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1930-10-17 - Northern New York Historical Newspapers

1930-10-17 - Northern New York Historical Newspapers

1930-10-17 - Northern New York Historical

3Mf£ SJrewster tamtarfc "BREWSTER, THE HUB OF THE HARLEM VALLEY" VOL. LXII, No. 25 Brewster, Putnam County, N. Y., Friday, October 17, 1930 $2.00 per year Columbus Day Crowd at Putnam Track Witness Finest Racing This Season "Rabbitt' Barger Drives Sadie Forbes in Day's Fastest Heat and Wins Two Races. Carl Greulock and Frank Maynard Oat Generated Professional Driver, Former Winning Stirring Four Heat Race With Tramp Union. Mr. Close Wins with Buster Dillon and Mr. Gordon with Two Year Old Lady Hanover. A card or racing program unequalled In all the annalB of events that ever graced the old Carmel Fair track were run off last Monday afternoon in the most beautiful fall setting one could ~ver wish to see. The track was never in better shape —"not a pimple on it," as the old swipe was heard to remark. Every tree had its most gorgeous individual fall color glistening in the rays of a bright October sun; so with blue skies, clear air and old friends on every side the day was complete in every respect. Four horses started in the first race, a Class A trot and pace. Tramp Union, a new arrival owned by H. O. Roulston of New Rochelle, and driven by Carl Greulock of Patterson, won the first and fourth heats to win first money. Frank Maynard driving his favorite, Waymart, took the second heat in the f&siesl time, 2:12. Polhemus, a pro driver, piloted Fruity McGregor, and won the third heat. Al Maxey was driv­ en by Losee, who was unable to steady his horse and though Fruity showed plenty of speed he broke in the pinch and placed fourth in the first three heats and was drawn when the three heat winners came out to battle for the final heat and race. Fruity Mc­ Gregor had the pole position when they left the wire in the final heat and for three-quarters of the mile was leading Tramp Union by four lengths and Waymart by six lengths. As they reach­ ed the three-quarter pole few people if any realised that Tramp Union or Waymart had enough reserve speed to close the gap between them and the leader in the last quarter. Anyone who witnessed that last heat will tell you they never saw a better heat driven and Mr. Greulock and Mr. Maynard received a great applause from the crowd when both of them not only closed the gap of from four to six lengths but came under the wire inches ahead of Fruity McOregor driven by the young professional. Polhemus. The spectators who waited for this heat were struck dumb with such an exhi­ bition of race track generalship and though it was only seconds after Tramp Union went under the wire a winner ahead of Waymart by an eye lash it seemed like an hour before the crowd burst into a wild chorus of cheers and hand clapping. When the three horses went under the wire and ordinary horse blanket would cover the trio and we will describe the finish to this manner: Waymart 2nd Tramp Union 1st Fruity McGregor 3rd Every heat to the second race of the Class B trot and pace was a hair rais­ er. Floyd "Rabbitt" Barger driving Badie Forbes won to three straight heats, the time of the second was 2:11 flat and the fastest heat of the day. Sadie's worthy contender for first place honors was Colorado O driven by his owner, Tompkins. The third race like the first two kept the crowd to a fever of excitement. "Rabbitt' Barger drove his pet, Lou Dillard, to win the first two heats. Charlotte Guy, a new comer, was driv­ en by its owner, H. C. Roulston, who finished a close second the first heat; and to the second heat he attempted some fancy driving by trying to cut Rabbitt away from the pole on the first turn the second time around by driving close to the inside and throw Lou - Dillard on the outside and into a break, but instead his horse broke when it heard the wheels of the sulky scrape and finally finished to a place he deserved—fourth and last. In that same heat Counselor Willis Ryder drove like an old timer and finished second with Bob Worthy only inches behind Lou Dillard; In the third heat Roulston finally got the laugh on Rab­ bitt by taking the last heat by a neck. Mr. Close driving his own Buster Dil­ lon proved that he had the stuff to win the last two heats of the fourth