august-2011

go.magazine

august-2011

COCKTAIL KING OF CHICAGO DAYTON ROCK CITY GRAND RAPIDS’ SUPER-SIZED ART PRIZE

THERE’S NOTHING STOPPING YOU • AUGUST 2011

RINGSIDE

IN PARADISE

PUERTO RICO’S BOXING

CULTURE PACKS A PUNCH

Pg. 38

COMPLIMENTARY COPY

ATLANTA

RISING

WELCOME

TO TO THE

BOOMTOWN’S

BOOMTOW

BRIGHT BRIGHT

+

FUTURE

Predictions Pred P di d ti from f the th Falcons’ F l ’f fresh-faced h f dQB QB MMatt tt RRyan,

Sugarland’s Sug lead guitarist Kristian Bush,

Coca-Cola CEO Muhtar Kent and more

Pg. 45

BUSINESS

NAVIGATING THE

ENTREPRENEURIAL WORLD

OF ADVENTURE TRAVEL

Pg. 29


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IF YOU BUILD IT... The Promenade II tower,

Atlanta’s seventh tallest skyscraper

PHOTOGRAPH BY ANTHONY BERENYI/

SHUTTERSTOCK

ON THE COVER: Falcons quarterback

Matt Ryan on the roof of The Ellis Hotel in

Downtown Atlanta

PHOTOGRAPH BY IAN SPANIER

FEATURES KNOCKOUT

ISLAND//38

Fans lured to Puerto Rico

by its powerful boxing

legacy can witness intense

Friday night fights, meet

future champions—and

get the chance to step in

the ring.

AUGUST 2011

ISSUE 076

THE FUTURE OF

ATLANTA//45

Meet the city’s newest

football star, tour the

brand-new BeltLine,

taste the food trends of

tomorrow and see what

local VIPs predict for the

city in this Atlanta special.


CONTENTS

LET’S GO//009

The top 10 must-dos

in Pittsburgh//009

This month’s greatest

events//012

Fanny packs are

back//015

Learn how to

navigate underground

markets//017

Milwaukee’s top

custard spots//018

Fashion exhibits and

the shopping sprees

they inspire//020

Top travel deals//020

Beauty looks that

take cues from iconic

movies//021

BUSINESS//023

The best of

Bluetooth//023

The making of the

Georgia Aquarium’s

new dolphin

exhibit//025

How to start your

own adventure travel

company//029

The country’s top coworking

spots//032

PUZZLES//134

Crossword & Sudoku

THE ROOM//138

The Eloise Suite at New

York’s Plaza Hotel

CRAZY COCKTAIL The Blueberry, served at The Aviary in

Chicago, a new spot from famed chef Grant Achatz.

GO GUIDES//063

The best places to shop, dine and explore in each city we serve

ON THE TOWN

CHICAGO//074

DAYTON, OH//080

GRAND RAPIDS, MI//093

MORE FOR YOU//123

See a list of more than 100 channels available onboard through XM

Satellite Radio. Also, look over AirTran Airways’ programs, route map,

clothing and inflight beverage offerings.

THERE’S MORE//Check out the magazine at

airtran.com/go or get the new Go app by

scanning the code printed to the left using your

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AUGUST 2011 4

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airtran.com/go

EDITORIAL

editorial@airtranmagazine.com

Editor-in-Chief

Orion Ray-Jones

Executive Editors

Sam Polcer, Brooke Porter

Associate Editor

Peter Koch

Assistant Editor

Sophie-Claire Hoeller

ART

art@airtranmagazine.com

Art Director

Tony Judge

Associate Art Director

Jeff Quinn

Photo Editor

Erin Giunta

ADVERTISING

stephen.andrews@ink-global.com

For Advertising Inquiries

call toll-free 888-864-1732

U.S. Group Publishing Director

Steve Andrews

Associate Publisher

Greg Caccavale

Senior Account Managers

Dan DeLong, Tony Alexander,

Lee Frazier, Mario Ceo

Production Manager

Joe Massey

Production Controllers

Grace Dinwiddie, Stacy Willis

Marketing & Events Manager

Nikkole Wyrick

Sales & Marketing Coordinator

Melinda Hanna

INK

Executive Creative Director

Michael Keating

Publishing Director

Simon Leslie

Chief Operating Officer

Hugh Godsal

Chief Executive

Jeffrey O’Rourke

Online Director

Sal Lababidi

AIRTRAN AIRWAYS

Vice President of Marketing & Sales

Tad Hutcheson

Director of Marketing

Samantha Johnson

Go is published on behalf of AirTran

Airways by Ink, 68 Jay Street, Suite

315, Brooklyn, NY 11201 Tel: 347-294-

1220 Fax: 917-591-6247

© Ink All material is strictly copyright and all rights are

reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced

in whole or part without the prior written permission of

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the time of publication. Opinions expressed in Go are not

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AirTran Airways does not accept responsibility for advertising

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are at the owner’s risk. Any mention of AirTran Airways or

use of the AirTran Airways logo by any advertiser in this

publication does not imply endorsement of that company

or its products or services by AirTran Airways.


It’s summer. Time to to your favorite vacation

spot. A served chilled at 37 degrees is

carbonated perfection. The ideal to attain

refreshment nirvana. A billion barraging your

mouth. With secret ingredients, perfectly balanced

zesty warm and smooth going off like a line

of synchronized swimmers. So refreshing and

uplifting to keep you , and .

Your thirst won’t know what hit it. So while you are on

your way with , enjoy a Coke on us. A

formula kept under and for 125 years.

©2011 The Coca-Cola Company.


SDS S DEALLY

ONDER AND

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behind and stay in a world of enchantment and wonder.

SAVINGS FOR YOU, MAGIC FOR YOUR FAMILY

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Resort. Book our special offer now for stays through December 31, 2011 and your family will enjoy:



unlimited beverage cups, souvenirs and more!




“Love Your Family” to make your reservation today.

For more information, visit www.swandolphin.com.

WONDERFUL


DAN SELLERS

CEO Greeting

A Few Thoughts about

Customer Service from

Gary Kelly

We’ve done a lot of introspection during Southwest’s 40th

Anniversary year. With the AirTran acquisition, it may be

the most exciting year we’ve experienced since our fi rst.

Back then, I was still in high school concentrating on girls

(one special girl, to be more specifi c) and sports. Today’s

Southwest is very similar to the 1971 version, in regards to Customer Service.

By saying Customer Service, I’m not talking about procedures or even

products, because times do change. (A slide-rule was high-tech in 1971.)

Rather, I am talking about our fundamental relationship with our Customers.

We ran a double-page newspaper ad before our fi rst fl ight that outlined

the diff erences between Southwest and the (then) existing carriers. Our

new airline was most diff erent from the others when it came to Customer

Service. The ad told potential Customers that our Flight Attendants would

serve from their heart, not by rote. My favorite part of the advertisement

is where it admitted we weren’t perfect. Obviously, anything involving

machinery and weather will have problems from time to time. Even back

AUGUST 2011 7

GO MAGAZINE

before our fi rst fl ight took to

the air, we not only admitted

that we might disappoint but

advertised it. We explained

that we would proactively

acknowledge problems and

do our best to make sure

Customers were cared for

properly.

When we began talks with

AirTran, one of the major

compatibility requirements

was for similar Cultures and

Customer Service. In addition

to their low-cost, low-fare

brand, that’s what made

AirTran such a good fi t. In

particular, AirTran is a superb

operator with leading on-time

performance and baggage

handling. Fortunately for

our Customers, the art

of Customer Service at

AirTran and Southwest

isn’t a historical artifact;

it remains a way of life for

both airlines. Southwest

was just named the No. 1

airline for Customer Service

by Consumer Reports, and

AirTran is the No. 1 fi nisher

in the 2011 Airline Quality

Ratings. While AirTran is

diff erent from Southwest, I

have every confi dence our

AirTran Employees will be

successfully integrated into

the Southwest Culture of

Customer Service.

I’m not surprised about

another Southwest/AirTran

similarity: Employees of

both airlines have regular

Customers who are more

than Passengers, they are

fans. Without the AirTran

and Southwest Employees,

who have established and

maintained amazing levels

of service, the concept of

Customer Service would be

just that—a concept, and not

a way of life.

Cordially,

Gary Kelly

Chairman, President and CEO


LET’S GO

THE LIST

Pittsburgh

1

Phipps Conservatory

This stunning building, complete with 19 lush gardens,

is a throwback to the city’s Gilded Age heyday—and

modern-day visitors will appreciate summertime events

like Friday evening mixers featuring margaritas and apps; candlelit,

three-course dinners in the Conservatory; and a Wednesday

afternoon farmers market. 700 Frank Curto Dr; 412-622-6914;

phipps.conservatory.org

AUGUST 2011 9

GO MAGAZINE


LET'S GO

THE LIST

2 3 4 5

Primanti Brothers

You’ve never seen a sandwich quite like the

monster pastrami at Primanti Brothers.

If you’re feeling meek, there’s no shame

in bringing a partner to split it. Like all

sandwiches at this local chain, it’s topped

with a tomato slice, a fistful of french fries

and coleslaw. 3803 Forbes Ave; 412-621-4444;

primantibros.com

Stage AE

This concert space

opened late last

year with a sold-out

show by local remix

master Girl Talk.

It hosts intimate

indoor shows as

well as outdoor

blow-outs by the

likes of My Morning

Jacket (Aug. 10)

and ZZ Top (Aug.

19). 400 North Shore

Dr; 412-229-5483;

promowestlive.com

The Pennsylvania

Brewing Company

Housed in the old

Eberhardt Brewery,

this 163-year-old

landmark microbrewery

makes

authentic German

beers using a solid

copper brewhouse

imported from the

Fatherland itself.

Quaf a Bavarianstyle

Penn Weizen

in the biergarten, or

grab a growler to go.

800 Vinial St; 412-237-

9400; pennbrew.com

Carnegie Museum

of Natural History

One of four

museums administered

by the

Carnegie Institute,

this grand museum

was founded more

than a century

ago by the steel

baron himself. It

holds more than 21

million specimens,

including dinosaur

skeletons and

ancient Egyptian

mummies. 4400

Forbes Ave; 412-622-

3131; carnegiemnh.org

6 7 8 9 10

Cinema in the Park

at Flagstaff Hill

Pack a picnic before

catching a free

flick in Schenley

Park (one of six

participating parks).

This month’s

screenings include

Secretariat (Aug.

21), The Twilight

Saga: Eclipse (Aug.

24) and Tangled

(Aug. 28). After sunset

on Wed and Sun; Frew

St and Schenley Dr;

412-422-6426

AUGUST 2011 10

GO MAGAZINE

Mattress Factory

This museum,

housed in an old

North Side factory,

commissions sitespecific

works from

local and international

contemporary

artists. Through

Aug. 21, artists

explore the concept

of neighborhood

through sculpture,

photographs and

installations. 500

Sampsonia Way; 412-

231-3169; mattress.org

Shadyside

This small, unhurried

enclave along

Walnut Street is

chock-full of shops,

restaurants and

early 20th-century

homes. Parents find

children’s specialty

clothing at Picket

Fence, diners crowd

Italian favorite

Girasole, and the

flexible slip into

Yoga Flow. Walnut

St east of S Aiken Ave;

thinkshadyside.com

Tessaro’s

At this local burger

joint, an in-house

butcher custom

grinds each halfpound

patty, and

the grill is fired with

locally harvested

hardwood, making

for a charred-onthe-outside,

juicy-on-the-inside

backyard classic

with a woodsy

barbecue flavor.

4601 Liberty Ave;

412-682-6809

The Strip Public

Market

Set in the revamped

Produce Terminal

amid the city’s most

vibrant commercial

district, this market

dishes out food from

the region’s best

farmers and bakers.

Afterward, hit The

Strip’s bustling

stores, restaurants

and bars. 2100 Smallman

St, opposite 17th

St; 412-281-4505;

pittsburghpublic

market.org

—Jason Clampet


Taking Minds to Higher Elevations

For over 100 years, Asheville School has prepared high

school students for college, as well as all the years that

follow. We offer each student the chance to belong to a

community built on a foundation of academic excellence,

mutual respect, and shared values.

The only way to truly appreciate Asheville School is to

experience it. Arrange a tour. Talk with our faculty,

students, and alumni. We invite you to find out for

yourself what’s best for your family, and your child’s

future.

Located on 300 acres, Asheville School is a co-ed college preparatory

boarding and day school for students in grades 9 through 12. Asheville

School’s 275 students represent 24 states and 13 countries. Recent

graduates are attending Harvard, Stanford, Columbia, University of

Pennsylvania, Cornell, UNC-Chapel Hill, Davidson, NC State,

University of Virginia, Emory, Duke, Furman, Wofford, and Wake

Forest, among others.

ashevilleschool.org

Asheville • North Carolina

828.254.6345

360 Asheville School Road • Asheville, NC 28806 • admission@ashevilleschool.org • 828.254.6345


LET'S LET S GO

GO

EVENTS EV

AUG. 5-7

Hampton Cup Regatta

Hampton, VA

The country’s oldest continuously running

hydroplane boat race (say that five times

fast) features some of the speediest

nautical rockets in North America,

reaching up to 170mph racing on Mill

Creek. The best views are from the bridge

or Fort Monroe. hamptoncupregatta.org

August

AUG U 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

AUG. 12-14

Outside Lands Music & Arts Festival

San Francisco

Muse, Phish, Arcade Fire and The Black Keys

are among the performers at this

raging fest in Golden Gate

Park. Local eats, wine

events and an artisan

market round

out the lineup.

sfoutside

lands.com


AUGUST 2011 12

AUG. 10-16

Elvis Week 2011

Memphis

There’ll be a whole lotta shakin’

goin’ on at Graceland (not to mention

The Orpheum and other local

venues) during this annual event,

complete with an Elvis tribute artist

contest, mansion tour, 5K run

and youth karaoke. elvis.com


GO MAGAZINE


AUG 12-14

Seattle Tattoo Expo

Seattle

The artwork is off the wall—and on the

body—at this 10th annual event, co-founded

by famed Seattle tattoo artist Damon

Conklin. In addition to daily contests (“best

leg,” “best portrait,” “worst tattoo,” to name a

few), there’s a beer garden, cigar lounge and

live music. seattletattooexpo.com


SAN FRANCISCO: JEFF KRAVITZ ; SEATTLE: CHRISTOPHER NELSON


FRINGE: VESETH R. SIEU


AUG 18-21

Irish Fest

Milwaukee

Whiskey, broiled fish, Irish dogs, Celtic

music, currach (wooden boat) races

and everything else from the Old Country

you can think of will be at Henry W.

Maier Festival Park. Yes, there'll even

be leprechauns. irishfest.com

21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 SEPT E 01 02 03 04

...

