to the Frisco booth. Ralph Beatty

of the Barnes Dairy Products Com-

pany and Paul Cockn~an of the Cock-

man Produce Company also were vis-

itors.

It was decided that the regular

meeting night for the club be changed

from Monday to Thursday, and here-

after n~eetiugs will be held on '

third Thursday in each month. P-

ever, since ill September this rill,

during the week of the fair, ther:

in' will be held the second Thurr!

Girls' Club, St. Louis

The August luncheon of the Fr

Girls' Club of St. Louis was he1

the Crystal Koo~n, Hotel Jeffer

August 25, with approximately

guests and members of the club 1

ent.

The program was one of the r1

interesting ever prese~~ted, and ,

honor guest for the day was D. L.:I

sythe, general road foreman of pr?

nient of Frisco Lines and far-fa!!

engineer of the world's champion ;

drlral~ce loconlotive No. 4113. He.'

ac:comp:~nied to the luncheon by :

srt Collett, fuel agent for R

Liues. Mr. Collett introduced hlr

the members.

SIr. Forsythe made a splendld :

to the girls, expressing his plea?

at being able to be preseut, and

told interesting bits about his !

endurance ~IIII. "At one time I

not have my clothes off for 48 how

he said. "I do not want to take,

special credit for the run berz

anyone else could have done it it I

uished with a first-class locomar

and good coal and splendid help,?:

as I had. I did not hold the ma:

key, I just worked out the probk

and 111.v co-workers did the resr

"It is an impiratio~~ to work C.

milroad like the Frisce-the besr

earth," he continued. "I do not

lieve there is a better spirit or bps

feeling among any class of raik,

enlployes thau there is on our '

today, and the Frisco Railroad tc

is oue oC the outstandi~lg roads -

attracts nlore attention in railr

circles and among busiuess p

than any other road in this cow

"Dependable service is what coo.

The fact that we made tlh lonng :.

with this engine is good adver'

ment for our road and shows Lhr

pays to ship and ride over a dey

able road which has locomotirr:

such condition as to make this

marlcable record."

Following the two addresses. :

odor Simonov, operatic and con -

tenor, gave a group of songs, a,., .

panied by Bert Baunlgartner of,

advertising department. Frisco L!.


Page 11

' -

,wng an Italian love song. all Irish

':song and responded with two en-

.. ,$. His numbers were entl~usias- Clubs Make Excellent Traffic Record

llly received.

\!is8 Dorothy Green. niece of Miss

'.vile Kerr of Frisco Girls' Club .

.. ?enled a delightful piano solo . Al-

~i!!~h only twelve years of age. Miss

:-+en is n very accomplished yonng

wician .

Mrs . Louis Gibson . chairman of the

i'ertainn~ent program had previously

:sed out slips to the me~nbers with

~rds such es rice. salt. ginger. sage .

-pper and sugar and several girls

. reired slips with the same wort1 .

;she called for the word. these girls

;*P and she read their fortune . The

:me created considerable laughter

. 111 was an added feature to the in-

-resting program .

Due to the recent marriage of Miss

ktherine Martin. who served the

:rh xi vice.president. it was neces-

. ry to elect a member to take her

'.ire. That honor was accorded Miss

:sr? Ansbro of the passenger traffic.

'+iwLment. and Miss Ansbro made

short acceptance speech .

E'ayetteville. Ark .

Esrb of the fourtee11 members presct

at the meeting of the Frisco Embyd

Club of Fayetteville. Ark., held

yrenber 10. pledged himself to do

. u wry best in solicitation work durr:

[he last six-month period of this

.+st. in order to get all possible busi-

. c ~ ior 2 the Frisco .

Solicitation work since the last

wing of the club. July 12. was dis-

.. .{I . During this time. fifteen pas-

..cer s. all of whom had planned to

-.-PI by bus. had been secured for

'.Frisco by G . C . Dakon . W . R . Rax

Guy Miles. D . G . Lelm and C . B .

.miloman . Several L . C . L . shipments

-+ heen secured by Virgil Farmer .

!licrrloL ahipme~~ts were reported for

' .. perlod .

Frreral members of the club made

.westing and instructive talks and

- . .e suggestions for the betterment

[he club . The next meeting night

* .. set for Tuesday. October 8 .

Willow Springs, Mo .

First Six Months

lir.srr1t.r of c~~~pioyc soiicit(~/ior~ of /r(r#ic for the first six rrror~ths of 1929 .

zcms h.'ghly sntisfnc/ory . trs is cuidcrrccd by the fol1ozl~irr.q /nbulatiorr . TItr

totals i~r mrlot . pnssrrr~~cr orrd ILL brtsirrrss srcurrci nrr trlrrrost as grrat for

this s k ~rrorrlks prriod. ns for tlrc cntirc yew of 1528 . Srrstnicd rflort b:'

c?aploys' rlrrb rrrrrrrbcr-s ir~ scotring traflic for the railrond drtrirrg tAc balnlrc~

of the yrczr . av7l makr possiblc n rrrzu high rrcord for thr Tmr .

.

Carlots LCL Passengers

St . Louis Terminals ................... . .............. 111

60

Fort Worth ................................................................... 18 . 4 26

Fayetterille .......................................................... 11 42 51

Ft . Smith ............................................................. 21 186 47

Jonesboro ................................................................. 91 685 180

Henryetta ............................ . .................................. 73 67 32

Pawnee only (of the Perry Sub Club) .. : ............. 192 225 22

Neodesha ......................................................................

94

Hugo ..............................................................................

Okmulgee ....................................................................

3

Thayer ..........................................................................

8

Monett ..........................................................................

22 6

Kansas City ............................... . .....................

48

Sherman .............................................................. 1. .......

39

.I/

Birmingham ........................... . .............................

5

Wichita .................................... . ....................

20

Arkansas City ................... . .................................

3

Madill .................................... .......... ..............................

G

Salem ................... . ....................................

22

BI~~skogee ................... . .............................

20

Tulsa ........................ . ................................................

49

Thomas ............................................................. :.I.! ....

1

Blytheville ..................................................................

35

Clinton, Okla ...............................................................

2

Olteene .............................................................. !.. .........

10

Clinton . Mo . ................................................................

31

Willow Springs ...................................... . ......

4

Blackwell ....................................................................

18

Eagle City ....................................................................

2

Drummond ..................................................................

1

Enid .....................................................................

30

Poplar Bluff ........................... . ..............................

26

Anlory ............................ . ........................................

150

Cape Girardeau .................... . .... . ..................

26

Sapulpa ............................... . ..................................

213

Oklahoma City ................... . ..............................

81

Frederick ....................................................................

2

Ft . Scott ......................................................................

24

Springfield, Girls' and Yen's ................................

3. 281

Helena ..........................................................................

4

Mountain Park ..........................................................

2

Hayti ............................................................................

6

Hobart ..........................................................................

5

Chaffee ..........................................................................

14

Perry .........................................................................

12

St . Louis, Girls' ................... . .............................

40

:i:e kfsco Employes' Club of Wil-

;T Springa. Mo., held a business

-.+ting at the Willow Springs City

'4 . September 10 . Ten members

North Encl Beaumont Sub (No figures available)

Joplin, Mo ...................................................................

St . Louis, Men .........................................................

Pensacola ..................... . .........................................

36

20

4 one visitor. Assistant Superintend-

-: C . B . Catlaham. attended .

rresldent R F . Livingston reported

. .I! he had Induced two passengers .

Totals .............. . ............................................. 4, 467 5, 241

-ho intended to travel by bus. to buy

':*h?ls over the Frisco to St . Louis

.- 81 from St . Louis to Chicago over

"- Chicago & 41t011 .

Entertainment committee informed

tbe club that they were planning an

entertainment for the next regular

meeting. to be held October 8 .

U pto-date

"What do you think of the bare leg

IaxJ?''

'!Oh. it's all right as far as it goes."


What Nation's Newspapers Said Edito riallg of Frisco's

I

Record Locomotioe Run

I

I

I

lt't'olrb tlrc Philudel~~lriu Z'ttDl~c Ledger of

Auguat 18, 1929.

While the endurance achievements

ol' airplane engines are being widely

applauded, a railroad locomotive in

the West has been modestly piling up

mileage and has established a new

endurance record for machines of

that type. For twenty days. engine

NO. 4113, of the St. Louis-San Francisco

Railroad, has pulled freight trains

between Kansas City, 310.. and Bir

mingham, Ala., rolling up a total of

6,144 miles, without its fire being

drawn. This is described as a record.

Interest invariably centers on thr

newest type of achievement. The

locomotive yielded in interest to the

auton~obile, and the aptomobile now

has become commo~iplace. The spirit

of romance and the popular imagination

at the moment center on the

airplane, and new automobile and

locomotive tests receive scant men

tion. hIeanwhile, unsung and almost

unnoticed, No. 4113 gives an endurance

performance that will delight

every superintendent of motife power

who dreads "engine failurew-and all

of them do. -

From the Denvev Poat of Aicflrcat 1.C. 1929.

Endurance records are the rage

these days. The one made by a St.

Louis-San Francisco loconlotive bs-

tween Kansas City and Birmingham

is worth while. It is an efficiency

record. This engine ran for twenty-

five days, covering 7,350 miles, with

out overhauling. The old record was

3,500 miles. The St. Louis-Sail Fran-

cisco locomotive 11auIed more than 13

and three-fourths million tons of

freight while making its record and

was still in good colidition. All rail-

road men are interested in its per-

formance, for they want to reduce

bperating expenses.

From the Ifrrnsns Citg Times of Atcgvat

15, 1909.

A Fri~co loco~notive has now marc

than doubled the best previous record

for endurance by completing a

series of seven round trips between

Fansas City and Birmingham, Ala.,

without having its fire drawn. It was

pinety-nine years ago this summer

$hat the first American ancestor of

locomotive No. 4113 sallied forth upon

ailother trial run. Peter Cooper catled

his conlraptio~l the Tom Thumb, because,

as he once wrote, "it was so illsignificant".

As a matter of fact, it

was little larger than a present-day

handcar and probably weighed not

"4113"

There have been many instances

of famous and significant numerals.

All of us know the meanings

and connotations of such numerical

phrases as "7-1 l", "23", "50-50".

"NX211".

And now Frisco Llnes has added

another potent numeral to the list,

with its famous "4113".

During the twenty-five day run

of Frisco endurance locomotive No.

"4113", the readers of 1,200 newspapers

served by the Associated

Press throughout America, almost

1,000 reached by the United Press

service, and 600 newspaper subscribers

to the service of International

News, saw daily stories of

the progress of the "4113". At the

conclusion of the run, "Time", the

weekly news magazine with a circulation

of almost 400,000 printed

an article with a photograph of

D. L. Forsythe, road foreman of

equipment, who rode the recordbreaking

engine on her trip. National

railway magazines, "Transportation"

and "Railway Age" carried

pictures and detailed stories

of the achievement.

And so "4113" came to take its

place, temporarily at least, as an

outstanding idiom, denoting endurance,

sturdiness, power, and splendid

performance.

T h e accompanying editorials.

clipped at random from American

newspapers, reflect. accurately the

impression created by this outstanding

achievement by Frisco

Lines.

-W. L. H., Jr.

much more tllan a ton. (No. 411::

would tip the scales at 560,000 Ibs.)

The Baltimore C Ohio railroad at

that time owned a double track from

Baltimore to Ellicotts i\Iills, thirteeu

miles away. which was being operated

by horsepower, and it was on this

line that Tom Thumb was to perform.

All went well on the out trip. The

train-there was orie car, carrying

company directors-attained at one

point a speed of eighteen nliles an

hour, and everyone was duly elated.

Rut on the way back Cooper tried to

race a horse-drawn train on the ser-

ond track. The Tom Thumb hat1

forged into the lead when a pulley

slipped and, before he could replace

it, the race was lost.

No. 4113 has just made a run last

ing twenty-five days and coverinr:

more than 7,000 miles without a,-

pair. In this matter of breaking r-

ords, we are glad to note. the 1-

horse is not to be outdone by elf'

the irou fish or the iron bird.

--

Flom tlie Rattle Crcak /.ll!ch.J Jolr

of .L~c.qctat 19, 1929.

Steanl 1or.olnotives now are go

in for enduranw records. They

doing pretty well at It, too, A I

morltl's record was made rew

when Ibgine No. 4113 on the

Louis-Sail F~anclsco Railroad tra\r A

7,350 miles without having its '

drawn. This means continuous oor

tion. pulling freight trains, f~r l

(lays-a longer time than the gasr

tor ran in the famous airplane

durance flleht at St. Louis.

It is good to see the steam ene

rouse itself for new demonstrat

of power and service. This type

engine is by no means shelved by1

gas engine. Steam may come t%

for new triumphs. Some engin?

say that airplaues will soon be us

it.

FIOIII t h Sv~i ~ Ovlari?z.v Trib~rne of 1110

18, 19.2'1.

Engine Xo. 4113, of the St. Lo1

San Francisco Railroad, in the oi

nary come-and-go of daily traffic, I

just comgleleil a run of 25 daya.

covered 7,500 miles. pulling hw

freights all the time between Kanc

City and Birmlngharn.

In those 2.5 days, its fire was no

drawn, its boilers were not

and no repairs were made. The r

ord more than doubles the previr

locornotire - endurance record. Er

so, it would probably have been

creased did not Federal regulatlll

require the esamination of engm

each 30 days.

This is a record which will brv.

no cheers from the multitude c

medals for the crew. But it standr

solid evidence that aviation is r

the only branch of trdnsportarl

which is making advances in eql!

ment and in methods.

--

I1'i,ot11 the St. 1,ort I $ L'loOe-I)oarooo~

Alcglfat 15, 1929.

While large sums are spentinmv

years for improvements in exist'-

rights of way and on terminals. 1'

$50,000,000 to be laid out in near:

road construction undertaken I'

year in the single State of Texas

the largest sum devoted to the I-

pose in a long period. And Texas h

many thousand miles of bus lines a'


11 -~pidly establishing air lines. In

LI- nnal transportation the railroads

rn still "standard equipment," the

+!:b creation in the entlre structure.

endurance tests as that in which

rr;sco locomotlve engaged, with fires

-dnwn and heavy service performed

I 'hout intermission from July 19 to

'1 a. m., 011 August 13, running up a

4 mileage of 7,350. have a sober.

tlcal value not to be overlooked in

attention naturally given to other

-! more novel endurance tests.

1

1

Ihe .!Ira MWI~IP,Y Ref~istei of Aiil]irnt

10, 1939.

lo this perid of endurance tests

: automotive ~nechanisms there

:nuld be some entertainment and

r!ue in the record run by a St. Louis

id San Francisco locomotive which

to Thursday had traveled 5,000

:iles in eervice without having its

7% drawn.

SInce the beat previous record was

miles, it Is plain that Locomorr

4113 is world's record holder

sv. The engine has been working

-tween Kansas City, Mo., and Birmerham.

Ma., according to the United

'ws dispatch about it. That in itrll

is peculiar, for an ordinary loimotive

run is confined to a railway

~irsion, and divisions are rarely ,500

:!'a long.

Of course. unlike such other mechqism

as airpIane motors or automo-

114 motors when put to sustained

~~!unnce tests, the locomotive is

operation. How

aurb mechanical attention it gets at

:mlnals h not clearly explained. It

I ,i rvtainly given careful checking.

nv, ., lubrication, and possibly some

??ah. Since the flres are not drawn.

, :a prnhably tollows that the test is

!1rc4p one of the boiler flues. Stop-

:am at terminals would give plenty

r! !he, it may be presumed, for

r.whanica1 attention to a hundred

;ar:s-air brakes, to mention merely

a9

rurtainly the railroad is taking no

I rlinees of any kind of failure in oper.

rinn that might tie up trackage or

i3n3 heavy property loss.

Onr of the benefits of the test

I'wld be to emphasize not the posr:'riiities

but rather the limitations of

I n~~.lnnisms

The Frisco's rrldwrame rurr lororrroti7~r. Nlr~rrber 4113, took a place itt the lirrrelight

with tirr farrrorcs flying pair, Jackson and O'Briirc, in corrwectio~t with tlrr tlreatre

progrnrrr at I-oeds State Thentre in St. Lottis, the week of Azcgrrst 24-30. The above

pkotogrnph is of the lobby display irr tlrr theatre tlrnt week. The tnodel loconrotive

crossir~g a bridge with a nrorrrrtazr~or~s backgrolirrd, the "two-sheet" carrying prirlted

stntistics 01s tile run, together with n picture of D. I.. Forsythe, arld the Jackso*r nrrd

O'Brine skeet o1r the right, all ronrbirred to make atr attractizrr lobby display. J4arry

thousands of Lords State patrons pawed irr adwrirntiorr before the set during thr

nuerk. The featurr attractiorr zvas Lort Charreg irr "Tlrrtr~deJ', a railroad picttrre.

livelier gait than ever. Engine 411? comotive seems likely to hold it3

of the Frisco has just finished a place for heavy hauling.

twenty-five day, 7,350-mile fast freight

run between Birmingham, Ala., and From the Mobile (41a.J ~e5hter of

Kansas City, Mo., without having its 4ll{~lfSt I!?, 1!?2!?.

i

fires drawn, its boiler washed. or re-

This seems to be a day of endurance

tests and there is a good deal of

pairs made. In those twenty-five

doubt about what some of them provo

days it hauled 13,780,749 gross tons

after they have been made. There is:

of freight, and consumed 1,600,000 practical value in a test of a maragallons

of water and 975 tons of coal. thon locomotive on the Frisco systen~

This 560,000-pound portable power between Birmingham and Kansas

plant, for that is what the locomotiv~? City which has recently been comis,

broke a world's record.

pleted.

Improvement of the steam engine.

in fact, is keeping pace with the de.

This loconlotive for more than

three weeks was kept in continuous

velopment of other means of gener- night and day service without allowating

power. The modern locomotive

hauls heavier loads at lower operating

the fires to die down. It traveled

7,350 miles under the test with thr

that have been establish-

J-$ as reliable through decades and

lwlrs of service, and that have

ing cost than ever before. Use of

new steels, better construction and

handling, have made it possible to

operate continuously over long runs

without laying up. Not many years

general road foreman of equipment

constantly in the cab to observe the

results. The run is said to have

doubled the previous world's record

for a locomotive's endurance without

bsn developed to what we call "a ago it was thought metal "fatigue" being take11 to the shops for an over

t.rh point of perfection," with innum- made it unsafe for a locomotive to hauling of one kind or another.

mMe costly auxiliaries to keep them run more than 150 miles without rest

L? operation. -

and overhauling. This Frisco engine FIYJ~ the Q ~ c i w ! ~ (Ilt.) Herald-Whig of

r-. the St. I,oais Stnr of .4?trrilst 16. was still going strong when a federal A icgifst 2, 1929.

153.

inspection law compelled it to stop. Down on the 'Frisco railroad be-

KMle marveling over airplane en- Electric motors and gas engines havrl tween Kansas City and Birmingham,

cmnce records and steamship runs. not yet displaced steam. As long as Ala.. a sturdy freight engine has been

I ?la': overlook that the steam loco- cheap coal is available for the rail- pounding away in an endurance test

I awe has been coming along at a roads, the modern efficient steam lo- (NOPI! trrrrr to Paye 15, please)


k'iftg Years of Progress in Joplin, Mo.

I:ifty ycors o!jo /'hoto!/rtrphcr C.. 14'. Jlrdd of Jopliir, Mo., ~z~ho sprc.itrlid irr phtrto!~rczplty of "rrrirrcs, iirirri~r~ irmib ;

rrsiderrccs, livestock, CIC.,'' osrordilr~ to his lel~rr.ltcuds, ~ o ~(rll~(1 s to lhc FI.;.YCO depot lo rrcord for postcri~y n Frisco i,lr

livc 'u-hiclr had jusl co~rrc lo Joph trezrl fro111 the shops. Tlrerc roos rro skgli~rc irr Jopliir irr 1879, as /Ire plrotograph ijrl! )

Tlrr pictrrrc is tkc properly of C'. '11. C'trrroll. Frisco cngiaccr irr Joplitr, arrd .mas srcrwed for tlrr ~llu~gozirrc by Jlr. HF~IT;;

,qrrro-trt rort!/-orfor of Joplirr, roltosr. sistcr is Mrs. CorroN.

irr ordcr to properly prrsrrrt Ihr fifly-year corttrost irr Joplirr's gl.o.z~llr (orrd irrcidcrrtoll~ irr I;risco ~rrotivr PO~IPT), 07

ph.otoyroplr. wos rrrotie lust rrrorrllr trl c.roctly tlrc satnc spot. Thr skylii~ Irnd grozwn, tlrr Dnckgrorrrrd liad cllarrged. .! ,

rrcar right is thc pltrrit of lhc Arrrcr.icarr Frrnritrrrr Corrrparr~. ~\~c.rl !o the left is thc First Natiorrol Rarrk Building i

distance; tlrm the tozr?rrirr,q Christrrmrr Rttildb~g, which is scrrr Dctizccrt tlrc stack arrd first dorrre of tltc locorrrotiz~c.

A glirtrpsc of !hr fiftjr-ycwr yrowlh of Joplilt czrrd Frisro 1,i~r.r.v ir co~toi~red in tlrcsc controstky plrotographs,

MORE RAPID HANDLING wnle date at 3:00 p. ~n., unloaded and Customer: I'nl afraid this sitit

eign cal.s

the fact that forto

be leturne(l to the

delivered back to the Missouri Pacific

at. Ft. Gibson on August 15. The case

shrink if it gets wet. How abo

Abe?

llonle line the least posgihle (le- Was gilten special conlmendation by 4be: No, siree, every fire corn

lay. H. A. J ~ agellt at ~ Welling, ~ J. ~ H. Dogwell, ~ su~erillteildent ~ ~ of ~ in town , has squirted water on

Oltla., reports follo\ving case tral~sportation at Springfield. suit.

excellent handling which included the

best of co-operation OII the part of the ''lsn'f my auto a beauty? It cost Impatient Co-ed: Say, what'.

cousigr~ee and the agent. sixteen thousand clollars." idea? I've been standing here 17.

Missouri Pacific 84250, loaded with "'W'hy, I didn't know autos ever five minutes.

flour and consigned to Grant Brothers. cost that much." Withered Bank Clerk: Think.

was received at Ft. Gibson, Okla., "Oh, it cost only five h~indred, but ing of it, my dear, I've been ria.

August 14, delivered to the consignee I spent the re? in repairs." here twenty-five years.


ir mnch being said about it in

mspapers.

locomotive is one of the larger

used in freight service, is six

old and has a record of 1,700

on the rails without having the

inocked from under its boilers.

up grades and dragging be-

t from 63 to 120 freight cars as

has warranted. Thirteeii crews

cineem and firemell have been

ed putting the old goliath

h the test. At last reports the

ing crews said they were going

,p on the rails and keep goin::

g as the engine held out. Per-

the rails will wear out before

ogine does. Perhaps business

I Birminghan~ and Kansas Cit?

ake up a purse Of $110 an hour

:ery additional 60 nlirlutes the

In horse keeps going.

eight engine takes more punish-

@an an airplane. They asiiall~

thorouAh "going-over" ill tho

louse at the end of 500 miles of

?. Airplane lnotors have been

strated time aud again. A ose-

ng like a freight loconlotive tle-

as mnch attention.

king about elldurance runs,

overlook the feat of a Frisco'

dive which covered more thall

lousand miles without a "rest."

eventeen days, or some thin^

ut, the locomotive was runninr:

rhe country from terminal to

al driving heavily loaded trailis

ght cars. Formerly locomotives

ly betn.een division points, cov-

about 125 miles or such matter

Ime out. Then taken in, fire

and they were allowed to cool

it seems the modern locomo-

ot only draws fonr to sixfold

~d drawn a quarter century ago

goes on for clays and days with-

ring Lhe fire taken from its fire-

n th? olden days probably less

alf of a railway's rolling stock

use at a time. NOW cars are

unloaded and again filled and

Lo other destinatious with a

Im amount of idle time that

)reased demand for service may

lsfied and that a high rate of

ley may meet the overhead and

i small portion for stock divi-

In our progress of the past

cades no department of n~odern

iy has nhown greater develop-

than rallways, the chief veins

teries of commerce.

Excellent Track on Afton Sub

~,llo,) I,r:r~de,, OJ

Pap 13

F'IYIIII the 4Spt~ii!!/fiel~l

.A fl.c/?l,~t I x. 1!12!1,

The Iron Horse, Frisco engine KO. Kansas City Ilnit No. 6. of the

4113, has succeeded in setting up ;I aiixiliary to the Friaco Veterans'

record of endurance which is quite as Association. held its first meeting of

important. il not so iiilensely spec- the fall at the Hotel Baltimore, Friday.

tacular, as many or all of the many September 13. ai~d reports a splendid

n~odern tests of endurance in other attendance. Plans were discussetl

lines of human or mechanical esl~ilor

a busy winter program and inbitions.

cluded in the plans is a drive for new

That a locon~otive slioultl emerg? members.

unhaimed antl still ready and "rear-

"We are going to have one meetin'

" to go after runs lasting 25 days

iug each month," Mrs. J. L. McCarter,

aud coveriug a distance of more thau

7,000 miles sans so much as a singh:

~wesitleut of the auxiliary, said. "on0

repair, is all achievement worthy of

in the afternoon just for the ladie(%

all praise and deserving of a place and the nest month we will have the

in the history ot' modern-day trans- meeting in the evening and include

portation. It bespeaks a fine, pains- the men.

laking, iutelligent applicatioii o f "I am not in as close touch wlth

brains to the biiiltling of machinery the presidents of the other auxilithat

is to be dedicated to the service aries as I wonld like. and I would

of man, to the easing of his burdens like very inuch to have them write

autl the lightening of his toil.

me and tell me of their activities. I

It would not be at all 1111befittin.s am intensely iuterested in each unit

that a medal should be struck in hon- and would like very much to correor

of Frisco engine No. 4113 and riv- spond with each president, for I feel

eted conspicuously on its, massive we could suggest things to each

front that wherever 'it runs folk may other which would be of benefit.

read it and wonder.

"Our Kansas City unit has a flower

autl sick committee, also an enter

Paymeuts by the Metropolitan

IAt'e Insurance Company to insured

officers aintl enlployes of Frisco

Liues duri~ig August, 1929. totaled

S24.Si4.92, divided as follows:

Shop group. health, $2.997.18;

total and permanent disability.

8316.64; accidental death and dismemberment.

$1,000; death. $2,-

000.00.

Supervisory group, total and permanent

disability, $1.939.54; death,

$15,241.00.

Clerks, total antl pernlanent disability,

$550.56

tainmeut committee and these committees

report at each meeting. We

pay dues of 60 cents each year

nhich gives us a little working sun1

wlth which to carry orlt our plans.

The payment of diies could of course.

IY optional with each clnh."

Mrs. WcCarter reports the next

meeting of the Kansas City onit on

October 11, at the Women's Benefit

Association club rooms. 2 West Linwood

boulevard, Friday g. m. at S:00

o'clock. All veterans and wives are

assured of a hearty welcome, and

visitors in the city are urged to attend.


INAUGURATE NEW TRAIN

"Air Capital Limited" Between St.

Louis arid Wichita on Sept. 8

-Other Changes

NAUGURATION of a new train between

St. Louis and Wichita,

I

Kans.. known as the "Air Capital

Limited" headed a general revision of

time on Frisco Lines, effective Sep-

tember 8.

"The Air Capltal Limited" carries

chair cars. Pullmans, diner and club

cars on a schedule bettering former

service by more than three hours.