race. Nathan Wittenberg who won a close race with Tramp Brook last Sat­ urday was confident of another victory. He took the first heat to easy fashion and apparently had the other two heats sewed up but Tramp Brook lost his head and broke with victory to sight. Charlie Haight finished 3, 2, 2, with Sam Patch. The race of the two year olds was won by Joe Gordon of White Plains, driving his beautiful colt, Lady Han­ over. Lady Polhemus, driven by Losee, finished a close second to both heats. The results of the races are as fol­ lows: FIRST RACE Class A Trot and Pace Al Maxey (Losee) 4 Fruity McGregor (Polhemus) 2 Waymart ( Maynard) 3 Tramp Union (Greulock) 1 Time—2:12%, 2:12, 2:14, 2:15U, SECOND RACE Class B rot and Pace Colorado O (Tompkins) Sadie Forbes (F. Barger) George E (Bob Thomas) Mystic Wood (Baker) Time—2:12, 2:11, 2:13V4. ' THIRD RACE * Class C Trot and Pace Charlotte Guy (Roulston) Lou Dillard (F. Barger) Bob Worthy (Ryder) Earie Brook (Losee) Time—2:18, 2:1614. 2:1914. FOURTH RACE Class D Trot and Pace Sam Patch (Haight) Tramp Brook (Wittenberg) Buster Dillon (Close) Time—2:22, 2:17%, 2:19%. FIFTH RACE Class E Two Year Olds Lady Hanover' (Gordon) Lady Polhemus (Losee) Time—2:34, 2:29. 4 dr 1 3 3 2 2 1 2 2 1 1 3 3 4 dr 4 1 1 2 2 4 3 3 2 2 3 3 1 1 1 1 2 2 Andrew Grimes Hurt In Danbury Fair Riot Late Saturday aiternoon Andrew Grimes, New York State's largest and popular member of the State Police, was caught to a young riot along the big mid-way at the Danbury Fair. Andy as we all know him best was out of uniform and like many others was out for a good time and acting his part as a spectator As he and his party were on their way to their car they walked through the mid-way. Andy spied a dozen or more young ruf­ fians beating a policeman. Andy could not stand seeing one to his chosen line of duty being molested to such a bru­ tal fashion: so made his way to the scene of action and successfully reliev­ ed the lone officer who he discovered later was nothing more than a special oop hired by the Danbury Fair Asso­ ciation. At first Andy tried peaceful methods, but the hoodlums wanted real fight and one soaked Andy to the right eye and the guy that did it knows now what it is to get a 250 lb. fist on the chin. The swinging of arms continued and Andy was cleaning up the mess to pretty fair shape when one of the cul­ prits swung on him with a cane, which struck him full on the mouth knock- tog out a beautiful front tooth and cut­ ting his Up to the extent of six stitches. Andy figured he had worked hard enough and not seeing a cop of any description he let the rioters carry on with their brutal work, knocking down old men, insulting women and pick­ pocketing those who came to their path, and so made his way to head­ quarters to report the progress of the battle which apparently did not con­ cern the special police, most of whom had gone home to supper. Andy said that if he had had his revolver or black jack with him he would have cleaned up the whole crowd which numbered between 10 and 20 and re­ ported to be from Wallingford, Conn., and all ^t*If drunk. Andy received a letter from the di­ rectors of the Danbury Fair stating they would pay his dental and medi­ cal bill. Those who witnessed the bat- tte and watched Andy mill around wiht a doze nswinging at him from as many different directions and the cop he ' went to help slink away under a tent on his hands and knee* are thinking Racing at Carmel Till Snow Flies seriously of suggesting to the Danbury It was announced from the Judge's stand last Monday afternoon that there would be racing every Saturday afternoon at the old Carmel track weather permitting. Next Saturday— to-morrow, four horses tied with 22 points each for the C. R. Diehl Cup to be awarded to the horse winning the most points during the season will be decided and will be presented to the winner to-morrow afternoon. The fol­ lowing are now tied for first place: Waymart, Cindy Napoleon, Fruity Mc­ Gregor in Class A and Buster Dillon to Class C. Regardless of class the horse winning the most points will win the cup. This week Nathan Wittenberg start­ ed his horse. Sir Zandt, he recently purchased from Mr. Butler of Mill- brook at Eta fiord Springs. An old veteran of the tracks, Bob Thomas of New Milford. joined the Putnam Riding and Driving Club last week and