february-2010

hemispheres.united.airlines

february-2010

HEMISPHERES

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Wellendorff has introduced another dimension... the feel.

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PHOTOGRAPH BY PETER FRANK EDWARDS

Feb.

AHHH....

Take a deep breath. Relax.

Prepare to embark on a tour

of the top spa packages in the world,

including Thailand’s renowned

S Medical Spa. (Sounds taxing,

doesn’t it?)

BY LAWRENCE OSBORNE

56

64

THERE WON’T BE BLOOD

Revered by some and condemned

by others, bullfi ghting is nothing

if not controversial. But can a more

humane, Velcro-tipped version of the

sport take off ? One Las Vegas promoter

hopes so. // BY EDWARD LEWINE

ILLUSTRATIONS BY SEAN MCCABE

68

THREE PERFECT DAYS: MONTREAL

This centuries-old city is

preserving its Old World fl avor

while nurturing a creative renaissance.

Breezing through its distinctive

neighborhoods off ers visitors a rich

taste of both. // BY MAURA EGAN

PHOTOGRAPHS BY PETER FRANK EDWARDS

contents

“ Uncover upscale boutiques and historic sites, often right

next door to each other, and breathe in the heady aroma of poutine,

Montreal’s signature dish.” 3PD | P. 68

UNITED.COM | HEMISPHERESMAGAZINE.COM

Parc du Mont-Royal YOUR COMPLIMENTARY COPY


FEBRUARY 2010 | UNITED.COM

10 Comments

departments

13 Voices Safety is United’s top

priority.

16 Connections United aims to give

you exactly what you want.

18 Wish You Were Here

DISPATCHES

21 Notes From All Over Alien designer

HR Giger is fêted in his native

Gruyères on the fi lm’s 30th

anniversary; Oahu’s waves are just

swell; a Vermont party goes to the

dogs; Magic: The Gathering casts

a spell on Rome; a Japanese town

takes recycling very seriously.

DIRECTIONS

27 News Where to stay, what to see,

when to go.

31 Goods

35 Whereabouts Nascar driver

Juan Pablo Montoya escapes to

tropical paradise.

36 Whirlwind Five hours in Old

San Juan, Puerto Rico

27

44

CULTURE

38 Sound On her latest album,

Charlotte Gainsbourg draws

inspiration from brain surgery.

By K. Leander Williams

40 Vision As the cultish TV

phenomenon enters its fi nal

season, experts weigh in on what it

all means. // By Matt Thompson

42 Print Scandinavian countries tend

to have low crime rates, but their

literary output most certainly

doesn’t. // By Mike Guy

44 Food & Drink British star chef

Heston Blumenthal rewrites the

recipe for roadside diner chain

Little Chef. // By Jay Cheshes

48 Industry By rolling out a new

model, the snazzy Kizashi,

Suzuki makes a run for the

front of the U.S. pack.

By Jonny Lieberman

50 Tech Wi-Fi Direct aims to

eliminate the need for wires,

Bluetooth and maybe even

hands. // By Alyssa Giacobbe

52 Hero Shaun Duvall forges

connections between Midwestern

farmers and their Mexican

employees. // By Joan Fischer

55 Artifact A souvenir from the fi eld

PLAY

87 Movies, television and audio

programming

98 Route Maps and Terminal

Diagrams

110 Crossword, sudoku and quiz

114 In Transit Who’s sitting next

to you?

115 Beverages & Food

COVER IMAGE

Natsko Seki // agencyrush.com

WRITE TO US:

Hemispheres.ed@ink-publishing.com

HEMISPHERES MAGAZINE

68 Jay St. Suite 315, Brooklyn, NY 11201

SUBSCRIBE TO HEMISPHERES

For a free subscription to our monthly

eMag and to access recent issues, go to

HEMISPHERESMAGAZINE.COM

40

FROM LEFT: PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, COURTESY OF JOHN SHORT


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FEBRUARY 2010 | UNITED.COM

10 comments

The Art of the Matter

We put a lot of thought into the look of Hemispheres, and readers are taking

notice. ALLISON MORRIS, who writes ShelfTalker, a blog about children’s books

for Publishers Weekly, was delighted to see the works of some of her favorite

illustrators in our November issue. In a recent post, she calls out “a clever,

colorful [cover] illustration that could only be the work of the incredibly talented

John Hendrix”; notes that Dispatches illustrator Graham Roumieu’s whimsical

imagery has provoked hours of laughter; and gives a shout-out to Whirlwind

illustrator Oliver Jeffers, “whose books are (all of them) beyond wonderful.”

Morris adds that she relishes “the chance to see the work of talented illustrators

like these on printed pages outside the world of (thank goodness we still have

them) books. Sightings of editorial art like this are fewer and fewer.”

BILL RICHARDS, editor of the magazine Inform: Architecture and Design in the Mid-

Atlantic, sent us an email saying that “Cover to cover...[Hemispheres] has some of

the best photography out there.” He goes on to praise our December issue: “It is

one of the best publications in the sky or on the ground. Substantive, timely and

engaging. What other infl ight magazine can go from the Mexican art dynamo

Gabriel Orozco to women’s boxing in the same issue without skipping a beat?”

Meanwhile, over at hemispheresmagazine.com, more readers are sharing

their experiences in our comments sections, a practice we heartily endorse.

After a Korean university professor assigned executive editor Mike Guy’s feature

“Riding With Mr. Thong” (July 2009) to her students, many logged on to comment.

“I feel as if I adventured in Vietnam with Mr. Thong and the writer,” says one.

Another advises, “Warning: after you fi nish reading, you might yield to the

temptation to visit Vietnam.” Yet another notes simply, “I can feel the beauty of

the landscape through this article.”

?

WHAT DO YOU THINK?

WRITE TO US! Hemispheres.ed@ink-publishing.com

HEMISPHERES MAGAZINE 68 Jay St. Suite 315, Brooklyn, NY 11201

Contributors

LAWRENCE OSBORNE

Osborne’s experiences

in Bangkok, from eating

street food to indulging

in spa treatments (page

56), were the subject

of his memoir Bangkok

Days, which was on

The New York Times’

list of the top 10 travel

books of 2009. Next up

for him is a book titled

The Wet and the Dry.

“It’s about drink culture

worldwide,” he says.

“Gulp.”

NATSKO SEKI

A Tokyo native and

graduate of London’s

Central Saint Martins

College of Art & Design,

Seki has done work for

Louis Vuitton Japan,

Yahoo! Japan, The

Guardian and The New

York Times. On the

cover of Hemispheres

this month, she

captures the essence

of Montreal, of which

she says “I haven’t been

yet, but I’d love to go.”

JONNY LIEBERMAN

The car fanatic loves

the Kizashi (page 48)

but declares, “The

greatest car ever made

is the Citroen SM.”

Lieberman writes for

Autoblog but says

his “real job” is being

a member of the 24

Hours of LeMons

Supreme Court—the

governing body of

an endurance race in

which all cars must

cost less than $500.

HEMISPHERES

EDITOR IN CHIEF Aaron Gell

EXECUTIVE EDITOR Mike Guy

ASSOCIATE EDITORS Adam K. Raymond,

Layla Schlack

ART DIRECTOR Rob Hewitt

DESIGNER Ellie Clayman

PHOTO EDITOR Erin Giunta

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Jane Black, Jason Gay, Alyssa Giacobbe

Sarah Horne, Edward Lewine,

Grant Stoddard, Matt Thompson

CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS

Claire Benoist, Spencer Heyfron,

John Lawton, Graham Roumieu

EDITORIAL INTERN

Lizbette Ocasio-Russe

EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Michael Keating

U.S. EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Orion Ray-Jones

INK PUBLISHING, 68 Jay Street,

Suite 315, Brooklyn, NY 11201

TEL: +1 347-294-1220 FAX: +1 917-591-6247

Hemispheres.ed@ink-publishing.com

hemispheresmagazine.com

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CEO Jeffrey O’Rourke

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PUBLISHING DIRECTOR Simon Leslie

HEMISPHERES is produced monthly by

Ink Publishing. All material is strictly copyright

and all rights are reserved. No part of this

publication may be reproduced in whole or part

without the prior written permission of the

copyright holder. All prices and data are correct

at the time of publication. Opinions expressed

in HEMISPHERES are not necessarily those of the

Publisher or United Airlines, and United Airlines

does not accept any responsibility for

advertising content. Any images are supplied

at the owner’s risk. Any mention of United

Airlines or the use of United Airlines logo by

any advertiser in this publication does not imply

endorsement of that company or its products or

services by United Airlines.


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PHOTOGRAPH BY UNITED AIRLINES CREATIVE SERVICES

United’s top safety offi cer Michael Quiello talks about the foundation of the airline’s business

—a proactive and uncompromised approach to safety and security // BY STEPHEN LEE

MICHAEL QUIELLO IS passionate about

safety. It’s obvious in the way he talks

about it. Analyzing a continuous stream

of data with his team is in many ways

a highly technical process, but Quiello

sees his mission in very human terms:

ensuring the well being of United’s

customers and employees—every day

and on every fl ight.

“Whether in the air or on the ground,

our number one priority is keeping

our customers and our people safe,”

Quiello says. “It is the foundation of

everything we do.” It’s a point Quiello

often reinforces in his conversations

with fellow executives, his team and

United’s employees at the many airports

he frequently visits.

HEMISPHERESMAGAZINE.COM | FEBRUARY 2010

voices 13

Always With

a Safety Mindset

“We know our customers want an

airline that is safe and on time,” he

says. “In 2009, we executed extremely

well in on-time performance, ranking

fi rst among the major network carriers

according to preliminary industry

statistics, but never at the expense of

safety. We know it can be frustrating if a

fl ight is delayed because of a mechanical

issue with the aircraft, but the bottom

line is there is no such thing as a

successful on-time departure unless it’s

a safe departure. We trust our captains’

judgment implicitly.”

A former commercial airline captain

himself, Quiello received his pilot’s

license at age 17 and is qualifi ed to fl y

everything from gliders and sea planes

to most major airliners. “I’ve loved

aviation all my life, including building

model planes and rockets. I guess I’ve

gone from balsa wood and tissue paper

to the majestic Boeing 777.”

After obtaining a degree in civil

engineering, he was commissioned as

an offi cer in the Marine Corps, where he

served as a jet pilot. Quiello, who has 28

years of experience in the commercial

aviation industry, joined United in

January 2009 as vice president of

Corporate Safety, Security, Quality and

Environment. Quiello has a polished

and easygoing nature, not unlike an

Ivy League professor in his dress and

demeanor, but his commitment to

continuous improvement, training and


14

FEBRUARY 2010 | UNITED.COM

voices

communication is intense.

As refl ected in his relatively long

title, another of Quiello’s and his team’s

responsibilities is aviation security,

which requires close coordination with

the Federal Aviation Administration

(FAA), the Transportation Security

Administration (TSA) and other

regulatory agencies, both U.S.-based

and international. He has served on a

number of national boards, including

the Air Transport Association’s safety

committee and the executive committee

of the Flight Safety Foundation.

One recent challenge for United and

all airlines was posed by the additional

security measures implemented by

the TSA in late December. “Our teams,

especially at our international airports,

really rose to the challenge of not

only meeting the TSA’s requirements,

but maintaining our focus on safety,

customer service and the integrity of

our operations,” he says with pride,

“an accomplishment that’s even more

noteworthy given the high volume of

customers we serve at that time of year.”

United worked tirelessly throughout

that period to help develop the industry’s

position. The key, according to Quiello,

is not only meeting the security

requirements, but ensuring that the

safeguards are implemented with a

sensitivity to the impact on the millions

of customers that United, and all airlines,

serve every year. He also points out

that while commercial airlines compete

for the fl ying public’s business, they

collaborate on issues related to safety and

security. “We all learn from incidents

no matter where they happen and

work diligently with the TSA and other

regulatory agencies around the world to

focus our eff orts on the best interests of

the public,” he notes.

Quiello emphasizes that United is

intensely focused on the day-to-day

safety of its employees, which requires

a highly regimented approach, with the

ultimate goal of providing customers

safe travel around the clock.

SAFETY AT EVERY TURN A United pilot performs a visual inspection of the

aircraft as one of numerous standardized prefl ight safety procedures.

“Safety is truly the responsibility

of every employee at United—from

our customer service representatives

to our fl ight crews—and we expend

considerable resources to provide the

support, tools and training our people

need to create the safest possible work

environment,” he says.

United’s pilots, for example, receive

world-class training, including

recurrent sessions with state-of-theart

fl ight simulators that re-create

everything from adverse weather to

complex emergencies. They also follow

rigorous and standardized prefl ight

safety procedures. When customers

look out the plane’s window and see a

pilot walking around the aircraft, for

example, they’re observing a standard

“The bottom line is there is no such thing as a successful

on-time departure, unless it’s a safe departure.”

visual inspection process in which the

captain or fi rst offi cer makes a fi nal

evaluation of the fuselage, engines and

landing gear.

As part of the safety team onboard

the aircraft, United’s fl ight attendants

vigilantly monitor the cabin to ensure

compliance with FAA regulations as well

as to identify any potential concerns.

“United’s maintenance teams are

highly skilled veteran technicians who

focus on our fl eet twenty-four hours a

day, seven days a week,” Quiello notes.

“And we have teams of mechanics that

take care of our ground equipment,

loading bridges and the airport lobby and

gate areas as well. Safety doesn’t begin

when a person boards our aircraft; it

begins when they enter the airport itself.”

The airline’s ground employees

who load baggage and cargo, as well as

skillfully guiding the planes into and

out of the gates, are also well trained to

carefully steer their equipment in the

midst of the very busy and crowded

environments that all major airports

represent. “The handling of our aircraft

is a highly orchestrated operation,”

Quiello explains. “We want to ensure our

employees remain injury free, and it’s

also important not to damage the aircraft

in any way, even if it’s just a slight bump.

If the aircraft needs to be taken out of

service for repair, it impacts operations

and therefore customers.

“No pun intended, but great safety

performance is no accident,” Quiello

says, without cracking a smile. “We have

in place an entire Safety Management

System that ensures all safety regulations

and policies are understood and followed,”

he goes on. “At the core of the system

is identifying and mitigating

potential risks well before

they become an issue.” Under

Quiello’s leadership, rather than

reacting to incidents, United takes a

predictive approach using current data

not only to improve safety performance,

but the overall performance of the

operations as well.

“The FAA monitors our safety

compliance, of course, but we

continuously self-audit and hold

ourselves and our regional United

Express and Star Alliance partner

airlines accountable beyond IOSA

standards,” he adds, referring to

the International Air Transport

Association’s Operational Safety Audit

standards, the world’s most stringent.

“The job is never complete when it

comes to the safety and security of our

customers and employees,” Quiello

adds. “There are only starting points. It

is all about continuous improvement.

As an airline, safety represents our most

profound responsibility, and we take it

very, very seriously.”

PHOTOGRAPH BY UNITED AIRLINES CREATIVE SERVICES


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FEBRUARY 2010 | UNITED.COM

16 connections

Just the Way

You Like It

United offers options that enable you

to tailor your travel experience.

ON ANY GIVEN DAY, more than 200,000 travelers take to the sky with United and

United Express. And like the snowfl akes so common in February, no two customers

are exactly alike.

The reasons we travel are as varied as the places we go.

Everyone wants transportation that is safe, clean and dependable. Many travelers

want more. For the family of four visiting grandparents for Presidents’ Day weekend,

the option to buy a fresh infl ight snack is a great convenience. The tall gentleman

crossing the Atlantic values added legroom. The businesswoman racing through

the airport to catch an early fl ight home appreciates the ability to get work done in a

United Red Carpet Club.

And because our customers have many reasons to fl y, United off ers options that

enable travelers to tailor the travel experience.

Want to move more quickly through the airport? There’s a Travel Option by

United SM for that. Want to stretch your legs? There’s a Travel Option for that:

Economy Plus®. Close to reaching a Mileage Plus reward level and want to earn a

few extra miles on this trip? There’s a Travel Option for that too.

We know that just because you and the customer seated next to you bought tickets

for the same fl ight doesn’t mean you’re looking for the same experience.

Visit united.com/traveloptions

POLAR ROUTES

For two decades, United

employee and retiree volunteers

have taken more than 3,000

disadvantaged and ill children

and their families on Fantasy

Flights to the North Pole.

Our special guests are

welcomed aboard our holidaythemed

aircraft, where games,

gifts and snacks await. After

a short “fl ight” to the North

Pole—and no, we’re not telling

where it is!—the children

meet Santa Claus for hours of

Christmas cheer.

United employees and

retirees work together during

their free time for several

months each year planning

the Fantasy Flights and raising

money to buy gifts for the kids

who attend.

During the 2009 holiday

SERVICES

season, children and their

families took fl ight in Chicago,

Denver, San Francisco,

CREATIVE

Washington, Los Angeles,

Cleveland, Pittsburgh, Buenos

Aires and Sydney.

AIRLINES

Choirs, clowns, SpongeBob,

Spider-Man and Tinker Bell

UNITED

have been known to make

BY

appearances. But the best

part of the show is seeing the

smiles on the faces of children

enjoying very happy holidays. PHOTOGRAPHS


POSITANO, ITALY // PHOTOGRAPH BY DAVID CICCONI


WHEN THE MOON HITS YOUR EYE

A perfect night begins on the Mediterranean coast.

HEMISPHERESMAGAZINE.COM | FEBRUARY 2010

wish you were here

19


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Gruyères, Switzerland

Party

Monster

A town throws a fête for its

most famous son, surrealist HR Giger.

(Aliens welcome.)

ILLUSTRATIONS BY GRAHAM ROUMIEU

HEMISPHERESMAGAZINE.COM | FEBRUARY 2010 22010

dispatches

NOTES FROM FROM ALL ALL OVER

OVER

JUST UP THE HILL from the idyllic train station in

this tidy Swiss village is a collection of the most

ghastly creatures ever seen. To fi nd them, one walks

1.2 miles through placid green pastures and past

aromatic cheese dairies churning out the town’s

namesake product. And then there it is, looming

over the postcard-perfect burg like a sentinel, the

stately Chateau St. Germain, now home to a museum

dedicated to a local artist.

While the area might seem better suited to soothing

pastoral watercolors, the artwork spread over the

stone walls and through the shadowy corridors of the

chateau is a mite darker: the world’s biggest collection of paintings, sculptures and set designs by Swiss

surrealist HR Giger, the creator of the toothy, slime-dripping star of the Alien trilogy and other terrorinducing

beasts.

Not only was it 30 years ago in April that Giger received the Academy Award for his Alien monster

(which, having burst out of John Hurt’s chest during dinner, instantly became the global symbol of

indigestion), but it also happens that the artist turns 70 this month. So the town of Gruyères decided to

celebrate with a yearlong party at the chateau’s HR Giger Bar, around the corner from the museum.

Beneath a low ceiling made from interlinked skeletons, a line of patrons waits by the dark bar. Then,

drinks in hand, they sit in bone-themed chairs that Giger built for a never-produced version of Dune and

study the Giger ghouls affi xed to the walls.

“Sometimes Mr. Giger will visit to pay respects to his people,” a bartender says. Not tonight, alas.

Director Oliver Stone is in the house, though. Sipping a club soda, he admires a particularly ghastly

demon. “A few decades from now, when they talk about the twentieth century,” he muses, “they will

think of Giger.”—SHARON MCDONNELL

21


FEBRUARY 2010 | UNITED.COM

22 dispatches

Oahu, Hawaii

DOING THE WAVE

At 6 a.m. on December 8,

dawn breaks on the north

shore of Oahu to the steady

cadence of 50-foot waves

pounding the beach. Boom...

boom... As a salty

mist hangs in the air over

Waimea Bay like cotton

candy, practically every

big-wave surfer alive is

lugging his or her long board

across the sand to compete

in one of the sport’s most

esteemed and infrequent

events: The Quiksilver in

Memory of Eddie Aikau, or

“The Eddie.”

One prominent invitee is

three-time world champion

Andy Irons. Having just

emerged from the water after

a 45-minute session, his eyes

are aglow with adrenaline.

“There are way more world

champions than there are

winners of the Eddie,” he

says. “They don’t hold it very

often, so I’m just happy to get

the invite.”

Named after late Hawaiian

surfi ng legend Eddie Aikau,

the Eddie has taken place

just eight times since its

debut 25 years ago. The

rules stipulate that waves

must reach a minimum of

30 feet for organizers to even

consider making the call.

This year, the extraordinary

swell sent 40-foot-high

walls of terror hurtling from

the Bering Sea to Waimea.

Big-wave cowboys studying

satellite photos knew the

Eddie was on days before the

swell hit.

The world’s most fearless

surfer may be Greg Long, a

skinny, soft-spoken 24-yearold

from San Clemente,

California. Today, with the

surf hitting 60 feet with

regularity, Long rides waves

that could easily swallow him

whole. In the end, he bests his

hero, Kelly Slater. His win is

based on the size of the wave,

his position at “takeoff ” and

the potential consequences

if he’d wiped out (best not to

contemplate). The prize: a

gnarly $55,000 check.

“I’m humbled,” Long says

from the dais.

Irons, standing nearby,

nods in agreement. “Thanks,

Eddie,” he says. —JEFF MULL

St. Johnsbury, Vermont

Dog’s Day

Becky Hoyt’s path to Dog

Mountain began when her copy

of Dog Fancy magazine fell to

the fl oor, opening to an ad for a

dog party.

“I had just been thinking,

‘Darn, I want to take a vacation

with just my dog!’” Hoyt says.

Which is how she happens to fi nd herself on a

mountainside farm in St. Johnsbury with her retriever,

Sway, and hundreds of other revelers—Scotties,

bulldogs, and a 165-pound Great Dane named Max

among them—who’ve gathered for artist Stephen

Huneck’s twice-yearly celebration of man’s best friend.

The forest around the mountain is lit with blazing

autumn colors. Dozens of dogs splash in the pond and

chase sticks, tennis balls and one another around the

farm in wild packs. They burst through the door of the

gallery where Huneck sits.

Gwen, his wife, edges past a Bernese mountain dog.

“There’s delicious cake, everyone!” she calls out.

Huneck signs books of his dog-oriented woodcuts for

attendees. He points to a small wooden building nearby.

“I built a dog chapel for people to go and remember

their dogs that have passed,” he says.

Later in the day, there are contests: Best Dancer,

Best Kisser. Huneck crowns Sway and Hoyt, both

strawberry blondes, Most Lookalike Couple.

A black lab noses a garbage can behind the barbecue

pit and tips it over. He plunges into a pile of hot dog

scraps. A permissive crowd watches until the pit master

shoos the dog—though not too fast. It is, after all,

his day.—LIZ LEYDEN


FEBRUARY 2010 | UNITED.COM

24 dispatches

Rome

STRANGE MAGIC

Late one night in Rome,

Marijn Lybaert is fi ghting

for his life. Down two games

to one, he is low on mana

and fending off a blistering

attack from Great Sable Stags

and Goblin Ruinblasters.

At stake: a prize of $45,000

and the title of World

Champion of Magic: The

Gathering, a role-playing

card game that might be

described as baseball card

collecting meets Lord of the

Rings. Camera crews eddy

around his table—the game

is being broadcast live to

a packed convention hall

mere steps away from the

Roman Colosseum—as a

pair of hushed announcers

speculate as to Lybaert’s next

move. His opponent plays

a card (a Bloodbraid Elf!),

Kamikatsu, Japan

Waste Not

and Lybaert blinks, stunned.

After months of rigorous

preparation, three harrowing

days and 18 competitive

matches in which the

original 409 contenders were

winnowed down to an elite

eight, he’s out.

For many people, Magic

cards are—along with Sailor

Moon, EverQuest and Jolt

Cola—part of a pantheon of

departed 1990s adolescent

geekery. But for an exclusive

set of diehard fans around

the world like Lybaert, they

are central to a still vital

subculture.

“I’ve made a lot of

friends playing in Magic

tournaments,” says the

24-year-old Belgian

architecture student, who

looks like a cross between

When it comes to trash, Japan is famously fastidious. Every household divides its

waste into three categories: burnable, nonburnable and recyclable. However, the

art of taking out the trash is elevated to a sublime level in the village of Kamikatsu,

where townspeople divide their refuse into no fewer than 34 categories, ranging

from the plastic caps of soy sauce bottles to ballpoint pens, green tea containers

and wooden chopsticks.