Known as No. 11, the "Air Capital

Limited" leaves St. Louis at S:00 p.

nl., arriving ill Wichita at 11:15 the

next morning. This train also carries

a Joplin sleeper which sets out in

that city for early arrival aild the

Wichita sleeper, Ioriuerly carried on

the Frisco's Bluebonnet, which leaves

SL. Louis at 2:01 p. m. Returning

the "Air Capital Limited" operates

as train No. 302. learlng Wichita at

9:00 p. in., arriving in St. Louis at

11:X a. m.

Greatly improved local service from

St. Louis to Springfield. Monett and

Oklahoma points becomes effective

through Frisco No. 3, which leaves

St. Louis at 8:58 a. m. instead of 9:30

a. m., arriving in Oklahoma City at

7:15 a. m. as before, and making all

stops between St. Louis and Spring-

fieId now made by local train.

Train No. 5 from St. Louis to

Springfield and points in Oklahoma

has been shortened one hour and will

leave St. Louis at 11:45 p. m. instead

of 10:45, arriving in Springfield at

7:20, Tulsa at 1:55 p. m. and Okla-

homa City at 6:20 p. m.

Frisco service between Kansas City

and Florida points is also improved in

the time revisions. Frisco No. 106,

the Kansas City-Florida special, has

had its time shortened between Menl-

phis and Kansas City and leaves

Memphis at 7:25 p. m. instead of 7:45

p. m., arriving in Kansas City at S:30

a. m. instead of 9:05 a, m.

No. 107, the Sunnyland from Kansas

City to Atlanta leaves Kansas City

at 9:00 a. m. as at present. arriving

in Springfield at 1:50 p. m. instead

of 1: 55, and Memphis at 9:00 p. m.

instead of 9:lO. This change enables

a connection at Memphis with the

Southern Railway's "Memphis Spec-

ial" for Chattanooga and the east,

leaving Meinphis at 9:10 p. m.

Service between Kansas City, Mo.,

and Oklahoma points on Frisco trains

111 and 117 is also greatly improved.

So. 111, overnight train from Kansas

City to Tulsa, has had its run length-

ened for the accommodation of pa-

trons. It leaves Kansas City at 11:25

.Iluil Cali~r,t. W'chitn. switchrirnn axd

f~rrsidrnt of the Frisco Eucploycs' Club

tlrerr, suggested the ~rarrre of Ihc rre7c'

trairr. HP is shawrr nbow starrdirrg hr-

sidr thc rmr standard jrrst bcfore tlrr

trnirr lrft orr its nmidcn trip.

p. m. as before, but arrives in Tulsa

at 7:00 a. m., twenty minutes later

than its former schedule. No. 117,

also from Kansas City to Tulsa and

Oklahoma City, makes its run from

Iiansas City to Tulsa one hour

shorter, leaving Kansas City at 11:00

a. m. as before and arriving in Tulsa

at 6:10 p, m. instead of 7:10 p. m. as

before. Arrival of this train in Okla-

homa City is at 9:50 p. m. instead of

10:35 p. m.

'*CHB3' CELEBRATES HIS

BIRTHDAY

"Uncle Charley" Ealtzell celebrated

his sixty-fourth birthday with his old

circus friends on I-Iagenbeck-tl'allnce

show, Saturday, August 24, at St.

Louis.

He was the recipient of a shower oi

ties, socks, handkerchiefs and cards

and at 4: 30 p. m. a special dinner was

staged for him in the cook's tent, and

the circus folk seated themselves

around a huge table and many were

the wishes for his health and success.

Following the dinner "Uncle Char-

ley" took Captain Clyde Beatty, the

lion and tiger trainer who works

thirty-two animals in the center rinq

at one time and Miss Erma Ward,

world's champion gymnist, to the

Frisco hospital where they were in-

troduced to the patients by "Uncle

Charley."

"They could not go to the circus,"

"Uiicle Charley" said, "so we brought

part of it to them." The visit was a

most unusual one, and thoroughly en-

joyed by all the patients.

I AGENCY

CHANGES

J. r';. Attebery installed tenrpor

ageut at Fletcher, Okla., August !

R. W. Berry installed tenipor

agelit at Bennington. Olila., Augusl.

Benoit, Ala., ticket agency 0'

closed, effective August 16.

C. ;)I. Neal installed pewar-

agelit. at Rushyheacl, Olila.. August..

G. J. Robi~ison installed permn,

agent at Chaudler, Olila., Auguat ?

H. 11. Russell installed tempor

agent at Cyril, Oltla., August 26.

J. S. Rocshe, regular agent at G8I

Kans., resr~med duty, vice R. D. Sr

effective August 21.

W. T. Durham installed tempo

agent at Grubbs, Ark.. August 11.

H. U. Fuller installed permx

agent at Keighley, Kans.. August

R. E. Essman installed tempor

agent at Leasburg. No., August

(C. T. Bruton relieved regular ar

F:. W. Daugherty, June 25, it' I

tiw~sfer and handled station in ! 1

ular agent's name.)

C. V. Keller, in charge ternpow

of station at Lebanon, No.. Augutii

C. Murphy, installed tempor

agent at Troy, Okla.. August 20.

C. H. Holling installed permar

apent at Cyril, Olila.. August 30. ,

31. C. Davis installed tempt

agent at Dunbar, Okla.. August 30.

A. A. Jones installed tempor '

agent at Mt. Hebron, Ala.. August

F. M. Means installed perman

agent at Nettleton, Ark., August 31

J. R. Boyd installed perman

agent at Pitt, Mo., Auyst 24. (Tn I

fer not made by Traveling Aud~l

Agents made personal transfer.)

C. B. Rawls installed tempo:

asei~t at Roff, Okla., August 29.

W. Dale left the station August 22

lievetl by .J. L. Kirkley, who ban,

the station in Dale's name until d

26.)

R. L. Holt installed perman

agent at Valliant, Okla., August 3L

J. H. Spears installed permac

agent at Bay, Ark., September 3.

C. E. Barnes installed perman

agent at Eram, Okla., September

Lon Richards installed freight.

ticket agent at Netherlands, Yo., r

M. R. Rice, ticket agent only, effecl

September 5, the date of the esr

lishment of a freight agency then

d. H. Camp installed perman

anent at Patterson, Kans., Sept '

E. E. Collipriest installed perman

anent at Ste. Genevieve, No., Sept

J. I". Geiger installed permanagent

at Sherwin, Icans., Septemb

i


New Methods of Claim Prewntion

.4s Di~riisscd by MR. C'. F. S.11ITH. Trovelit~g Cloiwr Adjuster

W HEN

asked to write an article

on claim prevention, I thought

it would be easy to set down

'r of the thlngs I had encountered

.eventeen years of claim work.

YtPen years ago claim prevention

. practically unknown. No one ever

'e any efforts towards eliminating

. wpte. It was taken as an every-

; matter-of-fact bit of railroading.

rile memory of the oldest employe,

"re had always been claims, ergo.

*re always would be Clainls weye

the poor-always with us, and

4 to be put up with and talcen care

In some manner.

'4) first experience with claim pre-

don was disheartening and dis-

liraaing. In my allotmeiit of claims

found one for the loss of a fifty

Jon barrel of syrup. Investigation

reloped the barrel had reached it8

.:Ination leaking slightly, and that

I agent had placed it in his ware-

1~ xith the leak down. which al-

wl entire contents to leak out.

iiu was such an act of carelesunesu

1 Ihonght he deserved a repri-

mi. I wrote and asked him why

hadn't used a little jodginent.

~mp~red the barrel, or lip-ended

lo eave the remainills contents.

ir turned up one corner of my letter

711 answered it thus: "How much

.dement do you expect for $40.00 n

mh?" Needless to say I let the

mler drop.

IVc have progressed far since that

37 We no more have emnloyes

tw judgment is limited by $40.00

month. An employe of that calibre

wl~l not advance very far in the

:]!mad world today. Present day

-ployes not only display excellent

Iwent, but they are on the look-

,.# for ways and means of protectt

property. They have furnished

1111~hle hints and suggestions that

3.e in n large measure been re-

amnible tor the splendid claim re-

1~8i~ona of the last few yearr. I

rer see en agent or platform inan

b doesn't tell me of some con-

11 nn needing correction. They fre-

w~rly tell of certain shippers who

., chronic In their failures in pack-

r marking, loading. etc. These

"7 sometimes get the impression

u do not handle these cases. This

? misunderstanding; we do handle

,m, but we seldom get one hundred

- cent results.

[n handling with patrons we are

irly always at a disadvantage In

r flrst place, if there is a claim

ley hare a grievance against us

rl are not in a frame of mind to

look with favor upon our suggestions.

In the second place, we cannot bring

pressure to hear. It is therefore

necessary to be diplomatic and care-

ful in our dealings with them, and

this is the reason we so frequently

ask our local agents and traffic rep-

resentatives to handle some of these

cases. If the offenders are good

patrons we reason our local represen-

tatives are familiar with them and

can no donht handle to better ad-

vantage than a representative of this

department. who would be a total

stranger, or, at best, an infrequent

visitor. We also occasionally ask

other agencies, such as the Western

Weighing and Inspection Bureau. to

help us. Claim prevention that ne-

cessitates handling with shippers and

ccnsignees is the most difficult of

my we now have to contend with.

We handle our own and foreign line

cases of negligence with little or no

difficulty; we also adjust the claims

with very little complaint; but we do

have serious difficulty in trying to

get some shippers to change their

methods and co-operate with us.

In this day it is almost in~possible

to tell our employes anything new

about claim prevention. They are

ali familiar with the things that

cause loss and damage to freight.

However, there is one thing that

causes unnecessary claim payments,

and that is inadequate and unreliable

records. This is especially true of

claims in which connecting lines are

involved. We might handle every

shipment perfectly, but it would all

go for naught if we did not have de-

pendable records by which we could

prove it.

Absence of seal records, erroneous

seal records, failure to maintain in-

spection records of cars, failure to

record notices to consignees, failure

to nlaiiitain ventilation records, etc.:

these things bring us into claim pay-

ments where frequently we are satis-

fied our handling was perfect.

The interline settlen~ent of claini

(allotnient between the various car-

riers), has become a highly techni-

cal procedure. yery few employes

nnderstand all the ins and outs of

this phase of claim work. These

stttlements all depend upon rules

that carry definite penaltles for fail-

uive to do certain things and failure

to maintain records of these things.

This 1s particularly true of records

01 seals, car inspections, ventilation.

icing, heating. 0. S. & D. and D. R.

reports. etc. As an illustration, let

11s take a part of rule 164 pertaining

ATTENTION, DOCS !

Members of the Frisco Medical

Association will hold their annual

convention in the Mayo Hotel at

Tulsa, Oklahoma, October 21-22,

according to announcements mail-

ed September 15. by Dr. Robert

Vinyard of St. Louis, secretary of

the association. Besides a for

midable array of technical discus-

sions and medical treatises which

will come before the convention,

the annual banquet and "fun" ses-

sion will be held in the ballroom

of the Mayo the first evenlng. Dr.

W. Albert Cook of Tulsa, is presi-

dent of the association. Two hun-

dred Frisco doctors i?re expected

to athnd, according to Dr. Ross A.

Woolsey, chief surgeon of Frisco

Lines.

to heating cars of perishable freight.

We find heaters must be lit as fol-

lows:

Celery-5 below zero to 10 below

zero.

Citrus Fruit-5 above to zero.

Apples. Pears, Cranberries, Onions

-10 above zero to 5 above

zero.

Potatoes-20 above zero to 15

above zero.

All other perishable commodities-

15 above zero to 10 above zero.

If we have a car of apples in heat-

er territory and fail to light a heater

when the temperature drops to he-

tween 10 and 5 above zero, we are

negligent. Likewise if we do this

and have not a dependable record of

it. we are negligent. But that is not

all; the rule provides for extinguish-

ing fires as followe:

Celery-5 below to zero.

Citrus Fruit-5 above zero to 10

above zero.

Apples, Pears, Cranberries, Onions

-10 above zero to 15 abovr

zero.

Potatoes-20 above zero to 2.5

above zero.

411 other perishable commodities-

15 above zero to 20 above zero.

If we heat our apples and keep a

proper record, but allow heaters to

be extiiiguished below 10 degrees. or

allow them to burn above 1.5 degrees.

or fail to keep a record of a proper

performance, we are negligent and

must assume part of the payment.

There are really only two rules for

preventing claims. First, handle the

shipment properly. Second, keep a

dependable record of this handling.

When that is done in erery case,

I'll open a hot-dog stand or filling

station, as the days of the claim de-

partment will be over.


FREIGHT ERRORS DECREASE

With sixty-seven fewer errors than

July. August had the lowe& number of

errors in the handling of freight of

ally month this year, it was announced

September 10 by J. L. SIcCormack.

Springfield, 310.. superintendelit of

freight loss and damage claims. The

errors for -4ugust were 318, as corn-

pared with 385 errors made ill Ally.

Errorless handling of freight was

achieved by five stations: .Jonesl)oro.

.irk.. Okmulgee and Muskogee, Okla..

and Ft. Scott and Pittsburg. Kans.. all

of group three. Because of this tie.

cach of these statioiis is entitled to

keep the group three pennant five or

six days during September. 111 group

oue. Springfield, Mo., had the best

record and takes the group one pen-

nant from Tulsa, Okla., where it has

been for the past eight months. Bir-

mingham. Ala.. had the fewest errors

in group two and will hold the pen-

nant of that group durins September.

This pennant has been at Hugo, Okla..

for the past month.

"The situation as a whole is very

gratifying." says >lr. McCormack, "and

all concerned will, 110 doubt, be inter-

ested as well as encouraged by the

information."

WILL BOWL AT SPR1NGFlEI.D

Bowling schedules have just been

printed covering the Springfield, Mo.

Bowling Association and twelve teams

from Frisco Lines at Springfield have

been entered in the league.

The Frisco bowlers will bowl on

Thursday nights, ' beginning Septem-

ber 5. and ending April 24.

The teams so far organized are, St.

Louisans, Sunnyland, S o u t h w e s t

Limited. The Governor, Chadwick

Limited. Texas Special, Bluebonnet.

Ozark Limited, Oil Field Special,

Kansas City Florida Special, Meteor,

and Memphian.

G. J. Williams is president of the

Frisco league, P. P. Peterson, vice-

president and Howard Piclrens. sec-

retary-treasurer.

IS THIS OLDEST TICKET?

J. A. Barrows, former Frisco em-

ploye now residing at 328 Harwood

avenue, Lebanou, Mo., claims to have

in his possession the oldest unused

Frisco railroad ticket in existence.

Mr. Barrows' father bought the

ticket on November 2, 1889, for one

of his sons to use between Stoutlantl

and Lebanon and either the so11 did

not use it or the conductor failed to

take it up, Mr. Barrows does not

know.

J. A. Barrows was employed by the

Frisco as a brakeman out of Ft. Smith.

- 7

Splendid -Track on Eastern D ioision

Tht spltl~did sorrdition of fhc track

yard is skow~r irr this pictttrc. The two

Lnkr llill Park is ill thc Bnckgvortnd.

It's October in the Oenrks

And the sky is brightest blue,

The many trees are decked out

In their very gayest hne.

The maple flaunts her flaming red,

The hickory's turned to gold

And all the oaks wear different shades

Beautiful to behold.

I pack my Innch, don 'hiking togs

4nd whistle to the pup,

And we are well upon our way

Before the sun is up.

For oh, today we're going to roam,

Far from the city's din;

Far from the motor's noisy whirr

And rattling of "tin".

Out where the walnut's pungent sinell

Is mingled with the breeze.

And squirrels frisk in gay content

Among the leafy trees.

We're going to eat our little "snack".

Beside a bubbling stream,

And sit down on a mossy bank,

In solitude and dream. :

4nd oh, the blissful peacefuln&ss,

From all the world apart!

It's October in the Ozarks,

And thkre's gladness in my heart.

-

I

cast end of the Valle~ Pork. S'. I

arc across the Grand (;lakc Crr,,

FARMER PREVENTS WRECK 1

The old adage that a railmad UI: 1

never loses his interest in railrm

ing, no matter what other occupatl'

he enters, has been proven agar

this time to the great benefit of FT

co Lines.

Several years ago H. F. Bemis.

Illinois Central railroad conductor :.

tired from railroading. and bou~ht

farm betn-een Ashley and Serer

Kan., near Frisco Lines' niilepo

433. His farmhouse was only a fF

rods from the Frisco's tracks, and 7 1

sight of the "iron horse" and loadt

trains iu a constant proceasioil l

most past his front door, 8uir"

Farmer Bemis well. I

On the night of,,July 22, fast freie' /

3 2 roared past his hme. .Form

lailroader Bemis heard what '

thought was a most unusual noise ' I

the rumble of the train hded In'

the distance. He left hie !IOU% I

looked at the track and found

broken rail. Jumping into his DIOfl

car Mr. Bemis raced to Severy ar

reported the rail, then drove hos

to protect the break and stop ireit

train KO. 335 before it reached t

spot. One time before Nr. Bern

saved what would hare been a b-

accident by discovering and rep

ing slipping timbers and r broth

:

switch stand.

On August 14, assistant gener

manager hi. ;\I. Sisson wrote Farm.

Bemis. thanking him for his aelir-

I


ILUATION-WHAT 1s IT?

{and years ago, maybe as maw7

ten,

L C. C. Field Party, con~posetl of

us men,

o n a Iltlle trip all over the

wo's Line,

took an Inventory of every rock

I plne,

Llery spike and nail and every

.:n of sand,

?y+ry old steam engine and every

t 01 land,

every bridge and culvert and

?ry passenger car,

even he shoulder ballast, and

I PI[ all of it at par.

ilipn they told the Frisco, in ac-

11s loud and stro~~g.

,nor we're right, we know it, and

can't prove us wrong.

': c argument once started, it seems

r~ll never end

:,- the Frisco produced Exhibits

'-1:~d on fact, on notes ancl trend,

!.v the Cost of Reproduction New,

team or train haul claim.

:t ~onimon, loose and solid rock ; the

:-!I? remains the same,

':) lend appraisers' estimates, the

ziwrial yard expense,

*:. .%in elevators, rolling stock. the

sales end the rents,

-r ihrk Uplift unit prices, the De-

:raidtion Cost,

'.? Construction Program questioll,

~1 how n~uch waste is lost,

Tsp v:al hard pan yardage and a lot

r; Gmeral Stuff,

:.> excess excavation, but this mas

:- ~ough,

k.?q figured the one ancl two way

kds, the shoulder ballast plane,

ru 1i.W rock slde borrow, the side

7ks nnd the main,

2: Earrey Eating Houses, the Addi-

::as and Betterments Account.

3, mavk laying and surfacing, in

iiqll and total amount.

3.: when the ,Bureau saw these

',!ma come pouring in,

2,~ began to squirm and wiggle as

:duck with a pin,

r:,:, made a call for evidence. for

r!ir of proof and facts,

iv the Frisco came right back and

il!i this play don't have three acts,

>> L a Valuation Hearing and we

.~i prove we're right,

Lr? made twenty thousand pages of

wrd, most of it at night.

% Bureau's final answer was in

rmig conipared to these,

li humble bees went South this

::ring and Hew with poise and ease,

Fch makes the hard pan softer and

rlicates your claim,

9 III~ Engineers can . testify: their

L'Aedge is known to fame,

A'

A Rose by Any .Othe'r Name--------!"

BULLETIN issued by the Bu- present was a considerable shipment

reau of Explosives at New

York City entitled "Care of

of sma!l livestoclz-guinea pigs. rabbits,

and what not. The casualty list

Explosives", contains valuable inforn~ation

in the care and handling

of these dangerous commodities while

enroute over the various railroads.

among these poor beasties makes us

thiuk of that old one about the shoe

factory fire where 1,000 soles were

lost.

One article, "A Rose by Any Other "The case was reported promptly,

Name" is a discourse on the dangers the report containing the edifying inof

handling Hydrogen Sulphide Gas. formation that the cylinder contained

The article reads as follows: 'Liquid Hydro Sulph.' This statement

"The title of the tale that follows

was suggested by the manner in

which the case was reported, and if,

after reading this little story, you will

just quote the rest of the proverb,

you'll see that no matter how limited

may be one's knowledge of a dangerous

article, said article seldom

proves a stickler for the conventions

of a formal Introduction. If anything

goes wrong, the d. a. will act according

to its nature without regard to

politeness or kindly feelings. There

can be no doubt though, that if you

was true as Tar as it went. which was

~iot nearly far enough. The two

clerks were taken to the hospital,

where the doctors were told that the

men had been overcome by 'liquid

hydro sulph.' The poor medicos were

slumped for awhile as to what sort

ol ailment they had to treat. They

got around it somehow; but a lot of

trouble would have been saved lf

somebody's passion for abbreviation

hadn't thl;own a veil of mystery over

the simple fact that the cylinder contained

liquefied Hydrogen sulphide

are properly introduced in advance,

you can go a lot further in protectgas.

.

"Now, you may or may not have

ing yourself against whatever tricks heard that. name before, but you have

may be in the repertoire of the ar- made the acquaintance of the gas, at

ticle you may be handling. A sn~:~Il least on a sniall scale, for this gas

child. meeting a wild cat, might not is what gives that peculiarly unfriendhe

afraid of the 'kitty'; but the said ly 'bouquet' to an ancient, fatigued

feline couldn't be trusted not to treat egg. It is unnecessary to be an acthe

child carelessly, to sqy the least: tor to have had experience with over-

"Well then, know all men by these

nresents, that a compressed gas cyripe

'hen fruit'; such experience alo~e

would suggest the advisability of aslinder

had arrived at an express plat- sisting a shipment of the gas to reform,

and had been laid down on a

bale of something else. In this position

it was comfortable and fairly

safe, but presently someone needed

to move that bale; so he lifted off

the cylinder and stood it up on end

while he went ahead with his work.

Now, gas cylinders have. most of

them, more or less flat bottoms,

wherefore they can be made to stand

upright. However, such a cylinder is

tall and heavy, and the base is apt

to be smaller in area than a football

field; consequently you won't be surprised

when we say that it wasn't so

very long before some bump or, jar

tipped the cylinder over. The protecting

cap over the valve was

knocked flying, the valve itself immediately

gave up the ghost, and the

yas b~gan pourinq out, unsavory both

in odor and disposition. T e two express

clerks who wefe nea ? dst quickmain

securely inside the cylinder.

"Therefore and consequently, even

though subsequent inspection showed

that both cap and valve on the cylinder

were defective, and therefore

easily damaged, the dlsadvantages of

knocking the cylinder over need no

further argument. Along the same

line, the cylinder couidn't have been

knocked over if it hadn't been stood

upright! It didn't deliberately climb

up of its lawn accord, did it?

''One of the surest things in this

world is the fact that a compressed

gas cyliuder is many per cent safer

lying down than standing up. What

if the law does require that the cap

be strong enough to protect the valve

in just such a case? Just because

an auton~atic pistol is equipped with

a safety catch, its an unhealthy pastime

to squint down into the muzzle.

ly took the count, and had tol'be carried

out of the ring. ' ~h$>g 'those

A lot of white marble has been carved

in proof of that!"

So they fought the battle back and Now that the x9ar is over and the

forth with rebuttal and direct, Hearing is hfstory,

And cross-examined day bp day, till Did the Frisco win? We wonder.

the lawyers were a wrwk. 1,- It's still a mystery.


T

LOCOMOTIVE FUEL PERFORMANCE RECORDS

From Wce of Fuel Agent

HE third month of the special

summer fuel drive has just

been completed and the results

are very gratifying indeed, since

during the month of August we made

a decrease in freight service of 7.45

per cent in unit fuel consumption as

compared with the month of August.

1928. The month of August ended

with the same performance as we

had in July, or 149 pounds per 1,000

gross ton miles. We had hoped to

get below the July co~~sumption bur

even in holding our own we did better

than August compared to July

last year when the perforn~ance went

up 2 pounds.

All the divisions, with the exception

of one, made a reduction in fuel

performance in freight service during.

August, the decreases ranging

from 2.05 per cent to 17.33 per cent.

the Southwestern and Western divisions

having the largest decreases

of 17.33 per' cent and 12.57 per cent

respectively.

In passenger service there was a

slight increase in the pounds per

gassenger car mile August this yea1

over August last year. the increase

being .3 of a pound per passenger

car mile, the average cars per train

decreasing from 6.96 to 6.90, the

Western division making the best

comparative performance, decreasing

from 19.6 pounds per passenger car

mile August. 1928, to 18.4 pounds per

gassenger car mile in August. 1929.

or 6.12 per cent.

In switch service the pounds per

switeh locomotive mile for the system

was 132 as compared to 127

pounds in August, 1928. or an increase

of 3.94 per cent. This is the

same ratio of increase which we had

ill July this year as compared to

July last year. However, there were

some divisions which made a very

nice ~howing in switch service, the

River division particularly with a

performance of 102 pounds per

switch locomotive mile this year as

compared to 150 pounds August last

year. a decrease of 21.5 per cent. The

Southwestern division also had a nice

decrease from 115 pounds August

last year to 103 pounds August this

year or 10.43 per cent.

Believe it is safe to say that the

drive for the past few months in

@el consumption has been directed

more towards securing a reduction of

fuel consumption in freight service

than passenger and switch, which is

certainly reflected in the showing of

the three classes of service.

This is mentioned merely to 5110~

there is considerable room for lur-

ther redudtion, particularly in the

passenger and switch services. if

everyone gets in behind these two

services as they have been behind

the freight service, not letting np of

course on the latter.

Shown below are a few of the!

trips on which good performances

were made, all of which helped to

make the good showing in August.

This should not be construed as

meaning that the following runs were

the only good runs during the month

nor in every case are they the best.

hot they are the best performances

which have been called to our atten-

tion and whenever there is a partic-

ularly good performance made thc

information would be appreciated I),?

the Fuel Agent's office in order that

it can he pl~blished in the following

month's issue of the Mogazirre.

EASTERN DIVISION

Rolla Sub: Engineer J. E. MORRI-

SON, fireman W. 0. DOUGHERTY.

extra west, Gratiot to Stanton. Auy-

ust 7, engine 34. handled 112.724

gross ton miles, burned 10 tons of

coal, performance 176 pounds per

thousand gross ton miles.

Engineer C. E. RAY. fireman J. R.

THOMAS, train No. 1, St. Louis to

Newborg, August 7, engine 1516. han-

dled 1,.560 car miles, burued 1,lSS

gallons oil, performance .73 gallolls

per passenger car mile.

Engineer SIDERS, fireman TEAK.

trail] No. 9. St. Louis to Newburg.

August 19, engine 1517, handled 1.6841

car miles. burned 1,002 gallons oil.

performance .59 gallons per passell-

ger car mile.

Lebanon Sub: Engineer HENDRIS.

fireman DEBO, train No. 9. Newburg

to ,Springfield, August 16, engine

1619, handled 16 cars in train, burned

1,102 gallons oil, performance .57

gallons per passenger car mile.

Eng,ineer 0. N. MORTON. fireman

13. C. HOLT, train 2/33, Newburg to

Lebanon, August 13. engine 48. han-

dled 58 cars in traln, 1,758 gross tons.

burned 10 tons of coal handling 112.-

754 gross ton miles, a performance

of 176 pounds per 1,000 gross ton

miles. This is a very good perform-

ance for westbound movement.

Springfield Sub: Engineer H. J.

LIVIDSON, fireman R OB

SHAW. engine 4128. extra

Springfield to Monett, Augu

handled 71 cars in train, 1

gross ton miles. burned 5 tons

performance 99 pounds per

gross ton miles.