AUG 18-20

TSCO Vegas to Reno Off-Road

Desert Race

Starts in Las Vegas

This 550-mile race challenges singleseat

race cars, motorcycles, ATVs and

trick trucks (some costing more than

$500,000 to build) to race over desert

terrain that's hard to even walk on, let

alone bomb through at speeds of up to

135mph. Spectators can watch the start

from the h Ali Aliante Station Casino & Hotel,

and there there e are 1 15 viewing w poin points set up all

the way y to to the the e finish. bitd.com

AUG. 26 TO SEPT. 5

World Police & Fire Games

New York

The second-largest multi-sport event in the world—

bested only by the Summer Olympics—features

18,000 police officers and firefighters competing

in 69 events, from the conventional (basketball, ice

hockey, golf) to the noteworthy (open water swim, judo,

archery) to the just plain, “Why?” (darts, horseshoes,

paintball). 2011wpfg.org

...

SEPT. 2-5

A Taste of Colorado

Denver

This annual event showcases

the best in local cuisine and

brewing. Non-foodies can enjoy

the live raptor display, blacksmith

demonstrations and gold panning.

atasteofcolorado.com

Art on

the Edge

A by-the-numbers look

at this month's top

fringe festivals.

MINNESOTA FRINGE

Aug. 4-14 • Minneapolis-

St. Paul

NUMBER OF SHOWS: 168

NUMBER OF PERFORMANCES:

865

NUMBER OF VENUES: 11

(15 TOTAL STAGES)

FOUNDED: 1993

fringefestival.org

FRINGENYC

Aug. 12-28 • New York

NUMBER OF SHOWS: 200

NUMBER OF PERFORMANCES:

1,200

NUMBER OF VENUES: 20

(20 TOTAL STAGES)

FOUNDED: 1996

fringenyc.org

INDY FRINGE

Aug. 19-28 • Indianapolis

NUMBER OF SHOWS: 56

NUMBER OF PERFORMANCES:

336

NUMBER OF VENUES: 5

(7 TOTAL STAGES)

FOUNDED: 2005

indyfringe.org/fringefest

yf g g f g f

Dreamplay,

FringeNYC


AT HARTSFIELD-JACKSON

Hartsfi eld-Jackson has many exciting shopping and dining opportunities for

you to explore. Walk or ride the train to more than 200 high-quality retail

shops, restaurants and spas located in the atrium and concourses T through E.

Shop, dine, explore and be amazed by what we have to offer!

For a complete list of our concessions, visit atlanta-airport.com/concessions

or pick up a Shop.Dine.Explore. brochure at the terminal directories.

atlanta-airport.com/concessions

XpresSpa, Concourses A and C

Swarvoski, Concourse C

Café Intermezzo/Buckhead Books, Concourse B

SCAN FOR SPECIAL

AIRPORT OFFERS


Happy Cow

Put-It-All

Pouch (unisex)

$75; happycow

.com.au

Dakine Girls

Classic Hip

Pack in Avalon

(women’s)

$18; dakine.com

What a Waist

CamelBak

FlashFlo LR

hydration pack

(unisex)

$45; camelbak.com

ROUNDUP

Whether it’s utilitarian, belt-like

or just plain plaid, here is proof

that the fanny pack is back.

PHOTOGRAPH BY

DAN MCCOY

AUGUST 2011 15

GO MAGAZINE

Jaegar Mini-

Purse Belt

(women’s)

$155; jaeger.co.uk

Marc By

Marc Jacobs

Leather Belt

Bag (men’s)

$198; marcjacobs

.com

High Sierra

Passport in

Pomodoro

(unisex)

$17.50; hssc.com

LET'S GO


Nowadays you don’t have to

go to London for a taste of

Fortnum & Mason. Not only is

our fine selection of food, wine

and gifts available online at

www.fortnumandmason.com,

but you’ll find our world-famous

tea served on every AirTran

Airways flight too.

The Best

of British


CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: ATLANTA (2): JULIA HURTADO; ALTADENA

URBAN FARMERS MARKET: GLORIA PUTNAM

Dishes on the Down Low

FOOD Renegade Re food bazaars are sprouting up around

the US, , se serving up gourmet goods with a side of intrigue.

“Pssssst…wanna buy organic honey? I’ve got

some pork belly banh mi here that’s out of

this world. Oh, you’re into foraged veggies? I

can score you the freshest.” Okay, so maybe

they’re not quite hawking goods out of

backrooms and dark alleys, but underground

markets—the latest foodie craze to sweep

the nation—do often operate in a legal gray

area. Here’s how to navigate them and score

delicious, cheap, hard-to-fi nd-elsewhere foods

in your favorite city.

BECOME A MEMBER. Pioneered by SF

1 Underground Market, membership is

the technicality that allows underground

markets to exist. Free memberships—usually

available through a market’s website—turn

them into “private” events, which are therefore

unregulated by health codes. It also

lends them that exclusive, I’m-in-on-a-secret

air that’s so important to hardcore foodies.

FIND IT. Some markets, including the

2Atlanta Underground Market, don’t

announce the location until the night

before, (after local health department

Boardwalk Empires

Take a summertime

stroll along three of

the best—and most

diverse—boardwalks in

the nation.

Boardwalk Hall

This legendary concert venue has

hosted the likes of The Beatles,

Frank Sinatra and, of course,

Jersey native Bruce Springsteen.

offi ces have closed). They might be held in

warehouses, storefronts, parking lots or even

private homes.

SIGN YOUR LIFE AWAY. It’s not that

3serious, but most markets make you sign

a waiver—either online or when you arrive—

stating you understand the risk of eating food

that’s not prepared in a commercial kitchen.

The vendors are budding food-trepreneurs,

testing the market for their homemade

goodies without the costly licenses and

commercial kitchen requirements of standard

markets. (Of course, they don’t want to make

you sick—it’s bad for business.)

NOSH. Most markets, like Washington,

4DC’s Grey DC Farmers Market, charge

a nominal admission fee of $2 to $5.

Then you’re free to eat your way through

the market, buying cheap, sample-size

experimental and ethnic dishes with a few

hundred of your closest friends.

AUGUST 2011 17

Atlanta

Atlanta Underground

Market

atlantaunderground

market.com

Aug. 6

San Francisco

SF Underground

Market

foragesf.com/market

Steel Pier

This 1,000-foot-long pier is home to the city’s

oldest amusement park, open since 1898.

Among the rides is The Rocket, a 225-foot-tall

slingshot on which riders experience up to 5 Gs.

GO MAGAZINE

LET'S GO

Altadena, CA (32 miles

from LA)

Altadena Urban

Farmers Market

facebook.com/altadena

urbanfarmersmarket

Washington, DC

Grey DC Farmers

Market

greydc.com

Atlantic City Boardwalk Atlantic City, NJ | Length: approx. 4 miles

Delaware Ave

Surf Beach


LET'S GO

Haycations

GETAWAYS

Farms and ranches around the US

let city slickers get away from it all—and get

their hands dirty—on rural farmstays. Here,

we compare a few standouts.

Dog Mountain Farm

Carnation, WA (36 miles from Seattle)

Workload: Two pitchforks (icon)

Setting: Overlooking the Tolt River with

a long, open view to the snow-tipped

Cascade Mountains

Bunk: Canvas platform tent with a plush

queen bed

At the Trough: Gourmet breakfast of

farm-fresh eggs, bacon, pastries, fruit and

coff ee or tea

Best Chore: Cheese making

Sorest Body Part: Back. There are more

than 150 chickens—plus ducks and

geese—to collect eggs from, and they

don’t lay them at a convenient height.

Downtime Fun: Horse-drawn carriage

rides, wine tasting, bird watching, hiking

Price: $150/night

dogmtnfarm.com

The Farmstead Lodging

Fredericksburg, OH (40 miles from

Akron-Canton)

Workload: Three pitchforks (icon)

Setting: Rolling farm country

Bunk: A gas lamp-lit private suite inside

an Amish farmhouse

At the Trough: Baked goods, coff ee and

juice at breakfast, and a full kitchen

for preparing the rest of your meals

(though dinner can be arranged with the

host family)

Best Chore: Feeding the Belgian draft

horses that power the farm

Sorest Part: Ego. Your hosts work harder

than you, and with smiles on their faces.

Downtime Fun: Buggy rides, perusing

local Amish crafts shops

Price: $100 to $140/night

330-674-0603

SHAKING THINGS UP We asked two Milwaukee food bloggers where to

find the best milkshakes in a city known for custard.

Country Log House Farm

Mount Joy, PA (23 miles from Harrisburg)

Workload: Four pitchforks (icon)

Setting: The famed wide-open,

green-pastured farm country of

Lancaster County

Bunk: A 150-plus-year-old cottage with

four bedrooms

At the Trough: The included breakfast

may feature pancakes, scrambled

eggs, quiche, ham or sausage, coff ee

and juice

Best Chore: Milking goats

Sorest Part: Shoulders. Milk does a body

good—particularly when you’re hefting

buckets of it.

Downtime Fun: Hiking, biking, wine

tasting, golf, fi shing

Price: $105 to $140/night

countryloghouse.com

BLOG FEED Milwaukeeans Paul and

1. KOPP’S CUSTARD

“There’s nothing better than

a Sprecher root beer fl oat on a

hot summer night. Unless, of

course, it’s a root beer shake

made with Kopp’s famous

frozen custard.” Multiple locations;

kopps.com

2. SOLLY’S GRILLE

“When you eat at this iconic

hamburger joint, be sure to

wash down your butter burger

with a classic strawberry

milkshake made with oldfashioned

Wisconsin ice cream

and real strawberries.” 4629 N

Port Washington Rd; 414-332-8808

3. LEON’S FROZEN CUSTARD

“Leon’s drive-in has been

serving up caramel shakes since

1942, and for good reason.

They’re ultra silky with the

perfect balance of sweet and

creamy. Order it extra heavy and

eat it with a spoon.” 3131 S 27th St;

414-383-1784; leonsfrozencustard.us

4. FRED’S

“This is the go-to custard stand

for locals in the Washington

AUGUST 2011 18

Heights neighborhood, where

regulars are greeted by name.

The fresh banana shake is a top

choice; add a bit of chocolate if

you’re feeling particularly indulgent.”

4726 W Vliet St; 414-771-6270

5. MAZOS

“The only thing better than

a burger made with Mazos'

freshly ground beef is one of its

classic chocolate malts, chockfull

of real malt powder and

served up in the metal canister

in which it is mixed.” 3146 S 27th

St; 414-671-2118; mazoshamburgers.com

GO MAGAZINE

Lori Fredrich (aka Peef

and Lo) blog at Burp!

Where Food Happens

(eatatburp.com).

Santa Cruz Beach Boardwalk Santa Cruz, CA (62 miles from San Francisco) | Length: 2,390 90 feet

Barbary Coast

This restaurant—one of 30-plus food vendors—is

open all day, and serves turkey legs, corn dogs

and sundaes. Other boardwalk finds include

funnel cake, cotton candy and saltwater taffy.

Double Shot

The view is

amazing from

this 125-foot

tower ride.

Giant Dipper

This wooden coaster—which opened ened

in 1924—has rocketed more than n

55 million riders along its half-mile le

length at speeds of up to 55mph. .


Enjoy the Southeast’s favorite family friendly

sports restaurant and bar. Serving the best

wings, burgers, salads and more. Operating

in Georgia, Tennessee and North Carolina.

www.tacomac.com

THE SOUTHEAST’S

LARGEST SELECTION OF

WORLD CLASS BEER!


LET'S GO

Style Muse

Need some inspiration for your next out-of-town shopping excursion? Just start

your spree at these local museums, where clothes rule.

FASHION

THE INSPIRATION: SPORTING LIFE

At Fashion Institute of Technology Museum, NY

You don’t have to be an athlete to be moved by this exhibit of

100-plus garments, accessories and textiles that reveal how

sportswear (for pursuits ranging from baseball and tennis to skiing

and swimming) has been infl uenced by fashion—and vice

versa. We’re talking a fl oor-length woman’s bicycling ensemble

with a divided skirt and a two-piece wool bathing suit from the

1850s. Through Nov. 5; fitnyc.com

THE LOOK: Famed swimsuit designer Malia Mills eschews wool

of yore for nylon and Lycra swimwear that has graced the cover

of the Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Issue. The suits do such wonders

you won’t care that they cost $350. Four locations; maliamills.com

THE INSPIRATION: FABULOUS!

At FIDM, Los Angeles

The title of this 170-piece exhibit, which celebrates

200 years of fashion history, says it all. Stylistas

will be inspired by everything from this 1890s

miniature corset from France to a 1907 Redfern

court gown with an 11-foot train to platform heels

worn by Mae West in the late 1940s. Sept. 10 to

Dec. 17; fidmmuseum.org

THE LOOK: The Way We Wore will send you

straight to high-end vintage heaven. Head here for

Pucci, Bill Blass, Chanel and pre-WWII treasures

like 1920s fl apper dresses. thewaywewore.com

THE INSPIRATION: MATERIAL WORLD

At the Indianapolis Museum of Art

Those who go gaga for GaGa-like bling will be drawn

to the wild pieces in this show, which includes

items adorned with extravagant materials like gold

and metallic threads, beads, shells, mirrors, bones,

fur and, like this hat by designer Bes-Ben, feathers.

Through Feb. 6; imamuseum.org

THE LOOK: Broad Ripple’s 8 Fifteen boutique has

been known to carry necklaces made with real

teeth from designer Samira 13 and a Haute Hippie

marabou feather vest. 8fifteen.com

Ocean Front Walk Venice, CA (7 miles from LA) | Length: 3 miles

Venice Fishing Pier

This 1,310-foot-long pier allows

anglers access to deep-water

fish like mackerel, halibut,

barracuda and sharks.

Venice Public Art Walls

On weekends and holidays, artists

express themselves here on concrete

walls covered with vibrant, legal graffitistyle

murals.

AUGUST 2011 20

GO MAGAZINE

DEAL METER

This month’s savings,

from high to higher.

Percent saved: 15% 15%

Half Moon, A RockResort,

Rose Hall, Jamaica • “1. 2.

3. Spa” package • Through

Dec. 15

Starts at $1,465 • Includes:

Spa welcome amenity, two

custom massages, unlimited

tennis, paddle boats, kayaks,

three-night stay

Percent saved: 15% 15%

Jupiter Beach Resort &

Spa, FL • “Boomers... Rock

on!" package • Through

Sept. 30

Starts at $199/night •

Includes: Accommodations,

breakfast for two, 10% off

beach chair and umbrella

rentals (plus 50% off a

second room); must be born

between 1946 and 1964

Percent saved: 20% 20%

Museum of Modern Art and

Top of the Rock package,

New York • No end date

Cost: $33 • Includes:

entrance to MoMA and

observation deck at Top of

the Rock

Percent saved: 27% 27%

W Dallas – Victory • “Go

Way Out West” package

•Through Sept. 30

Starts at $319 • Includes:

accommodations, two

cocktails, parking

(also available at W properties

in LA, San Francisco,

Scottsdale, AZ, and Seattle)

Percent saved: 33% 33%

Colonial Williamsburg

“Summer Stories” package •

Through Sept. 1

Starts at $99/person/night

• Includes: Accommodations

at Williamsburg Lodge,

daily breakfast (including

tip), ticket to historic area

and art museums, $100

activities card

Venice Skatepark

Open since Oct. 2009, this

16,000-square-foot park is a tribute

to Dogtown, the nearby birthplace of

modern skateboarding.