This tiny hamlet on the mountainous island of Shikoku in southwest Japan is

expected to become the fi rst in the country—and indeed the world—to achieve

what it calls Zero Waste. Currently, every single item

of garbage is either recycled or incinerated. The 2,000

residents of Kamikatsu, who started the program six

years ago, have progressed enough that they expect to

eliminate the use of incinerators and reach Zero by 2020.

Kamikatsu’s rubbish revolution is organized at Zero

Waste Academy, on the outskirts of town, where trash

is separated by type. Each item has been painstakingly

washed and delivered here by the residents (the program

is voluntary), at which point seven academy staff

members sort it into perfect piles. Last year, 135 tons of

garbage were incinerated and 192 tons recycled.

“I came up with this as an obvious way to tackle an

environmental issue,” says Sonoe Fujii, the founding

director, pointing to his Zero Waste Chart. “I never

expected such a perfect system. And yes, everyone

cooperates.”—DANIELLE DEMETRIOU

Harry Potter and the Jonas

Brothers. “People from

Japan, Belgium, even the

United States.” And though

he concedes that he was too

depressed to hang out with

any of them after his loss,

he’s philosophical about the

experience. “I learn bits of

strategy at every tournament

I go to,” he says. At this

gathering, though, it wasn’t

any particular strategy that

beat him. “When it comes

down to it,” Lybaert says, “the

other guy was just lucky with

his card draws.”

—MATT THOMPSON


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PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

news

HEMISPHERESMAGAZINE.COM | FEBRUARY 2010

directions

WHERE TO STAY / WHAT TO SEE / WHEN TO GO

Cut and Pasted

Long, long before we posted pictures to Facebook and Flickr, a lot went into taking

a photograph. But that didn’t stop some Victorian aristocrats from manipulating

them and occasionally making collages that incorporated watercolors to fantastical effect.

New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art has gathered some 55 of these little-known

pieces in “Playing with Pictures: The Art of Victorian Photocollage.” No Photoshop required.

metmuseum.org

27


28

WE WANT M.O.A.R. // Last year, New York hotel The Marcel at Gramercy redefi ned “hotel

cool” when it brought in a “Tattoo Artist in Residence,” a celebrity inker named Mister

Cartoon. The hotel is taking its commitment to edgy art a step further with the launch of

M.O.A.R. (Marcel Original Art on Rotation) this month. The fi rst artist to have his work shown

will be, well, Mister Cartoon. Don’t miss out on his graffi ti-like stylings. hotelmarcelnewyork.com

SWEET SPOT // The

Morton Arboretum

outside Chicago turns

its attention from

trees to chocolate this

month. Valentine’s

Day dinner and

brunch, chocolate

facials and various

exhibits about the

history of cacao

processing celebrate

everyone’s favorite

treat. Brave parents

can bring kids to the

Candy Garden to

explore Gumdrop Pass

and Marshmallow

Mountain. mortonarb.org

BARGAIN IN BANGOK // When planning a

trip to Bangkok, consider reserving

accommodations in the center of things

(trust us, a long ride home in a tuk-tuk

gets old fast). The Grand Hyatt Erawan

meets that requirement—it’s walking

distance from temples, palaces and

markets—and it also features one the

city’s best authentic Italian restaurants.

Don’t worry, there’s Thai cuisine, too.

The best part? This month, rooms are

20 percent off. bangkok.grand.hyatt.com

THE ROADS LESS TRAVELED // Those who have

trouble sticking to the tourist attractions will appreciate

a new series of travel books making its debut next

month. The Back Roads books, published by DK

Eyewitness Travel, comprise guides to Italy, France,

Great Britain, Ireland and Spain and come complete

with pull-out maps to make sure you don’t go off course

while going, er, off course. us.dk.com

CALENDAR

FEBRUARY

6-16

VENICE // While many cities

hold a Carnival, only this

one plays out like a 10-day

Cirque du Soleil, with masked

performers taking over the

city. carnevale.venezia.it

12-13

PHOENIX // Hoop it up at the

Heard Museum’s 20th Annual

World Championship Hoop

Dance. heard.org

19-21

MADRID // One of Europe’s

premiere art fairs, ARCOmadrid,

focuses on work from a

different country every year.

This time around, they’ve

narrowed it down to one city:

Los Angeles. ifema.es

26-28

NORCIA, ITALY // Indulge your

inner gourmand at the Black

Truffl e Fair, where the beloved

fungus can be found on just

about everything. norcia.net

MARCH

9-14

BIRMINGHAM, ENGLAND //

Smile for the birdie at the

100th All England Open

Badminton Championship.

badmintonengland.co.uk

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF HOTEL MARCEL, BY MARCO DI LAURO/GETTY IMAGES, BY IAN KINGTON/AFP/GETTY

IMAGES, COURTESY OF ROUGH GUIDES, COURTESY OF HYATT HOTELS & RESORTS, BY CREATIVE CROP/GETTY IMAGES


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FEBRUARY 2010 | UNITED.COM

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The Places I Go:

Juan Pablo Montoya

“WHEN I WAS RACING WITH FORMULA ONE,

one of my favorite cities was Singapore.

The weather there is really nice and the

shopping is great, but if I really wanted

to relax I would go to Phuket, in Thailand.

There’s a hotel there called the Amanpuri,

and my family and I would rent a private

villa there right on the beach. Oh my God,

it is stupid nice.

“I used to live in Monaco, and I would have

to fl y twenty-eight or thirty hours to a

race. Now that I’m with Nascar and I live

in Miami, the fl ights are nice and short.

So even though my racing season runs

from February to November, I can actually

travel more for fun.

“We went to Aruba this year. It’s very

American now, but it’s still a great place

to spend a week, and for kids it’s good

because you have both a McDonald’s and

lots of really upscale restaurants. Also the

windsurfi ng is great. I love windsurfi ng,

but even in Miami, where I live, the water

is too cold for me.”

Juan Pablo Montoya races the No. 42 Target

Chevy in the Nascar Sprint Cup Series.

HEMISPHERESMAGAZINE.COM | FEBRUARY 2010

whereabouts

35


36

First things fi rst: souvenirs. Puerto Rican Art and Crafts (204 Fortaleza St.; puertoricanart-crafts.com)

has it all, from high-end ceramics to handmade jewelry. But what you want is a mask of a vejigante, the

clownlike characters that delight (and sometimes scare) crowds at Puerto Rican festivals. ( 0:20 )

Continue along Fortaleza Street until you arrive at Barrachina (104 Fortaleza St.; barrachina.com),

which claims to be the birthplace of the piña colada. Indulge yourself with an umbrella-adorned

glass, and then decide if you’d like to sample the mofongo (plantains fried with meat) or asopao (a

traditional meat and vegetable stew). You can’t go wrong. ( 1:30 )

Make your way to Cristo Street, where you’ll fi nd the Cathedral of San Juan Bautista (151–153 Calle

del Cristo; catedralsanjuan.com), the second-oldest cathedral in the western hemisphere. Built in

1521, the cathedral is both captivating and a little creepy (it contains the tomb of Spanish explorer

and Puerto Rico’s fi rst governor, Juan Ponce de Léon). ( 2:00 )

There’s no time for a swim, but you can take a gander at the shimmering Caribbean. Head to Plazuela de la

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a procession of cunning Catholic believers that scared off a British invasion in 1797. Divine. ( 2:30 )

Now it’s time for tunes. Puerto Rico prides itself on an eclectic array of genres, from the loud and

pounding reggaeton to the more traditional bomba, but at the Museo de Pablo Casals (101 San

Sebastián St.), it’s all about the cello. The founder of the Puerto Rico Symphonic Orchestra, Casals has

a legacy as big as the museum’s library of recordings. Go ahead, have a listen. ( 2:50 )

Walk down San Sebastian Street to Casa Blanca (1 San Sebastian St.) and poke around the magnifi cent

Ponce de Léon family home. Though Juan himself never lived here, his descendants did for more than

250 years. Now it’s a museum detailing the remarkable history of Puerto Rico’s fi rst fi rst family. ( 3:25 )

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FEBRUARY 2010 | UNITED.COM

Mind Games

After surviving a freak accident, Charlotte Gainsbourg

rebounds with an award at Cannes and a sultry new album

with Beck. BY K. LEANDER WILLIAMS

SITTING IN HER SUN-FILLED LOFT in Paris,

willowy, dark-eyed, 38-year-old

Charlotte Gainsbourg is happy to have

a little quiet time. It’s been a hard year.

“I would even say a traumatic one,”

she says in her dusky French accent,

recalling the brain injury she suff ered

while waterskiing. Even the award she

won at the Cannes International Film

Festival (for her role in the latest fi lm

by Danish provocateur Lars von Trier)

was hard-earned. Making the fi lm was

a painful experience. “It’s good to have it

behind me,” she says.

Gainsbourg expresses her pain clearly

on the title track of IRM, her new album.

The song’s shadowy rhythms swirl and

ping-pong beneath Gainsbourg’s voice

in a techno-pop simulation of the sound

of an MRI (the English translation of

IRM). “Analyze EKG,” she sings. “Can

you see a memory?” The album was

written and produced by Beck, and the

haunting track is a direct reference to

Gainsbourg’s own MRI and subsequent

brain surgery.

“IRM actually ended up having

two meanings,” says Gainsbourg, the

sound

daughter of English actress-singer

Jane Birkin and her musical Svengali,

the iconic crooner Serge Gainsbourg.

“Obviously, the accident frames

the initial meaning. But then as we

completed the record, it seemed to

me that both experiences were about

putting yourself in someone else’s

hands, allowing them to look inside

you. I hadn’t really written songs

before, so once Beck and I decided to

work together, I let him take the reins.

It was fascinating to watch him in the

studio, building tracks from the ground

up—one rhythm and instrument after

another.”

The time she spent in L.A. helped

her get acquainted with American

culture. “Beck’s lyrics contain images

from the blues and other American

references that I was unfamiliar with at

fi rst,” she says.

To start the new decade, Gainsbourg

is confronting one of her biggest fears:

She’s going on tour. “Frankly, it horrifi es

me,” she says with a smoky laugh. “The

extent of my performing experience

so far is doing two songs during one of

Air’s concerts,” she adds, referring to the

French lounge act. “I was scared to death,

but it made me wonder why I didn’t start

doing this at eighteen.”

Brooklyn writer K. LEANDER WILLIAMS

was never a fan of waterskiing.

ALSO THIS MONTH VLADIMIR HOROWITZ

SADE

What else to listen to

on the go in February

THE LEGENDARY

BERLIN CONCERT

SOLDIER OF LOVE

Chilling out is about

This newly remastered taking your time, one

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displays the her last album. The

fl eet-fi ngered piano singles off this edgy

master at his new release suggest

dynamic and her famed groove is as

mesmerizing best. smooth as ever.

MASSIVE ATTACK

HELIGOLAND

In trip-hop, time is

elastic, which may

explain how seven

years have passed

since MA’s last proper

release. The update is

a pulsating journey,

with vocals by Damon

Albarn, Hope Sandoval,

and Tunde Adebimpe.

PHOTOGRAPH COURTESY OF PAUL JASMIN (TOP)


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FEBRUARY 2010 | UNITED.COM

vision

Lost Horizons

How will ABC’s byzantine brain-scrambler wrap things up?

Hemispheres asked the experts. BY MATT THOMPSON // ILLUSTRATION BY SONIA ROY

AFTER FIVE INCREASINGLY convoluted

seasons of time travel, Egyptian

mythology and sweaty jungle hikes,

ABC’s Lost is fi nally set to resolve its

tangled web this winter. But despite

hours of Zapruderesque freeze-framing,

our total understanding of the knotty

narrative amounts to the following:

Kate Austen is played by Evangeline

Lilly. Fortunately, we were able to ask

Entertainment Weekly’s resident Lost expert,

Jeff Jensen, and popular Lost blogger

“Doctor Arzt” to lay odds on a few of the

most likely scenarios.

THEORY 1: THE GARDEN OF EDEN

The Idea: When Jack and Kate discover

a pair of skeletons on the island and

christen them “Adam and Eve,” they may

be on to something. Maybe the island

is actually the biblical Garden of Eden,

with the diabolical Smoke Monster

representing the angel meant to keep

us mortals out. Perhaps this is why the

Godlike Jacob has a nice biblical name?

Expert Opinion: Doctor Arzt is “totally

behind this possibility, in a purely

agnostic kind of way.” Jensen is skeptical,

saying bluntly, “I’m not a believer.”

The Odds: 108–1

THEORY 2: PANDORA’S BOX

The Idea: Maybe those bumbling dogooders

in the Dharma Initiative, the

shadowy organization that built the

island’s bunkers, accidentally released

a slew of spirits when attempting to tap

a pocket of electromagnetic energy. The

Others—another shadowy group—have

either been battling said ghosts or doing

their ghostly bidding ever since.

Expert Opinion: “Not implausible, but I

wish this theory explained the Others’

connection to the seemingly supernatural

Jacob,” Jensen muses.

The Odds: 23–1

THEORY 3: THE BIG GAME

The Idea: At the start of the Season 5

fi nale, the Others’ big boss, Jacob, shares a

beach with another mysterious immortal.

Though it’s assumed that the two are

archnemeses, what if the entire confl ict

of the series is merely a grand social

experiment conducted by bored gods?

Expert Opinion: Doctor Arzt is intrigued

but unconvinced. “There was defi nitely

a certain friendliness about their

conversation,” he says.

The Odds: 15–1

THEORY 4: THE BLANK SLATE

The Idea: All of that time-traveling may

have been for naught. When Juliet set off

the nuclear device at the bottom of the

mine shaft, she may have created a totally

new future, one in which the entire story

never unfolds! Perhaps the fi nal season

will consist of the characters going about

their normal lives as time attempts to

course-correct to their old reality.

Expert Opinion: “I love this idea,”

Doctor Arzt gushes. “Lost fans would be

completely disarmed.” Jensen echoes

the sentiment but adds a caveat: “Many

fans are worried that the ‘reboot’ theory

negates fi ve years’ worth of drama.”

The Odds: 4–1

Contributing writer MATT THOMPSON knows

the real answer...he’s just not telling.

PHOTOGRAPHS OF CHARACTERS BY ART STREIBER/COURTESY OF ABC


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42

FEBRUARY 2010 | UNITED.COM

print

Fear Factor

Scandinavia is full of mysteries. For instance, though it’s almost crime free,

it’s overfl owing with crime fi ction. Why? BY MIKE GUY // ILLUSTRATION BY BEN GIBSON

SCANDINAVIA IS CRAZY about crime. Norwegians

celebrate Easter with a tradition

known as Paaskekrim, which entails

reading murder mysteries and watching

detective shows. In Sweden a few years

ago, there were slightly fewer novels

about murder published (84) than actual

murders (91). In Iceland, the murder rate

is among the lowest in the world.

So why did Scandinavia become a

hotbed of top-shelf crime fi ction? Is

it the gloomy frostbitten winter? The

unrelenting insomniac summers?

Either way, Nordic crime fi ction—characterized

by fast-paced plotting, smart

writing and crackling atmospherics—is

creeping onto shelves crowded with

CSI-driven procedurals. Somehow,

the unabashedly literary tone of these

Nordic stories has captured our imaginations.

Mssrs. Cornwell and Connelly,

meet Stieg Larsson, Henning Mankell, Jo

Nesbø and Arnaldur Indridason.

The breakthrough Nordic hit is

Larsson’s Millennium trilogy, starting

with The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo.

Larsson, a prominent journalist, died

of a heart attack in 2004, before his

completed series saw the light of day, but

Dragon Tattoo along with sequels The Girl

Who Played with Fire (2009) and The Girl

Who Kicked the Hornet’s Nest (out in May in

the U.S.) have gone on to sell 20 million

“ I use the mirror of crime to look at the whole

society,” says Mankell. “I would never think

of writing a crime story for the sake of itself.”

copies. The trilogy’s success is surprising.

Centered on the travails of a sexy young

hacker, they are long, complex and slow-

paced—not exactly catnip for sleuth fans.

This month, the genre’s godfather,

Mankell, releases The Man from Beijing.

Opening with the discovery of a puzzling

multiple murder in a Swedish hamlet,

the story follows judge Birgitta Roslin

through a fascinating maze to China

and Africa. It’s part white-knuckler, part

historical fi ction and part exegesis

on colonialism.

“That’s a link that connects all of the

Scandinavian thrillers,” says Barbara

Fister, a Nordic crime afi cionado

at Gustavus Adolphus College in

Minnesota. “These societies spend a lot of

time contemplating social justice.”

Mankell, a 62-year-old Swedish icon,

has been churning out crime fi ction since

1977. “I use the mirror of crime to look at

the whole society,” he has said. “I would

never, ever think of writing a crime story

for the sake of itself.”

Other spring releases include

Norwegian writer Nesbø’s virtuosic The

Devil’s Star, due out in March, about a

brilliant alcoholic detective who follows

a serial killer to the top ranks of the

Oslo PD. And in May, Icelander Arnaldur

Indridason’s Arctic Chill mines similar

territory with the murder of a darkskinned

teenager. Stick around for the

surprising ending—nearly as surprising

as the way Scandinavian writers have

brought heat back to a tired genre.

Executive editor MIKE GUY has never seen CSI.


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44

FEBRUARY 2010 | UNITED.COM

Polishing Up a Greasy Spoon

Take a dowdy roadside diner (the U.K.’s Little Chef chain). Add one culinary mastermind

(Fat Duck chef Heston Blumenthal). Whisk together, then bring to a boil... // BY JAY CHESHES

FOR HALF A CENTURY, Fat Charlie, the

toque-wearing mascot of the Little

Chef restaurant chain, has been a

pudgy beacon for hungry truckers

and road-tripping families searching

for sustenance during long hauls at

the wheel. At its height in the 1980s,

the chain had a virtual monopoly on

roadside dining in Britain, with 330

outlets across the U.K. But due to

changes in eating habits and increased

competition, that number has dwindled

to 177. Modeled on American diners,

the restaurant’s sprawling menu was

known for its lowbrow British grub.

Massive breakfasts, served day and

night, were by far the most popular

items. Though the food was nothing to

swoon over, whether you were outside

of Manchester or just shy of Brighton, it

did a reliable job of fi lling you up.

So how to explain the mouthwatering

fare I discovered—red wine–braised ox

cheeks, steak with Béarnaise, mussels

fragrant with white wine and herbs—at

BURGERMEISTERS Popham cooks serve

revamped fi sh-and-chips and burgers.

food&drink

a Little Chef next to a gas station on the

A303 near the tiny hamlet of Popham?

And why were there Pop Rocks, black

olives and saff ron in the sweet custard

SHORT

trifl e I devoured for dessert?

Little Chef, it turns out, is growing up. JOHN

After being rescued from bankruptcy

OF

in 2007 by new owners, the chain

embarked on an unlikely experiment,

singling out a typical Little Chef

COURTESY

for public fl ogging on the national

airwaves. Producers for Britain’s

Channel 4 somehow convinced Heston

Blumenthal, the country’s most exalted PHOTOGRAPH


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FEBRUARY 2010 | UNITED.COM

46 food&drink

and imaginative chef—his acclaimed

Fat Duck restaurant outside London

has won three Michelin stars for such

outlandish dishes as snail porridge and

bacon-and-egg ice cream—to give their

down-at-the-heels Popham branch a

makeover. If the experiment succeeded,

they’d roll it out companywide. At the

very least, it’d make good television.

“They said, ‘Please, can you not

do any research?’” recalls the stocky

Blumenthal, in his usual chef whites,

when I catch up with him at the Hinds

Head, the classic pub he runs across

the street from the Fat Duck in Bray. “I

hadn’t set foot in a Little Chef in twenty

years. As I got more immersed in it, I

realized the enormity of the project.”

Throughout Europe, star chefs are

increasingly putting their stamp on

mass-market cuisine. Jamie Oliver is

reinventing school lunches, Ferran

Adrià is dabbling in fast food, and Joël

Robuchon is putting out canned soups

and sauces. The Little Chef experiment

is Blumenthal’s way of joining in.

Big Chef Takes On Little Chef aired last

January. On the pilot, Blumenthal had

to come to grips with a kitchen without

pots or pans—just a griddle, a deep fryer

and a microwave. The kitchen staff was

painfully unskilled. The dining room

was an embarrassing mess, with ripped

seats, peeling paint and stained carpets.

Ian Pegler, the fi nancial executive

enlisted to bring the chain back from the

brink (and a dead ringer for the Little

Chef mascot) seemed to be looking to

Blumenthal to pull off a miracle.

“There’s the world of cooking—my

world,” says Blumenthal, “and then

there’s Little Chef. It’s a diff erent

industry. The fact that they both

produce food is amazing.

“But look, sometimes I will eat a readymade

meal,” he adds. “And I defi nitely

appreciate the diff erence between a

really good one and a bad one.”

By the third episode, the project

looked to be on the verge of collapse.

Blumenthal and Pegler were butting

heads, and the chef seemed to fear the

whole scheme was nothing more than

a publicity stunt. “He didn’t trust me,”

recalls Pegler, sitting in a booth at the

Popham Little Chef. “But he didn’t know

me. And every time we’d meet we’d have

a camera or a microphone somewhere

After the Popham store makeover,

someone called asking if the airfi eld was

nearby—he wanted to fl y in for lunch.

between us.” Nonetheless, at the very

last minute, the new Blumenthal menu

made its splashy debut.

The Popham Little Chef was

thoroughly remodeled and now boasts

a spiff y new dining room with shiny

CLASSING UP THE JOINT The forlorn old Popham shop, left, and the spiffy Ab Rogers update

NOT-SO-FAST FOOD Scottish mussels with

toast points, from the new menu

white tiles and red-apple banquettes

courtesy of a Blumenthal pal, designer

Ab Rogers, whose work would

normally be beyond the franchise’s

reach. But the bigger change is what’s

on the plates. The eggs are now freerange,

the ground beef organic; there

are fresh herbs on the chicken and

Belgian chocolate in the pudding.

There are enough signature

Blumenthal fl ourishes—the trifl e with

Pop Rocks, for instance, and a fi sh-andchips

plate served with an atomizer that

unleashes chip-shop aromas (really

pickled onion juice)—that there’s no

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF JOHN SHORT (BOTTOM RIGHT, OPPOSITE)


THE LITTLE CHEF THAT COULD Popham suddenly

became the hottest spot in the middle of nowhere.

doubt the chef has left his mark.

Still, it’s clearly not the Fat Duck,

where a 13-course tasting menu will set

you back £150 a head. Far from it. Most

dishes remain under £10, and to ensure

chainwide consistency, the dishes, based

on Blumenthal recipes, are prepared

by food packagers and reheated to order

in hot water (a variation on the sous-vide

technique used by high-end restaurants).

Nonetheless, shortly after the

program aired, the Popham restaurant

became the hottest spot in the middle

of nowhere. The restaurant, which

doesn’t take reservations, began getting

calls from people looking to make one.

Celebrities popped in. “One day in the

same lunch hour,” says Blumenthal,

“you had pop star Suzi Quatro, Eric

Clapton and the bloke who played

Doctor Who all queuing up for a table.”

One fellow called asking how far the

restaurant was from the local airfi eld—

it’s directly across the street—because

he was planning to fl y in for lunch. “For

three or four months, business was up

eight hundred percent,” Pegler says.

Though the frenzy has subsided

somewhat, aftershocks continue. Little

Chef plans to transform fi ve more

branches in the next year. Blumenthal,

who may soon shoot a new program

building on the Big Chef premise

47

(working title: Michelin Impossible) in

which he tackles other big projects, is

in discussions with a grocery chain

to develop his own line of packaged

meals. Little Chef, in the end, may help

sustain the Fat Duck, his very tiny

and exorbitant-to-operate fl agship

restaurant, which employs a staff of

around 75 to serve just 44 diners.

“There comes a point,” the chef allows

with a smile, “you’ve got to try and get

some level of fi nancial security.”

JAY CHESHES has covered star chefs for

Fortune and W. He’d happily devour

anything Heston Blumenthal cooked.

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48 industry

The Suzuki Method

There are few things as topsy-turvy as the U.S. auto industry today.

Which is why something called a Kizashi, a new sedan from Suzuki—yes,

Suzuki—might actually get some traction. // BY JONNY LIEBERMAN

GO AHEAD AND try to name the bestselling

car in Japan. Honda Accord?