Engineer A. E. CANARY, I?

C. A. YEAGER. train No. 38, F

35, Monett to Springfield, ~ugt'

lla~~dled 3.548 tons 11 miles an0

tcns 33 miles, 77 cars in train,l

11 tons coal. performance 135 I

1)er l.O@O gross ton miles.

SOUTHERN DIVISION

Memphis Sub: Engineer

DLESTOS. fireman J. HAT

train 135, .Jonesboro to Mer

August 30, engine 4138, handlei

250 gross ton miles, burned 6 to'

coal. performance 77 pounds per'

gross ton miles.

Engineer J. BUSHNELL, lirr

K. SIGLER. train 136. Memph

Jonesboro, August 29, engine

handled 157,500 gross ton m

burned 6 tons of coal. perform

76 pounds per 1,000 gross ton m

Engineer E. McELVANEY, kt:

T)AVISON, train 136. Memphis

Thayer. August 20. engine I

handled 432,000 gross ton lu

burned 18 tons of coal, performr

83 pounds per 1.000 gross ton m:

Engineer BOX, fireman L. F

NETT, train 131, Thayer to Y.

phis, August 22, engine 4133, hand

279.750 gross ton miles. burned

tons of coal. performance 85 poor

per 1.000 gross ton miles.

Tupelo Sub: Engineer GRE!

fireman W. RYAN, train 107, hb

IMS to Amory. August 2, engine 1'.

handled 12 cars in train, burned

gallons oil. performance 59 ~al1

per passenger car mile.

Engineer K. D. DOBB. fireman

WATKINS, train 135, Potts Camp

Amory. August 15. engine 4106, 1

dled 148,050 gross ton miles, bur'

i tons of coal. performance 94 pow

per 1,000 gross ton miles.

Engineer T. SMITH, fireman

HENRY. train 135. Potts Camp

Amory, August 14. engine 4120, h

dled 143,850 gross ton miles, burr

7 tons of coal. performanc~

pounds per 1.000 gross ton - miles.

Engineer T. NOLEN, fireman

LITERS, train 938, engine 4I'

A~nory to Potts Camp, August l

handled 151.200 gross ton roll

burned 8 tons of coal. performa!


i'i pounds per 1,000 gross ton miles.

Pen~acola Sub: Engineer

IIIAMES, firemall WIMBERLY, ex-

1-A south. Magnolia to Pensacola.

Lugust 18, engine 1614, handled 303,-

111 gross to11 miles. burned 10 tons

I coal, performance 66 pounds per

1100 gross ton miles.

Engineer MARTIN, fireman LEW-

S, train 939, Magnolia to Pensacola,

!reust 19. engine 1618, handled 244.-

111) gross ton miles, burned 9 tons

I! coal, performance 73 pounds per

,000 gross ton miles.

mgineer JACKSON, fireman ROB-

ERTS, traln 2/908, Pensacola to

\~asnolia, August 31. engine 1106.

andled 1,064 passenger car miles,

lurned 6 toils of coal, performance

11.1 pounds per passenger car mile.

Columbur Sub: Engineer KIRCH-

:RABER, fireman SELLARS, train

:/908, Magnolia to Amory, September

I, engine 1106 handled 1,071 pas-

wger car miles, burned 5 tons ot

aal, performance of 9.3 pounds per

passenger car mile.

RIVER DIVISION

St. Louis Sub: Engineer HENRY

CAIPBELL, fireman J. F. BRIGGS,

~:ain 808. Chaffee to St. Louis, Aug-

r~st 23, engine 1019, handled 720 pas-

smger car miles, burned 683 gallons

nil, performance .94 gallons per pas-

crnger car mile, incidentally this

r m made up 20 minutes lost time

clo the run.

Engineer J. R. JOHNSON, flreman

Vd. HUTCHTNSON, train 802.

ChaNee to St. Louis, August 13, en-

pino 1011, handled 5 cars Chaffee to.

hpe Cirardeau and 12 cars Cape

c1;ardeau to St. Louis, a total of

1% passenger car miles, burned

l.lb5 gallons oil, performance .9 gal-

lo~s per passenger car mile. This

win was delayed 23 minutes Chaffee

tcd Cape Girardeau, arrilring St.

L?ais 16 minutes late.

Engineer R. S. EDWARDS, flreman

GrO. 9. KWOWLTON,. extra north.

hffee to St. Louis. August 5, en.

ria" 4018, handled 426,736 gross ton

mil~s, burned 16 tons of coal, per-

Inrnance 76 pounds per 1,000 gross

tan miles. Handled as high as 93

rm in train, was delayed two hours

cn road. On duty 10 hours and 25

rlnutes. Boiler blown out 9 minutes.

aares were shaken three times and

1.5 pan cleaned twice over the di-

n~ion. This same crew on July 7,

hndled train 838. Chaffee to St.

Lnuis. engine 4021, handled 420,732

:-ass ton miles. hurned 15 tons coal.

prformance 71 pounds per 1,000

froas ton miles.

Chaffee Sub: Engineer A. W.

rUBUCHON, fireman A. H. RESER.

ronductor J. S. LLOYD, engine 4029.

Yale to Chaffee. July 30, handled 301.-

290 gross to11 miles, burned 7 tons

of coal, performance 46 pounds per

1.000 gross to11 miles. This consump-

tion is much better than the average

and is a very commendable showing.

NORTHERN DIVISION

Kansas City Yard: Engineer B. W.

CUMMINGS reports the following

performance in switch service August

16, with fireman CLAUDE COFFEY.

engine 3674, worked 8 hours, from

4 p. ni. to 12 midnieht. and used 268

scoops of coal, which is equivalent

to 4.020 pounds and reflects a per-

tormance of 83 pounds per switch

locomotive mile. He reports 100 per

cent co-operation by switch foreman

JESS WILLIAMS and switchmen

RURNES and BARNEY. Engine

created no b:ack smoke and did not

pop once during the time on duty.

Kansas City Sub: Engineer MIL-

LER, fireman ROY. train 1/131. Kan-

sas City to Ft. Scott, August 20, en-

gine 4135, handled 207,168 grosn top

miles, burned 8 tons of coal, per-

formance 77 pounds per 1.000 gross

to11 miles.

Engiurer McCRUM, fireman KaL.

train 1/131, Kansas City to Ft. Scott,

August 21. engine 4133. handled 207,-

548 gross ton miles, burned 8 tons

of coal, performance 77 pounds per

1.000 gross ton miles.

Wichita-Burrton Sub: Engineer

KOEHLER. fireman MALYGREN, on

trains 307 and 310. Neodesha to

Wichita and return August 14, en-

gine 1006, handled 954 passenger car

miles, burned 6 tons coal, perform-

ance 12.5 pounds per passenger car

mile.

Engineer MONTGOMERY, fireman

BIGGENSTAFF, extra west, engine

4002. August 13, Neodesha to Wichi-

ta, handled 267,083 gross ton miles,

hurned 17 tons coal. performance

127 pounds per 1,000 gross ton miles.

Carthage Sub: Engineer KYLER.

fireman CASEY, train 309. engine

1401. August 15, Monett to Neodesha.

handled 625 passenger car miles,

burned 3 tons coal, performance 9.5

pounds per passenger car mile.

Engineer HINDS, fireman ANDER-

SON, train 335, engine 4022. August

15, Monett to Neodesha, handled 219,-

465 gross ton miles, burned 12 tons

coal, performance 109 pounds per

1,000 gross ton miles. Delayed at

Carl Junction 30 minutes setting out

and filling and 25 minutes filling at

Columbus.

Ash Grove Sub: Engineer MOR-

TON, fireman BEAL, train 106.

Springfield to Ft. Scott, August 7, en-

gine 1521. handled 936 passenger car

Page 21

miles. burned 531 gallons oil, per-

formance .66 gallons per passenger

car mile.

Engineer NELSON, fireman HORN-

BACK, extra train, Springfield to Ft.

Scott, August 21, engine 4130, han-

dled 91,522 gross ton miles, burned

4 tons of coal, performance 87 pounds

per 1.000 gross ton miles.

Engineer KELLS. fireman MUL-

LANE. extra train, Springfield to Ft.

Scott. August 29, engine 4136, han-

dled 167,735 gross to11 miles, burned

8 tons of coal, performance 95 pound8

per gross ton miles.

Engineer P H E L P S, fireman

BROTHERTON, train 136, Spring-

field to Ft. Scott, August 30, engine

4102. handled 192.816 gross ton miles,

burned 6 tons of coal, performance

62 pounds per 1,000 gross ton miles,

on duty 4 hours.

Afton-Parsons Sub: Engineer DIX-

ON, fireman FLETCHER, extra train

Afton to Ft. Scott, August 30, engine

4108, handled 243,408 gross ton miles,

burned 6 tons of coal, performance

49 pounds per 1,000 gross ton miles.

This 'is an exceptionally good per-

formance.

Engineer BAXTER, flreman NEIL-

SON, extra train, Afton to Ft. Scott,

August 31, engine 4131, handled 284,-

416 gross ton miles, burned 10 tons

of coal. performance 70 pounds per

1.000 gross ton miles.

Engineer LANE, fireman NELSON.

train 1/138, Afton to Pt. Scott.

August 23, engine 4120, handled 380,-

383 gross ton miles, burned 14 tons

of coal, performance 74 pounds per

1,000 gross ton miles.

Engineer KIRKPATRICK, flreman

SHARP, extra train, Afton to Ft.

Scott, August 21, engine 4100, han-

dled 372,471 gross ton miles, burned

14 tons coal. performance 76 pounds

per 1,000 gross ton miles.

Engineer STOUT, flreman DAVIS,

train 3/132, Afton to Ft. Scott, Aug-

ust 20. engine 4123. handled 269,509

gross ton miles, burned 11 tons of

coal. performance 82 pounds per 1,000

gross ton miles.

Engineer CONRAD, fireman WIL-

LIARD, extra train, engine 4019,

August 28. Afton to Ft. Scott, han-

dled 244,408 gross ton miles, burned

10 tons of coal, performance 82

pounds per 1,000 gross ton mlle.

Engineer KIRKPATRICK, fireman

SHARP, train 2/138, engine 4007,

August 23, Afton to Ft. Scott, han-

dled 239,892 gross ton miles, burned

10 tons of coal, performance 83

pounds per 1,000 gross ton miles.

SOUTHWESTERN DIVISION

Tulsa Terminal: Engineer J. C.

BURNGTT. flreman JOHN RHBN-

(Nmu turn to Page 22, please)


FUEL RECORDS

(Corttirrircd frolrr Page 21)

ARD. engine 3801, August 1. worked

an 8-hour shift. consumed 338 gal-

lons oil which is an average of 7

gallons per switch locomotive mile.

This is a very good performance clue

partly to light work and close co-

operation by crew.

Engineer J. ALLRED, fireman

RYKER, engine 3803, August 2.

workecl S hours, burned 396 gallons

oil, performance 8.2 gallons per

switch locomotive mile.

Engineer T. CLAYTON, fireman

LEDBETTER. engine 1213, August 2.

worlrecl 8 hours, burned 421 gallons

oil, performauce 8.7 gallom per

switch locomotive mile.

Cherokee Sub: Engineer 0. L.

WOLFE, firenan E. VINSON, eugine

4156, train extra west, August 12.

Alonett to Afton, handled 80,355 gros;

ton miles, burned 4 tons coal, per-

fornlance 100 pounds per 1.000 gross

ton miles.

Engineer D. WORTAIAN, fireman

R. SWIFT, train 439, engine 4122.

August 13, Afton to West Tulsa.

handled 174,720 gross ton miles.

burned 1,109 gallons oil, performance

6.3 gallons per 1,000 gross ton miles.

This is a very good performance for

westbound movement.

Engineer J. L. RENO. fireman R.

ROY, extra west, engine 4119, Auq-

ust 19, handled 319.030 gross ton

miles, Monett to West Tulsa. burned

1,511 gallons oil, performance 4.5

gallons per 1,000 gross ton miles.

This is remarkably good performance

through train and close co-operation

011 part of crew.

Creek Sub: Engineer C. CONWAY.

fireman W. D. WHITE, local trail1

541. engine 1335, August 8. Tulsa to

Henryetta, handled 62,915 gross ton

miles, burned 940 gallons oil, per-

formance 15.1 gallons per 1,000 gross

ton miles.

Sherman Sub: Engineer C. hIAT-

LOCK, fireman TRICE, extra south,

engine 4151, August 6, Francis to Ma-

dill, handled 155.668 gross ton miles.

hurned 1,109 gallons oil, performance

7.1 gallons per 1,000 gross ton miles.

CENTRAL DIVISION

Ft. Smith Sub: Engineer J. S. HO-

G..\N, fireman ELMER BALLEY, es-

tra. engine 1342. August 19. Ft.

Smith to Monett, handled 181,552

aross ton miles. burned S tons of

coal, performance 88 gonnds per 1.000

gross ton miles.

Engineer C. I. WORIACK, fireman

E. G. COPELAND, train 1/734, engine

1279. August 19. Pt. Smith to Nonett.

handled 160,623 gross ton miles.

The Tulsa Freight Office Group

011 11 war?rr day i i ~ Septeiitbcr, the ~irrployes of the freight office at 7'rrlsa p

for t11i.v pl~otogmplt.

7'1:~~ arc, reading frorrr. left to right, seated: Allcrr Lewis, 0. S. & 6, di.

,it-thrrr F. .llillcr, caslricr; Elriro B. IIcbert, assistarrt chief clerk to agent; Rv

I.. Kerrrs, corrlrtrr clerk; George Kyger:, report clerlz; Ralph Jforris, bill ci

crrrd Iinr-1 Browr. cltief bill clerk

7 ,

Srcorrd roa-: WIII. H. Ilolrrrcs, D. I?. clcrk; 0. I.. Yorrrig. srrpcr-irrlerrdcrrf Tri I

terrrrirtol; Mary C. Jeirkrrrs, c.rpnisc clcrk: 14'. I?. Rust, chirf clerk to agmt; Rg

Rryarrt. trnzdirrg denrurragr strpen~isor of Sprirrgfielti: Clork H. Heiisiey, na-

Tr~lsa: Goldie I+'orkrrtan, tortrrage clcrlr nrrd Irme Doiirrcr. secretnry to ogril!

TOP rortv: lilza Joh~isorr. clrirf cltrirtr clcrk; Gcorqc Kerrts. denrrrrrogt. r1r.r'

Herr~rar~ Rolert. diver-siotr clcrk: Ford Flzrflord, cash book evritrr: Claude lob~is.

claim clerk: JInyrrurd I.l/oodcock, record filer: Kerlrrrth I'nrbnrtqlr, stenogrnpl .

clerk; W. A. Brytrrrt. rote rlzrk: Vernon .l.lrl>orrnlti, offire b o ~ orrti Ceorqr ,

Jurres. .sz~


'

Fashion Note

There will be little change in the

.~luser pocket this year.

What To Do

"JIy wife says I talk in my sleep,

'wtor, what should I do?"

"Sothing you shouldn't."

Be Pachunt

"Dear Sir: I got your bill what I

(iue you. I ain't forgot you, plese

xaie. When some other fools pay

t:e I pay you. If this wuz judgment

wv and you wuz no more prepared

rn meet 9ur maker as I am this ac-

imnt you sure would go to hell. Hop-

.ng you will do this, I remain your

very truly."

Ain't It So

Little beams of moonshine

Little hugs and kisses,

lake the pretty maiden

. .

Change her name to Mrs.

He and She

"Then we're engaged."

"Of course."

"And you say I'm the first girl you

mr loved?"

"21~-but I'm harder to please now

[!an I used to be."

Knew the Commands

She was only a drill sergeant's

iwrhter, but she knew when to call

I ball.

On a Short Trip

'They say he's wandering in his

hind."

''Tell, don't worry, he wont go

,r"

The Rest

Teacher: "Tell me, Johnny, why

.IS,! put a hyphen in bird-cage?"

Johnny: "That's for the bird to sil

0."

No Kiddin'

"Where were yon born?"

''in a hospital."

"Honest? What was the matter

ith you?"

Frank and Earnest

A modern young man kissed a

beautiful girl.

"1'11 be frank with yon," he said,

after the embrace was over. "You're

not the first girl I've kissed by a long

shot."

She lit a cigarette.

"I'll be equally frank with you,"

she said. "You've got a great deal

to learn, even at that!"

Triangles

The eternal triangle doesn't worry

the young father half as much as the

flannel one.

-Purple Parrot.

And So On-

"Why didn't you shave?"

"I did."

"When?"

"Just after you said you were near-

ly ready."

Sometimes

"LIother I never see any pictures

of angels with whiskers. Do men go

to Heaven?"

"Well, some men go to Heaven,

dear, but they get there by a close

shave."

If You Believe in Signs

Sign in bathroom in the corner

boarding house:

PLEASE CLEAN TUB

AFTER BATHING

LANDLADY

Which One

"I can't make this letter out," said

the business man to his secretary. "I

don't know whether it is from my

tailor or my lawyer, both named

Smith."

The letter read-"I have begun

your suit. Ready to be tried on

Thursday. Smith."

Zat So?

"When I was in China I saw a

woman hanging from a tree."

"Shanghai?"

"Oh about six Sect."

Pagr 23

Not Enthusiastic

Golfer to Caddie: "Notice any im-

provement since last year?"

Caddie: "Had your clubs shined up.

haven't you?"

Not So Good

A chorus girl, deliciously pretty

but decidedly low-brow somehow

found herself at a very select party

given by a famous society woman.

The girl, lonely and uncomfortable,

was leaning against the wall, framed

against the dark oak, when the hos-

tess took pity on her.

"My dear", she said, "You look just

like an old Rembrandt."

"Well", retorted the damsel sharp-

ly, "you don't look too darned snappy

yourself !" ---

Nobody Returned

"You're sure one bottle will cure a

cold ?"

"It must, sir. Nobody ever came

back for a second bottle."

A New Slant

As a well-known landlady once re-

marked, "Go, and never darkell my

bathtub again."

That's Right

Student: "What happens, sir, if the

parachute fails to open?"

Tough Sarge: "You come back,

sonny, and I'll give you another one."

--

A Railroad Joke

"It's getting so a couple can't neck

ill public any more without being

stared at."

"The boy friend and I have solved

that problem. We take a suitcase

and go down to the Union station."

Saloons can never come back to

their place on every corner until they

dislodge the gas stations therefrom.

He: You know I am going to be

married tonight ?

She: Well, what of it?

He: Woman, don't take it so non-

chalantly. Don't you realize that if I

get married tonight thirty girls go

back into circulation in the morning!


S

I7iz,c Frkco I.ilte.c wtewrt rr~rploycs,

~i'ilh courbhtcd service of 128 7enr.s ortd

8 rrfoirths, were retired wrd placed on the

Pozsio~r Roll at n urrrtirtg of llrr Board

of Per~siorrs, Iteld Augzrst 13, 1929, nf

tlrr St. Lotcis office.

YDNEY PORTER TOBIAS, wheel

inspector, mechanical department,

Springfield, Mo., was retired

on July 31, 1929, due to his having

reached the age limit July 16,

1929. He was born at Circleville,

Ohio, July 16, 1859, and was educated

in the schools near his home. He re-

J A 31 E S FRANKLIN SUMMEY,

mained on the farm during the great-

B&B foreman, Central division, was

er part of his life and on October 8.

retired from active service June 30.

1901, took the position of wheel in-

1929, due to his

spector for Frisco Lines at Sprina- .- having reached the

field, where he has remained. On

age limit, June 1.

February 5, 1895, he was married to

He was born June

Miss Ida M. Parker of Springfield.

1, 1859, at Bright-

3Ir. and Mrs. Tobias have no children.

water. Ark., and at-

They reside at 2634 North Grant

tended the schools

street, Springfield. Continuous servnear

Pea Ridge,

ice of 27 years and 10 months en-

Ark. At the age of

titles him to a pension allowance of

22 years he was

$49.75 a month, effective from August

employed as Ia-

1, 1929.

borer on the

-

Briahtwater bridge

FAYETTE ALMON WOODWARD. ,,, in 1881. He served

P, SUJIa,EY

in various capacilocomotive

engineer, Northern divisties

and in 1906 was promoted to the

ion, was retired June 30, 1929, due to

his having reached

position of B&B foremail at Jopliu.

Mo. On June 8, 1877, he was married

the age limit on

June 8, 1929. He

to Miss Mary Francis Baker of Casswas

born at Keene.

ville, Mo., and to them were born

three boys and five girls. The five

N. H., June 8, 1859.

youngest children are living, Mr. and

and attended the

scliools near his

Mrs. Sumn~ey reside at Westville,

home where his

Okla. Continuous service of 20 years

father was emand

3 months entitles him to a penployed

as a sash

sion allowance of $29.40, effective

and door maker

irom Jnly, 1929.

and carpenter. He

assisted his father G E 0 R G E ALBERT RlKNERT,

p, A, ,,.OOD,,,ARD until the age of transfer and labor foreman. Chaffee.

18, when he started

firing on the CitI&StP. He was

ilro., was retired from active service

May 9, 1929. due to total disability.

later en~ployed as fireman and hostler He was 69 years of age. born Novemoil

the Northern Pacific railroad. He ber 19, 1860. near Bellville, Canada.

entered Frisco service in December. His father was a farmer, and he

1883. hostling and running a switch helped with the farm work and atengine

at Kansas City and was later tended schools near Pleasant Hill.

promoted to the position of engiueer No.. after the family had moved to

where he has continued to serve until the United States in 1867. He worked

his retirement. On November 18.

1889, he was married to Mrs. M. C.

Tinges of Galena, Kans., who is now

deceased. They had no children. Mr.

Woodward resides at 4012 Main

street, Kansas City, Mo. Continuous

service of 23 years and 1 month entitles

him to a pension allowance of

$55.35 a month, effective from July 1,

in a rock quarry making stone ballast

for the KCM&B Line near Williford,

Ark., also mas employed by the Denison

Stone & Gravel Co. and a quarry

orerated by the Cotton Belt before

coming to Frisco Lines at Chaffee.

Mo., in the capacity of attendant in

the store room and oil house. He held

the positions of labor foreman, truckman,

car carpenter, car foreman, car

1929.

wheeler, interchange inspector and

his final position, transfer and labor

foreman. On August 14, 1SS2, he n*.

married to Elizabeth Agnes lfyers o'

Pleasant Hill, No., and to thea wpm.

born two sons, both employed h

Frisco Lines. Mr. and Mrs. Bienr-

reside at 418 S. Main street, Chaff- ,

Mo. Continuous service of 20 vow

and 5 months entitles him to 3 J .:

sion allowance of $26.15, eUew

from July 1, 1929.

- -

JAMES DEEL, crossing satchm:

Pittsburg, Kans.. was retired from '

tive service July 31, 1929, dtle to t

-

1

DEE,d

having reached 1

age limit July .

1929. He was bcr

I July 24, 1859, .

. B r id getown, ll

and attended I

schools near Ljr

County, Kans. I'

first work r:'

Frisco Lines *r .

in January, 1' %

when he wxa IIIT

to repair r'

r o u 11 d h o use '

Kansas City, !:

He also served as bridge waichn 1

at Ash Grove, Mo., and was ti

transferred to the

crossing watchman at Pittshv . 1

Kans. In 1884 he was mar'

to Miss Linlet Willian~s and to th+ (

were born three daughters. Mr. z

Mrs. Dee1 reside at Lacygne, K7'

Continuous service of 19 years ant; (

months entitles him to a pension ,

lowance of $20.00 a month, effec!,

from August 1, 1929.

AARON HENRY KEITH, pun1.

at Neely's Mo., was retired troa

tive service July 31, 1929, due to

having reached

age limit Jolr

I

July 20, 183

Anna, Ill., and

cated in 1'

schools near -

home. At the .:

of 43 he ares:. '

his first Frisco .

sition, that + of

driver foreman

- - - --: Clarkton, Sfo.

last position r

that of pumpr: .

A. H. KEITH


1 ' -1y's. Mo. He was nlarried to Miss

" rp Ellen Hall of Williamsville. Mo.,

Ire not given) and to them were

r? four boys and five girls. Mr.

-4 Nrs. Keith reside at Neely's

' wling, Mo. Continuous service of

;years and 6 months entitIes him to

p~nsion allowance of $20.00 a month,

, 7wlive Prom August 1, 1929.

ALBERT B. LEWIS

ALBERT B. LEWIS, roadmaster.

.wthnestern division, died August 10.

$23, in Baylor hospital, San Antonio,

-~ras, of acute appendicitis. He was

-mployed on the Southwestern dirlpion

as section foreman and road-

7;~sLer for Frisco Lines for the past

"4 years. On June 9. 1893. he was

uarried to Emma Dowler of Afton.

Ukla., and to them were born nine

tvlidren. Four daughters survive. He

n~ii a member of ;\Iasonic Lodge No.

'3 at Claremore, Okla. He was buried

i:, Rosedale cemetery at Ada, Okla.

FRANCIS GEORGE STEINGRANDT

FRANCIS GEORGE STEINt,K.ANDT,

pensioned gardener, died at

springfield on August 29. He was

iioro September 9, 1848, at St. Louis,

1

~nd entered the service as a laborer

in the store department at Springfield,

, Sriwmber, 1901. He served as clerk,

fnrvman, storekeeper and finally as

urdener at the reclamation plant

until his retirement August 31, 1919,

which was due to his having reached

th ape limit. His pension allowance

I an $20.00 a month and up to the

hue of his death he liad received a

total of $2,380.00.

-

E. E. HECKEL

E. E. HECKEL, of the traffic depart-

~r~t, died of heart disease at his

borne at 4406a Alaska Avenue, St.

Louis, No. He was born iu St. Louis.

July 15, 1903, entering the employ of

!h~ Frisco Lines April 1, 1919, and

I rz; married October 20, 1926. He was

t a talented musician and a member of

I ~ P Frisco Bowling League. His

, ridor and one child, nine months old,

rirrvive him.

I The Lrnllic department was repre-

atntec! at the funeral, held at St. Hed-

ria's Catholic Church, August 26, by

.L A. Rothenheber and A. A. Polley,

;rho acted as pallbearers.

- -

THOMAS JACKSON JONES

THOMAS .JACKSON JONES. pen-

dioned airbrake foreman, died at his

',ogle in Kansas City on September 3.

He was born June 10, 1846,

For Meritorious Seroice

RIVER DIVISION

Superintendem J. A. Moran reports the following cases of meritorious

service:

Fred Drew. section foreman, Naylor, Mo., rendered claim agent valuable

assistance in sever:tl laws~~its for alleged crop damage by hogs. Fifteen

merits.

A. B. Carlock, agenl-operator, Grarois, notified 801 that brake rod was

down. Ten merits.

L. 31. DeBerry, c:onc!uctor, was given a letter of commendation for alertness

in taking signal from Frank Green, extra gang foreman, Train 838, when

brake beam was down and dragging.

T. M. Stokely, conductor, E. S. Burgess. H. E. Montgomery, and E. W.

Watts, brakemen, re1,aired ccupler south 16990, Train 832, at Blytheville, enabling

car to move through to Chaffee for repairs, avoiding delay. Ten merits

each.

J. F. Touat, conductor, E. Latham, and Earl Ormsbee, brakemen, while inspecting

Train 839 at Coral, noticed four inches gone off ball of rail and notified

section men. Ten merits each.

B. McCammon, conductor. S. Hill. engineer, Oscar Williamson, fireman.

Fred Lett and Jeff L. Morgan, brakemen. repaired cars and handled to destination,

avoiding delay. Five merits each.