drove George E to' the sec­ ond race on Monday. Mr. Thomas pur­ chased George E to Canada, where the horse made a great record trotting on the ice. Bob says if any of the boys are game he is willing to put on a few ice races this winter on Lake Gleneida proving the thickness of the ice per­ mits. Another new comer to the track, Charlotte Guy, owned by H. C. Rouls­ ton of New Rochelle, will start at Windsor next week. Don't forget there will be good rac­ ing next Saturday and every Saturday uiternoon thereafter until snow flies. Brewster Tailor Shot Accidehtly By Pal Mario Marianl Loses Sight of Left Eye When Accidentally Shot by His Friend, Tony Furco, Last Sunday Morning In Vicinity of Field's Lane Between Brewster and Croton Falls. Victim Making Speedy Recovery in North­ ern Westchester Hospital. The first casualty of the hunting season just opened a few weeks ago was reported last Sunday morning. Mario Maflrani,. one of Brewster's well known tailors, who was employed by Mr. J. Diamond, received a charge of buck shot from a shot gun fired by his companion who was standing to thick underbrush about forty-five yards to the left and slightly to the rear. There were four to the party and were spread apart to skirmish line style going through a piece of thick under­ brush to a swamp about a mile south of Pierre Field's farm along what is known as Field's lane. Tony was the first to spy a woodcock and as the bird rose to flight he shouted to Mario, thinking that if he missed his mark Mario would get a chance to take a shot at the same bird or at least be on the look out. Un­ fortunately it was a terrible scream that Tony heard to response to his call. He dropped his gun and ran madly through the thick undergrowth to where Mario stood .His face was cov­ ered with blood and his clothing show­ ed marks made by other small shot from his ankles to his head. Tony call­ ed to his other companions to assist Mario to the road as he ran some dis­ tance to get his car. Mario was able to walk to the car and Tony drove with all speed to Dr. Vanderburgh's office, where the injur­ ed received first aid treament and was ordered to the Northern Westchester Hospital at Mt. Kisco, for further ex­ amination. It was found necessary to remove what was left of Mario's left eye. Two or three shot had come dan- generously near entering Mario's abdo­ men and a number had penetrated his left side under the arm and left leg and ankle. Tony has called at Mario's bedside every day since the accident and re­ ports that he is recovering very rapid­ ly and may come home this week end. Tony feels very bad and remarked that he could not eat a morsel of food for three days. Friends of both Mario and Tony are coming forth with much sympathy. They are experienced hunters especially Mario who has hunt­ ed all through this section for the r -at twenty years, Carmel Country Club Enjoys Week End Winners of Golf and Tennis Champion­ ships Receive Trophies from Clayton Ryder, President, and Clement M. Biddle, Vice President. Republicans to Meet in Brewster In Honor of Frederick P. Close Edward S. Agor, Chairman Republican County Committee, and F. Leon Shelp, Chairman Put­ nam County Lawyers' Committee, Plan Fine Meeting to Aid Candidacy of Hon. Frederick P. Close* Judge Close, Hon. Dan C. Nolan and Hon. Lee Parsons Davis to Speak in Town Hall, Brewster, on October 24. All Republican Candidates will be Present. Republicans of Putnam county are delighted to know that on Friday even- tag, October 24, at 8 o'clock, they will have the opportunity to meet Hon. Frederick P. Close, County Judge of Westchester county who is the Repub­ lican candidate for Justice of the Su­ preme Court in the 9th Judicial Dis­ trict. Judge Close will address the meeting and all who are interested are urged to be present. The Judicial District comprises the counties of Westchester, Orange, Dut­ chess, Rockland and Putnam and each county has a live organization cam­ paigning for Judge Close whose elec­ tion means so much to those who de­ sire to keep high type men in office. In Westchester Jerome A. Peck is chair­ man, in Orange Hon. A. H. F. Seeger, in Rockland Hon. Mortimer B. Patter­ son, in Dutchess Raymond E. Aid rich, and in Putnam F. Leon Shelp. Mr. Shelp and Edward S. Agor, chairman of the Republican County Committee, have made arrangements