TOP: COURTESY THE MUSEUM AT FIT, NEW YORK


Big-Screen Beauty

BEAUTY Channel your inner starlet with these iconic

looks from some of our favorite movies—each set in a

cinematic AirTran Airways destination.

BY CHRISTINA KALLERY

NEW YORK

Breakfast at

Tiffany’s

Audrey Hepburn’s

Holly Golightly perfects

the wide-eyed

gamine look. Take

cues from her flirtyyet-sophisticated

style with winged liner

and fluttery fringe.

Physicians Formula

Eye Booster

2-in-1 Eyeliner +

Serum

Create a coquettish

cat eye with this liner

that doubles as lashboosting

serum. $11,

physiciansformula.com

Rimmel London’s

Sexy Curves

Mascara

Perfect your doe-eyed

look with lush lashes

from this volumizing

formula. $7.50,

rimmellondon.com

CHICAGO

Pretty in Pink

Spirited redhead

Andie (played by

Molly Ringwald) may

have been born on

the wrong side of the

tracks, but her unique

style is so right.

Dior Addict

Lipstick in

Singulière

Andie’s bee-stung

pout was enhanced

with a soft (what

else?) pink hue, like

this one. $28,

dior.com

Laura Geller Air

Whipped Blush in

Whisper Petal

Not only does this

whipped blush

create a pretty flush,

but it also feels cool

on skin. $26,

laurageller.com

BOSTON

Love Story

Ali MacGraw (as

the tragically fated

Jennifer Cavalleri)

inspires undying

devotion with her

natural beauty,

strong brows and

pin-straight locks.

neuveauBrow

This conditioning

serum promises

fuller brows within

four weeks. $100,

neuveaubrow.com

Remington T

Studio Pearl

Ceramic

Straightini

Get Jennifer’s sleek

look on the run with

this 6-inch mini flat

iron. $18, remington

products.com

AUGUST 2011 21

LOS ANGELES

Pulp Fiction

Uma Thurman

mesmerizes as

mysterious siren

Mia Wallace with a

sleek ebony bob and

smoldering gaze.

Paul Mitchell

Smoothing Gloss

Drops

Mia’s glossy dark locks

boosted her enigmatic

appeal. A few drops of

this adds mirror-like

shine to your style.

$20 paulmitchell.com

Hourglass

Film Noir Lash

Lacquer

This glossy topcoat

takes everyday lashes

to dangerously seductive

lengths. Apply

over mascara for a

cinematic effect.

$28, hourglasscos

metics.com

GO MAGAZINE

SAN FRANCISCO

Vertigo

The epitome of ladylike

chic, Kim Novak’s

meticulously coiffed

and polished style as

Madeleine Elster is to

die for.

Philip Kingsley

Weatherproof

Hairspray

A Hitchcock heroine

never risks a hair

out of place. Secure

your updo with this

humidity-busting

spray. $15,

philipkingsley.com

DuWop Sea Shell

Compact Lip

Dual in Serenade

Nothing’s more crucial

than an artfully

applied lip, and this

chic compact houses

the perfect peachy

pink. $25, duwop.com

BALTIMORE

Cry-Baby

In this John Waters

classic, Traci Lords

channels teenage

bad girl Wanda Woodward

with crimson

lips and voluminous

blonde locks.

MAC Lipstick in

Lady Danger

A matte cherry pout

is a rebel’s must-have

accessory. Try this

on-trend orangey

red. $14.50,

maccosmetics.com

Amika Deep

Purple 13mm

Tourmaline

Curler

Voluminous curls

make the ultimate

sexy statement.

Use this iron to

create ringlets without

the clip. $129,

loveamika.com


Time travel at the speed of a 1935 Speedster?

The 1930s brought unprecedented innovation

in machine-age technology and

materials. Industrial designers from the

auto industry translated the principles of

aerodynamics and streamlining into

everyday objects like radios and toasters.

It was also a decade when an unequaled

variety of watch cases and movements

came into being. In lieu of hands to tell

time, one such complication, called a

jumping mechanism, utilized numerals on

a disc viewed through a window. With its

striking resemblance to the dashboard

gauges and radio dials of the decade, the

jump hour watch was indeed “in tune”

with the times!

The Stauer 1930s Dashtronic deftly blends

the modern functionality of a 21-jewel

automatic movement and 3-ATM water

resistance with the distinctive, retro look

True to Machine Art esthetics, the sleek

brushed stainless steel case is clear on the

back, allowing a peek at the inner workings.

of a jumping display (not an actual jumping

complication). The stainless steel 1 1/2"

case is complemented with a black alligator-embossed

leather band. The band is

9 1/2" long and will fit a 7–8 1/2" wrist.

Try the Stauer 1930s Dashtronic Watch for

30 days and if you are not receiving

Truly Unique

compliments, please return the watch for

a full refund of the purchase price. If you

have an appreciation for classic design

with precision accuracy, the 1930s

Dashtronic Watch is built for you. This

watch is a limited edition, so please act

quickly. Our last two limited edition

watches are totally sold out!

Not Available in Stores

Stauer 1930s Dashtronic Watch $99 +S&H or

3 easy credit card payments of $33 +S&H

Call now to take advantage of this limited offer.

1-800-859-1602

Promotional Code DRW730-02

Please mention this code when you call.

Stauer ®

14101 Southcross Drive W.,

Dept. DRW730-02

Burnsville, Minnesota 55337

www.stauer.com


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3

6

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GO MAGAZINE

PHOTOGRAPH BY

DAN MCCOY


COURTESY GEORGIA AQUARIUM

An inside look at the

masterminds behind the

Georgia Aquarium’s

newest attraction

BY JENNIFER BRADLEY FRANKLIN

WATER

WORKS

E

leven dolphins, 22 trainers,

three actors: When breaking

down the Georgia Aquarium’s

new Dolphin Tales exhibit into

a few raw numbers, it doesn’t sound

like that big of an undertaking. But the

full-scale theatrical production—open

since April—took a veritable ocean of

businesses, specialists and products to

build. What’s more, it was built while the

aquarium remained open, fully inhabited

by sound- and vibration-sensitive beluga

whales, penguins, stingrays, whale sharks

and other sea life.

Here’s a look at some of the companies

that brought it all together:

AUGUST 2011 25

GO MAGAZINE

BUSINESS

IF YOU BUILD IT, THEY WILL COME

The construction management fi rm

Heery International—also responsible

for the original aquarium project, which

opened in 2005—took on the challenge of

building out the 84,000-square-foot space

on a confi ned 1-acre site (not to mention

one bordered by city roads and the rest of

the existing aquarium). First, a team of

acousticians measured the impact of the

noisy construction equipment on the animals

near the site in order to determine

how long the equipment could safely be

used, thereby mapping out a timeline

for completion. The project kicked off in

October 2007, and was completed in June


BUSINESS

WATER WORLD

From top: The AT&T Dolphin Tales

Theater under construction; a dolphin

flashing its quintessential smile

2010 (fi ve months ahead of schedule). One of the Heery project managers and scuba

diving enthusiast, Steve Jones got to mix business with pleasure (and put his hobby to

good use) by becoming the fi rst to do an inspection dive in the tank.

HIGH-FLYING DOLPHINS

Dolphins aren’t your ordinary cargo, so special care had to be taken in bringing them

to their new home. With the world’s only two commercially operated Gulfstream G-III

aircraft with oversized cargo doors, Phoenix Air, based in Cartersville, GA, transported

all 11 of the cute-as-ever mammals (which entered via large elevated platforms) from

all over the Caribbean and as far as Hawaii. The aircraft is spacious enough to allow

six or seven aquarium caretakers to attend each animal in-fl ight.

Phoenix pilots developed a trick to make sure their aquatic passengers were

comfortable. “Our guys mounted an empty mayo jar half fi lled with water on the ledge

of the cockpit and marked the water level with a red line to see how the water moved

during takeoff and landing,” says Bob Tracey, Phoenix’s vice president. “The goal is

to keep the water level exactly equal to the line, since that represents what the water is

doing in the dolphins’ containers.”

THE SHOW MUST GO ON

While the dolphins are the centerpiece of the new exhibit, it takes lights, sound and

technology—not to mention human actors—to make the sensational experience come

to life. And who better to bring the magic than WOW Works, a company founded

by Disney veterans who created full-scale theatrical productions for 10 years? “Our

inspiration is the audience—to see them entertained and enlightened, thrilled and

amazed by an experience they will never forget,” says Bettina Buckley, principal (with

Tylor Wymer) of the Clermont, FL-based company.

Creating the show took three years: First, they mounted a nationwide search for

actors and trainers. They also hired a team of stage managers, prop masters and techs

to run the theatrical show equipment, and then spent a year working alongside them

AUGUST 2011 26

GO MAGAZINE

COURTESY GEORGIA AQUARIUM


to be sure everything was running true to

their vision.

The biggest challenge WOW Works

faced was fi guring out how to keep the

high-tech equipment in pristine conditions

in a saltwater environment. The

solution? A complex plan that includes

daily, weekly and monthly maintenance—

both with aquarium staff and outside

contractors—whereby all equipment is

cleaned, tested and re-calibrated.

DESIGNER DOLPHIN DIGS

St. Louis-based architecture fi rm PGAV

employed gallons of creativity—in

addition to an in-house team of graphic

designers, model makers, interior and

media designers and, of course, architects—in

order to use every inch of the

84,000 square feet aff orded by the demolition

of what was the African penguin and

outdoor sea lion exhibits. (Don’t worry,

those exhibits were relocated.) That may

sound like a lot of space, but dolphins can

travel up to 100 miles per day in the wild

and need long lengths to swim in order to

stay healthy in captivity.

“We knew we needed to create ample

space and a great environment for the

animals, but also give guests a thrilling

experience,” says Project Manager Emily

Howard. “In the end, it came down to

literally balancing the inches.” Using an

unconventional oval shape for the pools,

aligned end to end and connected by a

clear acrylic gate, the team created the illusion

of much more space. The fi nal result

gives guests long views of the exhibit and

makes the space functional for the athletic

animals, with lots of room for them to swim

long distances and live comfortably.

SCAN IT

In addition to funding much of the $110

million Dolphin Tales exhibit, AT&T is providing

a fun way to dole out information about the

experience and the animals themselves—via

bar code scans positioned around the aquarium

(plus included on handouts for programmed

events). Guests just need to download a scanner

to their smartphones in order to access

info on feedings and training times, as

well as detailed animal fact sheets.

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EVERGREEN ESCAPES PHOTOS BY MIRA POLING

ALL WORK FOR

ALL PLAY

AUGUST 2011 29

GO MAGAZINE

BUSINESS

Turning your adrenaline-fueled

hobby into a money-making

endeavor isn’t easy—but the hard

work can pay off .

BY ROD O’CONNOR

T

here comes a lightbulb moment in

every entrepreneur’s life. For Jake

Haupert, it happened during his

honeymoon. It was 2006, and he and

his wife were kayaking New Zealand’s Doubtful

Sound on a small group daytrip, eyes peeled for

wildlife, when his mind drifted back home to

the Pacifi c Northwest.

Haupert grew up in Sumner, WA, in the

shadow of the jagged peaks of the Cascade

Range. He spent much of his career working for

an expedition cruise line that off ered intimate,

environmentally conscious shore excursions.

By 2002, he had returned to the Seattle area.

But it wasn’t until that honeymoon trip that he

connected the dots: Right in his backyard was

another region surrounded by stunning scenery

and unending waterways waiting to be explored.

“People who visit Seattle harbor a stereotype

that locals live an outdoorsy lifestyle,” Haupert

says. “I realized there was an opportunity to show

people an authentic Northwest experience.” In

2006, with a website, a stack of brochures his wife

made on their home computer and a biodieselpowered

Jeep Liberty, he launched EverGreen

Escapes Cascadia. His hiking and kayaking trips

would emulate those he’d experienced: small,

naturalist-led tours that emphasize sustainability

and highlight local fare, brew and wine.

He had solid travel industry experience and

an endless supply of entrepreneurial spirit, but

little money, fi nancing his nascent venture with

$5,000 in savings and an American Express card.

To get the word out, he drove his logo-wrapped

jeep around Seattle, networking with concierges,

travel agents and travel industry infl uencers who

could recommend him. Unlike most tour operators,

he off ered fl exible departure times and

eschewed minimum group sizes. “That quickly

put us a notch above everyone else in our region,”

Haupert says. “I had a clear vision of my concept

and the market I was going after. It became an

avalanche of business because there was such an

opportunity in the marketplace.”

Five years later, he’s the “chief escape offi -

cer” of a company with a fl eet of seven vehicles

and 25 employees. He’s expanded into Portland,

OR, and—after doubling its revenue three times


BUSINESS

in four years—EverGreen Escapes is on pace to

bring in more than $1 million this year.

The company has succeeded despite a tough

economy, thanks in part to a growing interest in

adventure travel. A 2010 study by the Adventure

Travel Trade Association, George Washington

University and Xola Consulting shows 26% of

respondents in the regions surveyed (North

America, Europe and Latin America) have

participated in adventure tourism—defi ned by

ATTA as any vacation that involves at least two

of the following: physical activity, interaction

with nature and cultural learning. And upwards

of 33% of those surveyed are considering incorporating

such aspects into their next trip.

But to those outdoor enthusiasts who think

that such a business is a ticket to lazy afternoons

paddling down a picturesque stream, think

again. “You have to understand that it requires

signifi cant time in the offi ce doing the business

sides of things,” Haupert says. “If you’re one of

those people who think being in front of a computer

sounds bad, then it’s not for you.”

“I think most people fi nd when you change

your hobby into your profession, you spend a

lot less time pursuing your hobby,” adds Mike

Fitzgerald, Jr., co-owner of Frontiers Travel, based in Wexford, PA. “I tell people to be careful trying

to develop a passion into a business, because you need the acumen to market that passion.”

For those clear-eyed entrepreneurs still thirsting for a life in adventure travel, Fitzgerald says

the fi rst step is to fi nd your niche. His parents, who founded Frontiers in 1969, couldn’t fi nd

reliable outfi tters to point them to good tackle-fi shing and game-hunting spots in the Rocky

Mountains. After some early success booking groups on their own, they expanded into fl y-fi shing

and bird hunting in Europe, Africa and South America. Today, it’s a $30 million company

off ering tours all over the globe, including deer hunting outside Denver and bonefi shing in The

Bahamas. “Early on, we identifi ed markets that were underserved,” Fitzgerald says. In the case

of fl y-fi shing, for example, by establishing itself in that niche, Frontiers was able to capitalize in

the 1980s and 1990s, when enthusiasts such as President Jimmy Carter and the Brad Pitt movie

A River Runs Through It helped lead an up-tick in interest in the sport.