J. %. Tucker, conductor, given letter of commendation for interest and

courtesy in assisting Mr. McMullin of the Lawrenceburg Roller Mills Com-

>any in handling a number of telegrams while Mr. McMullin was a passenger

on Train 808.

W. AI. Webber, agent, given a letter of commendation for mowing weeds

around station at Burdette and his efforts to keep his station and grounds iu

a neat co~idition.

WESTERN DIVISION

Superintendent S. J. Frazier reports the following cases of meritorious

service:

-4u;ust 2.5-E. E. Yocum, operator, Mountain Grove, Mo., noticed a brakc

beam down and signaled the conductor to stop the train. Five merits.

August 19-J. D. Holland, brakeman. Thayer, Mo., noticed a brake beam

down in Extra 15, south, and notified the crew. Ten merits.

August 10-Jim Judge (colored), brakeman, Amory, Miss., assisted in fir-

ing engine on Extra 2006, north, when fireman became sick. Five merits.

September 8-A. C. Marsh, operator, Olathe, Kans., notified J. M. Smith.

conductor. on Train 4/131 that brakes were sticking car about tenth back

from engine. His action likely prevented some badly slid flat wheels. Com-

mended.

NORTHERN DIVISION

Superintendent 'W. H. Bevans reports the following cases of meritorious

service:

Auqist 20-E. E. Young, operator, Paola, Kans., discovered brake beam

down aud dragging on 11162, and notified the conductor who stopped the train

and fixed brake beam. Five merits.

R. C. Reeve and H. Thresher, brakemen, Fort Scott. Kans., discovered

animal in SP 74621 that had fallen through bottom of car. got the animal ul)

and repaired car floor. Ten merits each.

August 17-R. G. Samuels, operator, Pleaston, Kans.. found brake beam

down and dragging on car in extra 4129, south, and notified conductor, giving

him a chance to stop and make repairs. Five merits.

August 3GEarl Long, section foreman, Scammon, Kans., imticed n part

of hralie rigging dragging on car in No. 132 and notified crew so that train was

Stopped before an accident occurred. Five merits.

KANSAS CITY TERMINALS

Superintendent .J. W. Skaggs reports the following cases of n~eritorious

service:

J. 0. Turner, yard clerk. Kansas City, Wo., discovered broken seal on BBA-

50444 and notified a special officer. As a result about $500 worth of copper

wire, stolen from the car, was recovered and the guilty persons punished. Tell

merits.


Don't Trade Your Lunch Box

ID you ever trade lunch boxes at

school and then wish that you

hadn't? I have, because I went

to the country school and carried my

lunch basket. However, I soon

learned that my mother knew how to

put np very good lunches and I

wouldn't trade, especially if it was

"sight unseen."

The school lunch box is sometimes

a difficult problem for those who live

in the rural districts. Each child

should be provided with a lunch

basket large enough to carry a ther-

mos hottle to hold milk. We must

remember that these youths attending

school want to grow to be healthy

men and women and each one needs

a quart of milk daily. The older girIs

in my country schooI used to take our

milk and make cocoa on an oil stove

vhich we had. That was good for

us because we had something warm to

supplement the cold sandwiches. It

is wise to have something warm at

noon-time so that the stomach won't

have to warm up all of the food eaten.

Sometimes it is possible to have

creamed vegetable soups, especially

if the Home Economics classes serve

hot lunches.

There are lots of good sandwiches

for the lunch pail. The best ones are

made from bran bread or graham

bread. The whole grain of wheat is

so much better for children, because

the outer coverings of the wheat

grain, known as bran, is rich in fiber

and is an aid in preventing constipa-

tion.

Some children may like just plain

bran bread sandwiches but most of

them like a filling between the slices of

bread, which shonld be cut one-fourth

inch thick. One which proves to be

a favorite is made from grated carrots

moistened with honey or cottage

cheese. Chopped dates and nuts

mixed with lemon juice and honey

are also tempting. If meat is served

at home for other meals of the day,

it is not necessary to include it In the

lunch. A chopped hard boiled egg

mixed with pickle and a little mayon-

Ry F;.4RRdIRA R. BROOK5

naise makes a delicious

sandwiches.

filling for

A bran muffin occasionally will lend

variety to the breads which are put

in the lunch pail. Dates, raisins. figs

or nuts may be added to the muffin

Plain bread sandwich

Chicken leg

Celery

Pear

Milk

Jelly sandwiches

Chopped carrot, cabbage, celer?

cottage cheese salad in jar

4pple

Graham crackers

Milk

11atte1~ as a special treat. If my lunch

hox contained a date bran muffin I

know I wouldn't trade with anyone.

This fall there are all kinds of fresh

fruits and a few vegetables which

may be included in the Iunch. Tomatoes,

celery, and raw carrots pack .

easily and taste good with a little

salt. Small cantaloupes can be carried.

Let the children have the fun

of cutting the melon. A bunch OK

grapes would always be good at this

time of the year. Then there are

always bananas, oranges, and apples.

The canned fruits and tomatoes can

he carried later in the season in a

little jar with a screw top. Baked

Fresh tomato and peanut butt,

sandwiches

Pear

Small candy bar

JIilk

BRAN MUFFINS

2 tablespoonsful shortening

% cup sugar

1, egg

1 cup sour milk

1 cup bran

1 cup flour

l/2 teaspoon soda

1 teaspoon baking powder

apples mere always my favorite Cream shortening and sugar I

dessert for my schooI lunch.

gether, add the egg. Mix and F

Children like something sweet.

Oatmeal cookies and corn flake

macaroons are good and healthful.

Too much cake and pie should not be

encouraged. The following rules may

help to plan the lunch box:

Always have milk; use bran bread

for sandwiches; use fruits and vegetables

in sandwich fillings ; always

have a fresh or canned fruit.

The following are lunch box menus

for use this fall:

Egg sandwich

Carrot and honey sandwiches

Toma to

Grapes

Graham crackers

Milk

flour, soda, salt, and baking powdu:

To the creamed mixture add the bra.

then the milk, alternately with th

sifted dry ingredients. Pour in'

greased muffin tins, and bake lo

moderate oven (3700 F.) for Inen'

minutes. Yield: S large or 12 mi

ium size muffins. If sweet milk

used instead of sour milk, omit ti

14 teaspoon of soda and use 3 t+

spoons baking powder. Raisins 8

dates may be added to muffins if h

sired.

CORN FLAKE MACAROONS

2 egg whites

1 cup sugar

M teaspoon vanilla

1 cup cocoanut

2 cups corn flakes

Date sandwich

% cup nut meats (chopped)

Chopped cabbage and nut sandwich Beat the egg whites until stiff, n:

Peach

the sugar gradually, then add

Corn flake macaroons

vanilla, cocoanut, coru flakes. a

Milk or cocoa

nut meats.

Drop by spoonfuls on a butter

Cottage cheese and honey sandwich

Lettuce sandwich

pan, and bake in a moderate 0;

(400° F.) until the macaroons arD

Cantaloupe

delicate brown. Yield: 24 small md

Milk

aroons.


'

thc lhrrr sty!cs bictnrrd nbow is irtdividrtal nrrd clrnrrr~irrgly npproor.

tlrc nrctrsiorr. Tltc pnitcrrr rnny be srcrrrcd hy srrrdijrg 15 crrrls i,r

or coirr to The Fashion Drpnrt.r~rrrrt. 261 Fifth .Ivc.. New York City.

VANT TO REDUCE?

often do we hear people say,

t want to get fat, so I am cut-

wn on sweets."

all realize that to become over-

limits our activities", states

V. McCollum, Johns Hopkins

zity nt Baltimore, in a discus-

1 people who tax the penny

lo capacity.

two most common causes of

VARIETY FOR WARDROBE

No wonder more women every day are

taking to home sewing and making the greater

part of their wardrobe, the lines for the new

fall frocks are so straight and the frocks so

easily made, even though one may be an

amateur at sewing.

No. 2734 is a one-piece sports model and

will easily meet the everyday requirements

for the business woman, college miss and

socially busy woman of today. It is very

effective in navy blue canton crepe with slim

straight line styling, one the smartest ~ouilg

folk are choosing for all-day wear. Set ill

plaits below jaunty patch pockets provide

fullness to hem. Revers in eggshell silk

crepe, with crepe collar and tie in rust shade.

Style No. 2903 is smart in black crepe

satin and will prove a very economical choice

for afternoons. This style makes good use of

both surfaces of the crepe. The dipping side

gives a decidedly slenderizing effect to flaring

circular skirt, and the neckline shows fem-

inine note in draped collar.

The third style, No. 2790, is one wllicll

may be used for all general purposes. It is

effective in printed silk crepe in burgundy

tones and is thoroughly Parisiau with its dip

at the front in snugly fitted hip yoke and soft

gathers in the skirt. The neclzline ends be-

comingly with a scarf tie.

SUCH FOOLISHNESS

I Have you heard of such foolishness as-

The man who can't stand any "night air" in

his bedroom, but can stay out until three

o'clock?

The woman who can't eat butter, because

she is reducing, but must have her chocolate

cream candies?

The man who drinks coffee three times a

day, smokes incessantly, and rides to work,

but thinks he needs a nerve tonic?

The little boy who wants to be a football

hero, but still refuses to drink milk?

The girl who is always buying cosmetics for

that complexion which school girls covet, and

pie?

overweight are overeating and lack

of exercise. Sugar is a habit-forming

food and the more regularly one eats

sweet foods the greater is the need

for them. Well people who eat much

and rest much generally grow fat,

while many thin people who eat liber-

ally are still slaves to their nerves.

They are so active that they burn up

so much fuel they have difficulty in di-

gesting enough to keep themselves in

good condition. The street car, the

passes by the c'Ounter pick Out.

automobile and the suburban train are

great enemies to stout people.

"People who wish to reduce should

walk at least a part of the distance to

and from work. This is especially

true of those with a tendency to put

on weight. It is probably better to

take the greater part of this exercise

at the end rather than the beginning

of the day, since this will prevent a

sense of fatigue on reaching the place

of work."


Page 28

S

CHOOL days agaiu! Old Shep, a

big lazy collie, gazed at the late

September sun as it sent clown

its penetrating rays. Old Shep was

lying in the yard in front of the school

house. He knew that he was not permitted

in the school room, but he

woulcl lie under the trees or on the

doorstep, waiting for his two little

charges, Betty and Tom.

Shep woulcl leave the little farm

with the children early in the morning,

carrying their lunch basket for

them all the way to school, a whole

mile. When the three reached the

school house, Shep would deposit the

lunch basket and amble off into the

cool grass to wait for recess.

As the children marched out for a

few moments' play he would follow

Betty and Tom around the yard. He

was a great favorite with all the

children, for he would retrieve lost

balls and carry sticks and rocks which

they threw for him.

The afternoon would prove the longest.

After the short recess he would

wait patiently. knowing that when

they came out agaiu. they would start

for home.

It would have been folly for anyone

to attempt to touch Betty or Tom, and

he asked nothing better than to guard

them on their way to and from school.

On this particular afternoon. the

bees were buzzing and the breeze was

blowing the tall grass. Once in a

while a car would pass and Shep

would open one sleepy eye and gaze

at it.

Then all at once he heard the familiar

little song which the children

sang just before they were dismissed.

Old Shep got to his feet and shook

out his long furry coat. Then he

stretched and yawned and stood, his

eye on the door.

The children trooped out arm in

arm, books in straps slung over their

shoulders.

"Here she^!" called Tom, and Shep

hurried toward his little master, took

the lunch basket whicl~ he hauded him

in his teeth, and the three started up

the road.

Faithful Old Shep Finds the Lunch Basket

lesson today?" asked Betty.

"Sure-I like history. It's inter-

estiu'. Don't like arithmetic though.

Too hard," replied Tom.

"But that's easy for me, Tom," said

Betty. "What was Harry Jenkins

talking to you about today?"

"011 he's a big bully. I told him it'

he pulled your hair again or put the

ends in the ink well, I'd beat him up,"

said Tom.

"But Tom-he's bigger than you and

anyway, mother told you not to flght

with him." said Betty.

Just then the two rounded a curve

in the road and there stood Harry,

his arms folded and his head dropped

on his chest.

Old Shep dropped the lunch basket

and stood still, the hair raised slight-

ly on his back. Betty and Ton1

stopped too.

"So you thought you'd bluff me, did

ya?" said Harry. "Come on now, I'll

fight ya!"

Tom dropped his books to the

ground, but Betty flew between them.

"Now Harry, I won't let Tom fight.

He didn't bully you and I'm the one

that you're mad at because it was my

hair you pulled."

"I told yon I'd lick you if you ever

pulled her hair again," said Tom, "and

I mill."

Old Shep realized the enmity be-

tween the two. He stood ready to

protect his little master and mist~~ess

on a moment's notice and just theu

Harry glanced down into his face. It

did not carry a friendly feeling, aud

the fur on his back was standing.

Harry decided that perhaps the next

time would be better, especially when

Shep wasn't around.

"Well-I'll pull her hair if I want

to, because I don't think you'd fight,"

he said and turned and marched off

through the woods.

Tom and Betty and Shep proceeded

along the road, talking the incident

over. While Tom knew that Harry

was a bully, he also knew that he

must protect his little sister and he

was willing.

"Oh, Tom, wasn't that a nice history The next day Shep carried the

1u11cl1 basket to school as usual. All

depositing it on the school house stk

before his little master, he ambled

to the grass.

Just before noon Shep awaken

from a little nap to see Harry st

gingerly down the steps of the schr

house and off into the woods carry1

what looked to be the children's luv

basket. Old Shep followed a shr

way back. He wasn't quite sure h

he thought he recognized the set

of the lunch basket. He took a st

trail while Harry hurried on thros.

the woods. Then old Shep stoppv

He heard the crackling of brush a-

he waited. Soon he saw Harry reh-

to the school empty handed.

Old Shep investigated and ~OIP

that Harry had hidden the children

lunch basket. He also smelled an r,

ject nearby which was most digtar'

ful to him, because it smelid 11

Marry, and he disliked him.

He returned to the school yard ar

waited. Soon the children came ol

with their lunch baskets and t

looked for Betty and Tom. They 11

not come and Shep nosed into I

door. There they stood talking P

citedly to the teacher. Shep !at

then what it was all about.

So he barked. Betty and Tom P

looked at him. He ran to them


Page 29


7'11;s I ~trpp~, croz~d attcudcd the Frisco iss so cia ti or^ picrric nt nolirzg Pork ill Springfield, No.,

Scptc~nbrr 2. Appro.r:m7tely four tlrotrsortd persovrs 7aer*e present.

-

Frank Junkins Re-elected for Two Years

T

HE Metal Crafts and Car Dewtment

Employes' Association

held its sixth annual convenn

nn September 9, with approxi-

-4y Rfty delegates in attendance.

' meeting was an enthusiastic on*

.3 start to finish and many prob-

-.of interest to the shopmen mere

4Ipi during this session.

i81hing the noon luncheon, G

rl meeting was held with Mr. H.

' Worman, superintendent of mo-

.s power and hls associates which

Adrd Messrs. P. 0. Wood, G. W.

'.T, and J. K. Gibson. This meet-

:'ras held in the assembly room

tte Frisco building at Springfield.

fi~ the ninth and tenth, aft'er the

-'?ntion, the system committeo

.I tn the office of Mr. Frank Junk-

( -., general chairman of the system

Tiniltee, and perfected a reorgani-

TI lor the next two years. Mr.

, -!:ins was unanimously re-elected

. he board to serve as general

kman. The following members

::d elected: Earl Genung of the

: ;: shops, Springfleld, vice-general

.;:man; C. C. Bond of Enid. Okla:.

-Wed as secretary; C. J. Ken-

nedy of Birmingham, elected as of-

ficial chaplain of the committee.

One of the outstanding accomplish-

ments was the drafting of a new

system constitution and by-laws book

which was approved by the system

committee in regular session on

Sunday. September 8, and ratified by

the convention body on September 9.

The ratification of the new constitu-

tion and by-laws book does not, how-

ever, create any radical changes in

handllng or governing the organiza-

tion in general.

FRISCO MECHANIC

FAMILY NEWS

LOCAL NO. 17-TULSA, OKLA.

-

H. C. PRICE, Reporter

Mr. G. M. Jessee, roundhouse foreman,

has been snendlnz his vacation In Ala-

bama and ~loricla~

Mr. C. E. Hart, pipe man, and fanlily

are spending a few days in 3Iissouri.

Mr. H. R. Cole, locomotive inspector,

and family have returned after a fifteen

days' stay in I.ou1siana.

Mr. Fred Crawford. pipe man, and wife

spent a few davs in Kansas Clty with

Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Davls, formerly of

Tulsa

Mac I,ondagin, electi'icim, has returned

after a Leu days' vhcirtlon spent in ~Missouri

:und Arkansas.

Mr. Frank Hirharilson, water foreman,

and family spent ten dayx in western

Oldalioma and West l'esar.

3Ir. Paul Corbin and family are visiting

in Detroit.

Mr. 14. J. Ray. n~:icliine sllop for~nlun

has nloved his family from Springfleld to

':'ulsa.

air. C. I. Alesander, boiler foreman, has

r.tarted a new home in Onkhurst.

Mr. Erl Svhail is the possessor of a new

Ford. Ed has a hard time shifting gears.

1,ocal No. 17 met Sept. 6. 19%. with

a very large attendance. Mr. John White

mas elected for division chairman for the

nvst term on South-Western Division.

Mr. L. L. Graham, chief car inspector,

has some big Ash storles to tell after a

ufeck'8 fishing on the Illinois River.

Mr. I,. L. Finch has been appointed

night roundilo~~se foreman. vice J. C.

l'iiolnas, who is working days.

PITTSBURG, KANSAS

-

WAI. CHAXEY. Rcportcr

-

Mr. and Mrs. F. \'all and dauxhter

are no\\' on a vacation trip in sunny Cali-

fornia and esnect to be gonc about three

weelts.

Severni fellows from the shop force

c7elebr:lted Labor Day in Springfield, Mls-

souri, attenclinq the big Frisco picnic. A

good time and plenty of eats mas re-

ported by all. --

LOCAL No. &KANSAS CITY

DORALL DESISOX, Reporter

-

Local So. 4 had a large delegation to

xttend the annual picnic held In Springfleld

Labor Day. The following: are those

Rell. Ralph Gray, Dan ~c~renr, red

Benson. 18. 31. Landers, Mrs. Ora Branberg

and claurhter. Ted Valenti and wife.

Mr.-and Mrs. Ed ~'ing and family, Charles

ICnox. Jack Lewis, William LewalIen,

David Wright, Ales Murphy, John Ladlsh,

Mr. and Mr.s. Fred Chaffin and son, Mr.

and ,Mrs. Virccil Dellin~er and rhildren.

R. ~ TBiaden~'an~i wifeand son. A. -F:

Flolman and wife. Thomas 0. Steaman,

Flarold J. Owens, M. L. Braden nnd familr.

\Villiam Blessman and famllv. John

Cashmnn and wife. ~eorfie ~igl;fill and

wife AI .I O'Cennor and wife Nick Vidovieh'

aid 'wife. R. V. ~chudacker, William

Welt\, and wife. Louis ICalnev and

wife, J. b. Griffin 'and son, 6s. A.

Thompson, D. L. Denison and wife, Edward

Hunter, wife and son: Melvin Mc-

Cready and wife. Claude McCreadv and

lyife, Tom Davis and family, John Purtle

and wife, Roy Salsmnn and wife. Clarence

Vielbiq, Joe Super. W. McCredy. J.

Markle, Milo Beattie. Arthur DisseIhotT.

showing that Kansas City was very well

revresented as she always is. All reported

a fine time, but awfully tlred.


IIemphis on a permanent jop EL talk about hciiig carrful.

tlllmed from vacation clnys with

as machinist first class, Good luck "Pug.

C'. A. Sash, tin shor~ foreman, ret,ently folks at \Va?.ncaboro, Miss., Augu~:

Joe Plourd, supply man. has been off on returned from his vacatmn.

John t~lil the same oltl stories of I

the sick list for a number of days. Husiness at the reclamation plant at cl~iciten and fishing.

Andrcw Fredrickson. carpenter, and the time of this writing. is very heavy. 11-1 \\'illianwon, president of the r

wifc, have gone to Los Angelcs, Cal., to There are several new faces around the crafts, attended the meeting in Sprin?

visit their son. Golbert.

Dlant and \\e are dad to ndcome them. Scptemb~r 9.

Zora Sillyman nnd wife, who mere in- George Gippert, machinist. recently A large number from Monett atto

jurrcl severely in an auto wreck, are took a flshing trip down in the wilds of the annual Shop Crafts picnic 82 Fgr

troth doing niwly at this writing. Arkansas. George says, thanks to a very Aeld on Labor Day. but on account

Elmer Carlson, night roundhouse fore- substantial chin and aood w~de ledaes in the short distance nreferred ilrlvlnr:

man, has returned from his vacntion. tile river. J-le surceedcd in staying-up ill auto. 1\1:111?' tliinki. It savFd IS'.;.

mhich he and the wife spent visiting rel- IS feet of water until soincone rexrued quite a f-enr passes.

atives. and they also attended the shop him.

\\'c hll, I~tar that the way of the 11:'

pirnic held in Springfield Lalror Dny. "Radio bug" has at last reached our sressor 1s hard. Substitntinc tresp;.

Clarence Enhi is now back on his own hard-shelled timekeeper, W. A. >Iongold., for tl.ansxresxor will al~pl? to the- n

job after filling in as foreman in place Bill is in the market for a radio.

unfortunate accident that occuwed In

of Sight Roundhouse Foreman Carlson. Reclamation plant employes extend JInnctt wrrl on Labor ]Day, when r-

We all wish to extend our hearty wel- their sympzthy to J. IV. Thompson, gen- young men lost their lives, flue to '

come to Mr. and Mrs. 0. B. Stoner. who crd fcreman, in the death of his brother sl~iftinp of a load of pipe in which I

come to us from E't. Scott. Mr. Stoner in Brookfield. 310.. September 7th. were stealinc. a ride. Somewhere are 1

taking the plnve of Ed. Tuck, roundl~ousc \%itors at reclamation plant during mothers who don't know their sons V

foreman.

month of September were Frank Webh. died, for at this writing these boys t

Martin Iilwhne~ nn(l family spent James Cunningham. 311.. TVebh was for- pot been identified. There are a lat

T,abor J)ay with Xartin's father ant1 m~rl?; chief clerk to Harrv F. Drown, l~srons to bc learnc.tl by this accid~nl:

mother at T,ohmrtn, Mo.. where they cele- storekeeper, and is now working for Wil- ---brated

their golden we(1dinz anniversary. son Packing Company. Oklahoma City.

Mrs. T.ewis Baker. wife of boiler wash- \Ye need no introduction to Jimmie Cun-

NORTH BACK SHOP

zr, is improving slowly at this writing. ningham, Lindenwoocl. We are always

SPRINGFIELD, MO.

Charles X4'eller, hostler helper, is back glad to see our oltl friends.

on the job after being off a number of Ilarry F. Brown, storekeeper, is also

.\ I.F:S. \VATT, Reporter

days with hay fever.

vacationing at this timr. Understand

Willard Amhercrornbie and wife Spent Mr. Brown took a trip to Pcnsar'oln via

Frisco and also motored to Jefferson City. Tht, daurhters of the writer hare

a number of days visiting home folks in

Scott City, Kansns.

Regular monthly meeting of I.ocal No. turned to their duties after the sumns

Elmer Davis is back to work after a 1 was held at I'ythian Castle Hall. Auvacation

with thcir dad. One to her t

number of days in the hospital at St. gust 30th.

1,ital \vork in AIilford. Ran.. and 0th. 1

teachinr: in \Vest Plains, No.

Louis.

17'.estc.r Smith of the machine (ley:

Roy \\'all spent a short vacation vltiiting

relatives in Hoxie, Ark.

LOCAL No. 15-OKLAHOMA CITY nwnt I;lrr.nt Labor Dav with relatini:

lfollis Fout, is our new machinist ap-

E.-A; riarclay spent Labor

prentice. vice Dnve Wright. Hollis comes

R. \\'. GEE, Fiepo~,ter

to us from Mulberry. Kansas, and is the --

ing his farm home.

EIII~ Galloway announces the hirli,

son of Kirby Fout, who is B. and B. Se\-era1 of the shop employes iintl their a daugl~ter on September 5 , Thcy I:

foreman at Kansas City. We welcome tami!ies enjoyctl thrt picnic in TuiW ant1 named 11cr hlnrv Lou. and she HTIyou

to om midst. Hollis.

all rrport a fine time.

eight ant1 thrce-fourths pounds.

A1 Clark is the proud owner of a new Everybocly back from vacations and .I. C. (-!ox has returned from his 11

three window Ford sedan.

the force is normal again.

Ifon in Fensncola. Fla. While then

There was a birthday surprise party Mr. A. 11. L)ow has been appointed car vircitcd the Government air field and ( 8 1

civen in honor of Xrs. S. 0. Miller. wife foreman at this point. \Ye are glad to intervstlilg points.

of engineer, and the evening was spent have him with us and \velcome him to 311.. Senders, son-in-law of Floyd

yl:rving cards.

Olclahoma City.

Leonard, is in a critical condition at 1

\\'c were all very sorry to learn of the We \voultl like to have the brothers Sloincs. Iowa. having sustained renews

that Henew bIcGowan. brother from otller points visit us and see a real inju~.ics in an accident. Both of liir .

of o~ir own T,eslie, nrm drowned in the oil fi~lrl. Another' hi- well came in ves- a110 arms and ):is collar bone are bni:

rhr Piney River while on a fishing trip. terda-5, ant1 two mo& crpcctetl in tohay. I-Iis wife was here vi~iting her paren:.

Tf.e send our symDathies to those who L,ocal mects tlrst and third Wednrs- the timc of the accident but on 118

day. ICverybotIy looking for\v~rd to the (eipt of the llews she rustled back ta ' '

election of officers for tl~c incoming yenr. J,Ioine*.

Let you have the list in nest issue.

GIT~'~ n'llltlock, machini~t, visited

George Papln, our president, attendril

the convention in Sprinafield September 9.

Slr. Frank Junkins mas wit11 us the first

mertinx in September. IJc raked the

members over the coals for not attending

meetings.

Earl Genung', division chairman, or

Springfield, mas visiting in Olclahom;~

City recently. Hope he comcs oftrn.

We havc a new train on the Chiclcasl~n

Sub. 403-412 between Oklal~oma City ancl

Lawton. They have started off fine and

n7c are sure they mill do better.

C. H. Vnnderforcl, clerk at the rounrlhouse,

is away on vacation, and R. IS.

Stewart is rclleving him.

J. H. Xlcblains. yardmaster, accompanied

by hi9 two grandsons and Mr.

Sathan Boardman of Boardman L Co..

was on the Illinois River fishing recently.

No fish but bad a nico outing.

I

are left to mourn.

Charles Frizzell is the proud owner of

a run-lilte-new Chevrolet coach.

Mrs. Ted CRVR~RUR~ has returned from

ntivcs at V'ichita. Kans.. Labor Day

Tk-troit where she has been visiting reln-

reports a wonderful trip.

tivcs.

It. 41. Epps. drill press man. viril~I

Norman Potter, boilermaker, was off on

ativcs at ('olbv. . . lians.. the latter . ~. nnthe

si& list n number of days, but is now

August.

O K. and back on the job.

The North Shops extends its ssmm

We all wish to express our deepest symto

Gonlon Youell. special apprentiw

pathies to Roy Ewing at the loss of his

was called to Richland, Ken., to 21:

beloved mother, who passcd away August

the funeral of his cousin. Nark Cw!'