for the meeting. Besides Judge Close Hon. Dan C. No­ lan, former Mayor of Yonkers, and Hon. Lee Parsons Davis will speak. These gentlemen are well known to many residents of Putnam and it is expected that there will be a pleasant reception after the meeting. All local Republican candidates for office will be present, D. Mallory Stephens, can­ didate for Member or Assembly, Arthur L. Newcomb, candidate for sheriff, Ed­ ward D. Stannard, candidate for coun­ ty treasurer, Harry B. Brock, candidate for Commissioner of Public Welfare, candidates for coroner, Drs. Cleaver and Logan. The Lawyers' Committee in which Mr. Shelp is Putnam's representative, is doing a.in eat deal to stimulate politi­ cal gatfertogs. About 100 lawyers are engaged In work for the regular Re­ publican ticket on which Judge Close is the nominee for Justice of the Su­ preme Court. Come out and meet the candidates. All are welcome to Brew­ ster.. Sons of Israel Putnam in Boston Nine of the twelve ex-service men who attended Twelfth Annual National Convention of the American Legion held in Boston Oct. 6-9 IS' Hj H • m *kl •? -_ 1*1 Legislative Manuals For Distribution Assemblyman Stephens has twenty- five copies of the Legislative Mp'mn) allotted to him for distribution. He will be glad to give them to those who make a request for them. Fair Association that they come fur- ward with scune thing stronger than a couple of physical repair bills. Columbus Day week end marked the peak of .the fall season at the Carmel Country Club. The club room register was completely filled for two weeks to advance and many of the guests ar­ rived early to take advantage of the long holiday. Saturday evening an informal dance was held at the boat house on China Lake and a real live affair it was. Wharton Ford, better known among Brewster's younger set as "Flivver," brought his snappy seven piece orches­ tra up from Stamford, Conn., to furnish the music. Appropriate decorations were found to colorful autumn leaves and an open hearth fire added to the good .cheer of dancing. During an intermission to the dance the club golf and tennis championship trophies were awarded to their winners. Mr. Clayton Ryder of Carmel, Presi­ dent, presented the golf trophies. Albert R. Lee of New York, won the Presi­ dent's cup—the first leg on the trophy which will be retained by the three time winner. Leland C. Ryder, of Carmel, was awarded the runner-up prize, Rundle Gilbert of New York, third prize and Merritt Ryder of Carmel, fourth prize. Mr. Clement M. Biddle of Mt. Vernon, Vice President, presented the tennis trophy which he donated to the interest of the sport, to the winner Douglas Macduff of Peekskul. This cup will be known as the Biddle Trophy and must be won three times for per­ manent possession. The dining room faculties were taxed to the limit to accommodate the re­ cord breaking number of guests. Holi­ day dinners are becoming ever more popular at the club and reservations for Thanksgiving Day are already be­ ing made. The entertainment committee is plan­ ning now for a Hallow'en costume dance on November 1 and the Moonlight Serenaders have been engaged to fur­ nish the syncopation. The dance will be held at the boat house where a real Halloween atmosphere will prevail. A number of applications for mem­ bership were filed over the week end and if and when these are accepted the total number of members will be approximately 225. This picture was taken at mid-day on the 7th while waiting for the word to march. It was not until 3 p.m. that New York went off on the left foot and finished about 7 p. m., covering a distance of five miles through Boston's his­ torical streets. Left to right, rear rank—Harold Beal, Brewster; David Cathcart, Cold Spring; Ralph George, Mahopac; Raymond Cole, Carmel; Daniel Brandon and Emerson W. Addis, Brewster. Kneeling and possibly praying for two in the rear rank who had their pookets picked are: Left to right—Fred Selleck, Cold Spring; Samuel Ledley and William McCrady. Brewster. Picture will be loan­ ed to other newspapers to the county. Travis Will Contest To Be Heard Oct. 27 Jurors Drawn to Serve in Surrogate's Court in Action Brought by Mrs. Croft, Sister of the Late Thurlow Travis. Estate Exceeds $10,000. A panel of trial jurors to serve in the Surrogate's Court at Carmel has been drawn at the County