With Evergreen Escapes, Haupert focused his sights on customers who would appreciate

his tour’s educational components, so he priced his trips—which range from multiday itineraries

to half-day tours—accordingly. Initially, he charged a minimum of $50/hour per person, but

that has since grown to $100/hour. “I didn’t want to come in cheap and appear desperate for the

bookings,” he says. “I needed to price myself where people would expect quality.”

“Pricing is driven by the marketplace. Start by looking at competitors,” advises Lauren Hefferon,

owner of Ciclismo Classico, a cycling tour company that began by booking trips to Italy

and now off ers rides of the New England countryside near her Massachusetts home. “And then

you have to say, how do I control my costs better than other people? It’s similar to any business:

What’s your product? What’s your price going to be? How are you going to promote it?”

Heff eron, who started her company in 1988, has seen plenty of changes on the promotional

end of the business, with travel agents and direct mail supplanted by blogs and social

“I tell people to be careful trying to

develop a passion into a business.”

AUGUST 2011 30

GO MAGAZINE

THE HIGH WAY

A Ciclismo Classico biking

tour in New England

networking. And while Ciclismo Classico

maintains a robust Facebook presence

(with more than 9,000 “Likes”), she

insists that word-of-mouth referrals are

still the most eff ective marketing vehicle.

Networking and promoting your

company at travel industry shows is a

great way to get your name out there, but

Haupert recommends thinking outside

the marketing box by attending out-ofindustry

events. For example, Haupert

frequently attends Seattle’s “Greendrinks”

events, where he rubs elbows with others

who care about sustainability.

Fitzgerald adds that there are many

legs to the marketing stool. “You have to

maintain a good blog and social media

presence,” he says, “but you still need

to look at brochures and catalogs and

mailings, too.”

In an industry that typically involves

alliances with equipment providers and

hotels, maintaining a spotless reputation

means maintaining quality control

beyond your own operation. For the fi rst

10 years, Heff eron leased bikes from

various third parties. But one day, she

discovered her supplier was providing

rides with used inner tubes—jeopardizing

CICLISMO: LAUREN HEFFERON


the safety of her customers. “Finally, I

bought my own fl eet of bicycles,” she says.

Unlike selecting an equipment provider,

choosing the right hotel partner can be

more subjective. Beyond having the right

blend of charm and services that aligns with

your company’s brand, properties should be

welcoming to adventure travelers, who can

be of a diff erent breed than the typical guest.

“The hotel can’t moan and groan when we

come rolling in with our sweaty pants and

our greasy bikes,” Heff eron says.

Regular site visits to hotels are also

essential. Frontiers, which partners with a

vast network of lodges, has staff visit all of its

properties nearly annually. “The fi rst thing a

client is going to ask you is, ‘Have you been

there?’ If you haven’t, your chances of closing

that sale drop dramatically,” Fitzgerald says.

While customer service hiccups may

stunt growth, would-be business owners

also need to remember that adventure travel

is subject to many uncontrollable elements,

from injuries to the whims of Mother Nature.

Thus, the proper insurance and paperwork

is essential—including securing the correct

permits for protected public lands. “There

can be a lot of red tape,” Haupert says. “But

without the proper permits, your insurance

wouldn’t even cover you if something were

to happen. You’d be out of business before

you even got started.”

And because many adventure trips take

place in remote areas, it’s also important to

know the location of the closest hospital and

have a medical evacuation plan. “You have

to think about things that you never want

to think about,” Fitzgerald says, “but when

things go wrong, they can really go wrong.”

Despite all of the risks—and the fact

that it doesn’t guarantee you’ll spend any

less time behind a desk than you do now—

there’s something undeniably romantic

about running a business where you’re

responsible for ushering fellow adventurers

on life-changing experiences. Chances are,

you’ll change, too.

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Haupert says. Spoken

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BUSINESS

COLLABORATE, C

BY DAKOTA KIM

ILLUSTRATION BY

HANK OSUNA

Inspired by his “shoulder to shoulder” days of working at a

trading desk—and subsequent ease of idea-sharing—Roman

Gelfer founded Sandbox Suites in 2007. It offers various forms

of workspaces, including open desks, rotating drafting tables,

1950s coffee bar “thinking” booths (complete with magazines and

espresso), private workstations and team

offices for up to 6 people.

You’re most likely to see startup

CEOs and developers filling the

Turnstone desks and mingling

at the various Sandbox-hosted

social events. It runs regular

group bike rides and lunches,

“bootstrappers” breakfasts

for entrepreneurs looking to

solve one another’s problems

and workshops on capitalizing

startups. “I’ve met friends and collaborators

at the samovar tea parties,”

says Anu Nigam, owner of Buzzbox.com, a

mobile news app. “Those social things make a big difference.”

There are currently three locations, two in San Francisco

and one in Berkeley; members can move freely between the three

locations. Multiple locations; 415-659-8197; sandboxsuites.com

COST: $295 (desk) to $595 (single, private furnished office) and up to $2,000

(private furnished offices for up to 6 people)

SIZE: 6,000 sq. ft. (SOMA); 5,000 sq. ft. (Union Square); 3,600 sq. ft. (Berkeley)

TOTAL WORKSPACES: 50 (SOMA); 50 (Union Square); 30 (Berkeley)

INTERNET SPEED: 50 mbps download, 10 mbps upload

BEST AMENITIES: 1950s-style café, showers, innovative worktables like the

Turnstone Campfire Paper Table, a rotating tabletop made of a stack of papers

for scratching down notes

Xbox 360. La-Z-Boy sofas. Air hockey. These amenities might sound

like they belong in a frat house—but more and more business travelers

are fi nding such perks (plus others, like massage therapy, acupuncture

and communal bikes) at co-working spots across the country. While the

practice of co-working—when individuals rent space in an offi ce and work

alongside others—is not brand new, the latest off erings are more stylish,

technologically advanced and amenity-laden than ever before. Here’s a

look at a few of the best:

SANDBOX SUITES SAN FRANCISCO THE COOP CHICAGO

AUGUST 2011 32

This new co-working loft is located in the gallery- and

boutique-filled River North neighborhood. In a city with a

fast-rising technology sector, it attracts mostly designers and

web developers; even founder Sam Rosen runs his web design

and development business, One Design Company, out of the

space. Hot startups like Groupon,

Poggled and VSA Partners

are nearby, offering

exciting collaboration

opportunities. “We’ve

had product developers,

programmers,

lawyers, microfinancers,

even a guy

getting his doctorate

in Spanish history,”

says Rosen.

The COOP—which

turns into a local artist gallery

on Thursdays every six weeks—hosts

regular family meals, events and benefits, but perhaps its mostloved

amenity is Eli, an affectionate golden doodle, who’s been

known to improve productivity and encourage well-needed breaks.

The COOP also allows members of other co-working spaces to

use desk space free of charge for the first few days if their home

space participates in the Coworking Visa program. 230 W Superior, 2F;

312-212-0861; coworkchicago.com

COST: $20/day to $300/month (or 20 visits)

SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft.

TOTAL WORKSPACES: 30-40 (but can fit up to 60 people)

INTERNET SPEED: 50 mbps download, 10 mbps upload

BEST AMENITY: The office dog, a golden doodle named Eli.

GO MAGAZINE


REATE, CO-WORK W

AUGUST 2011 33

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BUSINESS

BLANKSPACES LOS ANGELES

The flexible, spacious, skylight-filled design is the highlight at

Blankspaces, the brainchild of architect Jerome Chang. Open

desks can be folded up to reveal an event space for 100 seated

guests or 200 standing, the high-end chairs are ergonomic, and

the walls are punctuated with three shades of blue fabric and

shelving (to boost creativity).

WEWORK NEW YORK CITY

Collaboration is key at this new-in-2010 co-working company,

with locations in Midtown, SoHo and the Meatpacking District

(plus an office in San Francisco and one in LA that’s in the

works). “Thirty percent of our members are doing business with

each other; the cash is moving from one hand to the other,” says

founding partner Adam Neumann.

AUGUST 2011 34

“Every time I bring in a candidate or a client, they’re always

impressed,” says member Dylan Campbell, a recruiter. “It feels like

you’re at a cool startup.”

The first Blankspaces opened in 2008 in LA’s Miracle Mile

area. Nestled between Beverly Hills and Hollywood—and located

a stone’s throw from E! Entertainment, Style Network and Variety

magazine—it unsurprisingly attracts a community of those in the

fields of multimedia and entertainment. (A second, larger Santa

Monica location opened in June.) Social media events

feature prominently in Blankspaces’ agenda,

with famous bloggers giving talks on starting

successful blogs, acquiring advertising,

generating revenue and hiring staff.

Multiple locations; 323-330-9505;

blankspaces.com

Another focus? Sustainability. With recycled furniture,

power from renewable sources, energy-efficient lighting,

carbon offsets, low-VOC paints, fair-trade organic coffee and

environmental charity donations for every member, WeWork

is as committed to environmentalism as it is to helping its

members succeed.

But there’s still room for fun and games. Air hockey and

ping pong, nap and meditation rooms, a film screening room,

a recording studio, a kitchenette on every floor and lounges all

contribute to the social atmosphere.

In March, the company launched WeWork Labs, a startup

space at the SoHo location for entrepreneurs to collaborate and

brainstorm. Neumann hopes that this will be the beginning of

a fertile technology community of the best programmers and

designers, as well as a resource for other WeWork members.

Multiple locations; 212-961-1300; wework.com

COST: $275/month (lounge) to $2,850 (private six-person office)

SIZE: 35,000 sq. ft. (SoHo); 42,000 sq. ft. (Midtown); 36,000 sq. ft.

(Meatpacking)

TOTAL WORKSPACES: 180 offices (SoHo), 210 offices (Midtown); 160 offices

(Meatpacking)

INTERNET SPEED: 75 mbps download, 75 mbps upload

BEST AMENITIES: Bike storage, fair-trade organic coffee, tools available for

home use (everything from projectors to drills and ladders)

GO MAGAZINE

COST: $15 (for 5 off-peak work bar hours)

to $150 (for 15 peak office hours); $99

per month

SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft. (Miracle Mile); 7,500

sq. ft. (Santa Monica)

TOTAL WORKSPACES: 4 offices and 28

desks (Miracle Mile); 20+ offices and

60+ desks (Santa Monica)

INTERNET SPEED: 21 mbps download,

7 mbps upload (Miracle Mile); 20 mbps

download, 10 mbps upload (Santa Monica)

BEST AMENITIES: Convertible space for events,

blogging networking events, ergonomic chairs,

free parking


CAMBRIDGE COWORKING

CENTER BOSTON

Those in science- or tech-heavy industries will feel

right at home at C3. Founded in 2009 within the

Cambridge Innovation Center, it offers amenities

like an electronics bench and full-wall whiteboards

(many with leftover elaborate algorithms)—plus

it’s located in Kendall Square, in an MIT-owned

building. According to a Boston Consulting Group

survey, Kendall Square is (per square mile) the

most economically and scientifically “innovative”

place in the world, measured by new startups,

venture-capital investments and research labs.

“MIT is this giant magnet that pulls people

from all over the world to do stuff here,” says

Founder and CEO Tim Rowe. “[In the Boston

area] you’ll find more companies that invented a

new kind of plastic than companies that developed

new mobile phone apps.”

C3, which is open 24/7 and has hosted every-

one from business students launching fashion

websites to people working on green energy,

fosters innovation with events like the Venture

Café, a networking event for entrepreneurs and

VC firms. And the Cambridge Innovation Center

and New England Venture Capital Association

have just launched CriticalMass, a new coworking

space devoted to driving new company

creation, with support and participation from

various venture capital firms. One Broadway, 14th fl,

Cambridge; 617-401-3300; cambridgecoworking.com

COST: $250 per month

SIZE: 5,000 sq. ft. (expanding this fall)

TOTAL WORKSPACES: There is no cap on occupancy.

INTERNET SPEED: 100 mbps download, 100 mbps upload

BEST AMENITIES: Electronics bench, fleet of bikes, law

firm and VC office hours, massage therapists (not to

mention unlimited snacks, drinks and fruit)

BEAHIVE BEACON, NY

This sunlight-filled, loft-like spot in the artsy town of Beacon was founded

in May 2009, and is just as much a community space as it is a place to get

work done. Besides the usual networking and solopreneur events, BEAHIVE

hosts game nights, film screenings, jazz concerts,

fundraiser parties for community organizations

and weekly member lunches (not

to mention tai chi and acupuncture

workshops at its nearby Kingston

location). “I view work as holistic,”

says founder Scott Tillitt, who is

currently looking to open more locations

throughout the Hudson Valley,

including Poughkeepsie and Hudson. “If

you can provide things that inspire people

outside of work, it makes them more creative and

happier in their work, and that’s what I’m really trying to do at BEAHIVE.”

291 Main St (plus a location in nearby Kingston); 845-418-3731; beahivebeacon.com

COST: $20/day to $240/resident desk

SIZE: 3,300 sq. ft. (Beacon), 1,600 sq. ft. (Kingston)

TOTAL WORKSPACES: 20-plus, three new private offices (Beacon); 12-plus (Kingston)

INTERNET SPEED: 28 mbps download; 5.25 mbps upload

BEST AMENITIES: Social events like game and film nights, solopreneur sounding

boards, charitable parties and fundraisers for local groups, weekly members lunch,

Kingston tai chi class, acupuncture events and jazz concerts

INDEPENDENTS HALL PHILADELPHIA

With biomedical, educational and multimedia industries flourishing in Philly,

IndyHall attracts all sorts of businesspeople, from designers, game developers

and entrepreneurs to scientists, educators and videographers. (Whether they

like the Old City space for its 300 square feet of whiteboard or the lounge with

an XBox 360 and library is anybody’s guess.)

“When one of our workers took his job, his

condition was, ‘I want to work from IndyHall three

days a week,’” says co-founder Alex Hillman.

“I think that there’s an opportunity for companies

to view co-working spaces as a reward

for productive teams.” Hillman adds that the

percentage of companies that subsidize membership

fees for those who telecommute is growing.

IndyHall, which was founded in 2007, is hoping

to change the way we live with a new six-unit residential co-housing

development through a partnership with PostGreen, a local sustainable

development company. The units will have private living areas and kitchens,

while the building will feature a large shared commercial kitchen, dining

room and roof deck. 20 N Third St, Unit 201; 267-702-4865; indyhall.org

COST: $25/day (for non-member) to $275/month (24/7 access)

SIZE: 4,400 sq. ft.

TOTAL WORKSPACES: 50, including multiple casual work areas

INTERNET SPEED: 26 mbps download, 6 mbps upload

BEST AMENITY: XBox 360 with Guitar Hero

AUGUST 2011 35

GO MAGAZINE

(33 MILES FROM WHITE PLAINS)


Convention & Visitors Bureau




www.VisitColumbiaMO.com


MARC MAULDIN

FEATURES

BOXING IN PUERTO RICO//38

“ By 2030, expect 1,300

new acres of parks and

33 new miles of trails

along the [BeltLine].”