ZSth at her home In Topeka, Kansas.

Charles Itippee, machine apprenl;,,

Audie Bateman has left for a short

out of time and is working extra b ~ w

business trig to West Plains, Mo.

\Villiam Wyatt, Milford Ball an#;

land IIoorr have been litred reeenl':

We all wish to express our deepest

machinists' apprentices.

sympathies to Dadid Fitchie at the loss

Connie Moreiand is sporting a '

of his beloved sister, Nellie, who passed

four-door sedan Ford.

away at the home, 5816 Lydia.

The cntire Sort11 Shops wish to PSI

Mrs. Dave Fitehie and daughter. Mar-

their sympathy to Mr. H. L. Roland. .'

jorie, have returned from an extended

worker. and family. at the loss of !'

vlsit spent in the western part of the

Tl.oIand, who has died since the la::

I'nlted States.

Port.


'"mr Owens and wife soent Labor Dav phis between Chaffee and Yale teams

r,,-ilis-m&her~'nd sist& in St. Louis.'

tinmy my Wardlow, one of our old-time

,-,,.irncn, rnl visiting Lriends at the

recently.

.Ji~:l-h" Smitll, !v110 was 01)erateil on the

.I ,,f ,\ugust for infecteil l)li~tlrlcl~, is not

.,wred much at this nt.itinx. Buck i.-

-;n-in-law of F. L. Leonard.

BRIDGE AND BUILDING DEPT.

EASTERN DIVISION

Sunday, August IS. No, Chaffee did not

win the game, but Yale sure knew they

had olnred. as thc wore \vlns 2 to 1. Two

special - trniris were operutcd over. the

main line mid the branc:li(!s to accommo-

(late trli employes v:ho desired to attend

thc :;1111e. --

MECHANICAL DEPARTMENT

PARIS, TEXAS

-

S. B. I'.\T,JIERTREE, Reporter

time. We have Mr. Posey machinist, and

311.. Cauldwell, car man, t)o thank for the

suc:ccss of the barbecue; the result of

their diligent antl untiring efforts. I.ocal

So. 18 needs more of such men to pro-

mote good feilonmhip among the employes

Fro111 all recant reports iind rulnors, A.

C;. Eitzen, coach inx1)ector. is contemplat-

ing matrimony. 'I'he (late has not heen

set Yet. but 4rthur says. "It won't he

Ion= now."

"Shorty" ;\IcCullough of car department

Inns been off for sonie time with an initrred

foot, but lie is now aWc to be ar

work ~ - amiin

hlr, A. (.'. I lufilrs, forrtier clerk at Fort Mr. k&plte, air hrnke man, spent I.nl)or

h11-t HolTrnan and family npclit tn week \Yortl,, rew~itly trxnsftwwl to 1'ar;is 3s 1My in Sr. Louis.

.,mg relatives at \\'ellington, Ihn. votton cle~,li, l'lris is not Mr. Huglls first S, It, fiIaLl~is, night roundl~ouse fore.

Roy Smltl~ and family spent t\vo lays trip to Paris, an11 we nc~lcorne him as an man, is laklng his vitcation mntl spendring

tlrr first of tlie nlontl~ visiting rela- old tlnncr.

ing :-I f ~ w dxys at Washington. D. C. J

:es at \\rillow Springs, 310.

Mr. H. 'C'. .\lesser, former relief clerk 1-1. Waide. inspector, is acting foreman

t:ub Nisrr and George Gott spent La- at Ilugo. 0lrlalrom;l. W;IS c.lnnploycd as bill during his ahscnce.

Uay Aslnlnl: on tlic Gasconailc, I:ircr clcrh nt Paris the first part of this month.

t'iocker, No.

We Inope Mr. Nrsscr learns to like our LOCAL NO. 33-HAYTI, MO.

.irthur Rude and wife rcw-11th' spent a little citv ilnd will be permanent with us.

03 days visiting relatives ilt Ilooper. 3Ilss Fav HccLclmu~i, clerk at frei~nt

$..I,.

offi('e, has' returned fron~ her vacation.

1.:. B. \\'III'~I~:SICI:, Repol tct, --

I ; ~ ~ KGott P and wife paid a sliort visit \\'e think she is tlic best looking "lady"

~clativea at Perryville, Ark. They wcre c.1c1.k i~t tile freixlnt office.

'rl~e Frisco ball team of (:Idfee, No..

\vent to IIIemlil~is and playrd a vcry in-

.~~li~? two days.

311~. 1:. C. 1)el~ricIi. ciiicf ('1wk for th?

r'lrarley Wallace, B. & B, fol'ernan, has transport:ntion

tl'resting Kame ot' ball, the score being 1

department, moved into ;I

,i!cl~n~ed hlrnself a new Ford coupe. nc.\v house on .Donl~an~ stwet the lirst

to 3 in favor of Alemphis. X special train

Orbin Franks has quit his joh in cans

containing c~levvn coaches were well

ot' the n~onth, ;IS well its Mr. 7'. R. Jack- crowded. The Ilayti band furnished tlle

\I. . ; nnd -.-- lias . .. . c'onr to -- Frernont. No.. to son. clnicf 1.1erk for the ~nec'hanical derii

lor Garrett Construction company.

music and everyone enjoyed the day.

partment, ant1 we are wondering when

I:d Euliss at present is taking clrarge

Joe I'ryol; first-class nrachinist, is on

JIessrs. Jackson and Derrick are going to l~is regular job again, as he has been otY

8 , wmy So, i. mhile Nr. Brown is oft' on fix up tl~eir ".iointn drivrway, which has for some tinnr. 'Cle careful. Joe.

:a txalion.

lwcn ~r~c?ntioned several times hcrctofore.

\V. 11. Brooke, general 13, k B. fore-

Tl~con St~,n(:k. first-class machinist.

Mr. 11. C. 'I';~ylor. :rwnt, attendtvl tl~c. spends most oT his Sundays at tile Cal)e.

,I:III, at this writing is in t11v hospital at Io~s anil tl~imwfie meeting at (;al!resto~l

$1. 1.011is on account of a slirainctl back.

Guess Thcon gets homesick.

the flrat of this montl~. \Ve hope Mr.

Cl~nrley Baron, B. & B. foreman, nrns

\'ick Slgier and family l~ave been visit-

'I'nylor enjoyecl l~is trip and ac~complished irlx ~,el;~tivt,s in Kentucky. Vic reports

,,' Illree days recently on account of sick ;I lot nf' good at the mcetins.

1.. '5.

I-~nvlnq a tilie time inntl was proud to see

311.. 13. S. Olson, nlastw mechanic, and

I:r%y Smith returned to \vorli Sel)tcmher

the blri iionie ~)lacc again.

fanlily took in tl~e annual T~amar County I:. I). Sanders, car inspector, has been

,. :~tter bing confined to bed 1'01. several

y on account of sickness.

'air :rind reported it Iwtter than ever. visitinz in St. Louis. I)emcy. as he is

k:h Riley was OR' sevel-a1 clays durins. Mr. N. B. Palniertrce, car inspector, and hnon'n lierr, came home sick but is 0. I


Page 3#

Jewel1 Payne, cnr department em. an,l ha.; accented a oosition with 31. J. rominrr cansized he lost his hllllnld n!

p!o?t.e, who hns been in the St. Louis Norse as b~o~iteeper. - if c&"&-gii t&at-~&ag it- P.&i;ce',,

hospital with an injured foot, is home for Fred B. Hmgel, yard clcrli, is off a few sorry that this occurred. but hope 11

a few ilavs.

clays and is being rellevcd by E. L. Sick- you will have another fat bank mll I

Alr C. " k. XIal tin antl family, brother 01s. rake along ncxt time-and better lo,%

of Mrs. H. H. Fuller of 805 West Oak, .Janws Fenwiclt, helner, is now stationed Homer liitchie. assistant ~ mneral ~ ~ for.. .. ~ .

have been visltinz with the Fullers here. at JIountain G~,ove. - man. wan nuitr nainf~~llv hurnpil ~i.,.'

Mr. Jlart~n 1s a live stock claim investl- I\'. B. Hauger, janltol.. who attended thc~l~cail in2 left irm~b-y~an e~e~~.~ic';lan

bator ot the Fr~sco General Office anti camp at Ft, Leavcllworth last montl~, while trylna to start the electric n]o.,.ree~des

in Springfield, 310.

liked it so well that lie failed to return. which propels tiie blast fan at tiie lor:.,

Mrs. T. E. Bently, of 1206 W. Pine, ha* 13. H. ;\dams iu now tilling tlie vacancy. sl~or). Mr. Ritchie returned to work .,

had as her guest* tl~rough August he1 [. W. Hill, yl'esldent of our local, &s snnic day after having liisinjuries~lre>r,.:

sister and husband. Mr. and Mrs. A. S. callcd to .C;prlng:'neitl to attend n meeting rlt tl:r hoxpital. Ilii is made of ttr >:I;:.-.

Eotts, of San Angelo. Texas : also her of the mc,ttll cmCt and CRY dtxpartment stuK that tlw American doughboys 18.mother.

Mrs. F. L. Snilth. --~~. and Aanchter. emnlorrs. sews. .- - . . .

Ana Mac Smith of- Santa Ana ~&as: deoke JlcCartney, matcr service fore- J. n:. Thompson and Mrs. Thornp~~~ri.

Mrs. Bently made a trip home dith M q man, is now on the sick list. accompanied by tiicir daughter, 311~ P&

Smith and Mrs. H. L. Bently of ~racf~: J. L). Piiillipps, engineer, has been re- s?, have returned from a trip to the At-

Texas. XIK Bently's mother came home imtated. lantic Coast. They saw Plymouth ROC'

with her for a short vlsit.

Jack Williams. night roundhouse fore- where our forefathers landed In 1620 a[

JIable and Robert Taibert. niece and man. wife and daughter are now on a Plymouth. Mass. They went up to tilt n;~tl-il~

to Annapolis. 310.. and to Pensacola, tion's capital and took a "rubber n d

Fla., for their vncntion. bus and wcrc shown. with explanation.

R. F. Carter, conductor, has now been a11 the Interesting and famous sights LO

home is in Sherman, Texas.

I tinstatcd. be seen at the seat of sovernment of 01

---

.\lack Beair11 of Co~~lova, Ala., is now went nation. They visited thelr son, K'assigned

as night pumper. ter, and his wife. who livr in Boston am

WEST SHOPS LOCOMOTIVE DEPT. There was qultc a gatlierlng of friends tlaversed some of the famous cow irai'

SPRINGFIELD, MO.

at the Y. A[. C. 4. the evening of,S,eptem- of that clty. 31r. Thompson brings horn

-

ber 7, on account of Thaycr recelvlng the the news that Walter is employed durir;.

A. E. GOOUFREY, Reporter wconil prize 111 hilvina tl~e best lookin< I l k summer vacation by the Edi~on ZIP+

sai6en on the IWsco system. Mr. Don B, trical Company hut mill return to 1:;

Local No. 2 met Friday night Septem- Fellows, florist. presented Sam B. V7001- school or business administration tlli

ber 6th. We were glad 'to see 'the large

rldxe with $10.00 In gold : also JIrs. S. B, fall. MI-. Thompson was much impresw

attendance at this meeting. Earl Gcnung

n'oolridge wlth a beautiful bouquet of by liis trip and enjoyed it all Immcn.sei:

was re-elccted for our division chairman

flowers. Prverai of the ladies and renat

West Shop. Our general chairman,

tlemrn plesrnt made some very plea~ant

lemnrlts complinicntin: S. B. IVoolrl~lge

Xr. Franlc Junkins, mas with us at this

meeting and made a very interesting talk

on getting tile rccond plize.

LOCAL NO. %ST. LOUIS, MO.

--

on the upbuilding of our organization. \Ire --- ROBERT W. REED, Reporter

are all very glad to sec Mr. Junkins at

our nieetinss and welcome him at any

time.

RECLAMATION PLANT

.\t a regular meeting of Tam1 KO. '

held on September 6. Brother Iktniel T

Mr. Junltins has the. sympathy of the

SPRINGFIELD, MO.

Wi~nlen was elected bv a Iaree rnaiorir

boys at the West Shop in the death of

to succeed himself as" divia1o~- chahn?

his sister, which occurl.etl Auqust 1Sth.

for the nest two years. It Is evtd~.

3Ir. and Mrs. Nathaniel Jlurray are

from thc enthusiasm dis~taved that L(r

the happy parents of twin boys, born Nrs. .\lbert Weaver visited with her Dnn has the good wis!iei aiid support r

Allgust 25. XIurrily Is a boilcrmalcer ap- slster in Joplin recently.

the association at this point.

prentice.

Finis Dlxon, ntoreroom emplovte, visit- Brother Franlc Junliinu was R vimit~

Ira Smith, boilermaker and John Fultz, ed his sister in Knnhas Citv a few davx at Local So. 5 at their nieeting held (..

ma,.hinist, made a week1-end fishing trip ~ecently.

Auzust 30. nnd favored us lvith an inta.

August 3lst. The boys were smiling over Mrs. V. J. r{uthe~ford was visitlng antl esting address.

tlie good luck and reported lots of fish. tlancacting business in St. Louis the past At a regular meeting OK Local So. '

Mr. and Mrs. Edward Merritt are the :nontli.

held on August 16, sis new rnemher

proud parems of a fine Slh-lb. girl, Betty Ci~arles Spencer. blacksmith helper. an- were admitted to a11 benefits of the

Jo. born August 11.

nounces that Hattie JIarle. a nine-nound. . - - ~-~, sociation as per ritual.

George Law. crane operator, and W. E. llandsome girl. has arrived at his home. Fred Estes. lead niarhinlst, In the mn.

Evans. boilermaker made a meek-end C. A. Xash. tin shop foreman. and fam- chine shop at Chouteau avenue, Is on

fishing trlp August $1, to .\rkansas. They ily spent 1,abor Day and Sunday preced- thirty-day leave. and with his wife an

reported a fine trip and plenty of fish. ing with his father and family at Tulsa. mother is visiting in California.

Narshall Dodd, cab carpenter, spent his George Tilornoson. machinfst. second Loyd C. Klose. first class electrlcinr

vacation in Los Angeles, Calif. Dodd re- class, was over on the River I>ivislon at is on a sixty-day leave and Alex. J:I~*.

Dorted a fine trio.

Cape Girarcleau looking things over mhlIc quln ir flllins his vacaicy.

- Jeff ~lwxl, boilermaker has the sym- lie was laid off.

Dnn Gorman. young machlnlat, just 01:.

pathy of the boys at Wekt Shop in the .John Thompson, our general foreman of the west shops, has accepted n job 1

death of his brother, which occurred Sep- was called to tlie northern part of ~1i.s: first class machinist at Chouteau avenur

tember 3. Mr. Brazel wishes to thank all souri, clue to the death of a brother. Mr. and went to work September 11th in 11;

the boss for their sympathy and floral of- Thompson has the hympatliy of the men of roundhouse.

ferinr --- ...

our nlant.

Quite a number of the rnemnerr of th.

Jol:; Plank, boilermaker, is back on the ~ i r~~~nrrnon i machinist second class association at this polnt attended tfh

job after being off on a leave of absence and Mrs. ~ a r ~ are o n on 'a sight-seein$ picnic at S~rinxfield on hbor Dm an*'

account of his health. The boys are glad anil vacation tl'ip to Los hngeles, Cal. all reoort a- rrood time

to see him back on the job.

Fobert Boyd. Iaborcr, mas painfully

Kenneth I,oe, machinlst, has been off inlured when he ~ o his t hand caught in

Ern& Carriger, cab man, has roicd

against boarding houses and loneir wenaccount

of sickness for several weeks. -re a pager press, which is operatcd by comhope

by the time thls goes to the press pressed air. \Ire hope his injuries will not

inas, and has moved his family and furniture

from Birmingham to St. his

Kenneth will be hack on the job.

prove serious and he n7111 return soon.

Jess Palmer is hack on davlizht work John Bownian. brown hotst fireman.

Alex. Jacquin has purchased n nrir.

after being on the night shift for about says he knows now what it mcans to say

Hupmoblle and Is learning to drm It

three years. Jess in a boilermaker onc has hnd his tonslls removed. he havand

reports the first valuable irwri

Edward Johnson, hoilermalter. has been ing had a tn'o weeks' trlal. with free

learned 1s to release the emergency brlkr

verv husv after work hours for the past room and board at the St. John's Hos- while drivinrr.

nit21

few weeks. Ed is b~~ildlnc a hoat and - . - -. . to this2wrlting there have been ne

we hope he will take us all for a boat ride George Glppert. maclilnist. was off duty

accidents at Chouteau avenue this mnnr',.

n'cst summer. for some time witt~ an injured hand, Our meekly saretv meetlngs hrtre h.'?

-

causrrl by a large splinter. Why should

changed to semi-monthlv meetincr. :~nl

Georrc worry about little things like every one of the emplobes Is request+l

MECHANICAL DEPARTMENT that? He has just recently sold his farm to malw talks on arcidenl preventlo-.

for

THAYER, MO.

a price that runs into six figures. Much good have come out of these meet-

Wade Coutz, laborer, was severely beat- inns.

en by hi-jackrrs who 1,obbed him and left Frank W. Schoenneman, dav stntionarv

F. 31. PEEBLES, Reporter

hlm in a serloud condition. on Xorth Main enxlneer, is tiie proud wandfather rl

-

avenue, the nlnht of September 7. He is J'fary Ann, who came to live with lilr. nntl

311s. Rodney Wilcos, wife of ,tile former improving under the doctor's care at the Mrs. Leslie Prichard on August 31. Jlr'

storekeeper at Thayer. who I.; now at Frisco ward in St. John's Hospital. Prirhard is Frank's 'dnuphter.

Memphis. was a visltor here.

Tom Willfamu. accomDanied bv Jlrs. That smile on Emery 1-1. bum garner'^

Mrs. F. N. Peebles. wife of the writer. nTilkuns. hns returned from a vacation fnce has grown a lot since the arrir;;'

Is visitinq at St. Louis. 310.

trip to California. Thcy visited in anil of Ilttle Pe~gy Ruth who came to t',

I. IV. Hill, car inpsector. who has been around Los Angeles and motored to Mex- Bulngnrner home on ' August 31.

off for the past three months, has now ico. San Diego and various places of in- Martha Jean is the name of the blwtbeen

reinstated.

terest alon~ the coast. Thev made the haired hahy girl who rame to live wlt

Joe Herbold. blacksmith. of -, Tenn.. - --. trip over th-e Eanta Fe.

Jlr, and Mrs. Neal 0. Garner on Septcqlwas

a visltor 'here.

Paul Preston, machinlst. second class. ber 11th. Neal is a first class machlnl

Frank ~chratz of Terre Hante. Inrl.. and went fishing on tlie Gasconade river with working the alr job.

H. .\. Schratr of Pocahontas arc visiting some frlends, and being suspicious of Proud and happy is putting It mi!,'

Frank Pcl~ratz, car Insprctor.

banks took his billfold along in a coat when the writer announces the arriv.'

L. E. Wilkerson, clerk, has resigned pocket. When the boat in which he was of Josephine Augusta Reed, who hwm


October, 1929

a member of the Frisco family on Au- several places of interest, including Cata- turned from several weeks' vacation at

gust 29th.

linn Islands.

his old home town in Indiana.

With all these announcements we should Homer Brumley, superviso~' of air work, F. A. Pl~tt, c-ar repairer, is confined at

work up a page of St. Louis baby pic- is also on the job again after an extended his home on account of iilncss.

tures.

trip to the Pacific coast and many west- J. H. Sorton and family have returnell

Dewey Jobnson is all happy and smiles ern states. He reports a great time. from a three weeks' vacation in Hirnlingthe

past two weeks on account of his William "Blondie" Dugan has been off ham.

wife and daughter, Charline, and son, sick for some time, but is again on the D. I?. Henderson, derrick enzlneer, h?s

James, who have Iwen tending the farm job, this time watching engines at the been on the injured list for the past sls

in Jackson, but :Ire now visiting with pnssenfier station.

weeics. Hr was in Cllaffee, %lo., most of

Dewey in St. I.ouis.

Frank "Pap" Kirk is a rerent pur- this time.

Lolp, daughtcr of engine inspector V. chaser of a Willys-Knight touring car. Monroe Stcwwt. third class machinist.

V. Chapman, who with Mrs. E. H. Chap- Mr. Kirk is also making extensive repairs spent a week in Wisconsin hunting and

man. wife of machinist at the west shops. to his residence at 916 Rogers avenue. fishing.

have returned from an enjoyable trip in David Rngsilale. engine watchman, is a Antoinette Marie arrived at the home

California. Lola reports a wonderful es- past month's purchaser of a home, hav- of Mr. and My. Walter E. Dold the other

cursion on a gl:lss hottom boat while on ing bought the property at 726 Ildereene (lay and old Dold" hasn't been the same

a trip to the Catalina Islands. They also Drive in Area Acres.

slnce. IHe is still a good Indoor ball

report that tile train selvice going both Charles nodsen. machinist, is stepping player, even if his mind isn't on his busiways

was excellent.

on the gas in ;I new Studet~aker fbur- ness.

James Hall, second class tank man. is passenger coupe.

G. W. Buckalew, machinist, who was

spending a two weeks' vacation at West Oliver Derrick, grease cup man, recent- injqretl by a fall, is back on the job

Plaines, Mo.. and points in Arkansas, vis- ly spent several days visiting a daughter agaln.

iting with the home folks.

at Coffeyville, Kansas. John Derrick. a .I. H. Stewart, car carpenter, is spend-

Andy ffolmquist will be working in son, who is ?i machinist on the day shift, irg his vacation with folks around

Anlory, Xiss., hy the time this goes to accompanied him.

Monett.

press, as he is making preparations for J. P. Rader, machinist, on the day .J. R. hlendows, car carpenter, who was

moving to that lloint from Chouteau ave- shift, is on a sixty-day leave of ahsence injuwd last November, is back with us

nue. We are for you, Andy; there is at present and is spending thc time in again and looking line.

nothing like being at home.

the country.

nr. W. Hull. car camenter. has rc-

Mrs. Ezra Woods has been confined to turned from &< two weeks' Vacation in

n local hospital for some time where she Xonett and other points weRt.

LOCAL NO. 32-NEWBURG, MO. underwent an operation. \Ire are glad to G. T. Youell. blacksmith. has returned

say she is improving nicely at present. from a sixty-day vacation spent in Jlon-

Nr, Woods is a truclcm~n on the second tana and Washington. He reports the

E. F. FCJ,I,ER, Reporter

shift.

:irrtle clop and Ilard cider in ll'asliington

IVeslev Kimble, boilermaker, on the as hne.

G. C. Hughes, general foreman, is third shift, is the proud daddy ot a 7%- .T G. Hamilton, car inspector, is taking

r pending his vacation visiting friends in Dound girl. - . who has been christened a two weclcx' v.lcation.

Fayetteville. Ark., and other points. "Opal."

J. J. Mazol, coach carpenter, has a Nash

D. R. Ece, stagbolt inspector, wife and Harley Stokes, inspector on the third sedan.

son. Bobbie, motored to Springfield. shift. 1s gomg fishing every once in E. F. Tuck former roundhouse fore-

H. W. Fuller, locomotive inspector. wife awhile in a new IIodel A Ford coupe, man at 1


BLE MEN'J

FLOWEK

AWARD1

CAi


UY IN SYSTEM-WIDE 1

"9NTEST

'WELVE

UENS

B

$ . r

I


I SOUTHERN DIVISION (

FREIGHT TRAFFIC DEPARTMENT

MEMPHIS, TENN.

--

KATE hI.4SSlI.5. Reporter

relatives in I>emopolis, Alir. I ~ \v:is P :LC- I.ine, 1)11t the nrw bux is tlle best ,

~xm~panied I)\, his uncle, Rerlnie S11rit11. Sny, we havr ;I REAl. hus now,;

Fred I). Crnss synnt st~vernl 11;~ys on we're cxpectiny tl~e employees at Yt

\Varrior River fishing whilc on vacation phis to want to cponle to Yale to u

recently. Haven't yet been able to de- so thcv can ride in our hus!

termlne the esact size of the fish Fred L. H. I)nvls, former yard clerk, is r

says he caught.

breaking in as a hraira~n:~n.

Ye reporter had a wonderful visit with John Bradv. weid1 master Yale, nl

friends in St. I.ouis and SIernphis while a flyinq trip to Tupelo September 8

vacationin% rerently.

another to Sikesto~~. 2,111.. Septenlber

--

J

r

1

s

o

it

n

D

I:. 1.; Buclloniln antl littlc daugl~trrs. MEMPHIS TERMINALS

BIRMINGHAM TERMINALS

I~hrlene and Audrv, cnloverl :I Great l.;rkes -

boat trip for their villrs at Ilome, at \\r:trrlell. Suncla>-. Sep-

J. 1'. T.uttn~~n. yard clerk. who rerent- Iieiti~ Allen of Anlo~y. Miss.. attrr~ded

lemlrv R

ly returncd to work after: 11:1vi11g been off Frisco ICmployes' C!lttl) Tlance at the Bi:

-.... ~. ..

Mrs.

sick thirty (lays, is agaln ill. We wish

IT. F. llaatings and little, (laugh-

tn1ia111 Athletic Club on Sept. Zrd.

lev. 11:try-Joe, ar'r i~t Iionle ns;iln alter

for him n speetlv recovery.

Eirminahium Terminal c-an hoast of

*pending most of the summer :~t Hardy.

T.ouis Mnnovcr. yard clrrlr. will leavr song-writer, same hein= Odirr B. Adlil-

Ilfr.5. T.:nuna &I. Chew, ot' tlw Rirminzsoon

for rtn extender1 trip to different switchman. Mr. Adkins ha$ conlp

11:lln Traffic I)epartment, W;IS :1 visitor in

points of interest, some of \vhicl? are Chi- thrre songs. nanlely. "Whcn You 1."

(>,l,..o . , , JIil\v;iukee, Srw Yorli, Philadeljji~ia. Called Me S\veatlrc%~rt." "near Old I'

Atlantic* Citv and Washinaton. 1). C. of Mine," tlnti "Southern Rose." TII

Miss l'iiclmn Drashrn;~n, stenogmpher songs wrre 1)roatlcast recrnlly over P'

in the PIcc41ianicill l>eliartment. was on tion 'Rr13RC by G:irlin SIorran, baritorher

w~ntio~~ the werk of 411gyst ?C,-:?I. I,. '1'. Flynn, revising clerk. spent

A. A. T.oelYc~l, tinwkwprr In s11p17rin- \~;\c~tion in I\,Iiusiqs.inni

Rlisr. formf'rly of hlempllis, Ilaid us :I

tendent tel'minals office. was off August

!I;

littlc visit this month.

for the purlwse of playing golf. superintrn~le~~t ter~nin;~ls oiTire, dp.

Anyone desiring

Ia'rank Sn~itlr, of our llnt ilinrss


Page 42

BRAKE LEVER BADGE PLATE

HE Brake Lever Badge Plate, also called Brake Diagram Plate, is a

T new detail on freight cars and will, from now on, be applied on all

new cars.

Those of us who are familiar with freight cars and know the importance

of proper braking ratio, and are responsible for cars being always

equipped with brake levers which will reduce brake-burned and

flat wheels, will welcon~e the new ruling of the A. R. A. Mechanical Division

making it compulsory for all cars being bzcilt after Aqpst Ist,

1929, to be equipped with a metallic plate giving the dimensions for all

brake levers. This. will enable the repair shop to replace missing or

broken brake levers by referring to the Brake Diagram Plate instead of

drawings which are seldom available at the repair shop or on foreign

lines.