Toyota Camry? Nope. It’s the Suzuki

Wagon R, which you’ve probably never

heard of and most certainly never seen.

In fact, not only has the diminutive

Wagon R been Japan’s top car for fi ve

consecutive years, Suzuki has built over

three million of them—huge numbers

for the island nation. Suzuki sold over

$30 billion worth of product in 2008—

manufacturing 3.5 million motorcycles

and ATVs and 2.3 million cars. In the

rapidly expanding Indian megamarket,

Suzuki controls nearly 50 percent of

the passenger car segment. Impressive

numbers, no doubt, especially

considering the company’s struggles to

get a toehold in the United States.

The last time a Suzuki generated any

noise in the U.S. was way back in 1988,

when Consumer Reports stated that the

tiny off -roading Suzuki Samurai liked

to roll over. While Suzuki disagreed

with CR’s fi ndings (to say the least), the

damage was done. Like the Corvair,

which had a poor safety record, and the

Audi 5000, which was alleged by 60

Minutes to accelerate without warning,

the Samurai—and by extension

Suzuki—had what a publicist might

call “an image problem.” Turns out

Americans aren’t so keen on driving

THRILL RIDE

What’s so great

about the Kizashi,

anyway?

cars they perceive to be unsafe, no

matter the actual facts. (The Corvair

was eventually made safer before it was

discontinued. The Audi 5000, it turned

out, worked just fi ne, and 60 Minutes

retracted its story.)

THE DASHING KIZASHI IS SURPRISINGLY EASY ON THE EYES. It may not

be a bite-the-back-of-your-hand stunner, but considering that

it competes against vehicles often described as “appliances,” its

tight, sporty lines, solid, confi dent feel on the road, and chrome

detailing set it well apart from the pack. Suzuki has grafted its

considerable motorcycle know-how onto the car, creating a

highly responsive suspension (tuned on the world’s toughest

tracks, like the famed Nürburgring in Germany), surprisingly

precise steering, and a 2.4-liter, six-speed engine that punches

the air. Very little about this sportster says “basic.”

PHOTOGRAPHS COURTESY OF AMERICAN SUZUKI MOTOR CORP.


While baby boomers snapped up Camrys

and Accords, Suzuki believes their kids may be

ready for an alternative.

Although Suzuki continued to sell

cars in the U.S. after the Samurai debacle,

the models were dull and forgettable

(heard anyone bragging about their

Aerio lately?). Then in 2006, it released

the SX4, a small, smart, sensible car

codesigned with Fiat, which came fully

loaded and with all-wheel drive for

just under $20,000. Jaded automotive

pundits murmured their approval,

but Suzuki wanted them shouting the

brand’s gospel from the rooftops. For

that they’d need a great car. Enter the

2010 Kizashi, a midsize sedan that’s

going to sell for less than other cars in its

class. It might just be a game changer for

the automaker.

The U.S. automotive scene is

always in fl ux. A generation ago, half

of Americans were as devoted as

golden retrievers to “The General,”

a.k.a. General Motors. Imports were

for hippies, eccentrics and rich dudes

with multiple ex-wives. Today, Toyota

is jockeying with Volkswagen for the

title of world’s largest automaker, while

GM struggles to fi nd its way out of an

onerous bankruptcy. Likewise, Chrysler,

emerging from Chapter 11 itself, was

recently supplanted by Honda as the

nation’s fourth-largest automaker.

While brand loyalty still plays a role

in car purchases, at the end of the day,

Americans are after a good deal. Which

explains why Hyundai just built its one

millionth car in North America, and why

the company’s luxury fl agship Genesis

was named 2009 North American Car

of the Year. Up is down, black is white.

So can Suzuki pull a Hyundai? Reilly

Brennan, editor-in-chief of AOL Autos,

thinks so. “Suzuki is an underachiever

in America,” he says. “If they can inject

what they do in motorcycles into their

car lineup, they have the makings of a

product renaissance. The Kizashi moves

them in the right direction.”

Roughly translated from Japanese,

Kizashi means “great thing coming.”

While it may not trip off the tongue, the

name is as bold a statement as the car

itself. This stylish four-door is aimed

straight at the heart of the American

car market—meant to compete with

powerhouses like the Camry, Accord,

Chevrolet Malibu and Ford Fusion, all

hugely successful cars backed by the

biggest nameplates in the business.

It will also be competing with very

competent midsize family sedans from

the likes of Nissan, Mazda, Subaru and

Hyundai. If all goes according to Suzuki’s

plan, even people looking at Acuras and

Audis might instead opt for a Kizashi.

The challenge is akin to selling denim

against Levi’s and Wrangler.

It’s not going to be easy. As Todd

Lassa, an analyst for Motor Trend, points

out, “Suzuki’s push for North America

ran smack into the worst automotive

market since the Great Depression.”

However, the Kizashi is a good starting

point, he adds, because the price is

right. Fully loaded, it costs a full

$10,000 less than the Camry—an

important discrepancy in a time of 10

percent unemployment.

In December, VW purchased a 20

percent stake in Suzuki—a direct bid to

tap into its massive share of the Indian

market. But, Lassa says, it’s also a way

for Suzuki to grow in the U.S. “I think

VW wants to foster Suzuki’s success in

America,” he says. “And the long-term

plan will likely mean building Suzukis—

including the Kizashi—at VW’s new

assembly plant in Tennessee.”

VW also senses that Suzuki is picking

up on a demographic shift and wants

to capitalize on it. While baby boomers

drove Camrys and Accords, Suzuki

believes their kids may be ready for an

alternative.

“We really wanted to move the brand

upscale,” says American Suzuki’s Jeff

Holland. “If we’ve done everything right,

the Kizashi will be a sharp contrast to

past Suzuki off erings in that category.”

It’s a risky move, especially

considering that Suzuki seems to

be wagering all its chips on this one

model. (Suzuki hasn’t announced the

development of any new products for

the U.S. after the Kizashi.) But as bets go,

you could do worse.

L.A.-based writer JONNY LIEBERMAN used

the Suzuki Method to learn the fl ute.

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FEBRUARY 2010

50 tech

Out of the Blue

A new technology called Wi-Fi Direct aims to

put wires—and Bluetooth—on the great technological

scrap heap. BY ALYSSA GIACOBBE // ILLUSTRATION BY GRACIA LAM

TO MANY, BLUETOOTH conjures images of

unwieldy earpieces and loud talkers.

But when the technology was developed

in the mid-’90s, it was meant to have a

much broader application than handsfree

chatting. Bluetooth was supposed to

eliminate not only the wires connecting

cell phones to ear buds but those

passing between all the other electronic

devices in our lives: computers,

cameras, headphones, robotic dogs.

As those knots of plastic spaghetti

under our desks plainly demonstrate,

it never happened. The problem is

Bluetooth’s slow transfer rate and

limited range, which render it too

weak for many applications. That’s left

the world with some decent wireless

keyboards and mice, but the vast

majority of electronics have remained

tethered to each other like huskies at the

Iditarod. Until now.

Wi-Fi Direct, a new technology

poised to replace both Bluetooth and

wires once and for all, was recently

announced by the Wi-Fi Alliance—an

Austin, Texas–based trade group that

manages the wide world of wireless and

includes such industry heavyweights as

Intel, Apple and Microsoft. It will allow

wireless devices to connect to and share

data with one another without the use

of a common server or network.

TECH WATCH

More news from the

cutting edge

This addition to prolifi c

deal-a-day website

Woot allows users to

submit bargains, which

are then voted on by

other users. Think of

it as a Digg for deals,

and the best place to

fi nd a chicken-shaped

slingshot for 96 cents.

deals.woot.com

What’s more, Wi-Fi Direct will be easy

to use, operating on a peer-to-peer basis

and requiring only a simple software

update. “What we’ve done is applied

garden-variety Wi-Fi technology to

enable two client devices to talk to one

another, print a picture, share a video

game or display something on a fl atscreen

TV,” says Kelly Davis-Felner,

marketing director at Wi-Fi Alliance,

adding that only one device, whether it’s

your PlayStation or your printer, needs

the software. That device will be able

to automatically detect and sync with

The vast majority of

electronics have remained

tethered to each other

like huskies at the Iditarod.

Until now.

others within a 300-foot range. Built-in

security measures would prevent you

from unwittingly sharing intimate

photos of your honeymoon with the guy

two laptops down at Starbucks.

In development for a year, Wi-Fi

Direct should be everywhere by

the middle of 2010. Tech bloggers,

meanwhile, are already hailing it as the

Bluetooth we never knew. “Farewell,

Bluetooth,” wrote Gizmodo’s Jesus Diaz.

“It was not a pleasure to meet you.”

ALYSSA GIACOBBE isn’t wearing a wireless

headset. She’s talking to herself.

DEALS.WOOT CAN’T YOU SEE I’M BUSY

Bosses don’t like their

employees playing

games, but everyone

needs a break now and

then. This devious site

hides addictive time

killers inside cleverly

disguised spreadsheets.

Who says “busy” means

busy working?

cantyouseeimbusy.com

WALK JOG RUN

Looking for a new

route to walk, jog or

run? This website and

its iPhone app allow

users to plot their own

exercise paths in cities

around the world and

try out new ones plotted

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52 hero

WHO • SHAUN DUVALL, 55

Building Bridges

Shaun Duvall helps Midwestern farmers

and their Mexican-born employees understand one another.

BY JOAN FISCHER // PHOTOGRAPH BY JONATHAN CHAPMAN

MISSION • To deepen cultural understanding and provide hands-on support to dairy farmers and their Mexican employees in

Wisconsin, Iowa and Minnesota. Farmers and workers are in a mutually benefi cial relationship, Duvall says, but problems

sometimes arise in rural communities that are unaccustomed to large infl uxes of newcomers. In the late 1990s, Duvall

started Puentes (meaning “Bridges”) to teach English to farmworkers and Spanish to their employers, as well as to provide

interpreting and support services—everything from arranging doctor visits to helping fi gure out bills. Later she began

taking agricultural professionals on annual 10-day “cultural immersion trips” to villages in Mexico where the farmers stay

with workers’ families. Duvall knew something special was happening on their fi rst trip when she watched a strapping

dairy farmer take the hand of two-year-old Lydia, the daughter of one of his workers. The toddler was the reason her

father was in the United States—and the farmer, as his employer, was helping give Lydia a better life. On the Mexican side,

the families were touched that a patron, an employer, would take the time to visit.

MOTIVATION • “Changing hearts and minds,” Duvall says. “Encouraging people to become more understanding and

compassionate.” Of course, it’s also pretty fl attering to be called “angel de los Mexicanos,” a nickname that makes her blush.

IN HER SPARE TIME • Duvall enjoys running, though she calls it “plodding.” (So far, she’s plodded through two marathons.) She’s

also planning to write a book about Puentes.

HOW TO HELP • Duvall urges people to learn Spanish if they don’t already know it and reach out to non-English-speakers in

their area. For more information, visit puentesbridges.org.


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Perhaps p better known for its poutine, p , Montreal is secretly yhome

to a delicious elicious variety of petite bagels. St-Viateur and Fairmount bakeries churn

them out piping hot.

P.

68

PHOTOGRAPH APH BY CLAIRE BENOIST

HEMISPHERESMAGAZINE.COM | FEBRUARY 2010

artifact

FEATURES

56

AHHH...

A visit to

Bangkok’s famed

S Medical Spa

By Lawrence

Osborne

64

THERE WON’T

BE BLOOD

A new type of

bullfi ght spares

the bull.

By Edward Lewine

68

3PD: MONTREAL

See Canada’s feisty

Francophone gem.

By Maura Egan

55


1. THE SPA AT FOUR

SEASONS RESORT

BORA BORA

BORA BORA, FRENCH

POLYNESIA // Part of a

chain of tiny islands in the

South Pacifi c, Bora Bora

brings new meaning to

getting away from it all.

Honeymooners and the

very privileged jet in for

the ultimate in luxurious

escape and Robinson

Crusoe fantasy. Topping

it all off is the Kahaia

Haven Ritual. Priced at

30,000 French Pacifi c

Francs (about $360),

the couples treatment

incorporates black pearl

powder and Tahitian

vanilla, said to be the

best and most fragrant

in the world.


AHHH...

THE WORLD’S MOST OUTRAGEOUSLY RELAXING SPAS

As a rule, it’s pretty hard to fi nd a bad spa treatment—but lots of fun to try. Spas specialize in

coddling us and indulging our whims, and in recent years the fi eld has reached hedonistic

new heights. As a result, there’s more relaxing to do than ever, and so little time! In an effort to

help you narrow down the many options for self-indulgence, we’ve traversed the globe to

bring you the most interesting and decadent treatments at the most exquisite spas on earth.

(Tough job, but someone’s got to do it.) What sets these palaces of pampering apart is

the way they incorporate local customs and ingredients—offering wraps, rubs and scrubs

to make you feel brand new. Enjoy.

57


2. LES SOURCES DE CAUDALIE

BORDEAUX, FRANCE // At the handsome cedarwood spa

at Les Sources, nestled amid acres of rolling vineyards,

the local vintages are put to more decadent uses than

simple drinking. A day begins with a bath in a wine

barrel fi lled with crushed grapes. Then, as a part of the

Honey and Wine Wrap ($87), oenophiles are slathered in

hot wine yeast and essential oils. As the sun goes down,

refreshed bons

vivants celebrate

the power of the

polyphenol with a

delicious grand cru.

The age-defying

Madonna is

reportedly a fan.

t

days later, I was almost sorry to be discharged.

It was while I was lying in Bumrungrad International

Hospital years ago, dying from an infl ammation of the epiglottis, that I fi rst

discovered the inimitable Thai genius for mixing medicine with pleasure. My

fi ve-star hospital off ered massage, gourmet sushi and liposuction, and there were

moments when I pondered indulging in all three at once. Cured of my ailment a few

Fortunately, you don’t actually have

to suff er to enjoy such synergies. Spas

that mix ardent pampering with more

elaborate dermatological treatments and

even surgical procedures are already a

growing trend in the U.S., where there

are 1,800 such facilities and several

state legislatures looking to regulate

the industry. So-called medical spas can

provide a lucrative sideline for doctors

increasingly looking for revenue

streams that don’t involve haggling

with insurance companies, and at the

same time off er beleagured patrons a

one-stop wellness shop.

Bangkok’s wildly popular medical

spas fuse these elements with a

generous dollop of Eastern religion. One

late autumn morning, slightly worse

for wear after an overindulgent dinner

party the night before at the home of a

Thai prince, I stumble into one of these

establishments, the S Medical Spa, with

the intention of setting myself right. Just

four years old, S, the trendy brainchild

of Dr. Pakpilai Thavisin, has already

established itself as perhaps the leading

HEMISPHERESMAGAZINE.COM

FEBRUARY 2010

3. SPA AT THE MANDARIN ORIENTAL

NEW YORK CITY // Masters and mistresses of the universe

ascend to the 35th fl oor of this swank hotel, retreating to

its well-appointed spa for billion-dollar views and custom

treatments. A blissful two-hour Signature Therapy ($450)

begins with a survey that’s only slightly less probing than

an IRS audit. The payoff is a no-holds-barred massage

tailored to your

particular woes,

accompanied by

showstopping

vistas of Central

Park. It’s good to

be king.

IN TREATMENT

TRAVEL WRITER LAWRENCE OSBORNE TAKES A BREATHER AT BANGKOK’S ACCLAIMED S MEDICAL SPA.

medical spa in Southeast Asia, rivaling

the luxurious Chiva-Som in Hua Hin.

Situated on Wireless Road, next to

the Nai Lert Park hotel, the low white

structures of the spa share the hotel’s

lavish gardens, which are famous

for their stone lingams—or symbolic

phalluses—left over from a previous

age. (Every garden should have a few.)

Huge kapok trees pressing against

the windows create a mood of jungle

luxury. Coming into Dr. Thavisin’s

temple of healing is like stepping into

a gentle future in which doctors coddle

and pamper us and where healing is

a consumer experience on par with

gourmet shopping and mani-pedis. The

only shame is that one can’t get a bypass

done here, or a liver transplant. Colonic

irrigation, yes.

“Art and Science” is the spa’s motto.


PHOTOGRPAHS BY CHRISTOPHER WISE (S SPA), BY ADAM FRIEDBERG (MANDARIN ORIENTAL), BY WHITNEY

LAKE (MAYFLOWER), COURTESY OF P2CL/FLICKR (THERME VALS); ALL OTHERS COURTESY OF THE VENUES

4. THERME VALS

VALS, SWITZERLAND // South of Zurich, high in the Swiss

Alps, the traditional baths at Vals were redesigned by

Peter Zumthor in 1996, and the resulting spaces make

guests feel as if they’ve helicoptered into a Bond fi lm

(Daniel Craig era). Owing to the resort village’s middleclass

roots, the treatments in this concrete and quartzite

cathedral tend toward functional—think a 50-minute

Lymphatic

Drainage Massage

(not for the faint

of heart), at $158.

Just lie back

and contemplate

modernist

architecture.

There are four resident doctors and

acupuncturists, as well as dietitians

and nurses. There’s a nutritionally

approved restaurant on the ground

fl oor, serving “S-Lite Spa Cuisine,” and a

lobby that looks like that of a boutique

hotel, with Naugahyde armchairs,

bubbling fi sh tanks (though, oddly,

no fi sh) and elegant fl oors decorated

with colored crystals. Dressed like a

runway model, and speaking fl awless

English, Dr. Thavisin herself ushers me

upstairs to her offi ce with a regal energy,

her excellent jewelry glittering.

5. MAYFLOWER INN & SPA

WASHINGTON, CONNECTICUT // There’s a reason Park

Avenue grand dames and Greenwich society hostesses

look so well rested (and it’s not what you think).

At the utterly tasteful Relais and Châteux property

Mayfl ower Inn, the debutante set tops off days fi lled

with horseback riding and doubles tennis with the

Mayfl ower Magnetic Facial ($180), 60 blissful minutes

of dermatological

witchcraft

said to reduce

infl ammation

and stimulate

circulation.

After decades

of attending

those nightly

fundraiser galas,

it’s just the trick.

“We’re a new kind of clinic, I

suppose,” she explains. “A fusion of a

spa and a hospital. What we do here

is use medically proven techniques

for getting you back to your youth.

Doesn’t everyone want to get back to

their youth?” As we walk past treatment

THE BIG CHILL From left, getting a rubdown; a staff member with fresh towels;

the chicly designed lobby

59


TEA TIME Blue Pea

Flower tea is a

house favorite at

S Medical Spa.

61


6. THE SPA AT ENCANTADO

SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO // Guests at the newest Auberge

resort, which sits at an altitude of 7,000 feet in the Sangre

de Cristo mountains, might feel as scaly as lizards in this

arid climate. That condition is easily remedied at the

resort’s airy adobe spa. You’ll start with a complimentary

Purifi cation Ritual—an exfoliation with cactus-fi ber cloth,

a soak and a cup of sage tea. Then it gets tastier, with

treatments such as

the Blue Corn and

Honey Renewal

($245), a vigorous

90-minute body

scrub. Bonus

points for the

creative use of

nachos—well,

blue corn—for

exfoliation.

suites fi lled with hydrotherapy

equipment, a pharmacy and a Botox

room, I think, Some of it.... “We use

everything from the West and the East,”

the doctor continues. “We stimulate

your lymphatic system. We improve

your circulation. Botox, massage,

acupuncture, Chinese medicine,

ultrasound—you name it, we combine it.

Then we move on to the skin treatments.

I began as a dermatologist, so we are

peerless on that front. I can make

anyone’s skin look like a teenager’s.”

Thavisin branched into holistic

medicine after she lost her brother

to cancer several years ago. The

conventional treatments he received

“ BOTOX, MASSAGE, ACUPUNCTURE,

ULTRASOUND. YOU NAME IT, WE

COMBINE IT,” THE DOCTOR

SAYS, ADDING, “I CAN MAKE ANYONE’S

SKIN LOOK LIKE A TEENAGER’S.”

struck her as woefully inadequate, and

she became determined to invent her

own synthesis of approaches.

Since teenage skin wouldn’t

really suit me, I opt for an in-house

diagnostics test known as a BEM, or

Bio-Energy Medicine, which involves

applying sensors to my head, wrists

and ankles. The sensors are hooked

up to a small, box-shaped machine

called a Quantum Xrroid Interface

System that supposedly measures

“bio-energetic forces.” True, these

forces are not yet recognized by the

serious scientifi c community, but what

do they know?

If I have this right, the machine

scans all 200 trillion cells in the body,

measuring one’s vitamin levels, amino

acids, natural sugars, toxins, hormone

levels, muscle tone, disease, bacteria,

molds, fungi and viruses. Following the

scan, the system wants to know more.

“Is sex drive defi cient?” the computer

wonders. “Is there an emotional link

7. THE LAKEHOUSE SPA, LAKE AUSTIN SPA RESORT

AUSTIN, TEXAS // Desert roses and travel-weary golf

buffs pad about in plush robes at this country-chic

resort on the shores of Lake Austin. After debating

the merits of local BBQ joints (a passion-stirring and

exhausting pursuit), it’s time to unwind with the grand

110-minute Tour of Texas treatment ($315). Start with a

prickly pear scrub, then move on to a sunburn-soothing

aloe vera wrap

before you “strike

oil” during a

massage with, you

guessed it, warm

essential oils.

to confl ict with modern society?”

Certainly not, I reply, then reluctantly

plead guilty to the second count.

“Your energy fl ow is quite good,” the

THE DOCTOR IS IN From left, S Medical

Spa’s reception area; Dr. Pakpilai

Thavisin; a hydrotherapy pool


8. WILLOW STREAM AT FAIRMONT MAYAKOBA

RIVIERA MAYA, MEXICO // On the east coast of Mexico,

the azure sea and a salt-rimmed margarita are never far

off. If that’s not enough to restore your spirit, the spa

at this oceanfront resort offers a taste of the region’s

Mayan roots (without the human sacrifi ce). During the

90-minute Cha Chac Rain Ritual ($229), named for the

Mayan god of rain, a blessing is recited and incense

burned. Then

guests are

wrapped in

cornmeal and oats

and left to dry

before rinsing off

in a rain shower.

doctor tells me when the test is done.

“But you are too mentally active.”

“Is there a cure?”

“Diet, massage and lifestyle,” she

replies. “And a dose of Thailand, too.”

It can’t be denied that doses of

Thailand—even muggy, traffi c-cursed

Bangkok—seem to have a miraculous

eff ect upon my usually dismal

blood-pressure scores. (My typical

in-country regimen of daily two-hour

foot massages might have something

to do with it.) My BEM results also

reveal a few respiratory problems and

9. THE ALLISON INN AND SPA

NEWBERG, OREGON // Nestled in the wine country of

Willamette Valley, the Allison Inn and Spa—the creation

of philanthropist Joan Austin—is the most anticipated

opening in the Pacifi c Northwest in years. Built in the

style of a WPA lodge rendered luxurious and surrounded

by tall fi rs, rolling vineyards and hazelnut orchards,

the cozy inn serves top-end farm-to-table cuisine, and

the spa features

state-of-theart

massage,

steam baths and

“pinotherapy,”

which uses the

Willamette’s

pinot grapes to

create anti-aging

treatments.

HEMISPHERESMAGAZINE.COM

FEBRUARY 2010

indicate likely exposure to motor oil

and grain mill dust. My “possible most

stressed organ”?

“Frontal lobe, brain.”

I opt for an S massage treatment,

the well-named Cool Guy Massage,

which turns out to be a massage so

powerful, so hypnosis-inducing that

I wonder where it’s been all my life.

It’s administered by a man (unusual

for Thailand), a deep-tissue probing

followed by a lighter surface rubdown.

As I lie there watching the banyans

dripping with monsoon rain, no longer

in the slightest bit stressed, I feel the

force of the Thai saying (repeated in

every tourist brochure) “Mai pen rai.”

“Never mind” is the common rendering,

but a more apt translation would be

“Que sera sera.”

“Did you know that massage helps

you live longer?” Dr. Thavisin asks

when it’s over. “It’s proven. Massage

should be part of every health care

system.”

“I can’t quite imagine Congress

passing massage funds,” I tell her.

“Yes, but it would make a lot of

sense,” she replies. “Americans work so

very hard.”

Veteran travel writer LAWRENCE OSBORNE

has surprisingly supple insteps.