AUGUST 2011 37

THE FUTURE OF ATLANTA//45

GO MAGAZINE

FLYING HIGH

Pro skater Tony Hawk at the June

opening of Atlanta’s first public skate

park, located along the BeltLine


KNOCKOUT

ISLAND

BY JOHN O’CONNOR PHOTOGRAPHS BY SAM POLCER

PUERTO RICO’S BOXING LEGACY PACKS A POWERFUL PUNCH, AND WITH

FUTURE CHAMPIONS TRAINING IN GYMS ALL OVER THE ISLAND, AS WELL AS

THRILLING FRIDAY NIGHT FIGHTS TO ATTEND, THERE’S NO BETTER PLACE

FOR FANS OF THE SPORT TO GET IN (OR NEAR) THE RING.

The Jose “Cheo” Aponte Torres Gym occupies one room of a

sprawling, ramshackle, implausibly pink municipal building in

the city of Caguas, about 22 miles south of San Juan. The gym

is big enough to hold a boxing ring, a gallery of speed bags, free

weights and benches. The schools have let out, so kids are everywhere—maybe

three-dozen of various ages, wearing comically

oversized headgear and gloves, slugging every padded surface.

AUGUST 2011 38

GO MAGAZINE

BOXING GLOVE IMAGE COURTESY OF WWW.PUERTORICOPRODUCTS.COM


TRAINING DAYS

Orlando “Capu” Gonzalez Jr. (left)

and his sparring partner Ryan

Hernandez at Atlantic Boxing

Club in Aguadilla

AUGUST 2011 39

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★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★


In the ring, two boys are trying desperately to knock each

other’s heads off , though in the peculiar alternate reality of

amateur boxing, they’re going about it very good-naturedly.

The director of this scene is Orlando Piñero, a lean,

diminutive man with wire-frame glasses and the easy

manner of a Texas cattle rancher. In his 39 years as a

trainer and manager, he has worked with more than

50 professional Puerto Rican boxers, including world

champions Miguel Cotto and Juan Manuel Lopez and

rising stars McWilliams Arroyo and Jonathan “Bomba”

Gonzalez. Carlos Espada, a coach on the Olympic boxing

team, recently told me, “Orlando is the most important

trainer in Puerto Rico, period. All the best boxers have

gone through his gym at one point or another.”

By those standards, today’s fl ock is fairly modest. A

number of fi ghters are not yet 4 feet tall. But they all seem

to possess a kind of unshakable conviction, something

springing from deep inner hungers, and I wouldn’t get in

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

ANYONE WITH A FEW

BUCKS—AND HAND WRAPS—

WHO CRAVES GOOD, HONEST

FIGHTING CAN DROP IN FOR

A WORKOUT AT SOME OF THE

BEST, IF UNASSUMING, GYMS

IN THE HEMISPHERE.

the ring with a single one of them. “They’re not all going

to be champs,” says Piñero, himself once an unsuccessful

fi ghter. “We train them to be good citizens. If they win, terrifi

c, but the main thing is for Caguas to be proud of them.”

It’s fair to say that Caguas is already quite proud.

Thanks to the Aponte gym—named for a late Puerto

Rican champ—and the Bairoa Gym across town, the city

has attained near-mythological status in the boxing world.

Its roster of title-holders and contenders could fi ll several

large volumes. But Caguas isn’t some oddball satellite

Narnia toiling away in mad isolation. Virtually every town

on the island has at least one boxing gym, sometimes

three or four. Most weekends, professional and/or amateur

matches take place in dozens of barrios, from makeshift

street-corner rings to big brassy stadiums.

If all of this leads you to believe that Puerto Ricans

are a little nuts about boxing, it’s because they are. “When

Trinidad fought, people went crazy,” Espada says, referring

to the fi ve-time champion. “The whole country came

to a stop. Stores shut, schools closed. Everyone watched.

It’s the same today with Cotto.”

As a boxing fan, I’ve heard a lot about Puerto Rico’s rare

passion for the sport. In May, I decided to see it for myself,

and Caguas, naturally, was at the top of my list. Anyone

with a few bucks—and hand wraps—who craves good, honest

fi ghting can drop in for a workout at some of the best, if

unassuming, gyms in the hemisphere. Get yourself a good

map, some Muscle Milk, and have at it.

Talking to Piñero, I got the feeling that boxing is

AUGUST 2011 40

GO MAGAZINE

YOUNG GUNS Derick Santana

works on his moves at the gym

at Rafael Fito Ramos in Fajardo


AUGUST 2011 41

GO MAGAZINE

★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

almost a spiritual enterprise for him, off ering a transfor-

mative, visceral experience through a bond of common

suff ering (he calls his gym “my church”). Kids start boxing

exceptionally early here partly for this reason, but also for

the lure of money and because they have massive shoes to

fi ll. “Poverty drives them to it,” Piñero says, “and growing

up hearing about famous fi ghters. It gets in their blood.”

We’re standing in a room adjacent to the gym, from

where we can hear shouts, the slap of leather and an occasional

muffl ed grunt of a fi ghter taking one on the noggin.

Piñero mentions a prodigy in his care, an 18-year-old with

the preternatural technical skill—if not yet the dedication—

to one day become great. “He could represent Puerto Rico

in the Olympics,” Piñero says, “but he needs to practice.”

The kid’s name is John-Karl Sosa. I wander into

the gym to watch him spar. He’s scary fast. At a lithe

140 pounds, with shoulders gouged to hard points like

a mountain range, it’s not hard to believe, as Piñero

reveals, that Sosa has sparred well against the gym’s most

famous professional, Juan Manuel Lopez.

“I loved it,” Sosa says when I ask him about his three

rounds with the former featherweight champ. A goodlooking

kid with light-brown skin and dark, fi erce eyes,

Sosa grew up worshipping Felix Trinidad. He dropped

out of school in the ninth grade and now works in the

Port of San Juan, training on the side. As we talk, sweat

pours from him, but he doesn’t look fatigued. In fact,

after a workout that would’ve landed The Rock on an

T

electrolyte drip, Sosa is going jogging.

he following evening, about 400 people

fi le into Coliseo Pedrin Zorilla in San

Juan for a 10-card professional event.

Considering the quality of fi ghters on

deck—including McWilliams Arroyo,

a 25-year-old up-and-coming fl yweight managed by

Piñero—the setting is refreshingly down-market. Beers

are $3, empanadas $2, and by the look of it, the half-empty

bleachers are occupied entirely by the boxers’ families.

Arroyo (8-1, 7 KOs), a former Olympian, turned pro

last year. His 113-pound, 5-foot-4-inch frame belies a

ferocious fi ghting style known as a “swarmer” approach,

which emphasizes a blitzkrieg line of attack à la Mike

Tyson. We’d chatted at the weigh-in the previous morning,

where Arroyo had described how he fell into boxing

after deciding he was too short for basketball. “In the

ring, every human being is the same,” he says. “You can

be small in stature, but big in heart.”

Arroyo faces Rigoberto Casillas, a striver from

Tijuana, Mexico, with just two wins in eight professional

bouts. Arroyo looks tentative at fi rst, out-of-sorts amid

the noise and lights. Casillas circles, landing a fl urry

of blows. Arroyo counters impatiently, looking a little

bored. When the bell ends the fi rst round he sulks back

to his corner. From my seat in back, I spy Piñero loping


★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

through the crowd, pressing hands. Next to me is Arroyo’s

twin brother, McJoe, who’s also a former Olympian and

professional boxer. The tension of the fi ght seizes him

and, as fi ghting resumes, he begins to scream encouragements

to his brother.

“Relax Willy! Box!” And, “Use your left! Have fun!”

Arroyo comes alive in the second round. He tries to

overwhelm Casillas with constant pressure, issuing a primal

scream whenever he lands a punch. By the sixth, he’s

in command, darting and bounding across the ring like

a marlin, landing combinations and staggering Casillas.

An insane amount of fl uids is fl ying: sweat, spit, blood,

Vaseline. I can’t fathom it; my battered old bones would

split like saplings under the punishment. Finally, in the

seventh round, the referee calls it off . Arroyo is jubilant.

Afterwards, I fi nd him ringside, his arm thrown over

Piñero’s shoulders. “I just did what my manager told me

E

to do,” he beams.

velyn Ruiz is trying hard not to laugh

at me. Her husband, Orlando “San”

Gonzalez, a former pro fl yweight, is

putting me through some light bag-andmitt

work. After all, a trip to experience

Puerto Rico’s boxing culture wouldn’t be complete

without some time in a ring. Today, it’s just the

basics—but the pace is too much for me. I’m forgetting

combinations, stumbling over my feet and sweating a

lot. I don’t blame Ruiz for laughing; I’m sure it’s a

pathetic sight.

Ruiz and Gonzalez run the Atlantic Boxing Club

in Aguadilla, a quiet town on the northwestern tip of

the island with a wide swath of beach, highly snorkelable

cobalt waters and several good hotels. Atlantic

provides free training to local kids, who also get help with

homework. Until recently, the gym was located in an

abandoned building that lacked a ring. Fighters literally

sparred in the street. The new place is similarly humble—

punching bags mended with duct-tape, weight machines

thrown together with odd parts—but it’s a big improvement.

Walls are freshly painted, shelves are laden with

trophies, and in the center of it all: a regulation-size ring.

They’re eager for newcomers if you’re interested. Call

ahead and Gonzalez will even save you a parking spot.

Gonzalez retired from boxing in 1997 after only two

professional bouts. For his second fi ght, his trainer essentially

sold him to the highest bidder, pitting him against a

vastly superior boxer. Gonzalez lost badly. The experience

drove him from competition. “Trainers and managers

don’t always take care of fi ghters,” he says. “They’ll take

money under the table, use fi ghters for their own gain.”

His son, Orlando Jr., 16, is a successful amateur (107 -

6) with 12 junior championships under his belt. Although

he has at least a year before he can turn pro, he’s

occasionally approached at matches by shady promoters.

AUGUST 2011 42

GO MAGAZINE


RING OF FIRE PR Best

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AirTran Airways

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daily, low-fare

flights to San

Juan. Visit

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for more

information.

“We don’t trust them,” Ruiz says. “These are people who

would take advantage of him.”

Orlando Jr., or “Capu” (a shortened form of “baby

rose”), is a sweet, painfully skinny kid with braces

and a shock of curly black hair. At 95 pounds (he now

weighs 108), he seems ill-made for boxing. Then again,

Manny Pacquiao, widely considered the best boxer

in the world today, weighed 98 pounds as a novice.

“I like to receive punches,” Capu says. “It’s in my

heart. One day I want to be recognized worldwide

as the best fi ghter.”

Sam, who initially didn’t want Capu to become a

boxer at all, reminds his son that he fi rst needs to work

on his uppercut. More to the point, he says, “I tell him

every day he has to learn something new. If he doesn’t,

I’ll take him out of boxing.”

That evening, we all drive to a gym across town

where Atlantic boxers will square off against other

fi ghters. At the weigh-in, a dozen or so kids strip to

their undies and hop onto a scale. The littlest

weighs 45 pounds.

Dozens of fi ghts like this one are

happening across Puerto Rico

tonight, in Caguas and Bayamón,

Barceloneta and Mayagüez, Fajardo

and Guayama. Almost all are free

and open to the public, and most off er food and drink.

AUGUST 2011 43

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★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★

Outside, a ring is being assembled in the middle of a

basketball court. It’s on loan from Atlantic, and the guys

piecing it together are having trouble, so Gonzalez dives

underneath to tinker. Kids descend by the dozen and

stand around, grinning. A breeze kicks through the trees;

we can’t be far from the ocean. Things feel alive with

possibility, and I’m loath to leave. But I have a grueling

drive back to San Juan. Reluctantly, I say goodbye, hop

in my rental car and am swallowed by a wall of traffi c.

I arrive in the capital in time for the Manny

Pacquiao and Shane Mosley fi ght in Las Vegas, which

my hotel is screening at an outdoor bar. After fi ve days

in Puerto Rico, the fi ght has a strange air of unreality.

Pacquiao enters the stadium accompanied by the vocalist

for the band Survivor, Jimi Jamison, who sings “Eye

of the Tiger.” Mosley, not to be outdone, has LL Cool J

with him, rapping (what else?) “Mama Said Knock You

Out.” It all feels glutted and excessive. The fi ght itself

turns into one of the dullest I’ve ever seen.

A week later, I call Ruiz on her cell phone. It’s a bad

connection, with a lot of fuzz, but I can make out that

Atlantic fi ghters won four out of fi ve matches that night

in Aguadilla, and that Capu didn’t box because there

wasn’t anyone on hand good enough to match him

pound-for-pound. Ruiz reminds me that I’ve promised

to come back to Aguadilla next summer.

“We’ll fi nish your training,” she says. She’s breaking

up. But I’m pretty sure I hear her laugh.


PHOTOLIBRARY

THE

FUTURE

OF

AUGUST 2011 45

With the largest redevelopment in the

city’s history well under way, a cuttingedge

dining scene and a bright young

football star, all eyes are on Atlanta.

Yours should be, too.

GO MAGAZINE


t the start of the 2008 NFL

season, the Atlanta Falcons

were bloodied and bruised.

The team, which played

in its fi rst Super Bowl

10 years prior, was

coming off of a 4-12

record, another missed postseason

and, worst of all, the saga of former

Pro Bowl quarterback Michael Vick.

It was, without question, one of

the worst times to be a Falcon (and

a fan, for that matter). But Matt

Ryan, drafted by Atlanta as the

third overall pick in 2008, felt none

of the despair. “I was a little naive

coming out of college, so I didn’t

worry about anything,” he says. “I

just tried to come in and win games.

And that’s exactly what he did.

On the fi rst pass of his NFL career,

the 6-foot-4-inch, 220-pound quarterback

threw a 62-yard touchdown

strike to receiver Michael Jenkins.

From there, he led the Falcons to

an 11-5 record and a playoff birth

while winning the Associated Press’

Off ensive Rookie of the Year award.

Soon, the No. 7 Vick jerseys that

dominated the Georgia Dome on

Sundays were supplanted by Ryan’s

No. 2. His face, which looks like it

belongs on the body of a 12-yearold,

began popping up on billboards

around town, and his name was

mentioned in conversations about

the game’s best young quarterbacks.

When Ryan fi rst arrived in

Atlanta, all anyone could think

about was the past. After his fi rst

year, all they wanted to talk about

was the future.

“He did everything the right

way,” says Dave Choate, Falcons

superfan and editor of The

Falcoholic blog. “Having a guy

fans can rally around made a huge

ATLANTA TIMELINE ➜ LATE AUG./EARLY FALL 2011: Part of an ongoing construction project of Emory Village, the first phase of a new park will be finished. ➜ FALL 2011: Following the debut of a

AUGUST 2011 46

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Will quarterback Matt Ryan

fulfi ll the expectations of fans,

coaches and teammates and

lead the franchise to its fi rstever

Super Bowl title?

BY ADAM K. RAYMOND

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

IAN SPANIER

PHOTOGRAPHED AT

THE ELLIS HOTEL

The King of Pop

diff erence when it came to recovering from the past few years. And now he’s

the face of the franchise in Atlanta.”