The plate gives the location of the holes in all the brake levers on

the car and sometimes the length of the brake rods; also carries the Rail-

road Company's initials and a pattern number.

It is usually made of cast iron and bolted, or riveted, to the center

sills near the brake cylinder. Rule 3 of the American Railway Associa-

tion also states that after January lst, 193 3, all cars must be equipped

with the Brake Lever Badge Plate.

ED. ADV. -

1


I. Firuton attended a meeting of the

r, t? Safets Council at Llttle Rock,

-t 29. He also attended a meeting

1 Jilssissippi Railroad Commission

?);on, JIiss.. August 6.

,' G. Oregg left this office to return

;.:~l~lngton University.

" D. Yock has ncceoted . nosition - of

uir qn.

' ',n Qlckles spent Labor Day vlsitinb'

- ',)ih? nt Willow Springs.

-11th) G~lbreath vislted In Slkeston

.' 044 t.ola latter part of August.

.,td to rrmrt that Roadmaster J. I


Pngc 44

Katherine Vogel, chief clerk's stenographer,

is spending two w~eks seerng

the sights in Chicago and Detroit.

Johanna Ruge, stenographer in division

freight agent's offlce, reports n

wonderful time In San Antonio. Tesas.

where she vis~ted her brother and

family.

H. T'. l'erby, drnftsnian, and Jlrs.

Yerby have just returned from a VHCRtion

trip. Their itinerary included

Houston, Ft. Worth, Dallas and Broken

Bow, Okla.

Just a few minutes before this report

was ready to be mailed it was

a~inounc,etl by J. Johnson Ehing, maintenance

clerk, that he had resigned,

effective immediately. account accepting

position of secretary to vice presiiltnt

and general manager, AIr. Louis

Ezrry, of the Ft. Smith and Western

Railway Co. We indeed regret to

hear this as "Joe" always kept everyhod.?

in a good humor. However. we

wish hinl all the luck in the world in

his new position.

STORES DEPARTMENT

FORT SMITH, ARK.

GRACE HEYBKTRN, Reporter.

-

Bill Harrison busied himself while

on his vacation in touring aronnd from

town to town; hittin=. till of the sur-

rounding territory, including Fayette-

ville, West Fork and \\'inslow. He

says his emulation of the "Vanishing

Americrtn" was :Ilmost perfect-he

passed out every nite.

Pat Jackson, while roaming through

the Oxarks sctuirrel hunting, became

lost and coming upon n native of the

hills inquired how to get to several

different places, to which he got the

answer. "I don't know." After some

questioning Pat said. "You don't seem

to know very much." \\'hereupon the

n:itive replied, "\\raal. I ain't lost," and

walked away.

SIr. J. S. Smith, representative of

the Manning, Maswcll and Moore Com-

pany, was a recent visitor in Fort

Smith.

Airs. Earl Johnson and young daugh-

ter Betty liavc returned from I-lr~co

where they were the guests of Mr.

and Mrs. Henry Johnson for several

weeks. Earl went to Hugo Saturday

and accompanied them home.

Irene Woestman selected Saint Louis

for her ya'ntion and reports hnvinji

had a very wonderful time. While in

St. Louis Irene was maid of honor for

her cousin. whosc marriage occurred

on July 20th.

Mr. and Mrs. Wm. F. Griggs werc

called to Springfleld the latter p,art of

July on account of the serious lllnesx

;lnd death of Mr. Qriggs' grandmother.

A\ recent vlsitor in this office was

I,. V. Cochran of Memphis.

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Jenkins hktvc

returned from a visit of several clays

in Galveston and other points in

Texas.

OFFICE OF GENERAL AGENT

OKMULGEE, OKLA.

-

TIIEIAI.\ 1. COBR, Reporter

-

311.. Charles A. Beard, operator and

ticket clerk at thih station, with 311 s.

Iieord, has just returned from an c'stended

trip through Canada, Washin,rrton,

Orrgon and California, stopping off at the

principal cities. They report a very pie-isant

and interestiug trip.

Ormator J. R Moore ha.; been workinpailere

lor tht. past few weeks during

tile absence of Operator Brarrl.

Mrs. Thelnix Cobb. a~com~anied I)? her

motl~r~~. snent labor Dav with her

brother a& family at ~rilmore. Oklahoma,

stopping: enroute at Sulphur

Springs.

Mr. J. E. King, yardmaster, has returned

from his vacatlon which he spent

most of tho time in Texas, visiting t~t

Sherman enroutr to Houston.

Mr. G. .I. Rruntlidge, general agrnt, attcndrd

the Freight Chin1 and Awident

Prevention Meetina held in Tulria Senreniher

10

31r.~~~. T. TVood, cl~ief clerk, and fan)ily,

motored to Sasakwa the wcek-cnti

of September 14 to visit with relatives.

E:wl \\:iihelm. the small son of Mr. and

AII s. Key F; ~~~ilhelm, is recovering from

a few days seriouh ilineha.

Miss Hclen Trone. of Sn~)ulpa. is now

ol~upyin:: the position of -Expense Bill

Clerk at Oltmulgee. Mrs. Thelma Cohb

was recently assigned to the new position

of general clerk at this station.

MECHANICAL DEPARTMENT

FT. SMITH, ARK.

I I:!


STORES DEPARTMENT

SHERMAN, TEXAS

IVA SEWELL, Reporter

I r Ford of Tuka, Okla., made us a

I visit on August 28. He was enroute

- 71 Dallas to Tulsn. Lee formerly

%ed In the master mechanic's office as

.- a. but is working for an oil comp~rn)'

Tulsa now.

1 J. Forlner, xection stockman, war

'hi to Noberly. No., on account of the

:s of his daughter recently.

':rs. H. R. Glascock and son have reled

from Houston, Tesas, where they

led several days.

:ene Eussel has taken the position of

.sewer, which was made vacant when

r Horn quit to go to school at Tyler,

. BS.

'[rs. C. V. Slontgomery and daughters,

-0th~ and Kathyleene, Ilave returned

71 a few days' vislt at ICauEman,

15%

Xr. and BIrs. L. Xlc;CIillan, chief clerk,

I wife, have been visiting with rela-

; at Port Arthur and Dallas. Mr.

:T~ilan has retusnecl to work now and

he enjoyed his vacation very much.

A marriage of much interest occurred

n Sunday, September 8. when E. I-I.

ott?') Russel of Springfield, 110.. and

..- Slna Fas Veazsr-were married. The

ldlng took- place -at the home of the

14'9 parents and they left immediately

: their home in Springfield. Scotty fos-

,!I: worked in the master mechanic's

EV- a? stcno.

!hrr Gerthal Guin. daughter of I


Pngc 36

I RIVER DIVISION

I

I!mI the rnisfo~,tune of tnrnlnx his car

over, causing consitlemhle damage to the

automobile antl sligl~t iniuw to himself.

1'11 tell you where they all went and how.

Roy >lcConachie, son of Jlr. and 1h.q .

I.. S, JlrConachie, has enrolled for thrs

'

I\Irr. 1'. E. Hopkins wrs a 'recent visitor year in the T'niversltsr of Kcntuckv. Lesin

Havti. " -.

incton. . . , - Kv. - . .

Mr. :\. S. Jlatti?ews l~as inove(1 his fam- JIiss Ethel Mae Robinson. charnli~ic

CAPE GIRARDEAU, MO.

ily h.om Sprinxflcltl to (!haflee and now daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Bob Robinwr.

reek mucln more at lionle in this place. Icft. Septembw 11th for Fnycttp. N.

Mrs. C. I.:. JlcL)onour:h and little dauch-

ISEZ LAII,, Reporter

n-here she will enter Centrill College.

-

tcr. Catherine 1.ee. hai-e been visiting 'for l\Iisses 7,izetta and Ircne Weirlin:.

some time in (:ampbrll. Nr. XcI)onou,-I1

Our deepest sy~npatliy is extendcd to cxpectn to join them in a few days to

daughters of dispatcher, have resun, i

Wilson Oakes, 13r;tIkeman on Si5-S7F. rpenrl his vacation. \Ye expect to hear of

their duties as teachers in thr ChaL

whose mother died September 3. 19'29. some. good hunting and fishing when

schools after spending thc sumnw 5.-

Lester Jeflord, W. 1'. & 1. 13. repre- "Chick" returns.

tending 3Iissou1'i University.

sentative. spent several days in our office 1\71., 2nd MIX Ray Fatchett hare re-

JIrs. Emmett Rond is improving rnr81.

recently, checking our lumlier shipments. turned from a short visit with Mrs. Fat- Ir aft.cr having an operation perfon.'.'

Edgar Willw and fnmily motored to diett's relatives in Fort Smith. Ark. in tl~e Southe:int Missouri Hospital .

hducah, ICY., over the Labor D:+y iioli- Wayne Sarius has resigned an messen- Cape Girnrdeau.

day.

ger in the Superintenrlent's office to re- Misr I*;\% Barber, who is employ& I.

Alonzo Forelrmn, son of Bill Clerk Fore- sume his Iilgh school work. F:ldon Staus- St. J,ouis, reoently visited her par?t.t>

man, lias Ivturned from Colorado, where inx is Alling tlw vacancy.

>TI.. and Mrs. J. E. Rarber.

lie spent several weeks.

Jlisses hlary Fai,~,ell and Relic, Kenne W. 1.. Rt~tninage, dispatcher, for nu-

David Ilan'ltins, Report Clerk, spent spent Labor i)ay in St. T.ouis shoppin:. ywrs in thin office. has resigned.

Labor Day with his mother. Airs. .I. A. and taklnc in some poorl siin\\-s.

SRSS he lias worked long enouxli lor

Han-ltins, at Desloge, Xlo, Mrs. Il:~n,ltiiis .

111an.

is Home Economics Supervisor in the

311.. arlcl Mrs. T,on Walker are teh -

Desloge sclioolu.

POPLAR BLUFF, MO., NEWS ovels tl~e ai'rival of a son on bwuut

Robert Kammer is n'orkinc- in our nfficc

Mius C1aric.e Clniborne of Nemr

for a few days, having relieverl Sxthnn

Trnn., has I'eturned honie after n ;

Carle, who is working at Chaffee.

-

with Xlr', and 3Irs. J. TI'. ClalDorne

J. F. Xeal, Ticket Agent. lias returnrrl 311,s. J. A. Robinson. \vice of operator. tl,ic( . . . I. J. Rarrett and wife varntlon*?,

two weeks in Penaacola, Florida.

Rir~ett report^ this an ideal spot lcmr

t ;I tions.


.I Kay, machinist, visited his


Payc 48

. .

night foreman at the roundhouse for the A 1200-Coot track is being constructed

past few months, was transferred to at Sals~nan to take care of unloading ma-

I ulsn. Jlondav.

terial for the construction of new roads

in the viclnity of Claremore.

Work of surfacins and dressing trark in MECHANICAL DEPARTMENT NEW

40th and 43rd TRACK DIVISION cvnnectior~ with the laying oi the new

SAPULPA, OKLA.

110-111. rail on the Cherokee sub is now

WEST TULSA, OKLA.

-

ctomplete.

J. A. >IachIII,LAN, Reporter

'I'he oil prinkl ling machine again went J. A-. l'.-\ISLEY and I.. A. JIACK

over the Cherokee sub oiling track.

Reporters

A .5OO-foot track has been constructed l'he semi-annual bridge inspection was

at Sci1110yah to serve tile French-York m;lde during the month of September. Enaineer 1'. J. Jlnlrenin, West T

Coal Co.

R. & B. gang So. 11, in charge of S. yards, is away Prom dutv account 01

Frank Eussrll, roadmaster on the 40th H Dean. foreman. renewed the .j0.000- jury.

track division, is on vacation. visiting rel- gallon whter t;tnk at Holdenville.

Engineer J. A. Rentty is away I.'

atives in Missouri. Quin Balccr, terminal

Wm. Everagc, B. & B. forcman, has duty, on \'nciltion, wl~icl~ he intends

roaclmastrr, is loolcing after Tiis territory returned from the Mayo Clinic at spcmd around 1.0s Angc.les, Californi~

during his absence.

Rochester and renorts his condition Eng.ineer V. P. Couch. Creelc Sub-I

0. F. Bradley has been assigned relief greatly improved.

sion, IS away from duty on vacation

foreman on the 43rd track division. C. 1nstall:ttion of the new water well, oil Il'ire~nan J. T. \Vatson, West TU!.?~

0. Reed hnh been assigned foreman on enginc pu~nplng ecluiprnent nntl 100,000 ;lway from duty in St. Louis hospitr

tile Red Fork section and J. 13. Recd has aallon steel tank at liristow Ir now In Hcnrv Cole. mncl~inist insnector. Ti

r 3

been nwignec! foreman on the AVW sec- progress.

1 ulsa, -has rcturnerl from his vat9

tion. L

Water servicc gang i~as completed over- which was agent in T.ouisiana with

hauling the heating plant at Okmulgee parents. Henry reports a delightful

and are now overhauling the heating with his new Ford. ~4th the exwt

plant at the Tulsa freight house.

of an accident which delayed ilii trip

ST. LOUIS ADVERTISERS T. J. Herndon, foreman at Sequoyah, ing to Louisinna.

is spending a :XI-day vacation In Mis- Machinist Ed. Scllall 1s the proud on

souri visiting relatives. Harry Austin is of a 1929 Model A Ford coupe.

in charge during his absence.

Engineer John Stroud, West Tulsa.

MARYLAND HOTEL Extra gang No. 146, in charge of Fore- returned from his vacation which .

Next to Frisco Bulldlnm

man Jones, is engaged in rip-mp work in spent in Sorth Carolina. Engineer St-

ST. LOUIS. MO.

vicinity of Bcrwick.

reports a very nice trip and that his!

POPULAR PRICK EUBOFEAS HOTEL Messrs. Wooldriilge and Rrown, from Ralph. fell so in love with the caul

Absolutelv Flre~roof

Mr. Worman's office, were visitors at Ihat hc is spendinr this term in coller

Rates: $1.50 and ~d Per Day

the local offices this month. They wcre that country. I

Electric Fan (Free) In Every Room checking up the motor car situation on Engineer D. P. Cronen is awav I.

I EATS :-Unexcelled CAFlWERId and I the division. duty on vacation, which he is sper

I COFFFX SHOP Service --

with his sister in Kansas City. >lo.

I

Machine Foreman H. J. Ray has.

OFFICE SUPT. TERMINALS, moved his familv to Tulsa and fe~ls r

WEST TULSA, OKLA.

'~t homr on his new job.

Roilm; Foreman Gro. I. Alexnnder, t

,lEFFERSOK 0414 JEFFERSON 0413

'r~iisa, 1s In~ilding a new home in i

Illlrst.

Becht Laundry Co. Miss Edna Wooden. secretary-time- Enrineer \V. 0. Tengue, West TI

keener in this oRice. who is also corre- 11:lr returned from his vacation, a

We Specialize in

spoildent for the 111;~gazine, Is *.o~~\'alesc~nc was spent in California, and repori

fro111 a revent ~~lwmLion. .\c.*.ording to \wy nlre trip via the Northern Rou'

Family Laundry

lapt rcllorts she i3 stvadily improving, ant1 Engineer C. M. Campbell, who has '

sinr,erelv trust we may be able to re- away from duty account of illne-n is'

3301-11 Bell Av. St. Louis port he; complete recovery in next issue. ported doing nlcely in the St. Louis i

Max Oldenhnge, yard clcrk, was re- pital.

cently conipelled to take his wife to the Fireman W. 1). White has retur:

Mavo Hos~ital at Rochester for an opera- from his vacatton which was spent

tlon. frace not had a late report as to California.

her present condition, but hope to re- The s~mpathy of all emplo~es is

INVESTMENT celvc favorable report from there in the Lended to Firemnn Soah Hnmllton's f

near future.