63


THERE

WON’T BE

BLOOD

ILLUSTRATIONS BY

SEAN MCCABE

SOME THINK

BULLFIGHTING

IS BRUTAL.

OTHERS FIND IT

BEAUTIFUL.

NOW ONE

LAS VEGAS PROMOTER

IS PUSHING A KINDER,

GENTLER VERSION

OF THE TRADITIONAL

SPECTACLE,

HEMISPHERESMAGAZINE.COM

FEBRUARY 2010

BY EDWARD LEWINE

SUBSTITUTING

VELCRO FOR COLD,

HARD STEEL.

65


HEMISPHERESMAGAZINE.COM

FEBRUARY 2010

THE BULL

bursts out of the corral like a snorting runaway semi, 1,000

pounds of muscle and bad attitude topped with horns.

The matador—a slender Spaniard in a spangled orange

suit—strides out to meet it. We’re not in Madrid or Tijuana,

but the indoor rodeo stadium at the South Point, a hotel

and casino off the Las Vegas Strip, and this is Vegas’ latest

attraction: a bloodless bullfi ght, meaning no assailing the

bull with swords or spears the way bullfi ghters usually do,

no “death in the afternoon,” as Hemingway put it.

Advantage Ferdinand.

Without having been weakened by

the gory stabbing that bulls suff er in

traditional fi ghts, the beast is free to

do what it wants. Evidently, what it

wants more than anything is to hook

its left horn around the nearly helpless

matador’s legs and jerk the poor fellow

skyward. I’m impressed. At the bare

minimum this is more interesting

than, say, a kick line of Elvis

impersonators. The crowd—many from

corrida-loving countries such as Mexico

and Portugal, along with a handful

of curiosity seekers who’ve pried

themselves from the gaming fl oor—is

sparse, scattered throughout the 4,400seat

arena. But this is a bold new idea,

and a new frontier for bullfi ghting.

Sometimes it takes a while for bold

ideas to catch on.

Three twentysomething guys are

perched on seats near me, washing

down popcorn with bottles of suds.

“That dude’s insane,” one of them

observes, as the matador, who has just

come crashing to the ground, staggers

to his feet in obvious agony and lurches

back toward the bull for another go.

The fi ght ends around 10 p.m. As

the crowd fi les out, the man behind

the event, a large, baby-faced 48-yearold

named Pedro Haces Barba

(though he goes by Don Bull), sits in

the grandstand, sipping a tumbler of

tequila. He operates more than a dozen

bullrings in Mexico, but he always

wanted to break into the American

market. So in the spring of 2009, he

approached Michael Gaughan, owner

of the South Point Casino, about doing a

continuing series of monthly bullfi ghts

in the facility’s rodeo arena. The idea

was to sign up the best Spanish and

Mexican matadors—which he did—

and market the bullfi ghts as an elite

event with special VIP seats going for

hundreds of dollars. Together they’d

fi nance the events, and before long...olé!

“This is my dream,” he says earnestly.

“To host bullfi ghts in America’s

entertainment capital is something you

will never forget.”

The spectacle of bullfi ghting in Vegas

may not be drawing the big crowds

yet, but it does make a certain kind of

sense—and with the right marketing, it

just might work. After all, visitors to Sin

City have been lining up to see Siegfried

& Roy don spangled suits and tangle

with dangerous wild animals for years.

Consider Don Bull’s Las Vegas

bullfi ghts the sport’s “soft” opening

in America. Sure, there are dozens of

small-time bloodless bullfi ghts held in

the country each year, put on mostly

by central California’s Portuguese

community. But those are held with

little fanfare and zero press. What

makes these Vegas bullfi ghts diff erent

is they are being widely advertised,

off ered as a monthly attraction in

66

America’s entertainment capital and

starring top matadors.

Not unexpectedly, these bloodless

bullfi ghts have stirred up controversy.

Animal activists have protested that

even without the evident cruelty, the

Vegas events exploit the bulls. But the

most vocal protests have come from the

bullfi ghting community itself, which

complains that the fi ghts aren’t cruel

enough. The bullfi ghting press has

described bloodless bullfi ghting as a

buff oonery, and consequently some

of the big stars who initially agreed to

appear—Don Bull’s prize acquisitions—

have withdrawn.

“I think this is a defi nite step toward

the disappearance of bullfi ghting

within the next ten to fi fteen years,” the

renowned French bullfi ghting promoter

Simón Casas told the Spanish press.

“The danger here is that you have big

stars taking part in what amounts to a

pantomime of a real bullfi ght.”

To understand what he means, it

helps to know what a “real” bullfi ght is.

Firstly, it is not a sport; no one who loves

it pretends it is. In fact, a bullfi ght is a

spectacle in which six bulls are ritually

dispatched. It unfolds in three acts, with

several main players. The bull charges

a padded horse, and a mounted picador

spears the bull’s neck; bandilleros then

place three pairs of barbed darts in the

bull’s back; fi nally, the matador emerges

and uses his cape to “dance” with the

bull before killing it with a sword.

Afi cionados say bullfi ghting is an

intricate brush with death for both the

bull and the bullfi ghter, and a crucible

that reveals the qualities of an animal

bred for fearlessness. To them, the

violence isn’t gratuitous. Charging

the horse and facing the spear reveal

the bull’s bravery. The fi ghters use the

spears and banderillas to lower the bull’s

neck and slow it down so the matador

can “dance” with it. The bull is killed,

In the Las Vegas corrida, the bull has a

Velcro patch glued to its back. There’s no horse, no

spear, no barbed banderillas. TO SOME,

THE SPECTACLE VIOLATES THE VERY

ESSENCE OF BULLFIGHTING.


PHOTOGRAPHS BY KIMBERLY DURHAM AND RD/KABIK/RETNA DIGITAL

they say, because it has learned the trick

of the cape and can never again appear

in a bullfi ght.

“It’s actually a complex and technical

art,” argues Robert Weldon, a New

Yorker who teaches Spanish and takes

part in amateur bullfi ghts. “It doesn’t

make much sense to people who haven’t

grown up with it, and that’s part of the

reason why it rarely does well outside

the Spanish-speaking world.”

Even so, bullfi ghting is in no danger

of dying out. There are twice as many

corridas per year in Spain and France

as there were 40 years ago. European

bullfi ghts alone generate billions every

year, and the tradition continues to

thrive in Central and South America.

Mostly, what has changed is the scope

and volume of anti-bullfi ghting protests,

especially in western Europe.

The Spanish government recently

removed live corridas from state

television for the fi rst time since TV

was invented. Calls to ban bullfi ghting

and end agricultural subsidies to bull

breeders have become an annual ritual

in the European Parliament. There’s

a growing movement afoot to ban

bullfi ghting in the Spanish region of

Catalonia and its capital, Barcelona.

“Bullfi ghting is under attack like

never before,” says Stephen Higgins,

an American fi lmmaker whose 2008

documentary, The Matador, about a

Spanish bullfi ghter, won rave reviews.

“People in the bullfi ghting business

have become quite sensitive about it, and

with good reason.”

THE TENSION

OVER THE

LAS VEGAS bullfi ghts has played

out against this backdrop. Is Don Bull

the savior of bullfi ghting or the herald

of its demise? In Vegas, the bull has a

Velcro patch glued to its back. There’s

no horse, no spear, no barbed banderillas.

The matador—who puts himself at risk,

since the bull is never speared—“kills”

his prey symbolically. In short, Don

Bull’s spectacle violates the very essence

of bullfi ghting: It removes the crucible of

bravery—at least for the animal.

Bullfi ghting advocates worry that

what Don Bull is trying to do—somehow

render bullfi ghting acceptable outside

the Spanish-speaking world—will

actually achieve the opposite. Without

the drama of the dance, the advocates

argue, what’s the point?

This was the note sounded by

Spanish star matador Julian Lopez,

El Juli, when he announced he’d be

withdrawing from the Vegas bullfi ghts.

“When they fi rst put me under

contract, they assured me this would

be the fi rst step to implanting the full

Spanish bullfi ght in America,” El

Juli told the bullfi ghting website

Burladero.com. “It hasn’t worked out

that way.” He was disappointed by the

bloodlessness, he explained, which he

didn’t fi nd to be at all “Spanish.”

Nonetheless, fans who attended

the fi rst four Vegas bullfi ghts were

pleased with what they saw. The

matadors were legit stars and the bulls

were brave specimens from the ranch

of Manuel Costa in Los Banos, California,

the most respected breeder on American

soil. “Don Bull put on as good a bullfi ght

as you can in Las Vegas,” says Lydia

Ackerman, 61, a New Yorker who attends

corridas all over the world.

Only a handful of people have shown

up; and the corridas scheduled for

December were canceled. A notice on

the Don Bull website says bullfi ghts for

2010 are “being prepared,” but Gaughan

WHO’S THE BOSS? Pedro “Don Bull” Haces Barba

on the Strip with his prized matadors

worries about about the project’s future.

“We put on a great show,” he says.

“But we’ve each lost at least a hundred

thousand dollars. I’m not sure how much

longer this can go on.”

One group who’d like to keep it going

are the Spanish matadors. They were

well paid, to the tune of $50,000 each,

and Vegas is a convenient stop between

regular seasons in Mexico and Spain.

It’s 10:15 a.m. on the day after the

bullfi ght, and matador Juan José Padilla,

a Spaniard known as the “Cyclone

from Jerez,” has been up all night

playing blackjack. He’s the one who was

tossed by the bull, and I can see he is

still in considerable pain. But despite

having fl own from Spain to risk his life

in front of just a few hundred people,

Padilla is smiling.

He wins $50 in chips, puff s his

gigantic cigar and rattles off something

in a thick southern-Spanish accent

to the dealer. The dealer looks at me,

uncomprehending. “He just told you

he loves you,” I tell her. “And he loves

Las Vegas.”

EDWARD LEWINE is the author of Death

and the Sun: A Matador’s Season in the

Heart of Spain.


Three Perfect Days

MONTREAL

Once a remote fur-trading post, Montreal is now a thriving modern city brimming

with Old World charm. BY MAURA EGAN // PHOTOGRAPHS BY PETER FRANK EDWARDS

70 DAY ONE

Pedaling through

the Old Port

A DAB OF FROSTING Parc du Mont-Royal blanketed in snow

72 DAY TWO

Seeing Canada’s

fi nest fi ne art

HEMISPHERESMAGAZINE.COM | FEBRUARY 2010

76 DAY THREE

Hiking through

the park

69


70

FEBRUARY 2010 | UNITED.COM

CANADIAN GOTHIC Opposite,

Notre-Dame Basilica; this

page, clockwise from above,

the Montreal skyline, XO

Restaurant at Hotel Le St-

James, and the hotel spa

YOU MAY WANT TO PRACTICE YOUR FRENCH IN MONTREAL, the second-largest French-speaking

city in the world, but don’t worry—it won’t be on the test. Most residents speak English. That’s

the nature of this beguiling Quebecois city. It’s an anything-goes, old-meets-new kind of place.

Modern glass skyscrapers edge up against 18th century Beaux Arts buildings, and the old

town’s European grandeur is balanced out by funky new cafés, a thriving university scene and

booming nightclubs in up-and-coming neighborhoods like Mile End and the Plateau.

The city abounds with examples of thoughtful urban planning, including underground

shopping malls, for those cold winters, and lush parks in which to enjoy the summers. But

visitors can still glimpse an earlier time, especially among the canals and warehouses lining

the St. Lawrence River. Montreal is a city of distinct neighborhoods and fi ercely proud

character. There’s no better way to see it than strolling its narrow streets. You’ll uncover upscale

boutiques and historic sites, often right next door to each other, and breathe in the heady aroma

of french fries smothered in gravy and cheese curds, the ingredients of poutine, Montreal’s

signature dish, which is served in even the swankiest joint. It may not sound so appealing, but

it’s quite good. And yes, it will be on the test.

DAY ONE Wake up in a four-poster bed at the

1 very posh Hotel Le St-James (1) feeling like an

Industrial-era trade baron. The St. James is in the

former Merchants Bank, in what was once the hub

of the city’s fur trade. As soon as you step outside,

you picture 19th century tycoons parading by the

imposing limestone façades whose grand columns line

Rue Saint-Jacques. In fact, you notice a bit of swagger

in your own step. But before you leave the hotel, put

on your Sunday best, because you’re off to church.

And not just any church. The Notre-Dame Basilica

(2), a fi ve-block stroll from the hotel, rivals the great

cathedrals of Europe. Established in 1829, the church

was built by an Irish Protestant architect imported

from New York. He converted to Catholicism on his

deathbed, perhaps so that he could be buried in his

creation. Montreal was once a very Catholic city—

count the steeples dotting the skyline—with the clergy

having as much infl uence as elected offi cials. Like

hairstyles, hemlines and pop music, that all changed

in the ’60s, when the Quiet Revolution led to the

secularization of government and education.

BILLY MAVREAS

OWNER, GALERIE MONASTIRAKI

// Riddell Fishing Tackle &

Appliances has always been

a source of fascination for

me. It’s a messy little joint

crammed full of trophies and

talismans made and collected

by George Riddell, an avid

fi sherman and luremaker who

opened the place in the ’60s.

ILLUSTRATIONS BY

ESRA CAROLINE RØISE


FEBRUARY 2010

00


72

MIDCENTURY

MADNESS // Indulge

your vintage cravings. // The

furniture stores on Amherst

Street in the city’s Gay

Village are a gold mine for

midcentury fi nds. Start out

at Jack’s, the biggest dealer

on the stretch, where you

can pick up pottery in neon

colors, Danish credenzas

and vintage rotary phones

and television sets. Cité

Deco stocks glamorous

lucite desks and coffee

tables, as well as whimsical

pop art paintings. Montreal

Moderne focuses on teak

and rosewood pieces,

including wall units and

dining tables. The prices are

reasonable, and the quality

of the pieces runs from good

to mint. And while an Arne

Jacobsen egg chair might

be too cumbersome to lug

back in your suitcase, most

of the store owners are

fl exible with shipping fees.

Just browsing? You might

enjoy watching employees

carefully restore the pieces’

original grandeur.

3PD MONTREAL

From the church, walk toward Place Jacques-Cartier (3)—a

pedestrian square that was once the entrance to the city’s port,

now thick with street performers and souvenir shops—and

wander the cobbled alleyways off Rue Saint-Paul. Amid 18th

century stone buildings such as the Chateau Ramezay, a

former governor’s mansion that now serves as a repository of

Quebec history, you’ll fi nd lofts for a growing creative class.

Be sure to stop by the three-year-old DHC/ART Foundation

of Contemporary Art (4). Local visionary Phoebe Greenberg

has created a platform for Canadian and international talent

to stage exhibitions, workshops and lectures. After you’ve

had your fi ll of highbrow culture, relax at Cluny Artbar (5),

a former warehouse that’s been converted into a café. Take a

seat at one of the establishment’s communal tables and order yourself a smoked salmon

panino and extra-leaded espresso.

You’ll need the fuel for zipping around Montreal’s Old Port in some the city’s many

bicycle lanes—just swipe your credit card at one of the 300 Bixi (think “bike” meets

“taxi”) cycle-sharing kiosks all over town (open May through November). Wending

your way along the Lachine Canal (6), lined with ferry terminals, quays and a huge concrete

silo, you’ll get a glimpse of the city’s industrial past. Across the river, you spot Habitat

67. Designed for Expo 67, Montreal’s world’s fair, as a prototype for aff ordable housing,

the structure looks like something dreamed up by Antoni Gaudí and built with Legos.

You continue pedaling along the leafy Rue Notre-Dame and pass through Antiques

Alley to Marché Atwater (7), a European-style foodmarket housed in an Art Deco

building, complete with charcuteries, cheese shops and fl ower stalls. After a serious

afternoon of bike riding and window shopping, you’ll want to sit down for a proper

meal. Restaurateurs Frédéric Morin, Allison Cunningham and David McMillan have

turned the neighborhood known as Little Burgundy into a culinary mecca. Settle on Joe

Beef, the name of which belies the upscale fare inside, where you order such classics as

Dungeness crab and seared scallops. The menu changes often, but the dishes are simple

and bold, so the seafood fl avors shine through.

Before you call it a night, head to Altitude 737 (8). In a city known for megaclubs, this

is the swankiest, an ideal place to hobnob with Montreal’s most glamorous residents,

enjoy a champagne cocktail and take in views of the city.

DAY TWO Now that you’ve gotten the lay of the land, it’s time to indulge in the

2 city’s cultural off erings. Grab breakfast at Olive + Gourmando (1) then board the

STM, Montreal’s effi cient public system, at Victoria Square and ride three stops to the

Canadian Centre for Architecture (2). This 30-year-old museum is housed in a 19th

century graystone mansion straight out of a romantic novel, which has been expanded

with surprisingly harmonious slick limestone façades. Its founder and consulting

RETRO CURRENT Habitat 67, top, and Grand Central antiques shop


HERE’S THE BEEF Clockwise from top left, Schwartz’s deli and its

legendary smoked meat sandwich, Daniel Roberge in Zephyr Art

Gallery, and the view on Rue Notre-Dame


74

FEBRUARY 2010 | UNITED.COM

CHOP SHOP // Pig out

at one of Montreal’s

hottest restaurants. // Au Pied

de Cochon is a carnivore’s

paradise. The restaurant,

which opened on a side

street in the Plateau district

back in 2004, has lured

meat lovers (including

chef Anthony Bourdain)

from around the globe

for artery-clogging dishes

such as pig trotter salad

and steak tartare. Chef

and owner Martin Picard

has developed bad-boy

status in the culinary

world with his unshaven

look and larger-than-life

personality. Though the

dining room, with its wood

burning fi replace, is quite

serene, Picard is pumping

out sinful dishes including

10 different preparations

for foie gras—on hamburger,

on pizza and, naturally,

as a topping for the local

specialty, poutine. If you

can’t get enough of Picard’s

gut-busting cuisine, head

just north of the city, into

the Laurentian Mountains,

to his Cabane À Sucre (Sugar

Shack), a cozy restaurant

where the chef dishes up

everything from buckwheat

pancakes to fried lobster

during the maple syrup–

tapping season, typically

mid-March to mid-April.

FRESH PAINT Museum of Fine Arts

architect, Phyllis Lambert studied under Mies Van der Rohe and has made the

center one of the country’s most important cultural institutions, with a vast archive

of architectural sketches, photographs and models dating back the Renaissance.

After wandering the halls and taking in the archives of Ernest Cormier, the city’s

preeminent architect of the early 20th century, enjoy a 10-minute stroll along Rue

Sherbrooke, one of the city’s swankiest thoroughfares, which leads to The Montreal

Museum of Fine Arts (3), a neoclassical structure that sits regally among boutiques

and blue-chip galleries. There are pieces by Rembrandt, Monet and Picasso within,

but you’re more interested in the homegrown talent. The dark, moody portraits by

Frederick Simpson Coburn (1871–1960), who grew up just south of the city, evoke

the Dutch masters, while Quebecois painter Marc-Aurèle Fortin (1888–1970) created

watercolor landscapes inspired by French Impressionism. Before you hop over to

the modern annex across the street, take a whirl through the decorative arts section,

which features an eclectic mix of furniture, textiles and other objects, from a Marius

Plamondon stained-glass window to an amorphous fan, courtesy of Maarten Baas.

Next, take a cab across town to explore the Plateau district (4). A working-class

neighborhood in the ’60s and ’70s, the Plateau has become a magnet for creative

types, who live and work alongside a mix of Italian, Portuguese and Greek

communities. This is also the epicenter of Montreal’s Francophone population,

particularly along the Rue Saint-Denis. The bustling street is crammed with shops,

jazz clubs, cafés and friperies (vintage

clothing stores carrying, among other

things, an impressive stock of ’70s skiwear).

You can only wander so long, though,

before you work up an appetite.

L’Express (5) is a classic brasserie that

feels as if it’s been airlifted from Paris; it’s

outfi tted with a gleaming zinc bar, bow-tied

waiters and a black-and-white tiled fl oor.

The food is sturdy bistro fare—croque

monsieur, steak frites—but the real draw

is jumbo cornichons and grainy mustard

that come with every order. After an

espresso, detour off Rue Saint-Denis and

wander through some of the residential

neighborhoods lined with Victorian row

houses, many featuring mansard roofs

and the peculiar spiral exterior staircases

unique to Montreal (evidently, recently

arrived immigrants wanted front doors to

call their own, even if they were in secondfl

oor apartments).

Invigorated by the walk, you’re ready to

see another side of the city’s nightlife. You

ADAM GOLLNER, AUTHOR OF

THE FRUIT HUNTERS

In the Plateau and Mile End,

there are alleys bursting with

fruit trees and stands selling

reproductions of Goya prints.

Those alleys are reminders that

revelations lurk all around.

PHOTOGRAPH OF AU PIED DE COCHON COURTESY OF KEN YU


76

FEBRUARY 2010 | UNITED.COM

THE RIVER WILD A surfer on

the St. Lawrence, below,

and Les Commissaires

BOARDING PASS

Montreal just has

that certain je ne sais

quoi, non? United can

get you there from

dozens of cities across

the U.S. and around

the globe.

duck into Casa del Popolo (6), an unassuming vegetarian restaurant that doubles as a

stage for the area’s promising young musical talent, and order a pint of Belle Gueule

ale, one of the strong local brews. You may also want to check out La Sala Rossa,

Casa’s sister joint across the street. Started as a cultural center by the city’s left-wing

Jewish community back in the ’30s, La Sala Rossa hosts acts ranging from fl amenco

performers to freestyle breakdancers. Given the strong beer, a midnight snack seems

prudent. For an inexpensive serving of poutine, you walk 15 minutes to Resto la Banquise (7), a

24-hour diner. Meanwhile, die-hard carnivores will line up at Schwartz’s on Rue Saint-Laurent,

an old-style Jewish deli with heaping portions of viande fumée, a.k.a. “smoked meat” (just don’t

call it pastrami).

DAY THREE You had a late night, so you sleep in—but not so much that you miss out on a

3 stroll through the Mile End neighborhood (1), the latest bastion of bohemia to sprout up

in this fast-evolving city. Here you’ll fi nd Commissaires, a gallery-boutique hybrid featuring

limited-edition designs by local artists as well as themed exhibitions. In a tiny new bookshop,

Drawn & Quarterly (2), the retail outlet of the infl uential comic book and graphic novel

publisher, you can easily spend several hours perusing everything from the latest Masterpiece

Comics to a variety of art zines. Pick up an armful of reading material and head to one of the

numerous independent coff ee shops in the area. Café Olympico (3) brews high-grade espresso

for Italian old-timers and twentysomethings alike, who

jostle for elbow room at the bar. Try to score one of the

nicked wooden tables and settle in with your latte and The

Walrus, Canada’s answer to The Atlantic. Next on the agenda

is sampling a legendary Montreal bagel, a species of bagel

that polarizes connoisseurs (they’re sweeter, chewier and

less doughy than their New York counterparts). Though

locals will go on about the diff erences at the nearby joints,

St-Viateur and Fairmount, both of these holes in the wall

churn them out piping hot. Why not try both?

Walk it all off with a sunset tour of Parc du Mont-Royal

(4), the city’s main park, which was designed by Frederick

Law Olmsted, the architect of New York’s Central Park.

At this time of year, you’ll see lots of cross-country skiers,

while in the spring and summer, joggers and bikers

predominate. After you huff and puff to the top of “la

montagne,” as Montrealers call it (although to be honest,

it’s not much more than a hill), you look down at all the

charming rues and alleyways you’ve meandered for the

past few days. It’s a beautiful sight in any language.

New Yorker MAURA EGAN thinks Montreal bagels are some of the

best in the world.

ALEXEI PERRY

VOCALIST, HANDSOME FURS

// Niu Kee is a Szechuan

restaurant that plays Beijing

opera and fi lls nearby

blocks with the fragrance

of “fl ower” pepper.


MAP ILLUTRATIONS BY STEVE STANKIEWICZ

3PD MONTREAL

2 1

3

6

Avenue Du Mont-Royal E.

0 5 Miles

Avenue Du Parc

4

4

Rue St.-Denis

3

2

7

7

5

Rue Sherbrooke O.