Clerk's of­ fice. This panel was drawn especially for the contest of the will of the late Thurlow Travis, of Putnam Valley, which is scheduled to take place at the court house at Carmel, Monday, Oct. 27. Mr. Travis left an estate said to be to excess of $10,000 personal and real estate and Is believed to be much great­ er than this amount. By the provision of his will after certain specific be­ quests, the residue was left to his ne­ phew, Blendon Croft. The will is being contested by Mr. Travis' sister, Mrs. Leila Travis Croft. The panel drawn consists of the fol­ lowing: Carmel—Oscar Mead, S. Willis Ptockney, Chester Adams, Alfred D. Agor, Henry Blumleto, Sr., Francis J. Ganong. Kent—Walter J. Heady, Nazario Menendez, Ulrick Eck, Allan B. Fo- shay, Lewis N. Merritt. Patterson—Theron Smalley, Wm. E. Buchanan, Wm. E. Ballard, Ward C. Rogers, Herbert W. Saunders. Putnam Valley—Roger Travis, Har­ ry Tompkins, Arthur Bailey, C. H. Attwater, Jesse Baxter, Harry Gor- ley. Philipstown—Granville Barrett, Ken­ neth Frazier, Gordon Busteed. Southeast—Wm. E. Maher, Percy C. Stuart, Rudolph Ptockney, Thomas Meaney, Avery VanScoy, Henry Eks- trom, Geo. H. Townsend, Jacob Susnit- zky, Harry Buck, George Rogers, Geo. Fagan. Here It la. "I'll bet that's one accident that won't get to the Brewster Standard," was the remark heard when Em Addis's new Buick Coupe was lying to Comeskey and Durkto's auto morgue last Tues- day morning. As accidents happen to the best of regulated families and even to great dirigibles driven by the world's greatest engineers who receive the weather forecast by radio every min­ ute we do not hesitate to publish the why's and wherefore's and lessons learned as a warning to those who have not turned their first turtle. After a morning of golf, two hours and a half of feverish auto polishing, the remain­ ing afternoon hours spent standing along the rail at the Carmel Fair track until the last horse had gone under the wire, four more hours of auction bridge and then a drive to Pawling about mid­ night is there any other reason why an auto driver ought not to feel sleepy. Never having fallen asleep behind a wheel to about ten years of driving one resents good suggestions to stop, sleep an hour or so and then go on the way with a clear eye especially if the night be foggy and your road lies over route 22 through Patterson swamp. The onjy credit concerning the accident belongs to the Lord, who saved our lives, we all hope for some good pur­ pose if nothing more than to warn others who get the dosy boy habit when driving late through thick fog.] It is bad enough to drive through fog. J say nothing of trying to do it with your eyes shut. What happened while the eyes were shut we can't relate, but those who pass the spot, which is quite evident by its lack of guard rail can picture to their minds eye what happened and to think that no one was even scratched is a sure sign that the atheists will lose customers. And the damage to lin­ ear is sufficient to make us dream of the bridal suite to the Putnam County Poor House. So Harry we hope and will work for your victory, for a hard boil­ ed Republican to be under the super­ vision of a Democrat no matter how gracious would be just too bad. Croton Falls Man Saved From Drowning Daniel Juengst narrowly escaped drowning last Monday while fishing alone on Peach Lake. Dan had just hauled up a heavy achor, turned about and was to the act of sitting down when he lost his balance when the anchor rope caught his ankle and fell backwards into the water. His feet were Incased to big heavy boots and he was caught to such a position that his feet were to the boat and he was standing on his head waist deep to water. He realized he could not hold that position long and still live so he commenced to kick the rope loose from his feet and finally managed to get his dogs free. The boots filled with water but Dan didn't care as long as his head was out of water where he could breath air for a change. Dan's only regret was, the baptism of a beautiful Longtoes watch he purchased at Dahm's jewelry store a few months ago. The watch has been cleaned, but the inside of Dan's boots are still wet. OBITUARY Leander B. Lent. Leander B. Lent, retired business man, former trustee of the old Vil­ lage of White Plains and one time post­ master of Brewster, died