Three seasons in—with the team’s fi rst-ever consecutive winning seasons

and two playoff appearances under Ryan’s belt—the future talk inevitably

leads to two words: Super and Bowl. And those aren’t words football fans

throw around lightly. “I’m expecting a Super Bowl birth in the next fi ve years,”

Choate says. “I’d like to say this year, but I don’t want to jinx it. Confi dence

among fans is very high.”

D. Orlando Ledbetter, the Falcons beat writer for The Atlanta-Journal Constitution

and the person who may know this team better than anyone who’s

not on it, says that confi dence is warranted. “They’ve got a young team and

they’ve done a good job of locking up some young talent,” he says. “If the team

continues to improve, a Super Bowl wouldn’t be out of the realm of possibility

in the next fi ve years.”

Ryan, who’s quiet and confi dent off the fi eld and a fi erce, red-faced leader

on it, doesn’t want to wait that long. “Super Bowls,” he says when asked what

he wants over the next few seasons. And yes, that’s “Super Bowls,” with an –s.

“That’s the reason everyone plays this game,” Ryan says. “We can do it now

and we can do it for a long time. We feel we can be great from 2010 to 2020.”

Falcons head coach Mike Smith isn’t quite as bold. A no-nonsense

disciplinarian, Smith focuses on sustainability when he talks about the

future. “This means sustainability from play to play, quarter to quarter, game

to game and year to year,” he says. “We want to be a relevant team year in

and year out.”

“Like the rest of the world, our city will grow much more

diverse and urban over the next 30 years. Atlantans are

already seeing the greater influence of international

cuisine, arts, language and traditions in our neighborhoods,

schools, places of worship and restaurants as

our city grows increasingly diverse. Just as the Civil

Rights Era ushered in a new prosperous era for Atlanta and the Olympic

Games changed the world’s perception of our community, we’re embarking

on a new era that promises to make our community even more dynamic and

globally connected.”

Muhtar Kent

CEO of Coca-Cola

new lobby restaurant/bar in May and another eatery in Augus August, the Hyatt Regency Atlanta (the world’s first Hyatt Regency hotel) will debut a grab-and-go market and an updated main Atrium. It’s all part of a $65

AUGUST 2011 47

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PORTRAIT BY ANDREW DEGRAFF


“He’s the face of the

franchise in Atlanta.”

If the Falcons achieve that, it will be largely thanks to

Ryan, who’s quickly growing into one of the NFL’s best

quarterbacks. Last season, he fi nished in the top 10 in both

yards and touchdowns while engineering fi ve fourth-quarter

comebacks. And when a quarterback experiences that type of

success, people start expecting big things. “I think Matt has

the ability to be one of the best quarterbacks in the NFL. His

drive to be great and his competitiveness is something that we

are very proud of,” Smith says.

That’s a lot of pressure for a 26-year-old. The NFL’s

scrapheap is full of young quarterbacks whose early success

brought on lofty expectations that were never met. But Ryan

doesn’t plan on being one of those quarterbacks. “The pressure

is one of the coolest parts about playing the position,” he

says, adding, “High expectations are a good thing. They mean

you’ve put yourself in a good position in the past, and people

believe you can do it in the future. That’s the responsibility

that goes along with being great.”

The pressure is defi nitely on for the 2011 season. Ryan’s

no longer a young quarterback, and with Pro-Bowlers like

Roddy White, Michael Turner and Tony Gonzalez surrounding

him on off ense, the Falcons are being picked by many

to win the Super Bowl. If the expectations of success and

the near-universal confi dence in Ryan’s ability to achieve

them are any indication, he is about to make the leap from

quarterback of the future to the quarterback of now.

MATTLANTA

A whirlwind tour of the Falcon

quarterback’s favorite local spots.

00:00 – 00:50

WORLD OF COCA-COLA

Ryan may be from Philadelphia, but he’s got

Coca-Cola running through his veins just like a

native Atlantan—and there’s no better place

to indulge in Dr. John Pemberton’s creation

than this landmark, where Ryan says he “learns

something new each time.” Make a beeline to

the main attractions: the bottling line and the

samples of products from around the world.

(Make sure to try Honduras’ Delaware Punch and

China’s Smart Apple.)

00:50 – 2:00

GEORGIA AQUARIUM

Just across from the shrine to Coca-Cola is

the world’s largest aquarium, with more than

8.5 million gallons of water. Catch a showing of

Dolphin Tales, the new theatrical exhibit that

incorporates actors and dolphins. As Ryan says,

it’s “definitely a cool place to go.” (For more on

the making of this exhibit, see pg. 25.)

2:15 – 2:45

THE TAVERN AT PHIPPS

After all that liquid, it’s time for some solids.

This popular eatery in Buckhead (where Ryan

lives) is one of his favorites to indulge in some

good eats. Hit the patio, order some barbecue

chicken nachos and sit back for some of the

city’s best people-watching.

2:45 – 4:00

LENOX SQUARE MALL

Walk across the street to this massive mall,

where the valet parking area looks like it could

be a car museum—and where Ryan re-stocks on

wardrobe essentials. You’re here for an authentic

No. 2 jersey from Champs Sports for $260.

4:00 – 5:00

HAL’S

Ryan says “you can’t go wrong with the

steak special” at this laidback haven of all

things beef. Get comfy on the first floor

(where “the action is,” according to the perky

hostess) and dig into the 12-ounce filet, a

hulking chunk of cow—and the first steak

Ryan tried there.

million head-to-toe transformation that will end Dec. 2011. ➜ OCT. 2011: Plans indicate that Novare Group will begin construction on SkyHouse, a 23-story apartment building with ground-level retail on West

AUGUST 2011 48

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THE

LATEST

LAUGHS

Atlanta may be known for veteran

comedians like Jeff Foxworthy and

Ron White, but there’s a new breed of

jokesters eager for their moment in the

spotlight. Meet fi ve rising stars.

COMPILED BY BRET LOVE

MIKE KAISER AGE 28

After growing up in Buff alo, NY, Kaiser exploded onto the Atlanta

comedy scene and has emerged as a comic beloved by other comics.

His intelligent writing and pitch-perfect delivery earned him the title

of “Best New Comedian” at the 2010 Atlanta Stands Up Awards.

JOKE

“The city recently lost its hockey team to Winnipeg, causing many

Atlantans to demand answers to questions like, ‘We had a hockey team?’

and ‘Where is Winnipeg?’”

LAURA AUSTIN AGE 24

This Orange County, CA,

native is a lifelong standup

fan who’s been frequenting

Atlanta comedy clubs for

more than two years. Inspired

to try her hand at comedy

after a bad breakup, Austin

has emerged as one of the

city’s most engaging female

comedians.

JOKE

“Georgia is considered the Peach State, which I assume is why every

major street in Atlanta is named ‘Peachtree.’ But our state produces more

peanuts than peaches. I guess producing a lot of nuts isn’t something we

should brag about.”

EVAN FOWLER AGE 29

An Atlanta native who’s been

doing comedy for two years,

Fowler’s rapier-sharp brand of

storytelling combines healthy

doses of both intelligence and

irreverence, making him a

popular favorite at local clubs

such as the Laughing Skull

Lounge and the Star Bar.

JOKE

“Atlanta is called ‘The city too busy to hate,’ but I prefer to think of it as

‘The city too busy for road maintenance.’”

NOAH GARDENSWARTZ

AGE 27

Known for his laidback stage

persona, Gardenswartz has

been performing stand-up

comedy since graduating from

Emory in 2006. Though he

frequently travels to perform

at clubs and colleges across

the US, he can be seen most

Mondays at the Star Bar and

Wednesdays at the Laughing

Skull Lounge.

JOKE

“Atlanta is known for having the worst traffi c in America,

and Southern hospitality. I think it’s time we reevaluate our

defi nition of hospitable conditions, or stop taking Southern

hospitality as a compliment.”

Peachtree Street. ➜ NOV. 2011: The JW Marriott Atlanta Buckhead will complete a $10 million renovation to transform the guest rooms and lobby. ➜ DEC. 2011: The Atlanta Marriott Perimeter Center will


TREY TOLER AGE 26

Having performed with the likes of Margaret

Cho and Greg Proops, Toler is a rising star

on the Atlanta comedy scene, leaving trails of

laughter and a growing fan base in his wake.

He also hosts open-mic night Wednesdays at

the Laughing Skull Lounge.

JOKE

“Siphoning gas is the rural Georgia credit

card, which is why I always clarify that I am

from Atlanta.”

Have a laugh at Atlanta’s BEST COMEDY CLUBS

FUNNY FARM COMEDY CLUB

11000 Alpharetta Hwy (inside Andretti

Indoor Carting & Games) • 770-817-4242

funnyfarmcomedyclub.com

A Roswell hotspot for nearly a decade, Funny

Farm attracts sellout crowds to the suburbs

thanks to a spacious, non-smoking room and

A-list offerings that have included everyone

from Margaret Cho and Richard Lewis to Bob

Saget and Gilbert Gottfried.

LAUGHING SKULL LOUNGE

The Vortex Midtown, 878 Peachtree St •

877-523-3288

vortexcomedy.com

The newest kid on the comedy block is also the

hippest, earning “Best of Atlanta” nods from

numerous local publications. The unconventional

location (in the back of a burger joint) only

enhances its cred, as does the mix of up-andcoming

locals and nationally known comedians.

THE PUNCHLINE

280 Hilderbrand Dr • 404-252-5233

punchline.com

This Atlanta landmark—named one of the

Top 10 comedy clubs in the country by USA

Today—was pretty much the only game

in town 10 years ago. Nearly every major

comedian in the world has appeared on its

storied stage; don’t miss Kevin Nealon,

Aug. 26-28. FUNNY FARM: CELESTE ECHOLS OF AVIDITY PHOTOPGRAPHY, LAUGHING SKULL: LAUREN GRUNDHOEFER

reopen after a $22 million facelift that includes redesigned guestrooms and additional meeting space. ➜ LATE 2011: The long-stalled Buckhead Atlanta project (formerly The Streets of Buckhead) will finally break

AUGUST 2011 50

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MARGARET MITCHELL: KENAN RESEARCH CENTER AT THE ATLANTA HISTORY CENTER; PAINTINGS: 2010 ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE

VISUAL ARTS/ARTISIS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), 2010 ESTATE OF PABLO PICASSO/ ARTISIS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), PORTRAIT BY ANDREW DEGRAFF

Key to the City

“Atlanta will be a leader in

sustainability, and we’ll have

more parks and greenspace

than ever before.

We’ll have thriving arts,

culture, film and television

industries that augment the

foundation built by Turner

Broadcasting Systems,

Tyler Perry Studios and

EUE/Screengems. And

Atlanta will continue to be the city

of choice for educated, talented individuals

because of the great career opportunities

and easygoing lifestyle here.”

“The life sciences industry will have an

immense impact on Georgia’s economy,

driving economic growth and job creation. In

the very near future, this industry alone will

employ thousands of our residents, offering

them high-paying jobs and an opportunity

to make a huge impact on the welfare of our

environment and the lives of people around

the world. The city’s major research institutions

such as Emory University, Georgia Tech

and the Morehouse School of Medicine are a

strong complement to this industry.”

“Atlanta will continue to grow skyward,

but I am certain our new buildings will be

more energy-efficient and include features

such as solar panels, green rooftops and

other sustainable components. And the

Atlanta BeltLine and the Atlanta Streetcar,

another new transit project, will attract new

residential housing, restaurants, shops and

recreational amenities to every community

they touch.”

Kasim Reed

Atlanta Mayor

CULTURE

CALENDAR

Mark your calendar for these upcoming Atlanta events.

GRANT PARK SUMMER

SHADE FESTIVAL

AUG. 27-28

Head to Atlanta’s oldest public park

for an artist market, live music and

Corks & Forks, featuring dishes

prepared by the city’s top toques as

well as fi ne wines and craft beer.

gpconservancy.org

ATLANTA’S BOOK: THE

LOST GONE WITH THE WIND

MANUSCRIPT

THROUGH SEPT. 5

Atlanta native Margaret Mitchell

penned the classic Civil War novel

75 years ago, and the Atlanta History

Center is one of

only two venues

to display

chapters of the

original manuscript—some

complete with

handwritten

changes.

atlantahistory

center.com

TEAM UP! EXPLORE

SCIENCE & SPORTS

THROUGH SEPT. 11

Future Hall of Famers will get a kick

out of this sporty exhibit at the children’s

museum Imagine It, testing

their skills in basketball, tennis and

even snowboarding while learning

scientifi c principles.

childrensmuseumatlanta.org

ATLANTA ARTS FESTIVAL

SEPT. 17-18

Glass-blowers, sculptors, photographers

and painters will be among

the 200 jury-selected artists displaying

and selling works during this

fi fth-annual fest in Piedmont Park.

atlantaartsfestival.com

PICASSO TO WARHOL

OCT. 15 TO APRIL 29

Seen together for the fi rst time in the

Southeast, this collection of 100 works

by 20th-century greats comes to the

High Museum courtesy of New York’s

Museum of Modern Art. high.org

ground. The six-block, 8-acre “urban village” is scheduled to open in 2013. ➜ LATE 2011: Construction is scheduled to begin on the $47.6 million Atlanta Streetcar project, which will transport people east-west from the

AUGUST 2011 51

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T


TO BE

OR

OTP?

BY ALLISON WEISS ENTREKIN ILLUSTRATION BY BRIAN STAUFFER

he 64-mile highway that circles

Atlanta is the unoffi cial perimeter

that marks the end of the city and

the beginning of the ’burbs. Inside,

you’re ITP (inside the perimeter);

outside, you’re OTP. The merits of

each have long been argued, and recent

census data have fanned the fl ames by

showing OTP population numbers skyrocketing

while ITP numbers stagnate.

Fighting for their location’s honor, two

Atlanta restaurateurs—one ITP, one

OTP—step into the ring to battle it out.

Stacey Eames owns Highland Bakery

(with three ITP locations) and lives in

Old Fourth Ward. Barbara DiJames

owns grace 1720 in Norcross and lives a

few miles away from her restaurant.

Ladies, your arguments please.

DIJAMES: I think the reason more

people are migrating OTP is because it

aff ords you your “cake-and-eat-it-too;”

you get the best of both worlds. The

air is cleaner, there are plenty of parks

(The Greenway, Jones Bridge Park) and

open spaces to hike, bike and enjoy.

Two Atlantans

debate whether

life is better inside

or outside the

perimeter

Stacey

Eames

Barbara

DiJames

EAMES: You can fi nd lots of parks and

green spaces within the city. Since I

spend so much time in the kitchen, I

love to be outdoors whenever possible. I

enjoy taking a quick jog through Grant

Park. Since I’m only a few miles from

work, I love riding my bike or jogging to

work. I’m especially excited about the

new Historic Fourth Ward Park.

I would never move OTP. I love

the ITP vibe. I love the diversity of the

people who come into our restaurants.