8

Boulevard Rene-

Autoroute Ville-Marie

Autoroute Bonaventure

6

THOSE THREE PERFECT DAYS

HEMISPHERESMAGAZINE.COM | FEBRUARY 2010

Port Victoria

MONTREAL

NEW YORK

DAY ONE

(1) Hotel Le St-James 355 Rue Saint-Jacques.; Tel: 514-841-3111 (2) Notre-Dame Basilica 110 Rue

Notre-Dame Ouest; Tel: 514-842-2925 (3) Place Jacques-Cartier Near Place Jacques-Cartier on Rue

de la Commune (4) DHC/Art Foundation for Contemporary Art 451-468 Rue Saint-Jean;

Tel: 514-849-3742 (5) Cluny Artbar 257 Rue Prince; Tel: 514-866-1213

(6) Lachine Canal (7) Marché Atwater 138 Ave. Atwater; Tel: 514-937-7754 (8) Altitude 737 1 Place

Ville-Marie; Tel: 514-397-0737

DAY TWO

(1) Olive + Gourmando 351 Rue Saint-Paul Ouest; Tel: 514-650-1083 (2) Canadian Centre for

Architecture 1920 Rue Baile; Tel: 514-939-7026 (3) The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts 1380 Rue

Sherbrooke Ouest; Tel: 514-285-2000 (4) Plateau district Rue Saint-Denis (5) L’Express 3927 Rue

Staint-Denis; Tel: 514-845-5333 (6) Casa del Popolo 4873 Boul. Saint-Laurent; Tel: 514-284-3804

(7) Resto la Banquise 994 Rue Rachel East; Tel: 514-525-2415

DAY THREE

(1) Mile End neighborhood Boul. Saint-Laurent at Ave du Mont-Royal (2) Drawn & Quarterly 211 Rue

Bernard Ouest (3) Café Olympico 124 Rue Saint-Viateur Ouest (4) Parc du Mont Royal

5

3

1 4

2

1

St. Lawrence River

Ile Sainte

Helene

77


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precious drop. When you’re on the go, so

is your coffee.

But who hasn’t needed a third hand on

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The tugo provides just that. It holds

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drink between the upright handles of

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ellingtonhandbags.com

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For corporate gifts or promotions,

tugo can be printed with your

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IN THE BAG

As a frequent traveler, you take pride

in expertly packing your carry-on so

that everything you need is within

reach during your flight. You place your

valuables securely deep inside and

make sure you have easy access to the

things you’ll want right away—or those

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checkpoints. What if you had a bag that

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the typical carry-on crowd. The roomy

interior and many pockets make it an

excellent diaper bag, too! Visit us online

at ellingtonhandbags.com

IN THE FOLD

We hate to dwell on the negative, but

we must address another challenge for

business travelers—balancing form and

function. When if comes to your wallet,

where you store your most valuable

possessions, sure you want it to look

nice, but you want it to fit easily into your

pocket and secure your belongings, too.

If you’re a man, you may find yourself

wishing you had an ultra-slim wallet with

no metal, so it can remain in your pocket

as you pass security checkpoints. And for

the ladies, it would be nice to have a cell

walletbe.com

phone wallet that fits your iPhone and

your BlackBerry.

WalletBe designs and manufactures

wallets that solve the inconveniences

of every day life. WalletBe gives you

designer quality at a value price. WalletBe

Men’s Wallets are made of Italian flat or

croco-embossed leather. They are thin

and flat for a perfect front pocket fit, and

durable enough to outlast even highend

designer wallet brands. WalletBe

Women’s Wallets are constructed with

100 percent Italian leather or soft and

durable microfiber. With features such as

an accordion-style opening for maximum

credit card visibility and convenience,

and detachable wrist and shoulder straps,

WalletBe has something for everyone.

Visit walletbe.com and enter the code,

“UNITED” at checkout and receive 10

percent off your order.

SCREEN SAVER

Sometimes you use your time inflight

to work on proposals or financial

documents—important, confidential stuff.

Other times, you just want to browse

HEMISPHERES

3mprivacyfilters.com

through photos of your kid’s soccer game

and your puppy—just as important, if not

somewhat less confidential. Whatever

you’ve got on screen, though, you may not

want to share it with a nosy neighbor.

Whether you’re flying between

cities or across continents, air travel

has become a great time to catch up on

emails or paperwork, or to simply watch

a movie. But powering up your laptop

means you’re opening your digital life to

everyone around you.

3M Privacy Filters keep your

on-screen data private by creating a

30-degree cone of vision, so data is

visible only to those directly in front

of your laptop screen—without blurring

or distortion.

And now, there’s a bold new way to

add privacy and personality to your

laptop screen. 3M GOLD Privacy Filters

offer unmatched data protection and

a gloss surface that actually increases

screen clarity. Your vibrant golden

screen will dazzle onlookers while

defending your data. To learn more, visit

3MPrivacyFilters.com


HEMISPHERESMAGAZINE.COM | FEBRUARY 2010

travel options by united

Purchase a whole year’s worth of

extra room and comfort.

Imagine knowing you’ll enjoy up to 5 inches of extra

legroom every time you fl y for the next year.

If you’ve fl own in United’s Economy Plus seating area,

you know what a big deal a little extra space can be. More

room to stretch out and relax (nap, anyone?). More room to

open your newspaper. More room to open your laptop.

Well, with the Economy Plus annual option, you can enjoy that extra

room for an entire year. The subscription also allows Economy Plus

access for one additional

travelling companion on

any joint itinerary.

Economy Plus seating is

available on all domestic

and international United

fl ights, as well as explus SM

fl ights from United Express.®

Economy

Economy

Economy Plus

A side-by-side comparison of a standard Economy seat

and an Economy Plus seat.

Economy Plus®

Annual Option

You can even save $50 on a

subscription through a special

Hemispheres reader discount.

Just visit united.com/epaspecial

and use promo code “legroom”

when making a purchase

by March 1, 2010.*

At just $425 per

subscription, the Economy Plus annual option can pay for itself in just

a few fl ights. It may be purchased only at united.com/traveloptions,

where you can also purchase the subscription as a bundle with a Red

Carpet Club membership, with Premier Fast Track, or as a gift.

No other airline off ers economy legroom comparable with Economy

Plus. And now, you can enjoy a full 12 months of 5 inches of extra space.

*Discount code valid for purchase 1/27/10–3/1/10. Off er subject to change without notice. Other restrictions may apply.

A seat map diagram of

a United A320 showing

Economy Plus seating near the

front of the Economy cabin.

A B C D E F

First

Class

Visit

united.com/traveloptions

Economy

Plus

Economy


ENTERTAINMENT

88 Films & Television

95 Audio Programming

110 Crossword

112 Sudoku & Quiz

FEBRUARY 2010

PLAY

INFORMATION

98 United Destinations

102 Terminal Diagrams

107 Alliances & Partnerships

108 Customs & Immigration

115 Beverages & Food

Let the wild rumpus begin with

Where the Wild Things Are.


NORTH

AMERICA

HAWAII

FILM

& TELEVISION

FILMS ARE SHOWN ONLY on fl ights of three hours or longer. Movies available on most 747, 757, 767, 777, A319 and A320 aircraft fl ights.

Schedules and selections are subject to change. International Language Tracks / (S) Películas están disponsibles en Español en todas las rutas

domesticas en el canal 10.

MEXICO

& CARIBBEAN

FILM TELEVISION FILM TELEVISION

FEBRUARY 1-15

Whip It!

FEBRUARY 16-28

The Boys Are Back [T]

FILM TELEVISION FILM TELEVISION

FEBRUARY 1-15

The Boys Are Back [T]

FEBRUARY 16-28

Whip It!

Both films available on flights

between Denver/Chicago and Hawaii

FEBRUARY 1-15

The Invention of Lying

FEBRUARY 16-28

Where the Wild Things Are

EASTBOUND

FEBRUARY 1-15

The Big Bang Theory [T]

Top Chef Masters

Where The Wild Things Are TV Special

The Simpsons [T]

FEBRUARY 16-28

The Offi ce [T]

Man V. Food

Friends [T]

FEBRUARY 1-15

The Offi ce [T]

Man V. Food

Friends [T]

FEBRUARY 16-28

The Big Bang Theory [T]

Top Chef Masters

Where The Wild Things Are TV Special

The Simpsons [T]

FEBRUARY 1-15

The Big Bang Theory [T]

Chuck [T][V]

The Middle [T]

The TELEVISION

Offi ce [T]

FEBRUARY 16-28

Frasier [T]

Royal Pains [T]

The Offi ce [T]

FEBRUARY 1-15

The Invention of Lying

FEBRUARY 16-28

Where the Wild Things Are

FEBRUARY 1-15

Where the Wild Things Are

FEBRUARY 16-28

The Invention of Lying

Both films available on flights

between Denver/Chicago and Hawaii

FEBRUARY 1-15

Whip It!

FEBRUARY 16-28

The Boys Are Back [T]

FEBRUARY 1-15

30 Rock [T]

The Middle [T]

The Good Wife [T]

FEBRUARY 16-28

Two and a Half Men [T]

Raging Planet [T]

Cake Boss

FEBRUARY 1-15

Two and a Half Men [T]

Raging Planet [T]

Cake Boss

FEBRUARY 16-28

30 Rock [T]

The Middle [T]

The Good Wife [T]

FILM SOUTHBOUND TELEVISION FILM NORTHBOUND TELEVISION

SECRET TEARS

ASK PEOPLE what they can’t fl y without, and you’ll get answers

such as laptops or neck pillows. Add to the list tissues, because

most of us fi nd catharsis crying while watching infl ight fi lms.

We weepers start out strong, tuning in to the latest Clive Owen

fl ick or Spike Jonze’s fantastical adaptation. Sure, Owen plays a

widower who rebuilds his family in The Boys Are Back, but it’s only

a fi lm. Yes, Max and his mother share an understated, aff ectionate

reunion in Where The Wild Things Are, but we can handle it. Travel

blogger Amanda Pressner of “The Lost Girls” says that tears are

just part of the travel experience, and one she wouldn’t change.

We wouldn’t either.—Patrick Huguenin

WESTBOUND

FEBRUARY 1-15

Two and a Half Men [T]

The Good Wife [T]

Cake Boss

30 Rock [T]

FEBRUARY 16-28

Samantha Brown’s Great Weekends

Brothers and Sisters [T]

The Simpsons [T]

Arrested Development [T]


MOST FILMS HAVE BEEN EDITED FOR AIRLINE USE.

However, customer discretion is still advised.

Content guidelines are provided as a courtesy to our

customers in choosing whether to view a fi lm.

WHIP IT!

1 hr.

46 min.

“Sweet without being sticky and funny without getting silly, Whip It! introduces

Barrymore as a director with a keen eye, a good ear for tone and an inspired

touch with actors.”—New York Post

Girl power. Whip It!, the directorial debut of Drew Barrymore, stars Ellen Page as

Bliss, a rebellious Texas teen who throws in her small town beauty pageant crown

for the rowdy world of roller derby. Marcia Gay Harden plays Bliss’ disapproving

mother, while Kristen Wiig and Juliette Lewis play roller-derby stars.

FEATURING Ellen Page, Jimmy Fallon, Daniel Stern

DIRECTED BY Drew Barrymore

THE INVENTION OF LYING

“However cheeky and blasphemous, this is, at heart, a rather sweet little

fable. Which of course would mean nothing if it weren’t explosively funny.”

—New York Magazine

Truth story. The Invention of Lying takes place in a world in which lying—even

the concept of a lie—does not exist. But when Mark Bellison suddenly develops

the ability to lie, he fi nds that dishonesty has its rewards. He lies his way to

fame and fortune, but still can’t get the woman he loves.

FEATURING Ricky Gervais, Jennifer Garner, Jonah Hill

DIRECTED BY Ricky Gervais, Matthew Robinson

CUSTOMERS ARE WELCOME TO VIEW their own

video entertainment aboard a United aircraft as long

as they are able to show the programming has an

MPAA rating of “R” or less.

1 hr.

38 min.

HEMISPHERESMAGAZINE.COM | FEBRUARY 2010

THE BOYS ARE BACK [T]

(S) Spanish

(G) German

(C) Chinese

(J) Japanese

[V] Violence

[S] Sexual Situations

[T] Adult Themes

1 hr.

44 min.

“Few fi lms have so poignantly portrayed a father’s relationships with his sons as

The Boys Are Back.”—The Hollywood Reporter

Sweet serendipity. This fi lm follows a wisecracking sportswriter who, in the wake

of his wife’s tragic death, fi nds himself a single parent. Raising two boys in a

household devoid of feminine infl uence, and with an unabashed lack of rules, life

becomes exuberant and reckless.

FEATURING Clive Owen, Laura Fraser, George MacKay

DIRECTED BY Scott Hicks

WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE

89

“Jonze has fi lmed a fantasy as if it were absolutely real, allowing us to see the

world as Max sees it, full of beauty and terror. The brilliant songs, by Karen O (of

the Yeah Yeah Yeahs) and the Kids, enhance the fi lm’s power.”—Rolling Stone

An adaptation of Maurice Sendak’s classic children’s story, in which Max,

a disobedient little boy sent to bed without his supper, creates his own

world—a forest inhabited by ferocious wild creatures that crown Max as

their ruler.

FEATURING Catherine Keener, Max Records, Mark Ruffalo

DIRECTED BY Spike Jonze

1 hr.

41 min.


FILM

& TELEVISION

TELEVISION DESCRIPTIONS

The views contained in the video content are not necessarily those of United.

LIVE LAUGH LEARN

TOP CHEF MASTERS

Top Chef Masters fl ips the judges’ table to fi nd out

which superstar hash-slingers can handle the heat.

Twenty-four world-renowned chefs are pitted

against each other to win $100,000 for charity.

They are faced with a Quickfi re Challenge—using

ingredients that aren’t exactly gourmet quality.

CAKE BOSS

Join Buddy Valastro and his family at Carlo’s

Bakery. They’re surrounded by even more sweet

temptation than usual when they’re asked to make a

cake for Dylan’s Candy Bar. The sisters are tempted to

hire an assistant for Buddy. Cousin Anthony learns a

thing or two about how dangerous delivery can be.

FRIENDS

Take a trip back to the early aughts—remember how

well “The Rachel” haircut framed her face? We’ve

brought back the sitcom that defi ned a generation.

This episode serves up some good old Ross and

Rachel tension when the latter’s sister shows up and

dates the former.

THE MIDDLE

Meet TV’s newest lovably dysfunctional family

headed by Frankie, the third-best used car salesman

(out of the three) at the local dealership, and her

wisecracking husband, Mike. There’s Axl, her

seminudist teenage son; Sue, the awkward teen who

fails at everything—with gusto; and seven-year-old

son Brick, whose best friend is his backpack. .

GET IN TOUCH

Like to plan ahead and know what’s playing before your

flight? Text “MOVIE” to 75309 and you’ll get a reply with

the current movies that are playing. If you really like to

plan ahead, text “NEXT MOVIE” for next month’s movies.

What do you think of our programming? We’re open to

suggestions. Please send them to play@united.com.

RAGING PLANET

It’s not easy to capture the force of an avalanche

without getting swept up. But through breathtaking

aerial shots, and reinforced cameras placed directly in

the path of descending snow, you’ll be able to witness

the devastating power of these natural disasters.

WHERE THE WILD THINGS

ARE TV SPECIAL

Peak behind the movie magic of runaway hit Where

the Wild Things Are. The stunning use of animation,

combined with people in elaborate costumes, let

young Max, played by Max Records, really interact

with his imaginary characters. It all looks seemless

on-screen, so you’ll be amazed to fi nd out what went

in to making this fantastical fi lm.

YOUR COMPLETE GUIDE TO MOVIES, TV SHOWS, MUSIC AND PREMIUM SEAT COMFORT ABOARD UNITED

HAVE A BAWL

Where the Wild Things Are may cause

you to shed a few tears, but we’re

guessing your neighbor will join you.

FEBRUARY 2010

PLAY

Play_0210_p01_Cover.indd 1 08/01/2010 11:31

IF YOUR AIRCRAFT

IS EQUIPPED

with in-seat video,

refer to the separate

Play guide located in

your seat pocket.


Opt to sit farther

from your feet.

Economy Plus. ®

Purchase up to 5 inches of extra legroom.

united.com/traveloptions

©2009 United Air Lines, Inc. All Rights Reserved.


JAPAN

FILM

& TELEVISION

B747 MAINSCREEN PROGRAMMING

INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGE TRACKS (G) Die Auffl istungder Sprachen für ausgewählte Spielfi lme fi nden Sie für die 747-400 Maschinen auf Kanal 2

für alle weiteren Maschinen auf Kanal 10. (J) トラック言語本の長編映画をチャンネル2と747-400航空機上の他の飛行機内でのチャネル10で選択されています

(C) 在747-400型飞机上这些故事片的音频位于第 10频道. 在其他型号的飞机上位于第2频道

GERMANY

AUSTRALIA

CHINA &

HONG KONG

SINGAPORE–

HONG KONG

VIETNAM–

HONG KONG

JAPAN–

THAILAND

If your aircraft is equipped with in-seat video, refer to the separate Play guide located in your seat pocket.

FILM TELEVISION

The Invention of Lying (G)

Where the Wild Things Are (G)

My One and Only (G)

*The Informant! (G)

*West Coast only

FILM TELEVISION

FILM TELEVISION FILM TELEVISION

The Invention of Lying (G)

Where the Wild Things Are (G)

My One and Only (G)

The Informant! (G)

FILM TELEVISION FILM TELEVISION

The Invention of Lying (J)(C)

Where the Wild Things Are (J)(C)

My One and Only (C)

*The Informant! (J)(C)

*East Coast/ORD only

Brothers and Sisters [T] (J)

Frasier [T] (J)

House [T]

FILM TELEVISION FILM TELEVISION

The Invention of Lying (J)(C)

Where the Wild Things Are (J)(C)

My One and Only (C)

The Informant! (J)(C)

Harry Potter

and the Half-Blood Prince [V] (J)(C)

Brothers and Sisters [T] (C)

Frasier [T] (C)

House [T] (C)

Brothers and Sisters [T] (C)

Royal Pains [T] (C)

Frasier [T] (C)

Brothers and Sisters [T] (C) / Royal Pains [T] (C)

Frasier [T] (C)

Extreme Loggers (C)

Out of the Wild:

The Alaska Experiment (C)

Some Assembly Required (C)

The Real (J) / HARDtalk (J)

Peschardt’s People (J)

Fast Track (J)

FILM TELEVISION FILM TELEVISION

Harry Potter and the

Half-Blood Prince [V] (J)(C)

The Informant! (J)(C)

EASTBOUND WESTBOUND

Ho Chi Minh City to Hong Kong

The Mentalist [T]

Brothers and Sisters [T]

30 Rock [T]

Chuck [T]

Cake Boss

Two and a Half Men [T]

The Real (J)

HARDtalk (J)

Peschardt’s People (J)

Fast Track (J)

Whip It (G)

The Boys Are Back [T] (G)

Love Happens (G)

*Cloudy With a Chance

of Meatballs (G)

*West Coast only

Whip It (G)

The Boys Are Back [T] (G)

Love Happens (G)

Cloudy With a Chance

of Meatballs (G)

Whip It (J)(C)

The Boys Are Back [T] (J)(C)

Love Happens (J)(C)

*Cloudy With a Chance

of Meatballs (J)(C)

*East Coast/ORD only

Whip It (J)(C)

The Boys Are Back [T] (J)(C)

Love Happens (J)(C)

Cloudy With a Chance

of Meatballs (J)(C)

Star Trek [V] (J)(C)

Star Trek [V] (J)(C)

Cloudy With a Chance

of Meatballs (J)(C)

Hong Kong to Ho Chi Minh City

NCIS: Los Angeles [T][V]

House [T]

The Middle [T]

The Mentalist [T]

The Office (U.K.) [T]

Parks and Recreation [T]

30 Rock [T]

The Real (J)

HARDtalk (J)

Peschardt’s People (J)

Fast Track

The Real (J) / HARDtalk (J)

Peschardt’s People (J) / Fast Track (J)

Brothers and Sisters [T] (C)

Royal Pains [T] (C)

Frasier [T] (C)


THE INFORMANT!

Based on the true story of Mark Whitacre, a rising

corporate star at Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) in

the early ’90s who secretly gathered hundreds of

hours of tapes over several years to present to the

FBI in what became one of the largest price fi xing

cases in history.

FEATURING Matt Damon, Scott Bakula, Joel McHale

DIRECTED BY Steven Soderbergh

MY ONE

AND ONLY

1 hr.

48 min.

1 hr.

49 min.

My One and Only is inspired by incidents in the

life of Hollywood icon George Hamilton and told

from the perspective of him as a witty young man.

Ann Devereaux leaves her philandering husband

and hits the road with her teenage sons to fi nd a

wealthy replacement mate.

FEATURING Renée Zellweger, Logan Lerman, Kevin Bacon

DIRECTED BY Richard Loncraine

UAL CORPORATION ONBOARD PHOTOGRAPHY AND VIDEO POLICY

Digital media loading occurs between the 25th and 5th

of each month. As a result, please understand if your

fl ight features a different line up before and after the

start of each month.

LOVE HAPPENS

1 hr.

26 min.

A widower writes a book about how to cope with the

death of a loved one, which makes him an overnight

self-help guru. But he still can’t deal with the loss of

his own wife. After meeting a freewheeling woman

at one of his seminars, she teaches him how to truly

move on.

FEATURING Aaron Eckhart, Jennifer Aniston,

Dan Fogler

DIRECTED BY Brandon Camp

CLOUDY WITH A

CHANCE OF MEATBALLS

1 hr.

29 min.

Inspired by Ron and Judi Barrett’s children’s book

of the same name, Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs

follows inventor Flint and a weather girl as they try

to fi gure out why food is falling instead of rain in

their town. Meanwhile, the mayor schemes to use

Flint’s latest invention for his own personal gain.

VOICES BY Bill Hader, Anna Faris, James Caan

DIRECTED BY Phil Lord, Chris Miller

HEMISPHERESMAGAZINE.COM | FEBRUARY 2010

(S) Spanish

(G) German

(C) Chinese

(J) Japanese

HARRY POTTER AND THE

HALF-BLOOD PRINCE [V]

2 hrs.

27 min.

As Harry Potter begins his sixth year at Hogwarts

School of Witchcraft and Wizardry, he discovers

an old book marked mysteriously “This book is the

property of the Half-Blood Prince” and begins to

learn more about Lord Voldemort’s dark past.

FEATURING Daniel Radcliffe, Rupert Grint,

Emma Watson

DIRECTED BY David Yates

STAR TREK [V]

[V] Violence

[S] Sexual Situations

[T] Adult Themes

2 hrs.

7 min.

The story chronicles the early days of James T.

Kirk and his fellow USS Enterprise crew members

during their time at Star Fleet Academy, with

adventures stretching from earth to Vulcan. Spock

is still logical and Scotty still complains bitterly

about the ship’s overworked engines. Kirk and

Spock are brought center stage as the film tracks

the origins of their friendship and how they

became officers aboard the Enterprise.

FEATURING Chris Pine, Zachary Quinto,

Zoe Saldana

DIRECTED BY J.J. Abrams

United Airlines strives to make its customer experience safe and comfortable and accordingly has issued the following policy in regard to the use of personal audio and video equipment onboard its

aircraft. This policy is not a contract and does not create any legal rights or obligations.

Customers who bring personal audio and video equipment onboard may only use these items with headsets. Noise-canceling headsets may be activated. The use of still and video cameras, fi lm or digital,

including any cellular or other devices that have this capability, is permitted only for recording of personal events. However, photography, audio, or video recording of other customers without their

express prior consent is strictly prohibited. Also, unauthorized photography, audio, or video recording of airline personnel, aircraft equipment, or procedures is always prohibited. Any voice,

audio, video, or other photography (motion or still), recording, or transmission while on any United Airlines aircraft is strictly prohibited, except to the extent specifi cally permitted by United Airlines

(October 2009).

93


©2010 The Coca-Cola Company. “Coca-Cola” and the Dynamic Ribbon are registered trademarks of The Coca-Cola Company. 36USC220506


AUDIO

PROGRAMMING

CH.

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

*Live communication between the fl ight deck and FAA

air-traffi c control is offered. As you listen, your fl ight

will be identifi ed by its fl ight number. This feature is

unique to United and may not be available on all fl ights.

Available at your captain’s discretion.