ilv. Fireman Hamilton. - whn has i

~~~ ------ ..- ~

S. A. Crawford. yardmaster. who has away from duty some 'time account

BONDS

been on sick leave for some time. urns a illness has succumbed.

Tulsa visitor for a day or two during the Firemnn \\'. A. Sevlor is anrsu fr

We deal in issues of the United

last week. leaving for Sherman I-Iospital iluty account vacation, which he is UPPvesterdav.

ing in his home in Olean, N. Y.

States Government, Railroads, Pub- The Fill horse racing meet opened at

Tulsa on the 14th; the Free State Fair WEST TULSA STORES DEPT.

lic Utility and Industrial Corpora- openina on the same date, l'he Fair con- -

tinues throunh next week. the races to

tions with established records of

OTIS R. RULE, Reporter

probably cdntinue for several weekearnings.

thereafter. Quite a large number of rare

horreh l~iiv~ bean received, as well as n

lurac -1rnount of show stock, and from

advanre infnrmlation received, both the

AID & COMPANY, Inc. Fair and r;~ring lneets will be interestinc

Security Bldg. ST. LOUIS, MO. eVClltS.

C. A. Piki., xwitchnian, who has been

in St. 1.ouis hospit;tl Iias again resumed

MEMBERS, ST. LOUIS STOCK EXCHANGE

O. I-Iarrison, chief clerk, has resumed

studies in tile University of Oklahon~s

Sornian.

Mr. S. R. Garclner, division storckeq

is the proud possessor of a new Dur

sedan.

311.. Clias. Warren. returned to a-

August 25 from n SIX weeks' ram

spent with his family visiting relat~,

and friends in Missouri.

Mr. Dwight Irbs, formerly etnployt?

truc.icer in the RtQi.cas Aepartlnent,

transferred to the rar. depart~nent. i

IMPORTED PRECISION DRAWING SET

Specially Priced at WHILE

$15.00 THEY

REGULAR $35.00 VALUE LAST

u 6-inch

Swediih Pen Intermediate Size Gmpasa Box )%-inch Bow Pencil

HERE IS 4 %-inch Ruling Pen 6-inch Gmpasa with parte 4 Y-inch Bow Pen

mAT YOU GET S+inch Ruling Pen &inch Divider Silver Center Pen Key and Lead Box

Drop Spring Bow Pen and Pencil 4 I


:r~h Mr. Irby success on his new job.

I:-.:. Dorothea Hyde left Tuesday, Sep-

Ihr li. ior a short vacation. Mrs.

:. dt. left us in the dark as to where

zpmt her vacation but we have our

!s about where the'greater portion of

, tme was spent, as she has purchased

rwlf a new Crosley radio.

;lr. 1,. P. Cochran, of Yale. Tenn.. vis-

: nr West Tulsa store September 5.

I!r. John Harris returned to work Au-

.' 31 aftcr havinq had a month's vatm.

!Jw. 0. R. Rule and children visited

. Jlianil. Olclahom~, from August 4 to 7.

TULSA FREIGHT OFFICE

TULSA, OKLA.

-

MARY JENKINS. Reporter

-

\IT, and Mrs. W. A. Woodson are the

he Is feeling Ane acain.

1 I;? 0. H. Reid, general agent, has rc-

-nd from his vacation which he says

.. enjared very much.

, 1'1qr W~llie Lee Caale, stenographer.

iveturned to her desk after having had

.~onslls removed at the Sherman Hos-

Page 49

On Equipment

Exposed to Weather

This signal machine hood was coated with NO-OX-ID.

Over this was applied NO-OX-ID-IZED wrapper. Then a coat

of black paint was applied conforming with the railroad's rule.

This hood is safe for many years to come.

116 Railroads use NO-OX-ID. Where can it serve you?

NO-OX-ID treated stet1 is always steel.

Dearborn Chemical Company

205 East 42nd Street, New York 310 So. Michigan Ave., Chicago

Frisco Building, St. Louis

Offices in AN Principal Cities

TRADE MARK

lhe OriginalRus t Preventive

The Tulsa employees club are resuming

meetings again, first one set for thi.;

week.

OFFICE OF SUPERINTENDENT

SAPULPA, OKLA.

JEXXIE F. AITCHISOS, Reporter.

-

Mr. and Mrs. Earl Parker are rejoicing

over the birth of an eight and a hait-

pound babv girl, Martha Jean, born Sept,

14. Mr. Parker expresses his joy with

the usual candy and cn1gars.

C. E. Harris, transportation clerk, has

taken a much-needed sixty days leave of

abepnce. HODP Mr. Harris returns with

the best of 'ealth.

Aaron Norgan accompanied the Tulsa

Legion Drum Corps to Ponca City where

they attended the State Convention. The

Tulsa corps was awarded the first prize.

Mr. Morgan also holds state office.

Earl Woolridge, transitman, and wife

are takinp an extended trip to Havana.

Cuba, stopping at intermediate points on

their wag'

Walter Rohinson. secretary. is enjoy-

ing his annual vacation in Chicago and

Colorado.

ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT

SAPULPA, OKLA.

V. I.. THOMAS, Reporter

JIr, and Mrs. L. A. Wright and family

have now returned from an enjoyable vacation.

most of which was spent fishing

at Spavinaw, Okla. Very sorry to re-

Dort that Mr. Wrirrht broucht no fishinx -

stories back with him. -

Mr. and Mrs. Broe Mitchell spent sev-

eral days vacationing in Springfield, Mo..

during the latter art of August and the

earlypart of Sepfember. -

Mrs. Tillle Burke, Miss Maurine Ma-

han. Broe hZitchell and W. C. Henke


Page 50

were the members of the accounting de-

partment who motored to Henryetta,

Oki;~., to witness the remains of trnin No.

11S, wllich was wrecked on August 18th.

blr, R. E. Pipkin spent Saptentber 6th

and 6th in St. Louis, hlo.. on company

business.

Mr. Hal Lamkin, travelling :iccountnnl

of Sprlnglield, 310.. spent one day in the

oificr tlurina' August, making the usual

check of tile timc?shects. -

Mrs. Tillie Eurke spent several days

wiLh a fishing party at \\'ymodtte. Okla.,

during the early part of Scptembcr. Al-

tilough the psrty brought in no fish. one

large eel was caught, which lalcr cs-

raper1 from its capturers.

Miss Maurine AIahan left Saturday,

Septemher 14ti1, for various points in

Ohio, where she is visiting with friewrls

and rclatlves.

Mr. 6. H. Betts, travelling accountant.

has been with us for somc? time doing his

usual work, that of. checking up on tllc

ti m,ekeepers.

Ihe stork has been busy in this depart-

ment again. this time at the home of &Ir.

and Mrs. 'VTralton R. McDono11g.h~ irnd

bringing with it on September .~th a

lovely baby airl, named Mary Elaine

B[cDonol~~'h.

I NORTHERN DIVISION

MASTER MECHANIC'S OFFICE

KANSAS CITY, MO.

Work is progressing very satist'actorily

on the new Mill Shop belng erected just

north of ollr Nol'th Freight Car Repair

I

Yard and we have vislo~ls of some day

having a ncw office, as the plans call for

the remodeling of our pl'esent blacksmith

shop into a storeroom and general office

biiildinfi as soon as the new Mill Shop is

finished.

\Be nll nearly had nervms Drostration

n7ait;nF- for; tlk GmC %eppelh to pass

over, but afwr patiently watcl~ing and

\r;~iting wert, rewarded with a good view

of the riant air linel. It passed almost

clircctl\f-over the shop 011 it$ course eastwnrd.

\\'e wonder if \Valter XIccllock ever

fI. fILL

Steve Hoyken, ouv office porter, spent

last n~onth in thr )Cast around Boston

and Scw Yoric (:it?.

XIiss Anncs Lynch toolc advantage of

the reduced fare to St. Louis Labor Day

to finish taking in whatever sifiiits she

missed on her previous stop-over on her

way to Alichigan City recently.

:\ card received September 16 from

I>orothy Shippey indicated that she was

around Tijunna. Mexico, Miss I~ucille Bartl~ei

filled Miss Sl~ippey's place wl~iie she

\V8S XlVR?.

OFFICE OF SUPT. TERMINALS

KANSAS CITY, MO.

I). II. SWIS1)ELI.. Reporter

-

President ICurn and Vice-President

Hutchison were in Kansas City September

3rd, leaving here on special train the

morning of -the 4th for Wichita.

W. L. Walsh, revlsing clerk, kpent his

vacation in C;diforniu this year and has

just returned. John Miller worked tile

wvising job in Bill's absence.

VISIT

PENSACOLA ITHE WONDERFUL CITY OF ADVANTAGES*~

write, wire or Visit

BOLAND REALTY COMPANY

REAL ESTATE-HOMES]- INDUSTRIAL SITES-SUBURBAN PROPERTY OR FARMS

15 W. GARDEN STREET PENSACOLA

Pensncola Depot Plastering and

Stucw Contractor

G. J. MONTAGUE

.\IASUFACTURER

VENlTlAN STUCCO AND VENlTlAN

DECORATIVE PLASTER

15 E. Intendencia St. Pensacola

SAN CARLOS

HOTEL

Pensacola, Florida

ABSOLUTELY

FIREPROOF

Headquarters for Frisco

Visitors

I Pensacola Depot Rooflnp Conlrnrtnrs

I Pensacola Sheet Metal Works

COMPOSITION. SLATE AND

TILE ROOFING

29 W. Government St. Pensacola

I WICKE BROS.

PENSACOLA DEPOT

PLUMBING AND HEATING

CONTRACTORS

111 N. Palafox St. Pensacola

S1.50 and S2.0@-NO UP

MANHATTAN HOTEL

GEO. I


Seal Gz~rner. Emery Buqarner and

Bob Reed each presented with a daugh-

ter! All of this has Marion Brayfield.

who served over-seas during the war,

deeply worl,ieil. Hc \vants to know what

we :ire .going to do in the nest war if

only girls are 11o1.n.

Among our office visitors recently was

Mrs. Martin A. Jertberg, formeri? Miss

Charlene \\'illaril.

hnrreline Golden. forrnerlv file clerk in

thi.; Qcpai.tment, has r~turncd home aftel.

n :is wwks stay in Colormlo Springy.

SPRINGFIELD FREIGHT DEPOT

F. L. & D. CLAIM DEPARTMENT

SPRINGFIELD, MO.

1:evenlle fo~, .\~gust altained figures esceeding

by a 1-ery gratifying amount those

of anv montlr in tl~is station's history.

I-larold L. Wilks is certainly a go- Another August achievement : Plaf;orm

::etter. He recently furnisl~ed a traffic tip cmployes were victorinus in the Best

wl~iclr resultcd in our linc securing tl;c Record-Fcnrest TSt~ors" pennant contest.

movement of 951 cars of chatt.

311.. S. Brucc Crow, oncc demurrage

We are glad to report that Alma Fiel- clerli, now witli Scars & Roebuck, Iiansas

den, of the 0. S. 6; D. department, has ('ity, called on us mhilr vacationing in

returned to the office after an absence of Springfield during September.

sevcral weeks on account of sickness and 1\11.. and Mrs. Julian I?. Wheeler were

;I tonsli operation.

visitors in St. Louis Sunday. September 15.

C. E. Nartin, claim investigator. is no\v Miss Mae Lundstrum spent the same

back at his desk with pleasant memories day in Ft. Smith and Fayettevilie.

of scenes and happenings in Enid and Miss Helen Uevine, extra clerk. llas IT-

Oklahoma City, the latter place being his 1u1,nerl from Iinnsas City and is now

old home town. Mrs. Nartin and two r~lanning a visit in Cherryvale.

daughters accompanied him on the trip. Understand that Mrs. Geo. Endley will

Ruby Northcutt, dictaphone operator. soon lcave for Milwaukee and New York

enjoyed a week-end visit in Mountain City : that Mr. and Mrs. Clias. R. Hel-

Grove the latter part of September.

fl.echt and chiidrrn will go to Newark, N.

Harol~l L. Wilks, 0. S. 6; D, investiga- J.; that hIr. and Mrs. E. C. Rorkman are

tor and family, enjoyed a motor trip xoing to Cl~icago, and Mr. Virgil Sands to

tl~rouzl~ Kansas and Oklahoma during- Pen~acola and Tallahassee, Fla.

the nionth of August.

1\11., and Mrs. Charles E. Anderson spent

others who spent quiet vacations at Svpt~~mber 1st and 2nd in St. Joseph, 310.

homc were: Mayme Hindman Hattie

Windman, Sylvia Martin, ~erne' Tuilncl~, AURORA-GREENFIELD, MO.

Gertrude Whitaker and A-ettie Sartori.

Labor Day is outstanding on thq cnl-

BRANCH

endar of most working folks, for after

that memorable holiday, plcnics, swim-

B. P. 1:XMEY. Reporter

minx and fisl~ing parties fade into the

background and the thoughts of the frivo- Yc sc~.ibe has just returned from a

lous and serious-minded turn in ,the di- tn.0 weeks' vacation, during which he vis-

1,sction of new fall finer? or yanrnlng coal ited in Pensacola. Fla.. lookinz over the

bins.

company's (locaks and new road, and

C. 13. Rlve, chief. 0. S. 6; D. (lepart- wishes to state that it is a verv interestment.

has recently purchased a new Whip- ing trip to note the wonderfui improiepet

six. L. C. Cox. traveling claim ad- rncnts the Flisco ir making in that secjustel;,

has a new Essex, and Betty A+ tion of thc country.

ams 1s driving a ncw Chrysler coupe. >I. E. 3Iiller, folmerly section foreman

NATIONAL

Reg. U. S. Pat. Off.

II - IN ST-

AVE FIRST

at Rcammon. Kans., has accepted a I

lion here as section foreman, Soltl

1)irision.

V. M. Chase, engineer, Sorthern t

sion. has just returned from a moo

1-amtior. in the East.

Ira Pilkington, bralieman, Northern

vision, has just returncd from a sh

fishing trip. Hc reports a fine catcl~

his daughter).

3Iarjorie Larrimer. daughter of F

1,:rrrimer. yard clerk. who has been sg

in- her vacation with her narents. tx

~uimcrl to Chicago, Ill., here she :

tinish a course in practic;rl nursina.

Lon Vinyard, section foreman, E.wi~

nivision, has just returned from an.

tended trip out West.

.\Iiss Irene Beal. dauchter of Ami'

0. Beal, is attending 'the univekir:

Missouri at Columbia, Mo.

Mrs. Troy Pannel, wife of Troy Par.

carman, this station, is spending ar

tcnded visit with relatives in dm:

Texas.

1\11., L Ramey and famlly, roadnt*

River Division, visiterl with his v

P. Ramey, a few days.

L. H. Uoran, second trlclc tow-

was off duty a few days on acm'l'

his mother bein:: serlouslv ill. G,

reDort that she is verv muc.11 lmorvt

he Frisco boys of- Aurola loin

extending our deepest sympathy In

and Nrs Hiram Hilton in the loss 0'

clauchter, having pa5serl away af: .

AUDITOR, REVENUES, TICKL'

ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT

ESTELLE HILTOS, Reporter

-

1,eola &Iughes spent her vkmtlr

Yellomstone Park, Helen XcHale 15,.

brc an


, 11 l'astle rmployed as a comptometer in the office.

frator ih this depnrtment before her A. E. Trotter. third Franks was on-

- ~rriase.

fortunate enou.qh to l&e his n& Durant

hla Hughes has been transferred to a the other nlght. Had run out into the

-1rion in the frei~ht denartment: Mal~ ditch as he was tnceting another car,

tali l,itw to ihe c&duct&s' depa~tment: and in tryinq to get the car huvk onto

I.lbor Day vacationists were: Viola the road, it caught fire and the body was

Z h.tn in Peoria. 111.; Estelle Hilton in entirely burned up. He managed to ~RVC

'imphis. and Mary Van Lie\\, in Decatur, the motor from complete loss.

'!I.

H. A. Atwt~ii worked Hrst trit,lt at >IS

.\Il.s. Annie L Peyton, mother of Joe Springfield week or ten days, reliev-

I wrtm. departed this life August YO. ing A. I.:. Gustafson. He is now rellev-

.-I.. wffered a stroke of patxlysls the ing G. C. Daughcrty, first trick, South-

1trt.r part of July, atnd on August 27 eirster!l Junction, \vho is taking a tlirec

41. war again stricken and passed away weeks vacation.

!ilnusI 30. The department extends the

,vrl sincere sympathy to Joe and his sis-

It. E. Essman is working agenry at

lieasburg, relievin~ Everett Daugherty.

h.1-e.

I:uhert Fall Is the proud possessor of a

who is still on t h sic.k ~ list.

,.a (?) Ford.

Charles Roberts, third trick. Southe;rstern

Junction, and a former Frisco operator.

"Hilo" Roach. attended a "triple-

SIGNAL DEPARTMENT

header" I~asehall Fame recently.

SPRINGFIELD, MO. -

JlATI1,DA C. HOFFMAN. Reportcr

ASSISTANT SUPERINTENDENT'S

OFFICE-NEWBURG, MO.

Chwle~ Smith, signal in~pector, has

1-1 returned trom Providence, li. I..

;Iwe he spent hls vacation visiting his

l~tldren and grandchildren. While enuatv

home he also visited the factory

,I thr Unlon Switch k Si~nal Co. at

.Sm.ir.wale, Pa.

.i number of our force took advantage

4 tlw occnsion and spent I.abor Day out

ul town. Mr. C'hr conlbined business

with pleasure and motored with his Cam-

)I! lo Southeastern Missout4 and North-

.m Arkansas. R. W. Troth, office engi-

.@er. .and C.ad Thompson, draftsman. molor14

to the White River. R. F:. Tester-

UII. rhlef draftsman, and family visited

plariws in Norwood. Mo. Cecil Jones.

kk. visited relatives it1 St. 1,ouis. and

I'P writer Rpent the day nt Eureka

SIlrlnpa. Ark.

.I!. n.' Garher, gene1v11 clmirman, antl

\. 0. I)rel~nan. secretary of tire R. H. S.

t f A.. with their families wlll attend the

mmnl district meeting of their order in

,'anon City. Colo., early in October. They

d l also visit in Denver.

Br were very sorry to learn of the

imth of the little daughter of Mr. and

Vrc. H. P. Hilton. wllo tllrd nt thr

&~ra Hospltai -after op&tio;~ fo;

ppmlicitis, August 20th. Mr. Hilton is

- 1 ~ 1niaintniner 1 at Aurot;~.

.I. I*. lhvis. dispatrher of Sapulp:r.

Oklahoma, is spending his vacatio~~ in

and around Ncwbura. Mr. Davis wax

formerly tlispatcher nl this plaw.

Clrestcr Moore. caller. and Wm. Heisiegel,

enginerr. are spendiug a few day.;

Hslling ;rt Tros Hock on thr Gtwronatlr

River this nlontl~. 'I'lley rrport tllr usual

wonderful success. (What other reDorts

could we expect from such fisherm& as

these two?)

Thlngs are looking bright :;!JOII~ now

for our brakpmen "youngsters. Following

is a list of the rwrnt additions to

the "staff," those who 11;rve been pk~cetl

on the brakeman's estrn board at St.

J,ouls: C. C. McCracken. St. 1,ouis: G. 11.

Rosce. Nrwburg-: thc brothers Rradrn.

TV. M. and Chas. I'.. St. 1.ouIs: R. J.

Ragan. St. James. and Vrrn Wilson of

xewburg.

,Miss hlautl Snyd~~. ro~d~uuster's clerk,

NEWBURG, MO., NEWS

-

111-:LEN Y. FELLOWS. Reportvr

.I. iV. kin^, thlrd Conway, has rcturu(~tl

18) nwrk ntter a forced vacntion caused

1'1 :I serious attack of appendlritls ancl

:'P rxtion for same. We arc glad to

1.m that he has fully recovered. His

-ition, while olf, was Hllcd 1)y \V. C.

'#,li

11 Pack s~~ond trlck operlrtor West

'81mcm, \;an off several dam sh'erlna

--~m a carbuncle on his neck.

?. T. Burton, thlrd trick. 1)ison. took

'.- daughter to the hospital for treat-

.- .. nr the other day. Hc was off three

-!hw dayP, relieved by 'Operator Arnold.

!.itra operator R. Jury will be unavailf:i

as relief man except on Saturdays

,111 Sundays, as he is attcmling Spring-

I Hirh School this wintcr.

i~lrilc~Flnley is worki~ik tllir~l tri(,k.

':.l:::ian Tower. I3e reports :r rather

',.I,,;? job, as there are no telegraph wirw

I CLASSIFIED ADS I

~dsiiled advertlslng under thls headlnp wlil

'. ~harged tor at the rate of 5 cents per word

-~h a nunlmltrn of i5 cents. LCash must ac-


' ' 1 ~ 1l'c.d Shop forrrrrc~r nt .Sprirrqfirld c/nirrr thc ]islrirlg record for tlrc .zrasorr jtrst

.rxl Ceorgc Jairctt. C'. I. Kic-hnr-dsolr nrrcl If'. li. Sturki, for-rrrtcir. 011 took 200

porrrrds oj fish froiir tlrc Rig .Sot Iti71rr 011 O ~ c.r!Jrtiitiorr C

rrcrirtlg.

7'lrc vrrrr oird n frzv o/ thp fish oi'c skowrt ohovc.

-

OFFICE GENERAL MANAGER

SPRINGFIELD, MO.

-

oli\'lLI.fC CORLE, ltrpoltcr.

1';1111 \V. Ar~lolrl is the proud Pather of

:~ilw :lnd one-half pound son, n7alter C.,

-r. Septanber I lth. Congratulations!

'MI n~other 111ul son lire doing nicheiy.

UI


l'aul Stecher on September 17th. The

Misses Loyola McLaughlin and Ethel

Richer were her bridesmaids, and be-

tween the three of them it was almost

a beauty contest, not excluding the

zroorn of course. Martha was oresent-

d with a set of flat silver from her

Frisco l'i-lends.

\\'e are glad to say that Mr. A. H.

liurgdorf is back at the office again

after having been on special work "up

tlir street" for some time.

The maill topic of conversation to-

(lay is bowling. Betwren all the new

rntliusiasts in the men's league as

well as the girls', we all know what

we should do, all that is left is to ob-

tain that average.

\Ye are indeed sorry to report the

dc:~th of Ernie Thielker's wire 011

Sept. 6th. Our deepest syinpathy is es-

tended to him.

.\largaret Leahy is back on the job

again and looking very well.

Jlr. Lamont is back at the Frisco

I

II

Hospital again fighting n1:ilaria. IHopc

hr win8 the Rght this time.

Ed Carn~bell of the sarne deoartine~t

is out thkre too, keeplng him company.

Ed is nursing a case of blood

poison and in the meantime the interline

department are working like bees

(this is the 17th of the month, no

wonder).

Milton Militzer am1 his wllc are rejoicing

over the :~rrival ol' a baby

Girl.

George Kendall of the statistic:~l dopartmerit

spent six days fishing, but

tiid not average quite one tisli ;L day.

Better luck nest time.

Katherine ICenney must be saving

her money. She stayed at home 011

her vacation just taking life easy and

trying to pnt on weight. \Ye are still

wondering whether or not she succeeded.

Clyde Rell, chief clerk, spent his vacation

in Chicago and reports a fine

time.

BANKS ALONG THE FRISCO LINES

The Peoples Bank

of Springfield, hlissouri

WE APPRECIATE

YOUR BUSINESS

OUR MOTTO

COURTESY, FAIRNESS AND

EFFICIENCY '9

I

The American National Bank

PARIS, TEXAS

Capital, Surplus and Undivided

Profits, S350,000.00

FRISCO DEPOSITORY BANK

American

Traders National Bank

BIRMINGHAM. ALA.

Capltnl and Surplru ~,000,000.00

"FRISCO DEPOSITORY BANK"

I

OFFICE OF AUDITOR-DISBURSE.

MENTS-ST. LOUIS, MO.

'1'. J Sweency, foriner divlsion acMi

illit at Chaffee. has been transfermi

the rapital expenditures und valuation.

ivonts departlnent.

J. R. Wilhoit has been tr:msferrc+

Chaffee as divislon accountant.

C. H. Carl spent a week in FL n"the

first of September in eonnectlon '

the BY-5% tor the Texas 1.iries.

Tim hIurr;tv and Paul Marsrhal r

turned ;tl)out the first of September t

several week:. spcnt maklng a motor

trip o\'er tlic Ft. \\'orth and Rio Gnr

Hailwits Co.

S. L.. Owlngs has returned from a I!

111onths' leave of absence spent in

\Vortl1.

W. J. Kelley and Marcus Coleman. I.

iVeinphis; Mr. J. Meador from Ft. B'P.

and Paul 13. Wade, are new enipla

in the raoital exnenditures and valim

itccounts -departnient.

Etldie Heard, hill and voucher ','

front Chaffee, spent September 14 In

office on his way to Albany, N. T..

accept ;I position with the Inten'

(!o~nmerce Commission.

.J. Pikesley left on the 18th. but o. '

th;tn saying he was going to ttlr o

try he wotild givr no inforinarinn a.

where lie irilentlrd spending his rani

Miss 1)orothy 1.:. Morrau has been. '

~doyed as stenoaapher in the n'lavi

t~ureau, due to the resignation of LL

Herman on August 22. 1.ucile is lo

marriwl about the first of 0etol)er.

There were a nuinlwr of 1.abnr I

trips, Chicago seeming to bc the n

popular plat-e. Juanlta Prathrr. Cr'

Oge, Geri Proost and Melba T:~lhot

went to Cliic;tgo.

Ellen Rochr and Edlth Rradley ai

a trip to Pensacola.

Vasliti Crimes spent neveral day. i

JIemphls in connection with Labor I

Julia Kitts spent her vacation ill 1'.

nda the last part of August.

Itla Kolodney and Marie Rusctia sp

the week-end of Septe~uhcr 14 in Spn'

field, Mo.

THE UNION NATIONAL BANK I

SPRINGFIELD, MO.

3% Interest Paid on Savings Accounts

4% Interest Paid on Time Certificates

THE BANK THAT ALWAYS RUNS STRONG

Successful Banking SINCE 1873

RESOURCES : Forty4one Million

THE FORT WORTH NATIONAL BANK

FRISCO DEPOSITARY

Main at Seventh Street UNITED STATES DEPOSITARY

I


~ T R F Bullerdivk spent the week fol-

.!ng Labor Day fishing.

;+n Vilslck left for California on the

.-I to spend two weeks.

hrguerite Breurnmer and Virginia

'- ming left tiic 21st for TVasilington,

'. 7. York and Boston.

OFFICE OF CAR ACCOUNTANT

SPRINGFIELD, MO.

Is captirined by J. I,. Cunningl~am. Dthers

irre 0. Miiier:,lI. Sweetin, I.:d..Rose, and

11. Freeze. lhr Owls are captained by

Sam Carey. Others are C. Cooper, J.

Hoyle, R. Gibson and Ed. Howe.

Car Inspector Bisswell is sporting a

. - .

new Ford car and oiling un lots of mile-

ilge these nice days.

Genrr;+l Ykrrdrn:+ster Jor Af;aroney is

taking 11is annual two weeks vacation

Pagc 57

Why Wait?-Get It Now (

It is better to have it when you

need it, than to need it and not

have it.

You cannot do much with the

small monthly premium while work-

ing, but You or Yours can do somo-

thing with $1,000 or a monthly in-

come which the mall monthly

premium ]myr for wlien Sick 01'

Hurt and unable to work.

at this timc. Axslatant Yardmaster Ben

Heatlr. Gratiot Yards. is acting as Ken-

1 lARIE ARNOLD. Reporter

em1 yardmaster at this time in Mr. Maroney's

piace. Wilke Weir, of the 6.45

('. Rc 1.2. 1, job, is i~vting as day yard-

i Sot n luch uew5, with \yo1 li tile order 01 ~r~astc~ in Mr. Heath's place.

-and such stacks of work ! Such Night Assistant General Yarpniastcr

that thr entire officc must needs Roy Stroup jutrt left on his vacation, acaturday

aftelnoon, the '7th. ruin- i~uninmietl bv his frrmilv. Carl I-Iarmon

erfectly lovely shower planncrl for is fi.lling in on Roy's job at night.

lane-, who resign& on thc 31st of Switc:iirnan William Gretch, 3:00 P. hl.

to become XIrs. 31. J. Buckner. (;ratiot train pard job. has returned to

)wer was later held at the homc dutv after u, vilcatiori nlotor trio to Kanence

Lyons, with Lillian Yates. sas- City and Denver. Bill's fiunily ac-

Pennington and Elizabeth Owen wmpanied i~irn on this trip.

g as hostesses. Grace left with There has heen several changes around

1 v.~shes of the office for a happ? on thc various iobs of biddinz and bumo-

General Bffices: Chicago. U. S. A.

nost exciting news to offer for the

ing, but we aFe settled down now and

Canadian Head Office. Toronto

nonth is the announcement of

business is exceEent through the St.

a

11 new diamond worn by Blanchc.

I.ouis 'I'crminal, making plenty of work

for all, especially thc extra men.

CUT OUT AND MAIL TODAY

rll of the Record Department.

ings haw bee11 rather scarce in

Fireman Oscar 1,arson has returned

after wpcwding fifteen days down home

Continental Casualty Company.

8. off lee for several months-the last

tlon hnving been last October. ;it Dison, Mo.

910 Mlchlgan Avenue. Chicago. Ill.

n Manniay: is still on leave ac- Yardmnster J.ou Olli~aus. Ewine ave-

I

f serious Illness of hc.r mother. nue. is spending his vacation in L& An- I nnl en~ployed by the FRISCO SYSTYal

two nn vacations at present, and peles. ;rc'comlxmied by his wife and aunt.

I

m\-e journeyed far for theirs- Jolm Iiennard of the 3:00 P. M. Emring ...................... ..... Dlvlsion :

3 Po~tland and other points in the

-

Please send nic InfornlaLion In regard to

)r slqhtseein~: and rlsiting.

this time.

your health and accident policies such a?.

Xkson has returned from a se- Knxincer 1-1. I.. McClclland has returned are carried by hundreds of my fellow ern-

Inws resulting from a throat in- to duty after being or sixty days account ployes In the Gnlted States and C;rnada.

of some fractured ribs.

Pender. trawling car service su- Switchman Wm. Beerman has returned

r. has rrturned to work after three to duty after being OR on tile sick list

~f e~l.io~rs illness. 1mrt of the time for ten days.

h the-hospital at 'st. ~ouis.

Foreman McCune of the 6 A. M. joh

sympathy goes out to Mrs. Kath- has returned to duty after being of£ haveecle

and Opha Jackson in the loss ing his tonrlis removed.

mothers during the latter part of Special Ofliccr John Davis is now at

hls home and will be glad Lo have vis- ADDRESS

itors. Mr. Davis recently suffered a

1

ST. LOUIS TERMINAL

broken leg.

Engineer George I,ay of the 3:00 P. M.

1.lndenwood job ha8 returned to duty

E. V. and Jim Hamilton in the recent

after being OK attending to private busideath

of their brother.

WM. GAGI-IYAN, Reporter

ness .....

Switvhman Charlie \'oorhees and wife

have just returned from R trip to Hum-

.iiman Roland "Firpo" Spires suf- Special Officer Hargcant D. J. Nolan, holt and Memphis, Tenn., and Pensacola,.