There’s something special about meeting

people from all walks of life—and

yet there’s a commonality. I’m not sure

I can pinpoint it, but there’s a common

thread that defi nitely exists within the

ITP demographic.

Martin Luther King Jr. Historic Site to Centennial Olympic Park. The proposed north-south route will travel down Peachtree Street from the Arts Center MARTA station to the Five Points MARTA station. ➜ AS EARLY AS 2012: The Center for

AUGUST 2011 52

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PORTRAIT BY ANDREW DEGRAFF

DIJAMES: The international culture

and diversity of ITP is fi nding its way

out here, too. I see a multinational

clientele showing up everywhere OTP.

I am blessed to live and work OTP and

yet still be able to be ITP in just 20

minutes when I feel the need to test my

survival instincts, pay double for a great

meal and see all my good friends that I

truly do miss.

EAMES: Maybe your friends like living

ITP for the same reasons I do—the

accessibility to art galleries like Inman

Park’s Whitespace and cool movie theaters

like the historic Plaza Theatre and

Midtown Art Cinema. For cool shoes

and casual wear I love hip shopping

Big Man on Campus

destinations like Junkman’s Daughter

and Abbadabba’s in Little Five Points.

DIJAMES: For those of us who are hon-

est enough to know we’d look ridiculous

still buying our clothes in a hip Little

Five Points boutique, we’re running as

fast as we can to fi nd our new “happy

place” OTP. I’m speaking for myself

and many others when I tell you that

when you reach the point you’re not

“cool enough” to deal with all the ITP

excitement, you move OTP. You know

the excitement I’m talking about—the

late-night noise from the club a block

from your condo, the sirens that wake

you up in the middle of the night and

the bad parking situation whenever you

want to go hit the next “it” restaurant.

EAMES: If you ever stood on my back

porch, you’d understand that living

ITP doesn’t have to be synonymous

with snarling traffi c and buzzing

BlackBerries. I overlook an organic

garden and a creek that fl ows nearly

year-round. Coastal oaks are fl ecked

with local birds; even the majestic

red-tailed hawk makes an occasional

appearance. Mix in some Georgia

plume, fl owering hydrangeas and blue

false indigo, and you’ll understand why

my ITP “well-being” is just that.

ITP or OTP? That is still the question.

“I think Atlanta’s going to be what I’ll refer to as a megacity,

with more than 10 million people. It’s going to be like

London, Beijing, Shanghai and Hong Kong. We’ll have a new

transportation infrastructure in place to support that kind

of growth. We’ll also have a new, enhanced variation of

MARTA more in keeping with the time. It’s going to be very

dynamic along the Peachtree ridge corridor. The city is going to be more

concentrated along that corridor in the arts, culture and business sectors.”

Mark P. Becker

Georgia State University President

Puppetry Arts will welcome the new Jim Henson Wing, which will double the museum’s size and allow it to bring 4,500 items out of storage. ➜ APRIL 2012: Ghost Brothers of Darkland County—a

AUGUST 2011 53

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It started as a master’s

thesis. In 1999, Georgia

Tech student Ryan Gravel

drew up a plan to turn

the BeltLine—22 miles of

mostly abandoned railroad

corridors circling much

of Atlanta—into a unifi ed

greenway, complete with

light-rail transit, solar powerproducing

parks and shaded

trails. The plan might have

died a slow death in the library

of Gravel’s alma mater had

he not worked up the nerve to

send it to dozens of the city’s

movers and shakers. One of

those recipients, then-Atlanta

PORTRAIT BY ANDREW DEGRAFF

ALL ABOARD

ATLANTA’S

BELTLINE

A huge loop of abandoned railroad tracks is now the greenway of the city’s future.

Hometown Improver

City Council member Cathy

Woolard, took the 29-year-old’s

concept seriously, crisscrossing

the city with him promoting it

to neighborhood associations.

The idea grew legs, and in 2005,

Atlanta’s then-mayor Shirley

Franklin offi cially deemed it a

25-year initiative.

Today, the BeltLine is alive

again with three new parks and

7 miles of trails created along

its route. In as few as three

years, BeltLine offi cials hope

the fi rst pieces of a light-rail

streetcar system will circle the

artery, and in about fi ve, the

old rock quarry situated next to

“Georgia Tech, Emory, Georgia State and our other many

colleges, universities and technical schools will continue

to partner on a variety of projects that will ultimately make

Atlanta a key education and research center. As a result,

nanotechnology will be a major industry in the state, bringing

numerous companies into Georgia.”

Bernie Marcus

Home Depot Co-founder and Georgia Aquarium CEO

the line will become the biggest

park in the city, spanning more

than 300 acres. By 2030, expect

1,300 new acres of parks and

33 new miles of trails along the

line—the largest redevelopment

in the city’s history.

POINTS ON THE MAP

1 SPOT: actress Jane Fonda

at Historic Fourth Ward Park,

a brand-new BeltLine

initiative that turned 10-plus

acres of contaminated

industrial land into green

space. Fonda’s apartment is

just a few blocks away, and

BY ALLISON WEISS ENTREKIN

ILLUSTRATION BY OTTO STEININGER

rumor has it she can be seen

strolling around its manmade

lake in the evenings. If you’re

a fan of pro skateboarder

Tony Hawk, you might catch

a glimpse of him, too—he

helped fund and design the

adjoining skatepark. 680

Dallas St NE; h4wpc.com

2 VIEW: two huge murals by

local artists on one of the

BeltLine’s underpasses.

Commissioned as part of the

public art initiative Art on the

Atlanta BeltLine, one mural

by The Loss Prevention

Collective features bikers

zooming by, and the other, by

HENSE, off ers a black, white

and gray bouquet of graffi ti

fl owers. Ralph McGill Blvd

NE at BeltLine Bridge

3 SNACK: on a homemade

oatmeal cream pie and fresh

lemonade at PARISH Market,

a homey-but-hip Inman Park

store and café. Grab an

outdoor table beneath a wide

umbrella, kick back and enjoy

the views of the BeltLine.

240 N Highland Ave NE;

parishatl.com

collaboration between Stephen King and John Mellencamp that’s at least 11 years in the making—will have its world premiere at Alliance Theatre. ➜ SPRING 2012: Phipps Plaza will

AUGUST 2011 54

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10

11

welcome LEGOLAND Discover, complete with an Atlanta skyline made of Legos. ➜ MAY 2012: The inaugural Atlanta Fringe Festival is scheduled to take place. ➜ FALL 2012: Emory Point—a mixed-

AUGUST 2011 55

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9

8

1

5

2

4

3

6

7


4 WALK: along the BeltLine’s

Eastside Trail. Begin at 10th

Street NE and Monroe Drive

NE and traverse 2.5 miles south

through charming neighborhoods

like Virginia-Highland,

Poncey-Highland, Old Fourth

Ward and Inman Park. Thanks

to the trail’s off -road shortcuts,

you’ll wind up at Dekalb

Avenue NE quicker than you

could in a car. Some portions of

this trail still have construction

crews, so don’t wear fl ip-fl ops.

Start at 10th St NE and Monroe

Dr NE; end at Dekalb Ave NE

and Airline St NE

5 SUP: at Kevin Rathbun

Steak, one of Atlanta’s hottest

restaurants and a great

example of adaptive reuse. Iron

Chef winner Rathbun transformed

a former cotton

warehouse along the BeltLine

into a home for $54 rib eyes,

and he’s counting on the line’s

future transit system to bring

even more carnivores right to

his door. 154 Krog St NE # 200;

kevinrathbunsteak.com

6 SIP: an Old Fashioned

cocktail at H. Harper Station,

a former BeltLine train depot

that’s now a hip restaurant

and bar. Opened last year, it’s

known for its extensive

cocktail list and laidback vibe.

Its name comes from the

Hoop Dreamer

grandfather of one of the

owners; Harold Harper was a

railroad engineer for more

than 40 years. 904 Memorial

Dr SE; hharperstation.com

7 PLAY: a game of bocce ball

in the center court at

charming Glenwood Park, an

energy-efficient live-workplay

community situated

between Grant Park and East

Atlanta Village. When you’re

through, grab an iced coffee a

block away at Drip coffee

shop, an independent joint

for joe that also sells locally

made jewelry and ice cream.

Glenwood Park Dr SE;

glenwoodpark.com

“I anticipate that LEED certification will be commonplace

and that we’ll see a much greater emphasis on

the long-term impact of such projects. In 30 years,

I expect to see green roofs and solar panels dotting

much of the Atlanta skyline.”

Kathy Betty

WNBA Atlanta Dream Owner

8 GAWK: at Po, a giant panda

cub that plays all day at Zoo

Atlanta just three blocks from

the BeltLine. Po is the only cub

of his kind born in the US last

year. 800 Cherokee Ave SE;

zooatlanta.org

9 KICK: a soccer ball at

Boulevard Crossing Park, a

brand-new BeltLine park with

two meticulously groomed

soccer fi elds. To help clear the

fi elds, the city brought in 24

goats to eat 1.5 acres of invasive

kudzu over a three-week period.

Right now, only about 5 acres of

the park are open, but it will

eventually span 22 acres, and

BeltLine offi cials hint there

OUTDOOR OASIS Historic Fourth

Ward Park

might be a BMX park and

skatepark in the works. 504

Englewood Ave SE

10 TOUR: the entire BeltLine for

free Fridays and Saturdays at

9:30am. The three-hour guided

bus tours (which start and fi nish

at the Inman Park MARTA

station) off er exclusive access to

a 300-acre rock quarry that will

soon transform into Westside

Reservoir Park, complete with

ball fi elds, an equestrian center

and a 30-day backup water

supply for the city. Tours can fi ll

up well in advance, so book a

seat at tours.beltline.org. Hint: If

the tour you want is full, check

the BeltLine’s Facebook page

(offi cials post notices if seats

open up). 900 Lois St NW

11 JOG: along Northside Trail,

which follows the path of

beautiful Tanyard Creek for a

little less than a mile. Let the

kids out of the jogging strollers at

either of the two playgrounds

along the path, or pack a picnic

lunch and chow down on the

adjacent grassy fi eld.

use development adjacent to Emory University—will feature 440 apartments and 82,000 square feet of retail. ➜ SPRING 2013: The highly anticipated Center for Civil and Human Rights

AUGUST 2011 56

GO MAGAZINE

PORTRAIT BY ANDREW DEGRAFF; PARK: CHRISTOPHER T. MARTIN


Visit Us In Our

New Home

FREE ADMISSION!

Witness A Delivery

Adopt A ’Kid

Mon–Sat: 9–5

Sun: 10–5

Adult’s Tasting

Tours and Tastings

www.chateauelan.com or 678.425.0900

100 Tour De France, Braselton, Georgia

“Book Birthday and Ballroom Events”

Cabbagepatchkids.com

: @cpkusa


© 2011 O.A.A., Inc.

Tastes of Braselton

Kid’s Tasting

Tours and Tastings

www.mayfielddairy.com or 1-888-298-0396

1160 Broadway Ave., Braselton, Georgia

www.braselton.net or 706.654.3915 | I-85 Exits 126 & 129 | 30 Minutes North of Atlanta | Braselton, Georgia

Discover the

stories of

civilization

at Georgia’s

premier museum

of ancient art

571 South Kilgo Circle

Atlanta, GA 30322

404-727-4282

carlos.emory.edu


THE GAME

CHANGERS

As these three

locals prove,

Atlanta is on

the forefront of

everything from

medicine and

technology to

farming.

WHO:

GRANT

SCHINDLER

Creator of Trimensional, and

Research Scientist at Georgia

Institute of Technology

WHAT: Trimensional, which launched in January, might just be the

world’s most accessible and aff ordable 3-D scanning technology.

The $.99 app allows iPhone users to capture a textured 3-D model of

any object.

HOW: Trimensional uses the smartphone screen as an active light

source while simultaneously photographing the subject using the

phone’s front-facing camera; then, custom algorithms analyze the

patterns of light refl ected off the subject to build a true 3-D model.

With a $4.99 upgrade, a ready-to-print format allows a user to send

an image straight to a 3-D printer.

WHAT’S NEXT: The latest version, released in April, allows users

to send their 3-D models in a variety of formats (JPEG, QuickTime

movie, animated GIF). Future applications include putting a user’s

3-D face on video game characters and participating in 3-D video

chats. trimensional.com

BY ASHLEY HESSELTINE

WHAT: If done incorrectly on darker skin

types, laser hair removal has been known to

burn and scar. Named Atlanta’s fi rst Laser

Center of Excellence, WIFH performs hair

removal on all skin colors and types.

HOW: By dedicating the bulk of his practice

to laser hair removal and staying extremely

dogmatic on the lasers used, Kulkin has

been at the forefront of the industry,

performing more than 100,000 treatments

with no major complications—half of those

on African-Americans or other dark skin

types (the highest reported number for dark

skin procedures in metro Atlanta). The most

critical component of laser hair removal on

dark skin is mastering the use of the YAG

laser, as Kulkin has done.

WHAT’S NEXT: Kulkin researches the

future of the industry and predicts the “next

big thing” (in the next 20 to 30 years) will

be improved home devices for laser hair

removal. He also continues to educate the

medical community and doctors from all

over the world about laser hair removal for

dark skin at workshops and conferences.

wifh.com

will be unveiled adjacent to the World of Coca-Cola and the Georgia Aquarium ➜ MARCH 2013: Football fans will rejoice when the College Football Hall of Fame relocates adjacent to the Georgia World

AUGUST 2011 58

GO MAGAZINE

WHO:

DR. JAY

KULKIN

Founder of Women’s

Institute for Health


COMPILED BY ALLISON WEISS ENTREKIN

WHO:

JONATHAN

HOSSEINI

Co-founder and

CEO of Kenari

Neighborhood

Food Systems

WHAT: Kenari is a system of nucleus farms, neighborhood retail stores

and commercial community kitchens, all located in a single neighborhood,

designed to change the way food is grown, made, sold and

eaten. With a home base and testing grounds in Roswell, GA, Kenari’s

mission is to replicate the system around the world.

HOW: Each Kenari Farm promotes growth and production of food

within the community by local entrepreneurs, existing farms and

community and backyard gardens. Neighborhood food markets sell

the local goods, while the shared kitchens enable producers to have a

licensed, certifi ed facility for making food/products they want to bring

to market—ideal for incubating small food businesses that don’t yet

have their own production facility.

WHAT’S NEXT: Its Market Maker technology, being piloted in four

metro Atlanta communities, Botswana and Ecuador later this year , will

be a critical component. It creates an electronic community currency

for transactions and provides an easy-to-use, digital interface. Components

similar to that of Foursquare, Facebook and eBay allow any-size

local grower or processor to sell to or buy from food markets using the

Kenari system. Through the technology, consumers can receive live

information online or via mobile application on where good local food

is growing and where it’s for sale. kenari.org

Guitar Hero

“Thirty years from now, the music and

film industries will be the most important

industries in Atlanta. There’s a

huge change in film right now in Atlanta.

You used to not see any movie stars in

Atlanta, and now they’re everywhere.”