HEMISPHERESMAGAZINE.COM | FEBRUARY 2010

XM RADIO AND UNITED offer a sampling of XM’s exclusive music

channels for your infl ight enjoyment. Find your aircraft model on

the grid below and review the selections on the channel listing.

Everything worth listening to is now on XM.

777 2-CABIN A319 & A320 SELECT A320 747 757 & 767 2-CABIN 737

MOVIE

English

Top 20 Hits

’70s Hits

Adult Contemporary Hits

Children’s Programming

From the Flight Deck

MOVIE

Dubbed

MOVIE

Dubbed

Classic Rock Adult Contemporary Hits

Classic Rock

MOVIE

English

MOVIE

Dubbed

MOVIE

Dubbed

Adult Contemporary Hits

From the Flight Deck

New Age New Age

New Alternative

MOVIE

English

Top 20 Hits

’70s Hits

Adult Contemporary Hits

Children’s Programming

Adult Album Rock ’70s Hits

Adult Album Rock

’70s Hits

Children’s Programming

MOVIE

English

Top 20 Hits

Adult Contemporary Hits

Children’s Programming

From the

Flight Deck Smooth Jazz

95

Unavailable

Top 20 Hits

Modern Adult Hits Modern Adult Hits Modern Adult Hits

Modern Adult Hits Modern Adult Hits

Classical Pops Classical Pops Classical Pops ’60s Hits

Classical Pops Classical Pops

’60s Hits ’60s Hits

’60s Hits

New Country Hits

Blues

Unavailable

Unavailable

Unavailable

From the Flight Deck

MOVIE

English

Top 20 Hits

From the Flight Deck

’80s Hits Children’s Programming

’80s Hits

Smooth Jazz Smooth Jazz

Classic Soul

Today’s R&B Hits

New Country Hits

Smooth Jazz

New Country Hits

Modern Adult Hits

New Country Hits

Classical Pops

Top 20 Hits

Smooth Jazz

’60s Hits ’60s Hits

’70s Hits ’70s Hits

Adult Contemporary Hits

Children’s Programming

From the

Flight Deck Smooth Jazz


AUDIO

PROGRAMMING

CHANNELS & ARTISTS

SMOOTH JAZZ Watercolors

plays the best contemporary

jazz instrumentals, classic

and new, blended with

just the right vocals. It’s

contemporary crossover

that’s always cool.

WHO YOU’LL HEAR

Dave Koz, Diana Krall,

George Benson, Sade,

George Duke

CLASSIC SOUL Soul Town is

a celebration of the Motown,

Stax and Atlantic record

labels—vintage soul and

classic R&B from the 1960s

and ’70s.

WHO YOU’LL HEAR

James Brown, The Four Tops,

Aretha Franklin, The

Supremes

CLASSIC ROCK Hold your

lighters in the air. It’s all

classic rock of the ’60s and

’70s, when music came on

LPs. Drop the needle on

Classic Vinyl.

WHO YOU’LL HEAR

Creedence Clearwater

Revival, The Beatles, Pink

Floyd, Lynyrd Skynyrd, Bad

Company, Rolling Stones

ADULT CONTEMPORARY HITS

The Blend is the soundtrack

of your life—a great mix of

Lite pop hits from the ’70s

through today; never any rap

or rock.

WHO YOU’LL HEAR

Rod Stewart, Billy Joel,

Madonna, Eric Clapton

BLUES From the Delta,

Chicago, New Orleans and

more, B.B. King’s Bluesville

covers more than 80 years

of authentic blues.

WHO YOU’LL HEAR

B.B. King, Buddy Guy, Etta

James, Muddy Waters

NEW COUNTRY HITS The

Highway plays the very

latest New Country, along

with the biggest hits of

the past few years.

WHO YOU’LL HEAR

Kenny Chesney, Taylor

Swift, Carrie Underwood,

Keith Urban, Rascal Flatts,

Sugarland, Tim McGraw

CHILDREN’S PROGRAMMING

Kids Place Live features

award-winning original

content blended with a music

mix of the most popular kids’

movie and TV soundtracks,

plus Children’s Programming’s

recording artists.

WHO YOU’LL HEAR

The Wiggles, Tom Chapin,

Dan Zanes, They Might Be

Giants

TODAY’S R&B HITS

R&B Hits from the ‘80s, ‘90s

and today. Sounds that reach

your Heart & Soul.

WHO YOU’LL HEAR

Mary J. Blige, Alicia Keys,

Charlie Wilson, Jill Scott,

Maxwell

ADULT ALBUM ROCK New

music and classic tracks from

artists who’ve stood the test

of time, plus quality rock

from credible new artists.

WHO YOU’LL HEAR

U2, Dave Matthews Band,

Neil Young, Coldplay

NEW AGE Spa is a place of

peace in a sometimes crazy

world. It’s a beautiful place

where you are soothed by

dreamy, fl owing music.

WHO YOU’LL HEAR

Enya, Brian Eno, Tangerine

Dream, Kevin Braheny,

Mark Isham, Suzanne Ciani

’60S HITS The times they

were a-changin’, and so

was the music. ’60s on 6

revisits the British invasion

and Woodstock with DJ

Cousin Brucie.

WHO YOU’LL HEAR

The Beatles, Beach Boys, Bob

Dylan

XM RADIO AND UNITED offer a sampling of XM’s exclusive music

channels for your infl ight enjoyment. Find your aircraft model on

page 95 and review the selections on the channel listing. Everything

worth listening to is now on XM.

NEW ALTERNATIVE The latest

alternative rock, best of

the ’90s and the next big

thing before it becomes so

big you can’t stand it.

WHO YOU’LL HEAR

Weezer, The Raconteurs,

The Bravery, Foo Fighters,

Death Cab for Cutie, Jimmy

Eat World

MODERN ADULT HITS It’s

the ’90s and now! Hear

today’s pop hits from

artists like Matchbox 20,

Alanis Morissette, Maroon

5, Kelly Clarkson and the

Dave Matthews Band. Feel

the Pulse of adult pop!

WHO YOU’LL HEAR

Daughtry, No Doubt, Colbie

Caillat, Plain White T’s

’70S HITS ’70s on 7 takes you

back to the days of bell bottoms

and pet rocks, when the music

was wider than ever—from

singer-songwriters and classic

rock to R&B and disco.

WHO YOU’LL HEAR

Elton John, Donna Summer, The

Eagles, Chicago, Fleetwood Mac

TOP 20 HITS Top 20 on 20

plays just the songs you vote

for. Cast your vote anytime

at 20on20.

xmradio.com; then plug in

and hear what’s hot.

WHO YOU’LL HEAR

Justin Timberlake, Fergie,

Daughtry, Kanye West

CLASSICAL POPS Listen to

classical music’s greatest

hits and famous movie

music, performed by renowned

orchestras and soloists,

on SIRIUS XM Pops.

WHO YOU’LL HEAR

Boston Pops, Cincinnati

Pops, Andrea Bocelli, James

Galway, Joshua Bell, John

Philip Sousa

’80S HITS “Totally awesome”

’80s on 8 sounds like one of

the great Top 40 stations of

the time, with rock, rhythm

and pop—plus hair bands

and the original MTV VJs.

WHO YOU’LL HEAR

Michael Jackson, Duran

Duran, Cyndi Lauper, Prince,

George Michael


Get commercial-free music, live sports, news and

exclusive entertainment through your existing

vehicle radio with easy Do-It-Yourself installation.

MUSIC · SPORTS · TALK · NEWS · ENTERTAINMENT

EVERYTHING WORTH LISTENING TO IS ON

EARN

4,000 MILES

United passengers can enjoy all of our exclusive

entertainment anywhere and earn 4,000 bonus

United Mileage Plus miles.*

Visit www.xmradio.com/ua for full details.

*OFFER DETAILS: To qualify for Mileage Plus rewards on eligible radios, you must buy a prepaid recurring minimum Quarterly subscription plan to any XM Package (excluding A La Carte, Mostly Music, and News, Talk & Sports), together with the eligible radio by 3/31/10.

You must activate your XM subscription on that radio no later than 3/31/10 with a valid credit card; pay an activation fee of $14.99 and any other fees and taxes that will apply to your subscription, maintain at least 12 months of continuous service, and retain that

credit card on the account for automatic recurring service billing. Failure to maintain 12 months of continuous “minimum service commitment” for each radio will result in a $75 early cancellation fee per radio. Service will automatically renew for additional periods

of the same length as the Plan you choose, at the then current renewal rate unless you cancel. Hardware sold separately. This offer may be modifi ed or terminated at any time. Pricing, programming, schedule, and channel assignments are subject to change. Check

xmradio.com for the latest updates. Subscriptions are governed by the XM Customer Agreement available at xmradio.com. XM Radio U.S. service available only in the 48 contiguous United States, and D.C., to those at least 18 years of age.

© 2009 SIRIUS XM Radio Inc. SIRIUS, XM and all related marks and logos are trademarks of SIRIUS XM Radio Inc. and its subsidiaries. Apple, iPhone, iPod and iPod touch are registered trademarks of Apple Inc. All other marks, channel names and logos are the

property of their respective owners. All rights reserved.

29190


ROUTE MAPS

NORTH AMERICAN CITIES

United/United Express Route Cities served by United and

Time zone boundary

United Express

UNITED HUB

Cities served by Star Alliance

or partner Code Share



Anchorage






Honolulu

Kapalua




Vancouver


Victoria

Seattle






Calgary


Saskatoon




Moses

Lake


Spokane

Kalispell

Regina

Portland Pasco

Eugene

North Bend

Redmond

Medford


Crescent City

Klamath

Falls

Eureka

Redding

Chico

Winnipeg

Missoula

Great Falls

Helena






Bozeman

Bismarck

Billings

Fargo

Boise Cody/

Yellowstone

Idaho Falls

Gillette



Jackson Hole

Rapid City

Minneap

PierreHuron

Sacramento


Reno/Tahoe

Casper

Rock Springs

Chadron

Sioux

Falls


SAN FRANCISCO Oakland

Scottsbluff

Salt Lake City

Alliance

San Jose

Modesto

Laramie


Hayden/

Fresno

Steamboat

Omaha

Monterey

Springs

Des

Grand


Moines

Junction


Vail/Eagle

DENVER

Kearney

Aspen

McCook

Lincoln

Inyokern

San Luis Obispo

Montrose Gunnison/

Colorado Springs

Bakersfield

Las Vegas

Crested

Hays

Santa Maria

Butte

Salina

Durango

Kansas City

Santa Barbara Burbank

Oxnard LOS ANGELES

Garden City Great Bend

Orange County

Ontario Kingman

Dodge City


Wichita

Liberal

Springfi

Carlsbad

Palm Springs

San Diego

Imperial

Yuma

Phoenix/Scottsdale

Albuquerque

Oklahoma City

Tulsa

Northwe

Arkansas

Manhattan

Glasgow

Williston

Wolf Point

Lewistown

Sidney

Miles City Dickinson

Sheridan

Worland

Riverton

Merced

Vernal

Cheyenne

North Platte

Grand

Visalia

Island

B

Moab

Telluride

Page/

Cortez

Lake Powell

Pueblo

Farmington Alamosa

Prescott

Show Low

Kahului


Kona

0 50 100 150 Miles

0 50 100 150 200 Kilometers

Hilo

Tucson

Los Cabos


Route lines do not refl ect actual fl ight path

Edmonton


El Paso

Puerto Vallarta


Midland/

Odessa


San Antonio

Austin

Laredo

McAllen

Mexico City



Dallas/

Fort

Worth

Houston

Corpus Christi

Harlingen

Brownsville


Duluth










Portland



Toronto Syracuse

Albany Boston

Grand

Hartford/

Milwaukee Rapids

Buffalo/

Niagara

Springfield


Falls

Providence

Detroit

Cleveland

New York (La Guardia)

(J.F. Kennedy)


Newark

Columbus

Philadelphia


Baltimore

WASHINGTON, DC (DULLES)

Cincinnati


St. Louis

Louisville

Richmond

Lexington

Norfolk/Virginia Beach




Greensboro/High Point/Winston-Salem

Raleigh/Durham

Nashville Knoxville

Charlotte


Greenville/

Memphis

Spartanburg

Columbia

Atlanta


Birmingham

Charleston





Savannah



Jacksonville

New

Orleans


Orlando


Ottawa

Burlington

Wausau

olis

Green Bay Traverse City

Manchester

Appleton/

Ithaca/

Fox Cities

Muskegon

Midland/ Rochester

Corning

Saginaw

London

Binghamton

Newburgh

Madison

Lansing

Wilkes Barre/

South

Scranton

New Haven

White

Cedar

Bend/Elkhart/

Williamsport

Plains Long Island/Islip

Rapids/

Mishawaka


Iowa City

State

Akron/Canton College Allentown

urlington Peoria Ft.

Moline

Pittsburgh

Wayne

Harrisburg

Johnstown

Altoona

Dayton

Morgantown


Springfield Indianapolis

Clarksburg

Parkersburg

Salisbury

Shenandoah

Valley

(Reagan National)

Huntington Charleston Charlottesville

Beckley

Waynesville

eld

Roanoke

Newport News/Williamsburg

st

Tri-Cities Regional

Paducah

Greenville

New Bern

Asheville

Fayetteville/Ft. Bragg

Jacksonville

Little

Chattanooga

Wilmington

Rock

Huntsville/

Florence

Decatur

Myrtle Beach

Augusta

Jackson

Montgomery

Hilton Head Island

Baton

Rouge

Mobile

Pensacola Tallahassee

Gulfport/

Biloxi

Ft. Walton

Beach

Gainesville

Tampa/St. Petersburg


West Palm Beach

Ft. Myers

Freeport

Ft. Lauderdale/Hollywood

Miami

North Eleuthera

Nassau

Key West

Providenciales



Cozumel


Grand Cayman



St. Maarten

St. Thomas

Antigua

San Juan

Punta Cana


St. Kitts



Santo Domingo

0 100 200 300 400 Miles

0 100 200 300 400 500 600 Kilometers

City

Montego Bay



HEMISPHERESMAGAZINE.COM | FEBRUARY 2010









Halifax





Hamilton





St. Lucia

99


Delhi



ROUTE MAPS

INTERNATIONAL CITIES


United Route

Code Share route serviced by a

Star Alliance member

Code Share route serviced by a

United Partner









Perth





Harbin


Shenyang Sapporo


Beijing



Baotou


Dalian

Fukuoka Sendai

Seoul

Qingdao


Komatsu

Tokyo

Shanghai Pusan OsakaNagoya

Nanjing

Chengdu Wuhan

Hiroshima

Chongqing Hangzhou


Xiamen

Fuzhou


Okinawa

Guangzhou Taipei



Kolkata Hanoi


Hong Kong

Shenzhen





Bangkok


Saipan



Guam


Phuket

Kuala Lumpur

Singapore


Ho Chi Minh

City (Saigon)

Kota Kinabalu



Cities served by United, United

Express and Code Share partners

Melbourne






Cairns

Sydney


Brisbane




Queenstown










Nadi




Auckland

Rotorua

Wellington

Christchurch

Dunedin





Time zone boundary

Route lines do not refl ect actual fl ight path


Apia


Honolulu



Rarotonga Cook










San Francisco


Seattle

Los Angeles





Denver




Dallas

Guatem

San

M


Philadelphia

Miami

Aruba

New York

Boston

Frankfurt

Belize

City

Washington, DC

Rio de Janeiro

Copenhagen

Chicago

Newark

Addis Ababa

Paris

Chennai (Madras)

Tel Aviv

Kuwait

Lagos

Johannesburg

Munich

Houston

Accra

Bangalore

Mumbai

Rome

Delhi

Amman

Alma-Ata

Amsterdam

Cape Town

Madrid

Stockholm

London

Dubai

Abu Dhabi Muscat

Vienna

Atlanta

Detroit

Warsaw

Shannon

Buenos Aires

ala City

Salvador

Brussels










Cairo

Asmara

Bahrain

Dakar

Lisbon

Durban

East London

Porto

Hyderabad

Orlando

Tbilisi

Port Elizabeth

Lima

Cuzco

Tegucigalpa

San Pedro Sula

anagua

Cochin

Colombo

Islamabad

Lahore

Peshawar

Trivandrum

Liberia

Doha

Abuja

Karachi

Geneva

Brasilia

Curitiba

Fortaleza

Manaus

Porto Alegre

Salvador

Belo Horizonte

Iguassu Falls

Recife

Dublin

Moscow

Charlotte

Jeddah

Riyadh

Sal

Istanbul

Belfast

Manchester

Birmingham

Bristol

Barcelona

Edinburgh

Glasgow

Hamburg

Oslo

Milan

Berlin

Panama City





Santiago

Montevideo

101

Budapest

Lisbon



Porto







































Turin

Lyon Geneva

Paris

London

Oslo

Copenhagen

Hamburg

Brussels

Hannover

Frankfurt

Nuremberg

Milan

Venice

Pisa

Rome

Naples

Trieste

Istanbul

Bucharest

Kiev

Vienna

Munich

Prague

Warsaw

Helsinki

Luga



Berlin


Bremen




Graz

Innsbruck Klagenfurt

Linz

Salzburg

Sofia

Sarajevo

Cologne

Dresden

Verona

Vilnius

Katowice

Marseille Nice

Stuttgart

Riga

Stavanger

Ancona

Dublin

Bologna

Florence

Genoa

Stockholm

Amsterdam

Basel

Aberdeen

Edinburgh

Belfast

Birmingham


Bergen

Ankara

Glasgow

Manchester

Skopje

Belgrade


Shannon

Cork

Adan

Antalya

Izmir

Leipzig

HEMISPHERESMAGAZINE.COM | FEBRUARY 2010


INFORMATION & TERMINAL DIAGRAMS

DOMESTIC

MAKING YOUR CONNECTING FLIGHT. Whether your next fl ight is on United or one of the Star

Alliance partners around the world, use the terminal diagrams on pages 102–106 to plan

your connection. In addition to gate locations, these maps show ticket counters, United

Red Carpet Clubs and interterminal transportation.

CONTACT INFORMATION

Reservations

united.com

800-UNITED-1 (800-864-8331)

Automated Flight Information

800-UNITED-1 (800-864-8331)

Mileage Plus

24-Hour Account Information &

Award Travel

united.com/mileageplus

800-UNITED-1 (800-864-8331)

Mileage Plus Visa Customer

Service

united.com/chase

800-537-7783

Baggage Services

united.com/baggage

800-UNITED-1 (800-864-8331)

Refunds

united.com/refunds

800-UNITED-1 (800-864-8331)

Customer Relations

united.com/customerrelations

Email: customerrelations@

united.com

800-UNITED-1 (800-864-8331)

Red Carpet Club

united.com/redcarpetclub

866-UA-CLUBS (toll-free)

520-881-0500 (outside the U.S.)

Hearing Impaired (TDD)

800-323-0170

Language Assistance (Asian)

800-426-5560

Reservaciones en Español

800-426-5561

United Cargo

unitedcargo.com

800-UA-CARGO (800-822-2746)

United Services

unitedsvcs.com

TRAVEL ASSISTANCE FOR DELAYED OR CANCELED FLIGHTS

At United Airlines, our priority is safety and keeping an on-time

schedule. On occasion, canceling or delaying a fl ight is the only option

to assure we maintain the highest safety standards.

Flight canceled? We automatically confi rm you on the next United

fl ight with available seats. EasyCheck-in® units located in the concourse

will assist you with information and a boarding pass—it will also help

you standby for an earlier United fl ight if one is scheduled. If you want

to travel standby and aren’t boarded, we will transfer your name to the

next United fl ight to your destination until you are onboard.

What about my bag? Baggage is boarded on the next fl ight if space

is available. This means your bags may arrive before you. United will

secure the bag until you claim it. See a baggage claim representative.

What if I have to stay overnight? If a fl ight is canceled to address a

mechanical issue or another similar reason within our control, we

Meetings Plus

800-MEET-UAL (800-633-8825)

Duty Free World

6095 NW 167th St. Suite D-4

Miami, FL 33015 USA

800-668-6182

United Vacations

unitedvacations.com

800-32-TOURS (800-328-6877)

Charter an Airplane

united.com/charter

Small Package Same Day

Shipping

Small Package Dispatch (SPD)—

Airport-to-airport service:

800-722-5243

Employment Opportunities

united.com/jobs

888-UAL-JOBS (888-825-5627)

EasyCheck-in kiosks are located

on the concourse to assist

customers who have experienced

a misconnection or canceled

fl ight. Customers who have

e-tickets and are traveling

domestically may use the kiosk to:

1. Rebook on another fl ight

2. Obtain a boarding pass

3. Standby for the next fl ight to

their destination

will provide you with a hotel and meal voucher. For uncontrollable

events—such as weather—we may be able to help you locate a local

hotel at a discounted rate; however United does not cover hotel or

meal expenses in this event. If we can not retrieve your checked bag,

overnight kits containing toiletries are available. Please see an agent.

What if the reason for my travel no longer exists? If as a result of the

delay or cancelation you decide not to travel, call United reservations

(1-800 UNITED-1) to get information on your options.

Help us help you keep informed. Sign up for EasyUpdate®, our messaging

service. If your fl ight is canceled or delayed, EasyUpdate® will

inform you. Enroll at united.com/easyupdate. At home? Go to united.

com for information or to check-in and print your boarding pass.

Your safety and satisfaction are important. We appreciate your business

and apologize for any inconvenience you may have experienced.


ORD

IAD

HEMISPHERESMAGAZINE.COM | FEBRUARY 2010

CHICAGO / O’HARE INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT EasyCheck-in is available at this airport.

United Gate Area

United Red Carpet Club

United First International Lounge

United Arrivals Suite

United Premier Check-In

Power Charging Station

Interterminal Shuttle Bus Stop / Train Stop

United Easy Check-In

Medical Center

WASHINGTON / DULLES INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT EasyCheck-in is available at this airport.

United Gate Area

United Red Carpet Club

United First International Lounge

International Arrivals Suite

United Premier Check-In

United Easy Check-In

Medical Center

TERMINAL

FIVE

International

Arrivals

Concourse C

Air Canada

C2 C12 C18

C1

TERMINAL

THREE

Concourse M

A2 A4 A6

A1 A3 A5

Train

Concourse F

US Airways

C Connector Tunnel

A14

F11

C24

C9 C17 C27

F14

F10

F4

TERMINAL

TWO

Concourse A

F6

F1

Elevated Airport

Transit System (ATS)

D2

D1 D3

MAIN TERMINAL

E3

E1

Concourse E

Air Canada

B1

A32

TERMINAL T

B6

Concourse B

Continental

Lufthansa

C1

B9

B22

C9

Pedestrian

Tunnel

TERMINAL

ONE

B14

B18

C8

C17

C19

Concourse D

D8 D30

103

Concourse C

C16

C18

B37 B79

C24

Concourse B

ANA

Continental

Austrian Airlines

SAS

South African Airways

US Airways

Lufthansa

C32

Shuttle runs between Gates C9 and E3.


LAX

SFO

DEN

TERMINAL DIAGRAMS

DOMESTIC & OVERSEAS

MAKING YOUR CONNECTING FLIGHT. Whether your next fl ight is on United or one of the Star

Alliance partners around the world, use the terminal diagrams on pages 102–106 to plan

your connection. In addition to gate locations, these maps show ticket counters, United

Red Carpet Clubs and interterminal transportation.

LOS ANGELES INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT EasyCheck-in is available at this airport.

United Gate Area

United Red Carpet Club

United First International Lounge

United Premier Check-In

Interterminal Shuttle Bus Stop

United Easy Check-In

SAN FRANCISCO INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT EasyCheck-in is available at this airport.

United Gate Area

United Red Carpet Club

United First International Lounge

United Arrivals Suite

International Arrivals Suite

United Premier Check-In

Power Charging Station

United Easy Check-In

Medical Center

DENVER INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT EasyCheck-in is available at this airport.