rvere Injurics on the night of Sep- Tower Grove Station, has returned from Rlorirln - . - - . - - .

2, and now is confined to the his vacation spent at Erie, Pa., and Swltr.hman Henry Clendennen, wifc and

Cleveland, Ohio. Special ORiocr G. L.

I.

dalight~rs. arc on a motoring trip to In-

:hman Harry Fritz and wife are Roseman assumed Mr. Xolan's position dinnnpolis and Cincinnat~, Ohio.

~ud parents of a baby boy.

while he was on his vacation.

Hughey Rohinson, chief clerk, Tower

er Greate, third trick train. Gra- Clerks at Gratiot Yards on vacation at Grove Station, is nursing a wrenched

I~S. I?. the oroud DOsSesSOr of :I this time are Grover Miller, third trick. ankle and limb at thls time, suffered in

hevr~let sedan.

spendlng at the Great Lakes: Wm. an auto accident.

y Heller, foreman of the 3:30 trans- O'Toole and Joe Dwyer, second trick, are C1arenc.c Stukey, timckerper, Tower.

r. is off on account of a broken motoring to New York and Washington. Grove Station, has returned front a vaca-

Harry will he glad to have vis- Robert Reed. air expert mechanic, tion at Wirhita Falls and New Orleans.

I his Iion~~. at 693s Arthur Ave. Chouteau avenue is the proud parent of Rilev Salsman. section foreman. Lin-

' cierks ai Grntiot Yards hav? a baby dauplite< named Josephlne Au- denwood, is confined to the hospital actwo

teams for the Railway Clerks gusta Reed, born on August 29, 1929. count ol' an operation.

g Inapue. Tile Night Hawks team We extend our sympathy to Switchmen 7'0111 O'Toole. chief car record clerk.

ESTABLISHED 1872

SHERMAN

The Merchants and Planters National Bank TEXAS

Will Appreciate Your Account CAPITAL AND SURPLUS $1.200.000.00

'IRST NATIONAL BANK

CHAFFEE. MO.

American-First National Bank

(FIRST NATIONAL BANK

4% and Safety

Member Federal Reserve System

Oklahoma City

Oklahoma

OF BIRMINGHAM, ALA.

FRISCO DEPOSITORY


To\vcr Grove Statinn, llas rrtrlrneci frottl wr Miss .Ie\rell Larkin. daugl~ter of 311s. I~ave be~un \r.ork on the new 2.1,

;I v;tc;~tl~rn spvnt in the vic:inity of lieo- Fannie Lnrltin of this city. \Ye wish then1 rn;iina for sc~l)plyin:: Monett lvitil n;ll

Icuk. Iowa.

the best of luck and the grerrtrst happi- ural gas :~nd our freight revenue h:

We wish to extend our sympn1l1.v to llesr in ti~c world !

heen ntaterially increased by r?cril*

Firenr;rtr !)an Fleming of lht. Southern Our flrst personal injury in seveml of a numher of ear loads of ~ntlchi~~rr

cli\.isicrn i!i lhc recent loss of Iris wife. montlw occurrvil on September 4, with 8. and supplies.

311.. Fk~nlng was on our cx11.11 I~oiircI, 11~- (:. Idarkin. estra machinist helper, as tl~r

i~ig iii St. l.nuis.

rlnfortunatv victim. He suptained a bnnr 3lr. and Nrs. Cecil Hinkle and rms

ilxctnv and severe bruire an11 cuts in tlw h:rve returned from :i three wrr'>:

rlxl~t fot*earm while ilaxistinF in r(*nlo\-- visit with rclntives in Fresno, C;,i

ST. LOUIS MECHANICAL DEPT.

ing c~~orlil~eatl from engine 1002, anrl will fornia. They took a sight seeing 1';

~~t'obiil)ly lose ilhout six weeks' time.

to S:tn I+ancisco while away.

l,Ol .IS[.; SCHUrTI.:. I :eporter

311.. and Mrs. R. P. Hridwcll, rnglneer. Mr. antl 3Irs. Hich:tt-d 3Iills sp,~

I'ranli l'hiel, brotlirr of Jolln Orcnl,.

rtn~l wife new aummonril to Ralcersfieltl. several d;~ya in St. J,ouis recently TI*.

(':I\.. on tlio 1Btl1, bv tl.-

~liml at IWsco

tleiltlr of a nenl,

Hospital Srptcmber 1-1.

iting relatives and enjoyinp 1 ,

\\-v csttwl our sympathy to Jul~n rtn~l

wlntive of Mrs. Bridwell.

"bright lights."

l+ank's other relatives.

\\'e wct,e almost l'orce~l to shut down the

\\.o!,ltx tl~v Itlttw part oC .4uguxt. \vi~t.rl 311% Carrol 1~)onlavy has relm

Two of nur other enainc.ers are scliour-

'I' I". Phillips, storekeeper thougl~tlersly Crorn a visit in California, being n,'

Iy ill in ttir Frisco Hospital. They arts

lr;ccl himself away on a w'eelc's vacittion. in K:~nsas City by i\lr. Ihnhcy, albr

.lohn 1,ync.h and \\'illiam Cook. \\'e Ilopr

tiiry will recover soon. Tl~e w1,iter also

'ie:lvina the railroad to run itself' as brsl Lhey visited lor ;L irw tl;~ys.

itopw this item might give friends of it could without his emcirnt mtlnnWinrnt. f.ouis Tucker, Jr., l~as been cmplh;

Mr. I'l~lllips vinitrtl his father neat, Rright- ;IS these two men the tliotrght of visiting

:In extra e,:illt:r irt this ht!~tIoir. t

1111,

tl~cm.

JIo. nnd harl a verv rt=stl'ul :in11 en- is the xnlr of lnuis T!~vkel', enginct.

1,cun Amos, mecllanir-lahol??~; was rlriv-

.~~~~sble'titne, totnlls obiivious of tlir tlis- 1\11., antl Nrs. A. 31. l'riniblc >l-.

tl'err I)(# wnx can sin^ by his ahsenco.

ill-. ftom Snrinzfteld to St. Louis when I~is

I.ithor Day vacation with relative.

(.:+I vulliclc;l with :L &st-bound machirtr

Hutchinson. Kansas.

:kt St. C'l.iir Pepteniher 16. A\ltl~ough Leon

\\'. P. Scott went to Kansas City

\\,I.; tht~own flom tlie car lie was not in-

17th to meet Mrs. Scott and xon, P,

.irrrvd. Ile said he left his car, a total AGENT'S OFFICE, MONETT, MO. xvho hiivr bcen visiting there

\\~cv-l


,-11t into Monett In the paat t\vo se:i-

.w. He llvrs 011 an 80-acre farm

.#~-t a few miles southeast avcl raises

8 :~clrpns and lsgumew eselusively, 62

, IVU in clovers and 18 acres in soy

,,


"Micltcy" Thompson was ill tho Frisco

I-loupltal August 16 to September 1, having

his tonsils removed.

Dan Whalen, division chairman of Local

No. 6, attended a meeting of the system

board and a general convention held

:it Pgrinzfield. Mo.. September 7 to lo. inc;lusive.

Incidentally the night hefo1.e 11e

left he was re-elected for the ensuing

two years by a large majority. This is the

flwt time tbat a division chairman lias

John E. Sclinrend, piecework checker of

qle Car Department, spent the first ten

clays of September vacationihg in Sew

York City, Washington, Buffalo. Albany,

Alontronl and other Northern and Eastern

1:oints.

Bill Spr~Itzer of tlic Store Department

is spending his vacation in Seattle and

other \Vashington points, September 9

to 23.

l~eld the office longer than one term. F. G. Collar, storekeeper took n few

days off September 12 to 8; fishing near

Harold King of the machine shop is Flora, Ill,

sporting a new Esses coupe.

A. 9. Abbott of Salem, 310.. was a

0. M. Evans. president of Local So. 6. Idindenwood visitor Seotember 7. At least

\\'as in Springfield September 9, nttend- that's one day Seanor had to obey oring

the general convention of all the 1oea.l~. dcrs. Brought back memoric!~ of those

C. C., "Colonel," McCraclten, has en- days whrn he was a switchman, you know.

t~rrd thc service of the Transportation

1)epartrncnt RS brnkc.man. Our best Charles Turner moved into 111s new

wishes for success go with you.

house at 6!J70 Bancroft the Rrst part of

Septtmber.

Fire Chief Charles Spuriel Turner really

achieved a record August 27. during Ci~arlie Connellcy is taking lots of vathe.

lunch hour, too. Thc Fyler avenue cviLinns this summer. His latest trio \\.as

bridae caught on fire tl~at noon and it was to Ilallxs. Tex., to sec his daughter.

reported to both the local forces and the Mr. ant1 Nrs. W. P. Gorman left Labor

dly Are department. Well, of course, be- Day for Shelby County, destination. Jleming

familiar with the history of our speedy pl~is, of course, where they spent a part

Krc~ chief. you might know what hap- of their vacation with the home folks.

penrd. He had the fire put out lonz be: From there they wrnt to Chlcago, where

fore the city department even got there. they had the Lllcasure of .seeing Hornsby

in fact,' he was putting away the (quip- make a home I.un. two doubles and n sinmcnt

when they arrived.

gle. lilll also says that he exceptionally

SPRINGFIELD ADVERTISERS

A High Grade CAST

IRON Adaptable for

RAILWAY CASTINGS

MANUFACTURED BY

Reynolds

Manufacturing Co.

SPRINGFIELD, MO.

We sollclt sour business. Offering you all

the servlce consistent wlfh good.

careful banking

The Citizens Bank

.TER031E O'HABB, President

ED. V. \\'II.I,IAMS, Vice-President

TOU \VATKISS. Cashier

E. ,I. ADAUS, Axsistnnt Caslller

T. \\'. \\'ATKISS. Asslnlnnt Cashier

220 E. Commercial St.

SPRINGFIELD, MO.

To give Universal Service is the goal

of Public Utility managers and opera-

tors. We are a part of the organized

effort to reach that ideal.

Springfield Gas and Electric Company

Springfield Traction Company

STOP AT THE

COLONIAL HOTEL

enjoy14 tile trip through the Flelcl Y

seum.

Ihgineer I\'. 14. Johnston, wife a:

c!eughter, Horrense left on the \Vah$.

Allgust 21 for st.' Thomas. Ontario. .

attend the wedding of JIr. Johnsts

nephrw.

K. ('. Jones is quitc tlw cat's meoww

a new scven-tube Atwater Kent mi

She got so enthusiastic she even left 11

tl~r whole night shortly after she got i:

Roilw Inspector E. R. McSabb r

turned from his California trip Au:

81 ant1 ~'rlievetl "Wicker Bfll" Henry

Iris charge of the goats. Wicker B

sajrs those goats would have been all r;:

if they hadn't chewed up so much of

tobacco.

The 3lisars Frances Coy and Chrixl'

Springer of Springfield we1.e week-.

guests oI' Myrl Jones September 7. !'

Coy is Myrl's aunt.

Tlir remlar meeting of tlic St. 1.e

T(wninaln Club was held September

;In exceptionally large cro\vd atteadi.

As usual. plenty of "eats" and good n:

contribotcd to a very pleasaut ever:

4. J. Alosley has resigned as president

the club. John Daniels, who is now t

inF: the position of president, is a I

hustlrr for the Frisco, evldenccd bv I

fact tllat Iir obtained thlrty-elght' r

for shipment ovcr the Frisco for

month of August.

Mr. and Mrs. George RIce and 11.

('atherine Meln of El 1)orado. Ark.. ;

Mr. and Mrs. I?ichwd Mllls of >101orj

motored to St. Louis for a few dass'r !

with F. .I. Gibbons and family. blrs. )I .

is Fred's mother and Mrs. Rlce and 1:'

Mills sisters of Mr. Gibbons. Mr. Y111 /

the ellief clerk at Monett.

W. S. Lester of Monett was a via*

at the home oC his daughter, Mrs. F.

Gibhons, August 24. Mr. Lester is pas

C'er con~luetor on the Frlsco, out of I'

nett.

Mrs. F. J. Gihbons ant1 daughter, 31

Antw. werc Rany County risltola Am

27, spentlin~

a week there.

FRISCO OFFICIAL

AMBULANCE

PHONE 74 2 PHONE

ALMA

1 LOHMEYER FUNERAL HOME

Springfield. Mo.

See First

For Good

Used Cars

Standard Motor to.

468 St. Louis Street

Springfield, Missouri

*

t THE LEADING HOTEL

A SPRINGFIELD, MO.

MAXWELL'S ONTRA

1 Cafeteria Telephone 1340 323 East McDaniel SPRINGFIELD. MISSOURI

Party

Banquet ar:

m all ~mmr


I I

11

I

Chapman-Dewey Lumber Company

MANUFACTURERS

) Hardwood Lumber . .

. .. . .

1 Grain Doors , s . .

Cypress Piling

. Boxes

( MEMPHIS, TENN. MARKED TREE, ARK. KANSAS CITY, MO.

Your

Fire Pail

and Barrel

Equipment

Becomes

Much More

Effective

whcn

is added to thc water

IVl-il~ 10rlu.11 for prices awl valttal~le

booklel on fire extinguishtng

systems.

.Is16 for booklet 5255.

SOI.\'AY SALES CORPORAl'ION

Alkalies and Cl~enttcal Products

.Ilnnufort uved hu

The Solvay Procsss Company

40 Itcrtar Street New Ynrk


Pogr 62

I American Handle Company

Manufacturers of

High-grade Hickory, Axe, Adze,

Pick, Sledge, Hatchet, Hammer

and Railroad Tool Handles

JONESBORO - ARKANSAS

Union

Asbestos & Rubber

Company

310 S. Michigan Ave.

CHICAGO

I W. R. MAXWELL I

915 Olive Street

SAINT LOUIS, MO.

Logan Iron k Steel Co. Arrow Tools. Inc.

C. G. Kershaw Contracting Co,

INCORPORATED

GENERAL CONTRACTORS

607 Woodward Bldg. Birmingham, Alabama

GRIDER COAL SALES AGENCY

Mine Agents

OVER 3,000.000 TONS ANNUALLY

BEST GRADES ALABAMA STEAM and DOMESTIC COALS

Railroad Fuel a Specialty

1414- 18 American rust Bldg., Birmingham, Ah I

NDT lNc .

SUCCEJSORS TO

.LOWRY LUMBER CO.

~~Nu~MCTURERS & DEALERS

IN ALL KINDS OF LUMBER

SPECIALIZING IN

RAILROAD BUILDING MATERIAL

Strong as Ever for the "Frisco"

Exchange Building MEMPHIS, TENN. Phone 6 - 2312

I


'I 1 W. H. (Bill) REAVES

1169 Arcade Bldg. St. Louis

REPRESENTING

The P. & 31. Company

Rail Anchors

The National Lock Washer Co.

Improved Hipower

Maintenance Equipment Co.

tabor Saving Devices

/ SERVICE ICE COMPANY (

Successors to

1 1MhlOHO 1.0s. ICE L COLO STORAGE

COMPANY

Eastern Junction. Frlsco Railway

BPRISGPIELD, YO.

WHOLESALE ONLY-CAR LOADS

K. E. OGSTOS, President and Treasurer

(Duner Car Closets

Enameled Iron Wet or Dry Closets

DUNER CO.

101 S. Clinton St. CHICAGO

fr Mailed description see Car Builders

Page 63

I MINES ON THE FRlSCO AT CARBON HILL, ALABAMA I

I MOSS & McCORMACK I

MINERS AND SHIPPERS

COAL-Blacksmith. Bunker, Steam, ~omestic-COAL

1901-4 American Trust Building BIRMINGHAM. ALA.

1

I

INSTANT SERVICE PHONE 6-0154 1

Bluff City Delivery Ca I

ICE and COAL

General Office, 651 Beale Avenue

MEMPHIS, TENN.

Manassa Timber Company

PILING

OAK-CYPRESLPINE

Arcade Bldg. St. Louis, Mo.

The Only Efficient Lowmotive Cleaner

Cv.9

The D. & M. Cleaning Process

Railway Exchange

CHICAGO, ILL.

CHAS. R. LONG, JR.

COMPANY

LOUlS\'ILI,I~ CHICAGO

ST. 1,OUIS

All Kinds of Jtailway and 111-

dustrial Paints. Varnishes and

1,acquers.

The Mount Vernon

Car Manufacturing Co.

-

I

Repair Shop.

500' x 150' Capacity Per Annunr :

Fully equipped with

10,000 Freight Cars;

Cranes, Electric 150,000 Chilled Tread

Riveters, etc., enabling

us to work in all kinds

of weather

Wheels;

20,000 Tons Forgings

BUILDERS OF FREIGHT CARS

OF ALL KINDS '

MOUNT VERNON, ILLINOIS


FOR GOOD SERVICE

HY MAN - MICHAELS CO., St. ~ouis; Mo.

Rails, Rolling Stock, Cars and Car Parts

HOUSTON NEW YORK SAN FRANCISCO

Home Office. 122 S. MICHIGAN AV.. CHICAGO. ILL.

Steel Tirem, Steel Tired Wheeln. Steel

Arlen. Steel Sprlnfia. Rolled Steel

R ~ C R Solid W TO U K h t Steel

Wheels. Steel Forfitngn, Steel

Crnrher Rollu nnd Shella.

Rolled Steel Genr Blank-

Steel nnd Iron Mnllenhle

Cnntinfir, Steel Pipe

Flnnrcen

I Standard Steel Works to.

Main Office: Philadelphia, Pa.

Works: Burnham, Pa.

1

Warden Pullen Coal Co.

/

MINERS and SHIPPERS

HENFtYFSTA - OKLAHOMA

ESTABLISHED 1893

- = - -- - Trade Checks. Pads. Ink. Etc.

- Fac-Simile Autograph Stamps -

:

-

z -

Z - 310 Olive St. St. Louis, MQ.!

~ ~ ~ ~ ~ B I P $ I I [ B M I ~ ~ I

I

Independent Gravel company^

PRODUCERS I

Crushed and Ground Carthage Limestone I

doplin Chat - Flint Sand -Crushed Flint

I

JOPLIN, MO.

Creators and

I ROBERT M. LUCAS CO. rtmer~~[....

FLEXIBLE CORROSION PROOF CEMENTS

and PAINTS FOR RAILROADS

1955 West Thirty-first Street CHICAGO, ILL., U.S.k

St. Louis Forgings CO.

Kansas City Bridge Company

Builders of Railroad and Highway Bridg~

River Improvement Work

KANSAS CITY, MO.

1

AXLES, LOCOMOTIVE FORClNCS

LONE STAR CONSTRUCTION COMPANY, INC.

MILAM BUILDING

SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS

Galloway Coal Company

EXCLUSIVE BIINERS OF

ELK RIVER and GALLOWAY COAL

General Off ice:

MEMPHIS, TENNESSEE

MINES AT

GALLOWAY. CARBON HILL

and HOLLY GROW$ ALABAMA

3IIXER 1.OCATED ON FRISCO RAILROAD

0

Viloco Railway

Equipment Co.

CHICAGO

For Dcpn,doblr Snuicr 1

"VILOCO" Pressed Steel Bra1 1

Step I

"VILOCO" Automatic Rail Washr I

"VILOCO" Bell Ringer

"VILOCO" Exhaust Pipe

"VILOCO" Improved Sander

"VILOCO" Pneumatic Whistle

Operator

Mill Creek Coal Company

CARBON HILL. ALA.

MINERS OF

MILL CREEK COAL

,


I /

I

I h Gideon - Anderson CO. 1 11 High Grade Machine T&IS

1 JIASUFACTURERS OF I 11 American Lathe6 and Radials I

I

i

Hardwood Lumber

1 Norton Grinders

AND

Slack Cooperage Stock

GEMERAL OFFICES

Band Saw Mllls and Planing Mills

GIDEON, MO.

SALES OFFICE

I AND DISTRIBUTING YARD:

110 Angelica Street

1 Tslcphona: Tyler 001 1-Tyler 0012

I ST. LOUIS, MO.

1 owens Paper Box Co.

1 PLAN AND FANCY BOXES

BIND YOUR RECORDS

into Permanent Books

Adapted by general and

local offices of every large

railroad in theunited States

B

BINDING MACHINES

PERMANENT BINDERS

LOOSE LEAF DEVICES FOR

ALL PURPOSES

McBee Binder Co.

New York St. Louis Athens

Cleveland Chicago

Pels Punches and Shears

Watson -Stillman Hyd. Machy.

BLACKMAN - HILL & CO.

Unxld I

Railroad Fusees

INSURE SAFETY

Best by Every Test

UNEXCELLED MANUFACTURING

COMPANY, Inc.

NEW YORK, N. Y.

PENSACOLA CREOSOTING COMPANY

PENSACOLA, FLORIDA

Speclallzing In the Manufacture and Treatment of the followInp Forest Produea

PILING CROSS TIES POLES CROSS ARMS CONDUITS

LUMBER and STRUCTURAL TIMBERS

on >I. S. B. k P. R. R.

Your Irrqulrles Solldted-Cost Estimates Glndly Furnished

Cable Address: "PENCREO" Shipments: Rall or Water

ANDERSON-PRICHARD OIL CORP.

REFINERS OF

1 Crow Coal Company

General Office : Dwight Bldg.

KANSAS CITY, MISSOURI

I Miners and Shippers

.Mines Located at Mulberry and

Scarnrnon, Kansas, and Henryetta.

Oklahoma, on the line of the St.

Louis-San Francisco Ry. Co.

INDUSTRIAL NAPHTHAS

OKLAHOMA CITY, OKLA.

I

"HERCULES"

-Red -Strand-

WIRE ROPE

Made Only By

A. Lesrhen P Sons Rops Co.

ST. LOUIS

St. Louis Surfacer and

Paint Company

RAILROAD PAINTS, VARNISHES

ENAMELS i

Arlington Ave. and Terminal Belt Ry. ST. LOUIS, MO.

I


LAYNE WELL SYSTE'MS

ARE DEPENDABLE

AMERICA'S GREATEST RAILROADS

USE THEM

Municipalities and Industries find them profitable

LAYNE & BOWLER, INC.

HOUSTON MEMPHIS LOS ANGELES

FT. SMITH ICE AND

COLD STORAGE CO.

COLD STORAGE FOR ALL PERISHABLE

MERCHANDISE

Storage Capacity. 125 Cars

Daily loe Making Capacity. 125 Tons

FORT SMITH - - ARKANSAS

The Pre-eminent

Insulation for

Wires and Cables

T@ KERlTE ElSeUt&eLP COMPANY IE

N W YLIU ",Lux, w T W C I M

I Sherrill 0iEo.

GASOLINE, KEROSENE, OILS

Fuel Oil in Cars or Over Docks

PENSACOLA, FLORIDA

I The Cleveland File Co.

I Quality Filer Since 1899

I

I

ST. LOUIS OFFICE

2817 LACLEDE AVENUE

Telephone, JEfferson 4600

Coal Mining to.

COAL OPERATORS

General Sales Office

OWIGHT BUILDING

KANSAS CITY. MO.

FORSTER PAINT AND

MANUFACTURING CO.

WINONA, MINN.

IIeflners and Jlunufncturers of

GRAPHITE AND GRAPHITE

SPECIALTIES

ROOF PAINT. ROOF CEMENT. ETC.

R. L. BARTHOLOMEW General Railroad Contractor 1

PILE DRIVING - BRIDGE

837 Roland Street >IlEMPHIS. TESX. and STPLCCTURAL WORK

Brookside-Pratt Mining lo,

INCORPORATED

A. R. Long. Presidant

Albert Allison. Sev-tary-Treasurer

PRODUCERS OF

Steam and Domestic Coal

Mines on Frisco, Southern and

1. C. Railroads

Brown-Marx Building

BIRMINGHAM, ALA.

I The Starr Coal Ca

MINERS and SHIPPERS

1

HENRYETTA - OKLAHOY ,

Hedges-Week! I

Construction CO,

Rooms 415-416 Holland Buildinl

Railroad Masonry Contradm

Headlight Headquarters 1

Headlights

I

and Turbo-generators

Train Lighting Systems

'l'rain Control 'I'urbo-genera~oi:

Fittings and Wiring Appliana 1

for I.ocomotive, Car and Shnr

Installations

The Pyle-National 1

Company :

1334-1358 North Kostner Ar.

Chicago, Ill., U. S. A.

CASADLN AGEhm :

The Holden Conl~any, Ltd., Ym~nal.

Wlnnipe& Vancouver, Toronto

EXPORT DEPARTMEST:

lntcrn~llonal Rnllway Supply Compci

30 Church Slreel. Sew Tork Mb

IIRASCH OFFICES :

3509 Grand Cen. Terrnlnal. Ben Yark r

$17 Boatmen's hnk Rldg.. St. Louis. 1'

.dl 1 Builders Ex. Rldg.. SL. Paul, Mnn


REID AND LOWE

RAILROAD AND

BRIDGE CONTRACTORS

Grading and Concrete Bridge Work

Smokeless Fuel Company

HUNTINGTON, ARK.

MINERS AND SHIPPERS OF

Semi-Anthracite C o a l

BIRMINGHAM, ALA.

The Locomotive Finished Material Co.

.iTCHISOS. ICASS.iS

FOUNDERS and ENGINEERS

High Ortide Grey Iron and Steel Cantinm

for Raliwnys-Finluhed or Rough

Finished Locorr~otire Cpllnders n Specialty

Equipped to make lawe Grey Iron

Cnstinm up to 23 mns.

SOUTHERN WHEEL CO.

Pngc 67

A. R. A. 850 Lb.

SINGLE PLATE

CHILLED TREAD WHEELS

FOR

70 TON CARS

TONCAN

Copper Mo-lyb-den-urn Iron Culverts

Manufactured by

Tri-State Culvert Mfg. Co.

Second and Butler, MEMPHIS, TENN.

J. W. McMURRY

CONTRACTING CO. 1 W. 0. SCHOCK CO. 1

R. R. & BRIDGE

CONTRACTORS Petroleum Products --

ill Railway Exchange Building,

KANSAS CITY, MO. Liberty Central Trust Building SAINT LOUIS

C.W.Booth& Co.

Railway Supplies

RAILWAY EXCHANGE BLDG.

CHICAGO. ILL.

C A. ROBERTS CO.

44 SHELBY"

Seamless Steel Tubing

t!!lCdGO ST. LOUIS

DETROIT INDIANAPOLIS

The New York Air

Brake Company

Manufactures the

STANDARD AIR - BRAKE

EQUIPMENT

GENERAL OFFICES

420 Lexington Av., New York City

WORKS

Watertown, New York

/ National Boiler Washing - Co.

I

OF ILLINOIS

CONTRACTORS

I NATIONAL HOT WATER . NATIONAL FUEL OIL

WASHOUT AND FILLING 4 FACILITIES for

I SYSTEMS 5 LOCOMOTIVE TERMINALS

lor LOCOMOTIVE BOILERS CONSTRUCTED COMPLETE

RAILWAY EXCHANGE

CHICAGO

WOLF RIVER SAND CO.

WASHED and SCREENED

SAND and GRAVEL

Office: 622 Falls Building

MEMPHIS, TENN.

CARLOAD SHIPMENTS A SPECIALTY I

LIST CONSTRUCTION CO. I

Railroad Contractors

415 Railway Exchange Building

KANSAS CITY, MO.

ATLAS COAL

Henryetta Fuel Company

Henry-etta, Oklahoma

NcALESTER, WILBURTON,

COLORADO

and

HENRYETTA


For better concrete

culverts and bridges

Photo, above, shows part of

"50 miles of excellent track"

between Carbon Hill and Birm-

ingham in which

*Fy;.g ..A. cc*

CRUSHEDAND SCREENED

was used eucluslvely as road ball.1~1.

The E'rlsco Railway has used lhousonds

of' lorn or bask slag for rodd ballast

In the Blrmlngham-Jlemphls dlrlslon-

find each venr t~undreds of tons goes

into the bulldlng of concrete bridges

and culverls.

Birmingham Slag Co.

Slag Headquarters for the South

BIRMINGHAM. ALA.

OUR OWN CRUDE

OUR OWN PIPE LINES

I 1

Midvale Cod Co.

HIGH GRADE STEAM

AND DOMESTIC COAL I

I

I Chemical Bldg. ST. LOUIS. MO. I

I The Producers Sand Co. I

Producers and Shippers of the

"HOUND TOOTH SAND"

SCREENED ASD \VASHED

I

BIG ARKANSAS RIVER CHANNEL SAND

307 National Bank of Commerce Building

Telephone 3-4272 P. 0. Box 2133

TULSA, OICLAHOMA I

Oklahoma

Steel Castings Co.

MAKERS OF

Railroad, Oil Field and

Commercial Castings in

OKLAHOMA

ELECTRIC STEEL

Tulsa, Okla., Box 658

BARNSDALL

Be Square Petroleum Products

3 BARNSDALL,

Modern Refineries

OKLAHOMA

WICHITA, KANSAS

OKMULGEE, OKLAHOMA 3

North American

Car Corporation

TANK CARS (

FOR LEASE,

I

CAR REPAIRS

~

OUR SPECIALTY I

SHOPS

~

CHICAGO, ILL. I

COFFEYVILLE. KANS.

WEST TULSA. OKLA.

GENERAL OFFICE

327 South LaSalle Strett

CHICAGO

OUR OWN REFINERIES\

OUR OWN TANK CARS;

4.

DEPENDABLE SOURCE OF 'SUPPLY

BARNSDALL REFINERIES, Inc.

Sudsidiary Barnsdall Corporation

Executive Offices

Petroleum Building, Tulsa, Okla.

General Sales Offices

624 S. Michigan Ave., Chicago, Ill.

I


-.# 7 . r, 1929 Page 69

1

S'I!ANDARD SEiW- STEEL FOUNDRY CO.

GREY IRON

- -

ELf CTRlC STEEL .

SEMI-STEEL

B-s&BRONZE

- - -

BUFFALO BRAKE BEAM COMPANY

- BRARE BEAMS -

AUXILIARY SUPPORTS FOR BRAKE BEAMS

Brake Pins (Self Locking)

aft Key Locks (Self Locking)

NEW YORK BUFFALO

THE OHIO INJECTOR COMPANY

1437 Monadnock Block CHICAGO, ILLINOIS

Manufacturers of

OHIO LIFTING INJECTORS

CHICAGO NON-LIFTING INJECTORS

CHICAGO AUTOMATIC FLANGE OILERS, CHICAGO

LUBRICATORS, OHIO LOW WATER ALARMS, CHICAGO AUTOMATIC

DRIFTING VALVES, LOCOMOTIVE BOILER ATTACHMENTS, OHIO CAB SQUIRTS

The Frisco Policy to guarantee the safety of their employes

is further carried out by their purchase of

Marathon Brand Sterilized Wiping Rags

G. MATHES COMPANY

St. Louis, U. S. A.


MINER

FRICTION DRAFT GEARS IDEAL SAFETY HAND BRAKES 1

I

SAFETY BOLSTER LOCKING CENTER PINS

REFRIGERATOR CAR DOOR FASTENERS SIDE BEARINGS

MINER, INCo I

W o H a I

)I/ THE ROOKERY CHICAGO (

GOULD

Side Frames Bolsters Couplers

Open Hearth Steel Castings

THE GOULD COUPLER CO.

Works: DEPEW ST. LOUIS

NEW YORK

i

BALTIMORE CHICAGO SAN FRANCISCO

Indiana and Illinois Coal Corporation j/

i

MONTGOMERY COUNTY ILLINOIS COAL :I

1425 Old Colony Building

CHICAGO

Daily Capacity, 20,000 Tons Located on the Big Four and C. & E. I. Railroads I

THE AJAX HAND BRAKE1

Safe and Efficient

I THE ONE-HAND HAND BRAKE

I


itobrr, 1929 Pagc 72

HOBBS TIE TIMBER CO.

Railroad Cross Ties, Switch Ties and Lumber, Poles and Piling

1965-66-67 RAILWAY EXCHANGE BLDG.

ST. LOUIS, MO.

We Help Make the Frisco Safe

DE BARDELEBEN COALS

Sipsey -Empire - Carona - Carbon Hill - Hull

FOR

DOMESTIC, STEAM, GAS, BY-PRODUCT AND CERAMICS

DeBardeleben Preparation

Gives Added Value

The South's Largest Producers and Marketers of

HIGH GRADE COALS

A

Southern Railway Building

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA

General American Tank Car Corp.

General American Car Co.

BUILDERS , a

Tank Cars

Milk Cars

Railroad Cars

LESSORS

OFFICES :

Illinois Merchants Bank Bldg., Chicago, Ill.

Canal Bank Bldg., New Orleans, La.

Magnolia Bldg., Dallas, Texas

Tank Cars

Milk Cars

Refrigerator Cars

Whitehall Bldg., New York City

Cosden Bldg., Tulsa, Okla.

Bartlett Bldg., Los Angela, Calif.


Pngc 72

L

WESTERN TIE AND TIMBER COMPANY 11

905 SYNDICATE TRUST BLDC. 11

WALTER POLLJIAN, President A. R. FATHMAN, Vice-president

E. A. NIXON, Vice-president THOS. T. POLEMAN. Sec'y and Treas.

E. J. STOCKING, Sales Manager

Treated and Untreated Cross and Switch Ties, Piling, Car and Track Oak 11

Owners of

KETTLE RIVER TREATING COMPANY

MADISON, ILLINOIS

Zinc and Creosoted CROSS TIES, Modern Adzing and Boring Machines 1,

Treating Plants located at Madison and Edwardsville, Ill. 11

E. A. NIXON, President H. G. McELHINNEY, Sec'y and Gen. Supt.

A. R. FATHMAN, Vice-president J. E. PETERSON, Treasurer

R. E. KNEELAND. V.-P. and G. Mgr. E. J. STOCKING, SaIes Mgr.

Magnus Company

INCORPORATED

JOURNAL BEARINGS and

BRONZE ENGINE CASTINGS

NEW YORK CHICAGO

I

I

I

I

1

-


CHRYSLLK IMPERIAL

CHRYSLER L';7"

CHRYSLER "jo"

CHRYSLER "66"

ODGE DXOTHERS SENIOR

DODGE CKOTHEIIS SIX

DE SOT0 SIX

PLYMOUTH

)DGE EROTHERS TRIJCKS,

'SES od IMO'TOR COACHES

FARGO TRUCKS

uzd COJMMERCIAL CARS

CHRYSLER

MARINE ENGINES

so all can enjoy it

LL units of Chrysler Motors operate

A hand in hand, pooling their experience

and resources, conducting group research and

experiment, holding council together, exchanging

ideas-and in each case the public is the

principal gainer.

Instead of small groups of engineers working

independently of each other, really pitted against

each other, Chrysler Motors engineers are mar-

shalled together as one vast creative force-with

all thought and all effort keyed in a common

spirit of teamwork and helpfulness.

There is no petty rivalry, no jealous conten-

tion, no hiding away of secrets. On the contrary,

the combined group carries on its studies and

development work in one great laboratory.

Progress, as a result, is not selfishly confined to

any one product, but is automatically extended

all along the line.

Advancements worked out for any one

Chrysler Motors car are, wherever possible,

adapted and applied to all the others. Thus, as

cach Chrysler Motors car advances in quality,

performance and value, all advance.

And, inasnluch as there is a Chrysler Motors

product for every pocketbook, this means that

the finest results of auton~otive progress are

passed along to be within the reach of evetybody.

F O R B E T T E R P U B L I C S E R V I C E

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