at 6:30 o'clock Friday morning, October 10, 1930. at his residence, 23 Cottage Place, White Plains. Death was due to old age and followed an illness of six months. He was a native of . Westchester county, navtog been bora to Peekskill 78 years ago, the son of Milton and Caroline Cole Lent. For a long period he resided to Brewster, where he was postmaster during the second Cleveland adminis­ tration. For a long period he was em­ ployed to the dry goods and grocery store of the late Edwin W. Dixon. He moved to White Plains 20 years ago and served the old village as trustee for one term. He was for a long time con­ nected with the wholesale hat indus­ try to New York City, but was inac­ tive to recent years. He is survived by his widow, Ro­ se tta B. Lent; one daughter, Eliza­ beth B. Lent, and three sons, Leon B., Harold and Murray M. A brother, Charles H. Lent, of Yonkers .and a sis­ ter, Caroline M. Lent, of Clifton, N. J., also survive. Funeral services were conducted at the residence Saturday evening at 8 o'clock. Sunday burial took place to Milltown Cemtery, the Rev. Herbert Hazzard, of the Brewster Methodist church, officiating. Tuttle Sold Papers To Win Education First on Farm, Later In City, Repub­ lican Candidate Won His Spurs by Hard Work. Brewster Firemen To Put Out Tickets Alex McKennon, of Mt. Vernon, was the holiday guest of Raymond Ter- williger. Miss Barbara Truran has shown a alight improvement, friends are glad to learn- She has been seriously ill fur the past two week*. Register and enroll tomorrow between 1 and 10 p. m. Mr. and Mrs. J. Ralph Truran are spending four days to Atlantic City. The Epworth league will serve their annual clam chowder dinner on elec­ tion day. Mrs. D. H. Bloomer has charge of the tickets, which are 75c. each. The Brewster firemen will start a ticket selling campaign beginning this week end for the Redpath Entertain­ ments which they are sponsoring. The season tickets are $1.50. There are four entertainments any one of which are worth a dollar. It is generally known that the net proceeds of the carnival held this past summer amounted to very little and right now the company's funds for general running expenses are nearly exhausted. Every one knows the necessity of keeping their Volunteer Fire Co. to good financial standing and when you are approached to buy tic­ kets "dig down" and by doing so you will at least show them that you ap­ preciate the protection YOUR fire com­ pany give you twenty-four hours a day 365 days to the year. The firemen wll also call on their friends to the rural sections, who never fail to give gen­ erous support. The first entertainment is held on Wednesday evening, Oct. 29. Brewster Bakery Makes New Brand of Rolls Brewster's leading bakery, piloted by Thomas O'Loughlto to the 'store and Edward Schmeiser to the bakery is flooded with calls personal and by phone for the new brand of rolls they are baking daily. They are called "Kris- pie Krust" and their shape resembles a loaf of bread, like minature golf—a small edition of the real thing. Bread and roll eaters the world ov­ er, usually eight out of every ten peo­ ple, want a roll that is not a heavy mess of dough. These rolls will melt to your mouth, cold or hot, but pre­ ferably warmed a bit to the oven. They possess a light texture, with a snappy, tasty crust and nothing but the purest and finest mixture goes into them, especially the milk, which is usually a rather thin member to most bakery food. They are made by our own Eddie Schmeiser. right here to Brewster and after you have tried a dozen at twenty cents you'll say they have anything stopped to the bread line from Maine to California, if you don't think so it's lead you want not good rolls. CHARLES II. TUTTLE Charles H. Tuttle was born April 21, 1879. to Greenwich Village, New- York City, the son of Henry Croswell Tuttle, and is the grandson of the Rev. Isaac H. Tuttle, who for forty years was the rector of St. Luke's Protestant Episcopal Church to Hud­ son Street, New York City. His father died when he was three years old and with his mother the boy lived on a farm to Oak Ridge, N. J. For seven years he attended the village school, and, as he grew older heloed with the work on the farm, feeding the cattle, milking the cows and working with the farm- hands to the field. Mother and son returned