United Gate Area

International Arrivals Suite

United Premier Check-In

Interterminal Train Stop

United Easy Check-In

15

16

TOM BRADLEY

INTERNATIONAL

TERMINAL

Lufthansa

Thai Airways

ANA

Singapore

Asiana

Swiss

Concourse C

US Airways

Concourse A

Air Canada

Continental

Lufthansa

25

26

28

TERMINAL

WEST

TERMINAL 3 TERMINAL 2

Air Canada

Air New Zealand

TERMINAL 3

Concourse F

88

Concourse G

United

Air New Zealand

ANA

Lufthansa

Singapore

37

36

79

80

89 81

International Terminal

Secure Connector

39

38

73

35 41

72

78A

76A

Concourse A

Asiana

71

TERMINAL

EAST

67A

TERMINAL 4 TERMINAL 5 TERMINAL 6

Continental

49

64

69A 68B

TERMINAL 1

US Airways

12

4B

Concourse E

Air Canada

TERMINAL 1

76

88

TERMINAL 7 TERMINAL 8

H

71A

75A

57

57

50 60

70A

72

Concourse B

Continental

US Airways

Concourse B

81

80

77

91

80 92


LHR

LONDON / HEATHROW INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

United Gate Area

United Arrivals Suite

United Premier Check-In

Interterminal Shuttle Bus Stop

FRA

FRANKFURT INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

United Gate Area

Interterminal Train Stop

Medical Center

NRT

TOKYO / NARITA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

United Gate Area

United Red Carpet Club

United First International Lounge

United Premier Check-In

Medical Center

TERMINAL 5

Pier A, Level 3

Gates A51-A65

TERMINAL 3

Lufthansa Tower Lounge

Level 5

TERMINAL 4

Satellite 4

43

HEMISPHERESMAGAZINE.COM | FEBRUARY 2010

Pedestrian Transfer Tunnel

47

B26

B24

B20

B28

TERMINAL ONE

B300-B303

B332-B340

Pier B

TERMINAL 1

36

TERMINAL 2

C1

B48

B44

37

C5

B46

Satellite 3 Satellite 2

37

38 32

Pedestrian Tunnel

Satellite 5

South Wing

31

Fourth Floor

Third Floor

Zone D

Zone A

TERMINAL 1

42

39

105

43

50

Pier C

C7

C8

56

Train to Terminal 2

North Wing

Satellite 1


TERMINAL DIAGRAMS

STAR ALLIANCE

United Gate Area

United Red Carpet Club

United First International Lounge

United Arrivals Suite

International Arrivals Suite

United Premier Check-In

US AIRWAYS HUBS CONTINENTAL HUBS

PHL

CLT

PHX

PHILADELPHIA INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

Concourse A

West

CHARLOTTE DOUGLAS INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

Concourse E

PHOENIX SKY HARBOR INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

TERMINAL 2

United

1

7

Concourse A

East

Concourses B-E

US Airways

Concourses A, B, C & F

US Airways

Concourse C

Concourse D

Concourse B Concourse C

Concourse F

Continuous shuttle bus pickup and drop-off between Gates F10 and C16.

1

7

Concourse B

TERMINAL 4

US Airways

Concourse A Concourse B

13

Concourse E

Concourse D

United

2 4

Concourse A

United

Concourse B

International

To transfer between terminals, catch the interterminal bus curbside.

IAH

CLE

EWR

Power Charging Station

Interterminal Shuttle Bus Stop / Train Stop

United Easy Check-In

Medical Center

HOUSTON GEORGE BUSH INTERCONTINENTAL AIRPORT

A25-30

A17-24

TERMINAL A

United

TerminaLink connects B, C, D and E.

It is above ground transportation between terminals while inside security.

CLEVELAND HOPKINS INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

C22

D14

C19 C16

C25

D10

D17

C14

Concourse C

Continental

D21

D6

C7

C29 C10 C4

D25

D2

B3

C2

Pedestrian Tunnel

D28

NEWARK LIBERTY INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT

115

98

Shuttle Bus

127

136

92

80

102

TERMINALS A-E

Continental

A3-15 B76-83 B84-91

72

B68-75 B60-67

101

130

TERMINAL B

88

75

71

B3

TERMINAL C

Continental

TerminaLink

AirTrain

B2

TERMINAL B

C14-23

TERMINAL C TERMINAL E

Concourse B

United

Concourse D

Continental

AirTrain connects to Amtrak and New Jersey Transit.

B1

TERMINAL A

United

Continental

A3

TERMINAL D

E10-14

C34-42 E1-9 E15-24

Concourse A

A2

A1


ENJOY A WORLD OF STAR ALLIANCE CONNECTIONS AND PRIVILEGES. To receive eligible mileage

credit, please ensure that the name on your ticket matches the one on your Mileage Plus

account and the identifi cation you will use at check in. If you need to make a name change to

your Mileage Plus account, please go to united.com/namechange for more information.

ALLIANCES AND PARTNERSHIPS

STAR ALLIANCE PARTNERS

REGIONAL ALLIANCE PARTNERS

You can earn and redeem miles on many of our Regional

Alliance Partners. See united.com/airlinepartners for specifi c

information about each of our Regional Alliance Partners.

Aer Lingus

Air Dolomiti

Continental Connection

Emirates

Great Lakes

Hawaiian Airlines

Island Air

Jet Airways

Qatar Airways

TACA Group

TAM

HEMISPHERESMAGAZINE.COM | FEBRUARY 2010

107

STAR ALLIANCE Established in 1997 as the fi rst

truly global airline alliance to offer customers a

worldwide travel network that aims to provide

customers a seamless travel experience across

multiple airlines. Today the Star Alliance network

offers more than 18,900 daily fl ights to 983

destinations in 169 countries.

EARN MILEAGE PLUS® MILES AND ELITE STATUS FASTER

With the largest airline alliance, you can earn

miles almost anywhere in the world you fl y. The

miles you earn on any Star Alliance fl ight can

be credited to your Mileage Plus account. Plus

the fl ight miles will count toward elite status in

Mileage Plus.

EARN RECOGNITION AROUND THE WORLD The more

miles you fl y with United and the Star Alliance

airlines, the higher your Mileage Plus elite status

can be: Premier®, Premier Executive® or 1K®.

Mileage Plus elite status is recognized across

the alliance as either Star Alliance Silver or Star

Alliance Gold, with travel benefi ts worldwide. See

united.com/staralliance for the Star Silver and Star

Gold benefi ts you can receive.

AWARD TRAVEL IS NOW EASIER With Star Alliance

Awards, you can use your Mileage Plus miles

for award travel on any Star Alliance carrier

worldwide. Or use them for Star Alliance Upgrade

Awards and upgrade to a premium cabin and

travel in comfort (available on most Star Alliance

airlines).


CUSTOMS

& IMMIGRATION

ENTRY REGULATIONS

CUSTOMS DECLARATION

ENGLISH

All passengers (or one per family) are

required to complete the Customs

Declaration forms prior to arrival in the U.S.

The forms will be distributed infl ight and

should include all personal data in English

and in capital letters. Please ensure you sign

your name.

SPANISH/ESPAÑOL

Todos los pasajeros (o uno por cada familia)

tienen que llenar los formularios de

Declaración de Aduanas antes de llegar a

los EE.UU. Los formularios se distribuirán

durante el veulo y deben incluir todos sus

datos personales en inglés y con letras

mayúsculas. No olvide fi rmar en el reverso

del formulario.

1. Apellido, Nombre, Segundo

nombre

2. Fecha de nacimiento (Día/Mes/Año)

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS

The following items are considered hazardous

materials. Do not pack in checked or

carry-on luggage.

FLAMMABLE LIQUIDS OR SOLIDS

Fuel, paints, solvents, lighter fl uid, matches

WEAPONS

Loaded fi rearms, ammunition, gunpowder,

Mace, tear gas, pepper spray

HOUSEHOLD ITEMS

Drain cleaners and solvents

COMPRESSED GASES

Spray can, butane fuel, oxygen bottles

FIREWORKS

Firecrackers, sparklers or explosives

OTHER HAZARDOUS MATERIALS

Dry ice, gasoline-powered tools, camping

equipment with fuel, wet cell batteries,

oxidizers, corrosives, radioactive materials,

3. Cuántos familiares viajan con usted

4. (a) Dirección en los EE.UU.

(nombre del hotel/lugar)

(b) Ciudad, (c) Estado

5. Pasaporte expedido en (páis)

6. Número del pasaporte

7. País de residencia

8. Países que visitó durante este viaje

antes de su llegada a los EE.UU.

9. Línea aérea/número de vuelo o nombre

del barco

10. El propósito principal de este viaje es de

negocios: Sí / No

11. Traigo (Traemos)

(a) frutas, plantas, alimentos, insectos:

Sí / No

(b) carnes, animales, productos de

animales o silvestres: Sí / No

(c) agentes de enfermedades, cultivos

celulares, caracoles:Sí / No

(d) tierra o he (hemos) estado en fi nca/

granja/pastizales: Sí / No

12. He (Hemos) estado en cercanías de

ganado (tocando o manipulándolo):

Sí / No

13. Llevo (Llevamos) divisas o

instrumentos monetarios por valor

superior a $10,000 o su equivalente en

moneda extranjera (Véase la defi nición

de instrumentos monetarios al dorso):

Sí / No

14. Tengo (Tenemos) mercancías

comerciales (artículos para la venta,

muestras para solicitar pedidos o bienes

que no constituyen efectos personales):

Sí / No

15. Residentes—el valor total de todos

los bienes, incluidas las mercancías

comerciales que he (hemos) comprado

en el extranjero, (incluyendo regalos

para otras personas, pero sin incluir

los artículos enviados por correo a

los EE.UU.) y que estoy (estamos)

introduciendo en los EE.UU. es de:

$___

Visitantes—el valor total de todos

los artículos que permanecerán en

los EE.UU., incluidas las mercancías

comerciales, es de: $___

I-94 ARRIVAL / DEPARTURE RECORD

DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY OMB No. 1651-0111

U.S. Customs and Border Protection

Welcome to the United States

I-94 Arrival/Departure Record

Instructions

This form must be completed by all persons except U.S. Citizens, returning resident aliens,

aliens with immigrant visas, and Canadian Citizens visiting or in transit.

Type or print legibly with pen in ALL CAPITAL LETTERS. Use English. Do not write on the

back of this form.

This form is in two parts. Please complete both the Arrival Record (Items 1 through 17) and

the Departure Record (Items 18 through 21).

When all items are completed, present this form to the CBP Officer.

Item 9 - If you are entering the United States by land, enter LAND in this space. If you are

entering the United States by ship, enter SEA in this space.

5 U.S.C. § 552a(e)(3) Privacy Act Notice: Information collected on this form is required by Title 8 of the U.S. Code,

including the INA (8 U.S.C. 1103, 1187), and 8 CFR 235.1, 264, and 1235.1. The purposes for this collection are to

give the terms of admission and document the arrival and departure of nonimmigrant aliens to the U.S. The

information solicited on this form may be made available to other government agencies for law enforcement purposes

or to assist DHS in determining your admissibility. All nonimmigrant aliens seeking admission to the U.S., unless

otherwise exempted, must provide this information. Failure to provide this information may deny you entry to the

United States and result in your removal.

CBP Form I-94 (05/08)

OMB No. 1651-0111

Arrival Record

Admission Number

See Other Side

ENGLISH

Prior to arrival in the U.S., all foreign

nationals (except Canadian citizens and

U.S. permanent residents or nationals

of countries entitled to the Visa Waiver

Program—see I-94W on next page) are

required to complete an I-94 form. One

form is required for each family member.

Customers should complete all personal and

travel-related information included on the

front side of the form. Please do not write on

ENGLISH

000000000 00

1. Family Name

2. First (Given) Name 3. Birth Date (DD/MM/YY)

4. Country of Citizenship 5. Sex (Male or Female)

6. Passport Issue Date (DD/MM/YY) 7. Passport Expiration Date (DD/MM/YY)

8. Passport Number 9. Airline and Flight Number

10. Country Where You Live 11. Country Where You Boarded

12. City Where Visa Was Issued 13. Date Issued (DD/MM/YY)

14. Address While in the United States (Number and Street)

15. City and State

16. Telephone Number in the U.S. Where You Can be Reached

17. Email Address

DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

U.S. Customs and Border Protection

Departure Record

Admission Number

000000000 00

18. Family Name

CBP Form I-94 (05/08)

OMB No. 1651-0111

19. First (Given) Name 20. Birth Date (DD/MM/YY)

21. Country of Citizenship

CBP Form I-94 (05/08)

STAPLE HERE

Effective January 12, 2009, all passengers

who intend to travel to the United States

without a U.S. Visa under the terms of

the Visa Waiver Program must obtain

an electronic preauthorization or ESTA

in advance of travel. When planning

international travel, please be sure that

you are in possession of all required

documents. Remember to allow ample time

for acquiring offi cial travel documents. For

complete information on the requirements,

and to apply for ESTA, please visit www.

cbp.gov/esta.

the back side of the form. All information

should be written in capital letters and in

English. You are required to keep this form

until your departure from the U.S.

SPANISH / ESPAÑOL

Antes de su llegada a los Estados Unidos,

todos los ciudadanos extranjeros (excepto

los ciudadanos de Canadá y los residentes

permanentes en los Estados Unidos o

ciudadanos de los países que tienen el

Programa “Visa Waiver”—Ver formulario

I-94W en hoja adjunta) tienen que llenar

un formulario I-94. Hay que rellenar un

formulario por cada miembro de la familia.

Los pasajeros llenarán toda la información

personal y relativa al viaje que se incluye en

el anverso del formulario. Le rogamos que

no escriba en el reverso del formulario. Toda

la información debe estar escrita con letras

mayúsculas y en inglés. Le rogamos que

guarde este formulario hasta que salga de

los Estados Unidos.

1. Apellido

2. Nombre

3. Fecha de nacimiento

(Día/Mes/Año)

4. País de ciudadanía

5. Sexo (masculino o femenino)

6. Fecha de emisión del pasaporte

7. Fecha de vencimiento del pasaporte

8. Número de pasaporte

9. Aerolínea y número de vuelo

10. País donde vives

11. País en el que abordaron

12. Ciudad donde obtuvo el visado

13. Fecha del visado (Día/Mes/Año)

14. Direccion donde se quedará en los

EE.UU (Número, calle)

15. Ciudad y Estado

16. Teléfono de contacto en EE.UU.

17. Dirección de correo electrónico

18. Apellido

19. Nombre

20. Fecha de nacimiento (Día/Mes/Año)

21. Pais de ciudadanía

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS NOTICE & IMPORT RESTRICTIONS ELECTRONIC SYSTEM FOR TRAVEL AUTHORIZATION

poisons, infectious substances

NOTE

There are special exceptions for small

quantities of up to 70 oz. (2 kg or 2 liters) of

medicinal and toilet articles carried in your

luggage. For further information, check with

any airline representative.

IMPORT RESTRICTIONS

Please note new controls on the import of

meat, fi sh, plants and their products into the

United Kingdom and European Union. Check

the advisory notices displayed in the baggage

hall for a detailed explanation of these

restrictions. If you possess any of these items,

please declare them to customs in the red

channel to avoid legal consequences.

SPANISH / ESPAÑOL

A partir del 12 de enero de 2009, todos los

pasajeros que quieran viajar a los EE.UU.

(entre los terminos del programa de no tener

que usar la Visa) tendran que obtener una

preautorización electronica o ESTA antes

de viajar. Cuando estés coordinando viajes

internacionales, este seguro que tenga todos

los documentos requerídos. No se olvide

de dejar tiempo sufi ciente para adquirir los

documentos ofi ciales de viaje.

Para información completa sobre todos los

requisitos, y para aplicar para ESTA, por

favor visite www.cbp.gov/esta.


I-94 NONIMMIGRANT VISA WAIVER / FRONT

DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY

OMB No. 1651-0111

U.S. Customs and Border Protection

Welcome to the United States

I-94W Nonimmigrant Visa Waiver Arrival/Departure Record

Instructions

This form must be completed by every nonimmigrant visitor not in possession of a visitor’s

visa, who is a national of one of the countries enumerated in 8 CFR 217. The airline can

provide you with the current list of eligible countries.

Type or print legibly with pen in ALL CAPITAL LETTERS. USE ENGLISH

This form is in two parts. Please complete both the Arrival Record (Items 1 through 15) and

the Departure Record (Items 18 through 21). The reverse side of this form must be signed

and dated. Children under the age of fourteen must have their form signed by a parent or

guardian.

Item 9 - If you are entering the United States by land, enter LAND in this space.

If you are entering the United States by ship, enter SEA in this space.

5 U.S.C. § 552a(e)(3) Privacy Act Notice: Information collected on this form is required by Title 8 of the U.S. Code,

including the INA (8 U.S.C. 1103, 1187), and 8 CFR 235.1, 264, and 1235.1. The purposes for this collection are to

give the terms of admission and document the arrival and departure of nonimmigrant aliens to the U.S. The

information solicited on this form may be made available to other government agencies for law enforcement purposes

or to assist DHS in determining your admissibility. All nonimmigrant aliens seeking admission to the U.S., unless

otherwise exempted, must provide this information. Failure to provide this information may deny you entry to the

United States and result in your removal.

Admission Number

00000000000

Arrival Record

VISA WAIVER

1. Family Name

2. First (Given) Name 3. Birth Date (DD/MM/YY)

4. Country of Citizenship 5. Sex (Male or Female)

6. Passport Issue Date (DD/MM/YY) 7. Passport Expiration Date (DD/MM/YY)

8. Passport Number 9. Airline and Flight Number

10. Country Where You Live 11. City Where You Boarded

12. Address While in the United States (Number and Street)

13. City and State

14. Telephone Number in the U.S. Where You Can be Reached

15. Email Address

16. 17.

Admission Number

00000000000

Departure Record

VISA WAIVER

18. Family Name

See Other Side

CBP Form I-94W (05/08)

OMB No. 1651-0111

19. First (Given) Name 20. Birth Date (DD/MM/YY)

21. Country of Citizenship

Government Use Only

CBP Form I-94W (05/08)

STAPLE HERE

ENGLISH

Prior to arrival in the United States, foreign

nationals (except Canadian citizens and

U.S. permanent residents) who are not

in possession of a visitors visa and are

entitled to the Visa Waiver Program are

required to complete the I-94W form. One

form is required for each family member.

Customers should complete all personal

and travel-related information included

on the front side of the card. Please ensure

that you answer all questions and sign and

date where indicated on the back side of this

form. All customers must provide a U.S.

address for entry.

Countries that are participants of

the Visa Waiver Program are as follows:

Andorra, Australia, Austria, Belgium,

Brunei, *Czech Republic, Denmark,

*Estonia, Finland, France, Germany,

*Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Japan,

*Latvia, Liechtenstein, *Lithuania,

STAYING FIT: INFLIGHT FLEXIBILITY

Knee Flexion: Lift knee toward

chest, decreasing the amount of

joint space at back of the knee.

Repeat with other leg.

Knee Extension: Straighten knee,

increasing the amount of joint

space at the back of the knee

to its full range. Repeat with

other leg.

Luxembourg, *Malta, Monaco, the

Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway,

Portugal, San Marino, Singapore, *Slovakia,

Slovenia, *South Korea, Spain, Sweden,

Switzerland, the United Kingdom.

*Nationals of these countries must present

an electronic (e-ppt) passport to be eligible

for the U.S. Visa Waiver Program.

Nationals of all Visa Waiver countries

must present a machine-readable passport

for the U.S. Visa Waiver Program.

SPANISH / ESPAÑOL

Antes de su llegada en los Estados Unidos,

los ciudadanos extranjeros (excepto

ciudadanos Canadienses y residentes

permanentes de los Estados Unidos) que

no tengan un visado de visita y se acojan

al programa “Visa Waiver”, tienen que

completar el formulario I-94W. Se requiere

un formulario por cado miembro de

familia. Los pasajeros deberán rellenar toda

información tanto personal como relacionada

con viajes en el anverso de la tarjeta. Por

favor, asegúrese de contestar todas las

preguntas , fi rmen y pongan la fecha en el

lugar indicado en el formulario. Todos los

pasajeros deben proporcionar una dirección

en Estados Unidos para entrar al país.

Los países que participan del

Programa de exención de visas son los

siguientes: Alemania. Andorra, Australia,

Austria, Bélgica, Brunei, *Corea del Sur,

Dinamarca, *Eslovaquia, Eslovenia, Espána,

*Estonia, Finlandia, Francia, *Hungría,

Irlanda, Islandia, Italia, Japón, *Letonia,

Liechtenstein, * Lituania, Luxemburgo,

*Malta, Mónaco, Noruega, Nueva Zelandia,

Países Bajos, Portugal,*República Checa,

San Marino, Singapur, Suecia, Suiza y el

Reino Unido.

*Los ciudadanos de estos países deben

presentar un electrónicos (e-ppt) pasaporte

para ser elegible para del Programa de

exención de visas de Estados Unidos.

Los ciudadanos de los demás países

exentos de visas deben presentar un

pasaporte de lectura electrónica en el marco

del Programa de exención de visas de

Estados Unidos a partir del 26 de octubre

de 2004.

1. Apellido

2. Nombre

3. Fecha de nacimiento

(Día/Mes/Año)

Do any of the following apply to you? (Answer Yes or No)

A. Do you have a communicable disease; physical or mental disorder, or are

Yes No

you a drug abuser or addict?

B. Have you ever been arrested or convicted for an offense or crime involving

Yes No

moral turpitude or a violation related to a controlled substance; or been

arrested or convicted for two or more offenses for which the aggregate

sentence to confinement was five years or more; or been a controlled

substance trafficker, or are you seeking entry to engage in criminal or

immoral activities?

C. Have you ever been or are you now involved in espionage or sabotage; or in

Yes No

terrorist activities; or genocide; or between 1933 and 1945 were involved, in

any way, in persecutions associated with Nazi Germany or its allies?

D. Are you seeking to work in the U.S.; or have ever been excluded and

Yes No

deported; or been previously removed from the United States; or procured

or attempted to procure a visa or entry into the U.S. by fraud or

misrepresentation?

E. Have you ever detained, retained or withheld custody of a child from a U.S.

Yes No

citizen granted custody of the child?

F. Have you ever been denied a U.S. visa or entry into the U.S. or had a U.S.

Yes No

visa cancelled? If yes,

when? ______________________ where? _________________________

G. Have you ever asserted immunity from prosecution?

Yes No

IMPORTANT: If you answered “Yes” to any of the above, please contact the American Embassy

BEFORE you travel to the U.S. since you may be refused admission into the United States.

Family Name (Please print) First Name

Country of Citizenship Date of Birth

WAIVER OF RIGHTS: I hereby waive any rights to review or appeal of a U.S. Customs and Border

Protection officer’s determination as to my admissibility, or to contest, other than on the basis of an

application for asylum, any action in deportation.

CERTIFICATION: I certify that I have read and understand all the questions and statements on this

form. The answers I have furnished are true and correct to the best of my knowledge and belief.

Signature Date

Paperwork Reduction Act Statement: An agency may not conduct or sponsor an information

collection and a person is not required to respond to this information unless it displays a current valid

OMB control number. The control number for this collection is 1651-0111. The estimated average

time to complete this application is 8 minutes per respondent. If you have any comments regarding the

burden estimate you can write to U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Asset Management, 1300

Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington DC 20229

Departure Record

Important – Retain this permit in your possession; you must surrender it when you leave the U.S.

Failure to do so may delay your entry into the U.S. in the future.

You are authorized to stay in the U.S. only until the date written on this form. To remain past this date,

without permission from Department of Homeland Security authorities, is a violation of the law.

Surrender this permit when you leave the U.S.:

- By sea or air, to the transportation line;

- Across the Canadian border, to a Canadian Official;

- Across the Mexican border, to a U.S. Official.

Warning: You may not accept unauthorized employment; or attend school; or represent the foreign

information media during your visit under this program. You are authorized to stay in the U.S. for 90

days or less. You may not apply for: 1) a change of nonimmigrant status; 2) adjustment of status to

temporary or permanent resident, unless eligible under section 201(b) of the INA; or 3) an extension of

stay. Violation of these terms will subject you to deportation. Any previous violation of this program,

including having previously overstayed on this program without a proper DHS authorization, will

result in a finding of inadmissibility as outlined in Section 217 of the Immigration and Nationality Act.

Port:

Date:

Carrier:

Flight No./Ship Name:

4. Nacionalidad

5. Sexo (varón/hembra)

6. Fecha de emisión del pasaporte

7. Fecha de vencimiento del pasaporte

8. Número de pasaporte

9. Aerolínea y número de vuelo

10. País de residencia

11. País en el que abordó

12. Direccion donde se quedará en los

EE.UU (Número, calle)

13. Ciudad y Estado

14. Teléfono de contacto en EE.UU.

15. Dirección de correo electrónico

SPANISH / ESPAÑOL

¿Le afecta alguna de estas restricciones a

usted? (Conteste Si o No)

A. ¿Padece usted de alguna enfermedad

contagiosa, defi ciencia física o

mental, o es adicto a las drogas?