to New York when the boy was ten and both have lived to the Big City ever since. Living to 46th Street, off Times Square, he sold newspapers and found time to study, winning a scholarship to Trinity School, graduating from there to 1895. Through his writing and tutoring he put himself through Columbia College and was grad­ uated to 1899. He graduated from Columbia Law College to 1902 with a> LL.B. degree. In college he was elected to the Phi Be tta Kappa So­ ciety to his junior year. On his gradu­ ation he was awarded the Chandler Prize to American history, the Banner Medal to American literature and the James Cordon Bennett prize to Eng­ lish prose. Mr. Tuttle became a partner to the law firm of Davies, Stone & Auer- bach (now Davies, Auerbach & Cor­ nell), 34 Nassau Street, with whom he got his first law job as a clerk. He was admitted to the firm to 1907 and remained a partner until his appoint­ ment by President Coolidge as United States District Attorney for the Southern District of New York. la private practice he was eminently successful as a pleader and trial law­ yer. As a public prosecutor he has become famous for his convictions of stock and bond racketeers, including the notorious George Graham Rice. His investigation to the bankruptcy proceedings to the United States courts resulted to the resignation of a Federal judge and the official auc­ tioneer, the dismissal of a Federal clerk and the disbarment or resigna­ tion of six lawyers prominent to bank­ ruptcy work. Recently, he has been instrumental, through his vision, keen observation, courage and prompt action, to un­ veiling graft which had been running riot through Important departments in the Tammany administration, in­ cluding a venal Judiciary; and in bringing some of the principal male­ factors to justice. Mr. Tuttle is a member of the Or­ der of Elks, New York Lodge No. l; the A. A. Scottish Rite, New York City; Mecca Temple and Kane Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons. Somers Reception To "Meet the Candidates" Miss Janet Hopkins, of New Paltz Normal School, spent the week end and holiday with her parents. Mulch shrubs early to the fall and perennials after the ground is frozen. A "Meet the Candidates" reception was held at the home of Mr. and Mrs. William Moeller, Lincolndale, on Sat­ urday afternoon under the auspices of the Somers Town Republican Commit­ tee. The affair was preceded by a lunch­ eon to the candidates after which each gave a short talk and an opportunity was offered for those present to meet them personally. Present were Supervisor Charles D. Millard, candidate for Congressman. Mrs. Millard and Miss Millard, Sur­ rogate George A. Slater and Mrs. Slat­ er. County Judge Frederick P. Clos>e. candidate for Justice of the Supreme Court. Ralph Gamble, candidate tot Assemblyman, and Mrs. Gamble. Miss Jane Todd. President of the Westches­ ter County Women's Republican Club, Right-of-Way Offered By F. K. James -/ Public sentiment having been so pro­ nounced in favor of building the Spruce Hill Road to Putnam Valley on the route of the present road and Intima­ tions made that the right of way need­ ed would be granted, Supervisor Silleck Immediately began an investigation to obtain the consents of property owners. While Frederick K. James had pre­ viously offered a right of way through his Wildwood Knolls develop­ ment for this road, when it appeared that the road would be stopped be­ cause of opposition to granting the necessary rights of way along the road, he has informed Supervisor Silleck that to order to get the road to that section improved and not to block the eflorts of Supervisor Silleck to obtain­ ing this improved'road for Putnam Val­ ley he will dedicate to the county the necessary right of way of all the land lie owns along the present Spruce Hill road. If other property owners will do likewise the improvement will be made possible and Supervisor Silleck is now endeavoring to secure these . County Clerk Charles J. F. Decker and Supervisor Elbert C. Purdy of North Salem were also present. The meeting was presided over by Mrs. Charles C. Fuchs of Granite Springs, recently elected Republican State Committee woman. Mr. and Mrs. N. P. Tuttle are away on a week's motor trip through the western part of the slate.

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