Sí / No

Dorsifl exion: With heel on fl oor, point

toes upward, decreasing the angle

between the foot and front of the leg.

Repeat with other foot.

Plantar Flexion: Lift the heel and

keep toes pointed toward the fl oor,

increasing the angle between the top

of the foot and front of the leg. Repeat

with other foot.

HEMISPHERESMAGAZINE.COM | FEBRUARY 2010

I-94 NONIMMIGRANT VISA WAIVER / BACK

109

B. ¿Ha sido usted arrestado o condenado

por alguna infracción o delito de

depravación moral; o por una violación

relacionada con estupefacientes;

arrestado o condenado por dos o más

infracciones cuya sentencia total de

reclusión fuera igual o superior a cinco

años; ha sido trafi cante de estupefacientes,

o pretende entrar en los Estados Unidos

para realizar actividades criminales o

inmorales? Sí / No

C. ¿Ha estado o está implicado en actos

de espionaje o sabotaje, actividades

terroristas o genocidios; o participó

de algún modo entre 1933 y 1945

en persecuciones relacionadas con la

Alemania nazi o sus aliados? Sí / No

D. ¿Tiene intención de trabajar en los

Estados Unidos; ha sido excluido o

deportado; o ha sido expulsado de los

Estados Unidos, o ha obtenido

o intentado obtener un visado o la

entrada a los Estados Unidos por

medios fraudulentos o dando

información falsa? Sí / No

E. ¿Ha detenido, retenido, o impedido

la custodia de un niño que corresponda

legalmente a un ciudadano de los

Estados Unidos? Sí / No

F. ¿Se le ha cancelado o denegado

alguna vez el visado o la entrada en los

Estados Unidos? En caso afi rmitavo,

especifi que? Sí / No

¿Cúando? ¿Dónde?

G. ¿Ha hecho valer alguna vez su

inmunidad frente a un

procesamiento? Sí / No

IMPORTANTE: Si ha contestado

afi rmativamente alguna de las preguntas,

comuníquese con la Embajada de los Estados

Unidos ANTES de su viaje, ya que se le puede

denegar la entrada en los Estados Unidos.

RENUNCIA DE DERECHOS: Por la presente

renuncio el derecho a solicitar la revisión del

Ofi cial de Inmigración acerca de mi admisión

en los Estados Unidos, o a apelarla, o a

impugnar cualquier acto de deportación que

no sea por razón de una solicitud de asilo.

DECLARACIÓN: Declaro que he leído y

entendido todas las preguntas y enunciados

enumerados en esta solicitud, y que las

respuestas que he propocionado en este

formulario son verdaderas y

correctas a mi mejor saber y entender.

Eversion: With foot on fl oor,

gently roll the sole of the foot

inward. Repeat with other foot.

Inversion: With foot on fl oor,

gently roll the sole of the foot

outward. Repeat with other foot.


110 FEBRUARY 2010 | UNITED.COM

ACROSS

1. Son of Willy Loman

5. Some are for trading

10. Fleur-de-lis

14. Austrian peak

17. Elder

19. Loathing

20. Risqué

21. Sri Lanka export

22. Main course

23. Molten rock

24. Large unrestricted rooms

26. 4,840 square yards

27. China problem

29. Little pancakes

31. Reunion group

32. Movie

33. Righthand page

35. Canadian dollar feature

36. Grayish

37. Kind of rug

39. Egg cells

41. Pact

44. Trick

47. Marley’s music

49. VW vehicle

53. Leopard-like cat

54. Caviar

55. Marked by anxiety

56. Hide-hair link

57. Church bench

59. Flowing tresses

61. and cheese

62. Human limb

63. Scoundrel

65. Friendship

67. Way up the mountain

69. “If all fails...”

70. Catch fi re

72. Unfulfi lled or frustrated

in realizing an ambition

74. Sage

77. Naysayer

78. To the point

79. Church part

83. Big fuss

84. Australian runner

85. A waterproof fi ller and

sealant

87. Casting requirement?

89. Go a-courting

90. Let in again

92. Laid up

93. Eye part

95. Earn

96. Aimless

99. Intolerant toward others

100. Goalkeeper’s line

102. annum

103. Big name in kids

construction

104. Move upward

107. Blacken

109. Exorcist’s target

111. Clobber

115. Up to, before the time

117. Camp craft

119. It’s the truth

120. Field of work

121. Heavy precious metallic

element

123. Role player

125. “To do” list

127. Canal site

128. Trick

129. Committee head

130. Ease up

131. Ram’s ma’am

132. Not up yet

133. In a heated manner

134. Active one

DOWN

1. Place to sit outside of the

principal’s offi ce

2. Opening

3. Computer security

feature

4. Enemy

5. Comedian

6. Type of connector

7. 18-wheeler

8. Slow

9. Wee

10. Magnetite, e.g.

11. The seizure of one’s

property by force

12. Put away

13. In (harmonious)

14. Replaced by a GPS

maybe?

15. Tether

16. A Midsummer Night’s

love potion

17. Caribbean and others

18. Play

25. Cast member

28. Nail part

30. Itty bit

34. Stuffed oneself

38. Go back into business

40. Violent struggle

42. On the train

43. School session

44. Brother

45. It’s clicked on a computer

46. Hospital supplies

CROSSWORD

AFTER YOU SAY ‘HIGH’

IF YOU FILL IN THE CROSSWORD PLEASE TAKE THE MAGAZINE WITH

YOU SO IT’S REPLACED. // ANSWERS FOUND ON P. 47

ALL THEME CLUES ARE IN BOLD

48. “Holy cow!”

50. Cash register part

51. Bruce and Robert E.

52. Fringe or border

55. Boston

58. Tree valued for nuts and

wood

59. Copycat

60. Baby bird?

64. Fight (for)

66. “Welcome” site

68. Commuting option

69. It can be shocking

71. Severe food shortage

72. Properly nourished

73. Good-for-nothing

74. Dermatologist’s

99. Alliance

BRUCE

concern

101. Charge

75. Brainstorm

104. Unit of money in

GREG

76. Long bath

India

BY

78. Garden bulb

105. Acquired relative

80. Nincompoop

106. Goggle

81. Super-duper

108. Kind of motel

82. Throughway

110. Get hitched

84. Arab ruler

112. Dentist’s directive

CROSSWORD

86. Put on TV

113. Below

88. Monopoly avenue

114. Legume

91. Trickery

116. Old Italian bread

PUZZLES

94. “Bye!”

118. Sound in a cave

96. Red-faced

122. A small piece

97. Student overseer

124. Sylvester, to Tweety

PUZPUZ

98. Clover 126. Word on all U.S. coins

©

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To order or

learn more:

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Bose.com/QC

©2009 Bose Corporation. Patent rights issued and/or pending. The distinctive design of the headphone oval ring is a trademark of Bose Corporation.


EXERCISE

IN EXACTLY

4 MINUTES

PER DAY

$14,615

THE TYPICAL QUICKGYM PURCHASER

GOES THROUGH SEVERAL STAGES:

1. Total disbelief that the QuickGym can do all this in only 4 minutes.

2. Rhetorical (and sometimes hostile) questioning and ridicule.

3. Reading the QuickGym literature and reluctantly understanding it.

4. Taking a leap of faith and renting a QuickGym for 30 days.

5. Being highly impressed by the results and purchasing a QuickGym.

6. Becoming a QuickGym enthusiast and trying to persuade friends.

7. Being ignored and ridiculed by the friends who think you’ve

lost your mind.

8. After a year of using the QuickGym your friends admiring your

good shape.

9. You telling them (again) that you only exercise those

4 minutes per day.

10. Those friends reluctantly rent the QuickGym for a 30 day trial.

Repeat the above cycle from point 5 on down.

You get the same results from

4 minutes on the QUICKGYM as:

• 25 to 45 minutes of aerobic exercise for cardio conditioning.

• 45 minutes of weight training for muscle tone & strength.

• 20 minutes of stretching for limberness & flexibility.

RENT A QUICKGYM FOR 30 DAYS.

RENTAL APPLIES TO PURCHASE.

Order a FREE DVD from www.quickgyminfo.com or call 818.504.6450


EASY

MODERATE

HARD

1.

2.

3.

112 FEBRUARY 2010 | UNITED.COM

SUDOKU

THE NUMBERS GAME // BY REIKO MCLAUGHLIN

If you’re looking at this

ad, so are your clients

To advertise in HEMISPHERES call

our sales team at 888.864.1733

ANSWERS

LEAD BY EXAMPLE

SOMETIMES IT REALLY IS WHAT YOU KNOW. // BY NOAH TARNOW

1. TRIVIAL PALINDROMES

Name the palindrome (a phrase that reads the same forward and

backward) indicated by the clue. For example: “The largest city in Poland

had yet to be cooked” gives you “Warsaw was raw.”

A. One single car by the largest Japanese automaker.

B. Coagulated soybean milk that comes from a fl ying saucer.

C. The brand-name pain reliever containing acetaminophen is without

companionship.

D. Edible seaweed, made out of the metal that steel is alloyed from.

E. Sandler or Lambert formally introduces himself to a woman.

F. A question of whether water birds related to ducks and swans view

the monotheistic deity.

2. HAIL TO THE FACTOID

In honor of Presidents Day, a few trivia questions about our past chief

executives.

A. During the 20th century, President ’s grandson married

President ’s daughter.

B. What building toy was invented in 1916 and named for the 16th

president?

C. Who was the only president born in Connecticut?

D. Who gave away the bride at the 1905 wedding of Franklin and

Eleanor Roosevelt?

E. Who was older: Republican nominee John McCain on Election Day

2008, or Republican nominee Bob Dole on Election Day 1996?

F. William McKinley was the only president between 1870 and 1912

who didn’t wear what?

G. Which two U.S. vice presidents shot a man during their terms in offi ce?

H. In 1884, Grover Cleveland’s fi rst campaign for president was threatened

when he publicly admitted to committing what scandalous act?

ANSWERS: 1. A. A TOYOTA B. UFO TOFU C. LONELY TYLENOL D. IRON NORI E. MADAM, I’M

ADAM F. DO GEESE SEE GOD? 2. A. EISENHOWER, NIXON B. LINCOLN LOGS C. GEORGE W. BUSH

D. PRESIDENT THEODORE ROOSEVELT E. DOLE (BY ONE YEAR) F. FACIAL HAIR G. AARON BURR,

DICK CHENEY H. FATHERING AN ILLEGITIMATE CHILD.

1. 2. 3.

MORE INFO ON QUIZ AT BIGQUIZTHING.COM. SUDOKU © PUZPUZ PUZZLES


Why log in when

you can go out?

How has dating changed over the years? From my

perspective, technology has changed everything.

When we started It’s Just Lunch eighteen years ago,

singles simply introduced themselves and began

talking – done. Now, couples chat, email, instant

message, tweet, text and even video chat. People

relate through their computers and mobile phones.

This makes it easier than ever to stay in touch with

someone you already know – but nearly impossible

to meet someone you don’t. Now the methods that

people used to rely on for romantic introductions are

gone, and people usually find themselves with just one

network in their city: the

office. That’s not always ideal

and busy singles don’t have the

time or desire to cruise the bars

or scan online profiles. This is

exactly where It’s Just Lunch

comes in. We introduce our

clients to real people – not

online profiles or phone

numbers. We provide that missing network, and we

do it in a way that fits into everyone’s hectic schedule.

“When you are ready

to start dating,

you want to start

immediately.”

Amy Brinkman,

DATING SPECIALIST

How does It’s Just Lunch “match” singles?

We believe that nothing replaces the human touch,

and we don’t believe in “computer matches.” It

doesn’t matter if you both like to jog, both like

Chinese food, and both would like something long

term – you can like all the same things and still not

like each other. That’s why we use our intuition to

create the match. First, we interview each client like

you would get to know a new friend, learning about

their personalities, their likes and dislikes, and

their relationship goals. Then, we call to arrange

their first date. We contact both clients, get their

schedules, find a convenient time and place for

them to meet, and even make them a reservation.

Betty Sinclair PJ Osgood

Sara Darling Jennifer Donnelly

It’s Just Lunch has professional Dating ing

Specialists just like Amy Brinkman all around

the world. Discover how we can help you

create a more rewarding dating life today. day.

Meet your match today.

It’s Just Lunch Dating Specialist Amy Brinkman asks

“Why waste time with online profiles and the bar scene when

you could be on a date right now?”

There are no online profiles for the world to see,

and it’s up to the clients if they want to share more

details during their date and exchange cards in

order to meet again. As part of our policy, we don’t

give out our clients’ last names or phone numbers.

What kind of people would I meet through

It’s Just Lunch? It’s Just Lunch clients are a

diverse group representing many different

professions, career stages and educational

backgrounds. Some have just moved to a new

city and want to fast-forward to meeting

like-minded people. We commonly

see singles spending most of their

time with people from work, but

they realize the pitfalls of dating

coworkers. They come to us to

expand their social circle outside

of work. Our clients do have one

thing in common, though: they’re

ready to meet someone new.

Any advice for the first-date conversation?

Rule number one: Never talk about a

past relationship. It can instill feelings

of jealousy, awkwardness, or insecurity

in seconds. If it comes up, give a brief

answer and change the subject. Avoid

topics such as politics and religion

until you’ve gotten to know each other

better. Make a conscious effort to

ask or answer questions from your

most positive perspective. Studies

show people find you more interesting

when you ask questions about them.

If you don’t know what to ask, just

pause a moment to think . . . silence

can be sexy and mysterious.

Over 150 locations in the United States, Canada, Europe, Asia, and Australia | Visit ItsJustLunch.com or call 1.800.335.8624


FEBRUARY 2010 | UNITED.COM

114

GETTING TO KNOW YOU

WHO / DAVE SWANSON

53 / President, Competitive

Intelligence Advertising

WHY I’M TRAVELING / My

company has model

railroad clients, so I’m

going to L.A. for a trade

show. But I’m also into

model railroads myself.

I’ve probably got about

four hundred at home.

I NEVER LEAVE HOME

WITHOUT... / My laptop.

It’s my universal device.

I use it for work. I use it

for entertainment. I use

it as a clock. I put books

on it to read. I’ll watch a

video in one corner of the

screen and work in the

other. Sometimes it’s the

only thing I take with me

on trips.

BUSINESS AND PLEASURE

If I’m going someplace for

business, I’ll also take a

personal day or two. I’m at

the stage in my life when

I might as well enjoy it. So

I’ve stopped fl ying redeyes,

and I always make

sure I have time to really

enjoy a new city.

BY ADAM K. RAYMOND

in transit

“ My company has

model railroad clients

but I’m also into them

myself. I’ve probably got

four hundred at home.”

PHOTOGRAPH BY SPENCER HEYFRON


UNITED ECONOMY - NORTH AMERICA

SNACKBOXES AVAILABLE ALL DAY ON FLIGHTS OVER 2 HOURS

CLASSIC $6

Kettle Backyard BBQ Chips Oreo Cookies

Jelly Belly Gourmet Jelly Beans Pepperidge

Farm Goldfish Crackers Sparrer Beef

Salami Gourmet Cheddar Cheese Spread

Pepperidge Farm Crackers

À LA CARTE $3 AVAILABLE ALL DAY ON FLIGHTS OVER 2 HOURS

Pringles Potato Chips

Ghirardelli Luxe Milk Chocolate Bar

Fisher Salty Nut Mix

PREMIUM COCKTAILS $8

Trader Vic’s Mai Tai

(served on Hawaii flights to/from the mainland)

Jose Cuervo Margarita

PREMIUM SPIRITS $8

Glenlivet Single Malt Scotch Whisky

Maker’s Mark Kentucky Straight Bourbon Whisky

SPIRITS $6

Bacardi Rum

Canadian Club Reserve Whisky

Dewar’s White Label Scotch

Finlandia Vodka

Jack Daniel’s Tennessee Whiskey

Jim Beam Black Bourbon Whiskey

Tanqueray Gin

chicken caesar salad

Walkers Chocolate Chip or

Shortbread Cookies

Clif Oatmeal Raisin Walnut Bar

SPIRITS, WINE and BEER AVAILABLE ON ALL FLIGHTS, ALL DAY

Alcohol may be served to customers over 21 only. By FAA rule, we may not

serve alcohol to customers who appear intoxicated. Customers are limited

to one alcoholic beverage at a time during service. Only alcohol provided

by United and served by flight attendants may be consumed onboard.

WELCOME ABOARD!

LUXE $7

Rondelé Peppercorn Parmesan Cheese

Spread Pepperidge Farm Crackers Food

Should Taste Good Multigrain Tortilla Chips

Oloves Mediterranean or Vinaigrette Olives

Wild Garden Hummus Dip Real Torino

Sesame Breadsticks Asher’s Dark

Chocolate Pretzel

We are pleased to offer Choice Menu meal and snack

selections for purchase in United Economy ® on most North

America flights. Enjoy the service and thank you for flying

with United.

ORGANIC $7

Late July Organic Cheddar Cheese

Crackers Terra Nostra Organic Dark

Chocolate Square Kettle Valley Organic

Fruit Snack Nature’s Path Organic Pumpkin

Flaxplus Granola Bare Fruit Organic

Cinnamon Apple Chips

Odwalla Banana Nut Nutritional Bar

(Available through February 10, 2010)

mySmoothie Fruit Smoothie Beverage

LIQUEURS $6

Bailey’s Irish Cream

Courvoisier VSOP Cognac

Kahlúa

PREMIUM WINE $7 - $8

RED - Cheviot Bridge Shiraz 2008 South Eastern Australia $7

WHITE - Cheviot Bridge Chardonnay 2008 Adelaide Hills Australia $7

SPARKLING - Rotari Talento Brut Sparkling Wine $8

WINE $6

RED - Redwood Creek Cabernet Sauvignon 2007 California

WHITE - Redwood Creek Chardonnay 2007 California

PREMIUM BEER $7

Leinenkugel’s Sunset Wheat Beer

BEER $6

Miller Genuine Draft

Miller Lite

PAYMENT

EasyPurchase

Only credit/debit cards are accepted.


NEW

BREAKFAST ON FLIGHTS OVER 3 HOURS DEPARTING BEFORE 10 AM

CINNAMON CRUMB CAKE MUFFIN $3

A moist and tasty muffin with cinnamon streusel topping.

FRUIT AND YOGURT PARFAIT $5

Low fat vanilla yogurt served with fruit and a side of granola.

CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST $5

French toast flavored bagel, cream cheese, Smuckers strawberry jam and Upstate

Farms strawberry yogurt.

HAM AND SWISS CROISSANT $5

Flavorful ham and swiss cheese on a croissant with dijonnaise sauce (served cold).

LUNCH/DINNER ON FLIGHTS OVER 3 HOURS DEPARTING BETWEEN 10 AM - 8 PM

ELI’S ORIGINAL PLAIN CHEESECAKE $3

Chicago’s Hometown Favorite. (Effective January 5)

ASSORTED CHEESE TRAY $6

Specially selected cheeses including monterey jack, havarti dill and

cheddar, dried cranberries, almonds and assorted Pepperidge Farm

crackers.

ANTIPASTO PLATE $7

Sliced salami, mozzarella cheese, havarti dill cheese, Mediterranean or

Vinaigrette olives and Grissini Torino breadsticks.

ROAST BEEF SANDWICH $9

Tasty roast beef topped with crisp romaine lettuce and horseradish

mayonnaise on ciabatta bread, accompanied by Kettle Classics potato

chips (Available through February 10, 2010).

ITALIAN SANDWICH $9

Ham, salami, mozzarella, roasted tomatoes, Italian dressing on rustic

Italian bread accompanied by Kettle Classics potato chips (Effective

February 11, 2010).

TURKEY SANDWICH $9

Tender smoked turkey topped with crisp romaine lettuce and sundried

tomato aioli sauce on multigrain bread, accompanied by Kettle Classics

potato chips.

THAI CHICKEN WRAP $9

Grilled chicken breast, romaine lettuce, julienned carrots, red and yellow

bell pepper strips and Thai aioli sauce wrapped in a tortilla, accompanied

by Kettle Classics potato chips.

SPINACH SALAD $9

Fresh spinach, blue cheese crumbles, dried cranberries and walnut halves,

served with balsamic vinaigrette dressing and croutons on the side.

CHICKEN CAESAR SALAD $9

Grilled chicken, red and yellow bell pepper strips, shredded parmesan

cheese on a bed of crisp romaine lettuce, served with classic caesar

dressing and croutons on the side.

United does not serve peanuts as snacks or use peanuts or peanut oils in foods

served on our flights. However, we do serve vendor products manufactured in

facilities that also produce items containing peanuts or peanut oils, and we do

have snack mixes that contain other tree nuts, such as almonds and pistachios.

spinach p salad thai chicken wrapp assorted cheese trayy

fruit and yogurt y g parfait p

Your feedback is welcomed via ualsurvey.com within seven days of your

flight. United, Choice Menu, and EasyPurchase are trademarks of United. All

other trademarks are the property of their respective owners.

We apologize if your selection is not available on today’s flight.


CONTEMPORARY

American Cuisine

Premium inflight dining

with a modern twist...

With a new food philosophy centered around contemporary American

cuisine, United’s premium onboard dining is being elevated to new

heights. Along with our culinary partners Charlie Trotter, Trader Vic’s,

and Master Sommelier Doug Frost, we’re offering traditional dishes

with a modern twist, while also offering regional and ethnic items. The

new menu is built around fresh, local, ingredients whenever possible,

combined in innovative new offerings.

CHARLIE TROTTER Charlie Trotter’s namesake Chicago establishment is one of the

world’s most-awarded restaurants, having been named, among others, “The Best

Restaurant in the World for Wine & Food” (Wine Spectator, 1998), and “Outstanding

Restaurant” (The James Beard Foundation, 2000). Restaurant Magazine has voted

it one of the “World’s 50 Best Restaurants” every year since 2004. Chef Trotter has

designed a new menu especially for United, available on most United First ® and United

Business ® outbound international flights.

TRADER VIC’S Selections from the legendary Trader Vic’s will be available in United

First and United Business class on many of our Pacific and Asian routes and on

United First class between Hawaii and the mainland. On any given flight you could

enjoy items like Sesame Pink Peppercorn Salmon with Lime Leaf Beurre Blanc Sauce,

or Chicken with Shiitake Mushrooms in Mango Chili Stir Fry.

DOUG FROST United has partnered with world renowned Master Sommelier and Master

of Wine, Doug Frost, to supply the perfect selections for all of our new menu offerings.

On selected intra-Pacific flights

originating from Japan, enjoy a Trader

Vic’s meal in United First or Business.

Coke Diet Coke Sprite Sprite Zero Ginger Ale

Starbucks Coffee Bloody Mary Mix Apple & Tomato Juices Spring Water

BEVERAGES

RELAX WITH YOUR FAVORITE DRINK. Beverage

service is available on most United flights. Alcoholic

beverage selections vary according to cabin class

and international or domestic flight status. Alcoholic

beverages are available for $6 – $8 on most flights.

NON-ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES










WINES

UNITED FIRST AND UNITED BUSINESS (DOMESTIC)

You will be offered a choice of red and white wines.

Selections may include the following:

RED



WHITE



UNITED ECONOMY ® ALL FLIGHTS



UNITED ECONOMY PREMIUM WINES (DOMESTIC ONLY)




UNITED FIRST AND UNITED BUSINESS CABINS

Please refer to the printed menu.

COCKTAILS, BEER, SPIRITS, LIQUEURS

UNITED ECONOMY PREMIUM COCKTAIL (DOMESTIC ONLY)

COCKTAIL


UNITED FIRST, UNITED BUSINESS AND UNITED ECONOMY

BEER




Beer offerings are subject to availability. A selection of regional

beers is offered on some International flights.

SPIRITS










LIQUEURS




ONLY ON INTERNATIONAL FLIGHTS




Alcohol may be served to customers over 21 only. By FAA

rule, we may not serve alcohol to customers who appear

intoxicated. Customers are limited to one alcoholic beverage

at a time during service. Only alcohol provided by United and

served by flight attendants may be consumed onboard.

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