Kristian Bush

Lead guitarist, Sugarland

DINE OF

THE TIMES

A taste of Atlanta’s food evolution,

from what’s been done to what’s next

TRENDY “JUNK FOOD”

PAST: PIZZA

Toppings like shaved barbecue pork

tenderloin, potato and cilantro-mint

chutney are par for the pie at

Shorty’s Pizza. shortys-pizza.com

PRESENT: BURGERS

Flip Burger, Yeah! Burger, Grindhouse

Killer Burgers, Farm Burger—take

your pick.

FUTURE: HOT DOGS

Top Chef Richard Blais does dogs

with style at his new eatery HD

(Haute Doggery), which opened

last month.

EXCLUSIVE DINING

PAST: CHEF’S TABLE

Get star treatment (for a $150

price tag) at Park 75 in the Four

Seasons Hotel. fourseasons.com

PRESENT: SUPPER CLUBS

It’s still highly competitive to

snag a seat at Souper Jenny’s

Underground Supper Club.

souperjennyatl.com

FUTURE: UNDERGROUND

MARKETS

Forty local food artisans secretly

set up shop at the Atlanta

Underground Market; in-the-know

subscribers are notified of

the location the night before.

atlantaundergroundmarket.com

TECHNOLOGY

PAST: ONLINE RESERVATIONS

OpenTable.com changed the game

when it arrived in Atlanta in the

early 2000s. opentable.com

PRESENT: DISCOUNT

MOBILE APPS

Created by

Atlanta locals,

Scoutmob’s

app takes

50% off your

restaurant

bill on-site;

no paying up

front. scout

mob.com

FUTURE: ELECTRONIC MENUS

At Bone’s steakhouse, patrons

are greeted with iPads detailing

the restaurant’s 1,300-plus

wines. bonesrestaurant.com

Congress Center, complete with a large outdoor screen for game viewing. ➜ BY 2030: Expect 1,300 new acres of parks and 33 new miles of trails, all courtesy of the BeltLine, construction of which is currently underway.

AUGUST 2011 60

GO MAGAZINE

BY ASHLEY

HESSELTINE

DESSERT

PAST: CUPCAKES

Temptations like chocolate

salted caramel and key lime can

be found at the family-owned

Atlanta Cupcake Factory.

theatlantacupcakefactory.com

PRESENT: POPSICLES

Find King of Pops’ gourmet

paletas at its home base (North

Ave and N Highland Ave) and

around town (locations on

Facebook). kingofpops.net

FUTURE: PIES

Bakeshop’s bourbon pecan pie

and double chocolate cream

prove what’s old is new again.

bakeshopatl.com

SOUPER JENNY: LAUREN RUBINSTEIN


For reservations call 404.237.2060

or visit buckheadrestaurants.com

The restaurant names above are all trademarks of Buckhead Life Restaurant Group.

BOCA RATON

CITY FISH MARKET

PRIVATE PRIVA VA EVENT EVENTS S AND A AND

CATERING

C RINGG

PRIME STEAKS & SEAFOOD

SEAFO S SEAFOO AF AFOOD OOD OD

Esquire's Top 20

New Restaurants (2010)

BISTRO NIKO


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CHRIS GLASS

GO GUIDES

ON THE TOWN

AKRON/CANTON 64

ALLENTOWN/BETHLEHEM 64

ARUBA 65

ASHEVILLE 65

ATLANTA 66

ATLANTIC CITY 68

BALTIMORE 68

BERMUDA 69

BLOOMINGTON/NORMAL 70

BOSTON 70

BRANSON 71

BUFFALO/NIAGARA 71

CANCUN 72

CHARLESTON, WV 72

CHARLOTTE 73

CHICAGO 73

COLUMBUS 78

DALLAS/FT. WORTH 79

DAYTON 79

DENVER 87

DES MOINES 87

CHICAGO//74

DAYTON, OH//80 GRAND RAPIDS, MI//93

Looking for a Western bar in Atlanta, a farmers

market in Denver or an art park in Minneapolis?

Look no further: Our local writers give you the

scoop on the best sights, shops and eateries in

every AirTran Airways destination.

(And if you want to share your insider knowledge, send recommendations

to editorial@airtranmagazine.com. Your hometown faves

just might show up in a future issue.)

DETROIT 88

FLINT 88

FT. LAUDERDALE 89

FT. MYERS 89

GRAND RAPIDS 99

HARRISBURG 99

HOUSTON 100

HUNTSVILLE/DECATUR 100

INDIANAPOLIS 101

JACKSONVILLE 101

KANSAS CITY 102

KEY WEST 102

KNOXVILLE 103

RESTAURANT GUIDE $=Less than $20; $$ =$20-$30; $$$=$30-$45; $$$$ =$45–$75; $$$$$=More than $75

Prices are for appetizer, entrée and dessert for one person.

All distances are from the airport, except where noted.

AUGUST 2011 63

GO MAGAZINE

LOCAL LEGEND Kelley Deal of The Breeders fame at the Patrick Dougherty

installation at Wegerzyn Gardens MetroPark in Dayton, OH.

LAS VEGAS 103

LEXINGTON 104

LOS ANGELES 104

MEMPHIS 105

MIAMI 106

MILWAUKEE 106

MINNEAPOLIS/ST. PAUL 107

MOLINE/QUAD CITIES 108

MONTEGO BAY 108

NASSAU/PARADISE ISLAND 109

NEW ORLEANS 109

NEW YORK CITY 110

NEWPORT NEWS/WILLIAMSBURG 111

ORLANDO 111

PENSACOLA 112

PHILADELPHIA 113

PHOENIX 113

PITTSBURGH 114

PORTLAND 114

PUNTA CANA 115

RALEIGH/DURHAM 115

RICHMOND 116

ROCHESTER 116

ST. LOUIS 117

SAN ANTONIO 117

SAN FRANCISCO 118

SAN JUAN 118

SARASOTA/BRADENTON 119

SEATTLE 119

TAMPA 120

WASHINGTON, DC 120

WEST PALM BEACH 121

WHITE PLAINS 122

WICHITA 122


GO GUIDES

Akron/Canton

ohio

National Hamburger

Festival

At Lock 3

State and Main sts, Akron;

716-565-4141;

hamburgerfestival.com

Burger masters from around

the Midwest convene at this

annual festival to flip their

hearts out as bystanders

eat their hearts out. While

enjoying America’s favorite

sandwich, visitors can also

ogle classic cars and listen to

the sweet sounds of Changes

in Latitudes, America's premier

Jimmy Buffett tribute band.

Aug. 20-21.

by kristin lindsey GO EAT

by lisa gotto

GO SHOP

Heggy's Nut Shop

3200 W Tuscarawas St, Canton;

GO SHOP

Don Drumm Studios

330-454-6611;

Dale & Georgia Boutique

& Gallery

heggysnutshop.com

and Barkery

437 Crouse St, Akron;

A small diner with a large

403 Northampton St, Easton; 610-

330-253-6268;

following, Heggy's has been

438-5573; daleandgeorgia.com

dondrummstudios.com

a local favorite for generations. This divine doggy emporium

For one-of-a-kind jewelry,

Hearty chili, burgers, coneys

offers only the most stylish

housewares and other items

and buttered fries are sure

in canine couture, luxurious

that have artistic flare, head

to satisfy patrons from all over. accessories and yummy

to Drumm’s, which features

Just remember to save room

tail-wagging rewards created

handmade works from more

for the homemade candy or

in its own on-site bakery. And

than 500 North American

ice cream, and to order a

lest your feline feel slighted,

artists. The shop’s signature

bag of freshly roasted nuts

there are purr-fectly suitable

pewter style is recognized

to go. $

selections and nibbles for your

around the nation.

Piatto Novo

kitten, as well.

GO SEE

1989 Front St, Cuyahoga Falls;

330-920-7530; piatto-novo.com

GO SEE

Clay's Park Resort

Expertly prepared Italian

SteelStacks

13190 Patterson St NW, North Lawrence; cuisine, breathtaking

101 Founders Way, Bethlehem; 610-

330-854-6691; clayspark.com

views of the Cuyahoga River

332-1300; artsquest.org

What better way to escape

gorge and cascading falls

This art and cultural

the scorching summer sun

are the trademarks of this

campus, built on the former

than to spend the day in this

romantic restaurant that is

Bethlehem Steel plant

new water adventure park?

located inside the Sheraton

site, is anchored by the

Slip down dual, 150-foot

Suites hotel. Any dinner

65,000-square-foot ArtsQuest

water slides into the 10-acre should start off with the

Center, a multimedia-rich

lake, or drop in on zip lines.

lobster bisque. $$$$

and technologically wired

For fun without getting wet,

community gathering space.

Clay's Park features miniature

Visitors can take in an

golf, hiking, fishing and

independent film or art exhibit,

outdoor sports like volleyball

tour a state-of-the-art public

and basketball.

broadcasting station, then

enjoy the sounds of live music

at the two-floor Musikfest Café.

GO PARTY

The Warehouse

520 E Fourth St, Canton;

330-639-4180;

thewarehouseincanton.com

One of the few dance clubs in

the area, this 5,000-squarefoot

newcomer includes two

bars, a dancefloor and lounge.

Don't miss Wednesday's indie

dance night, featuring popular

guest DJs.

FUN FACT!

Fifty percent of America’s

population lives within a 500mile

radius of Akron.

AUGUST 2011 64

Allentown/

Bethlehem

pennsylvania

GO EAT

The Bay Leaf

935 W Hamilton St, Allentown;

610-433-4211;

allentownbayleaf.com

In-the-know locals always

take out-of-town friends here

for its inspired menu of New

American and Asian-influenced

cuisine. Fresh plates of

stir-fry Siamese chicken in a

GO MAGAZINE

OLDIES BUT GOODIES

This shop—which claims

to sell "antiques with

urban attitude"—is

a haven for reused,

repurposed and recycled

pieces recovered from old

buildings, such as vintage

lockers and nostalgic

advertising signs.

Salvage Goods

24 S Third St, Easton;

610-258-8176;

salvagehomegoods.com

Thai curry sauce and rack of

lamb in a cognac rosemary

sauce blend well with this

restaurant’s cozy, candlelit

vibe. $$$

GO PARTY

Level 3

2805 Center Valley Pkwy, Center Valley;

610-798-9000; level3lounge.com

Located on the rooftop of

Melt, this swanky nightspot

thumps with the beats of an

in-house DJ on Friday and

Saturday nights. Partake in

the premium bottle service in a

cozy nook, or get comfortable

in a private cabana (complete

with fire pit) on the large

outdoor terrace.

FUN FACT!

Easton's State Theatre for the

Arts is inhabited by a ghost

that theater staff dubbed

“Fred,” after a former theater

manager. Fred has been

sighted more than 10 times.


Aruba Asheville

by Aruba’s steady trade winds,

and you’ll understand why the

Dutch call it “blokarting.” Once

those wheels start turning,

you move like the wind at

north carolina

by susan campbell

speeds up to 35mph.

by constance e. richards

GO SHOP

Palm Beach Plaza

95 L.G. Smith Blvd; 297-586-0045;

palmbeachplaza.com

This brand-new, modern mall

spans three levels and is home

to scads of classy boutiques

and artisan shops, as well as a

food court, multiplex cinemas

glow-in-the-dark bowling and

the high-tech Fun City arcade.

GO SEE

Land Sailing

With Aruba Active Vacations

Pick-up and drop-off from resorts;

297-586-0989;

aruba-active-vacations.com

Imagine a cart attached to a

billowing sail that is powered

MADAME BUTTERFLY

Witness the magic of

metamorphosis—from

caterpillar to chrysalis to

colorful, exotic wingedwonders

that flit about

you in tropical gardens.

For the best interactions,

visit in the early morning

when the butterflies are

the most active.

The Butterfly Farm

J.E. Irausquin Blvd, just

across from Divi Phoenix

Resort; 297-586-3656;

thebutterflyfarm.com

VIRGIN GORDA

BVI, US

GO EAT

Amadeus

249 Tanki Leendert; 297-587-3644;

amadeusaruba.com

Mozart’s music sets the stage

at this charming 17th-century

inn created by Austrian owner

expats homesick for authentic

stroganoff and schnitzels. You

can also enjoy a salute to the

tropics with fish, seafood and

West Indian ribs. $$

Passions on the Beach

At Amsterdam Manor Beach Resort

252 J.E. Irausquin Blvd; 297-527-

1100; amsterdammanor.com

This romantic, toes-in-thesand

restaurant is graced with

spectacular sunsets nightly.

Try the “rocking hot shrimp”

or the signature spiced lamb

chops, and end your evening

on a sweet note with the chef’s

“sparkling lovers dessert for

two.” $$$$

GO PARTY

Kukoo Kunuku Party Bus

Pick-up and drop off from hotels; 297-

586-2010; kukookunuku.com

Let the good times literally roll

aboard this wacky bar-hopping

bus that makes stops at secret

watering holes and for an

authentic Aruban dinner. The

wheels go round to a lively

island beat for a real parranda

(party). Yes, maraca shaking

is required.

FUN FACT!

Aruba’s most famous icon, the

Divi-Divi tree, points southwest

due to the prevailing trade

winds from the northeast.

AUGUST 2011 65

GO SHOP

Antique Tobacco Barn

75 Swannanoa River Rd;

828-252-7291;

atbarn.com

With more than 75 dealers

and rows and rows of antiques

skillfully set up in smart

vignettes, this is the catchall

for antiques from the North

Carolina mountains. From

old-timey butter churns to the

odd Duncan-Fife cupboard,

this is the place to find gently—

or not-so-gently—used items

from yesteryear, including

jewelry, hats, books and

kitchenware.

GO SEE

The Altamont

18 Church St; 828-274-8070;

myaltamont.com

Another theater has opened

its doors in Asheville—this one

on a leafy side street with a

full art gallery. The 120-seat

black box theater is housed in

a renovated LEED-certified

building from 1895. Furnished

short-term rental suites

upstairs mean that visitors

can experience local theater

right downstairs.

GO EAT

Bouchon Street Food

62 N Lexington Ave;

829-350-1140;

ashevillebouchon.com

This dressed-down outpost of

Bouchon—set on an open-air

courtyard behind the main

restaurant—is the perfect

place to outfit your next

picnic or al fresco dinner.

GO MAGAZINE

Choose from crêpes-to-go,

salads, baguette sandwiches,

cheese and pâté plates,

French onion soup, authentic

paper cones of “frites” and

bistro glasses of wine served

outside. There’s a small interior

bar and booth area in case it

rains. $

Cúrate

11 Biltmore Ave; 828-239-2946;

curatetapasbar.com

Spanish for “cure yourself,”

this new traditional tapas

restaurant serves up creamy

chicken fritters, stuffed

piquillo peppers and other

small plates, as well as

tableside-made cocktails like

the cava sangria and a gin and

tonic with an edible flower.

Chef/owner Katie Button is an

alumna of Ferran Adria’s famed

elBulli in Spain; with her family,

she has created a hip dining/

drinking/socializing venue

downtown. $$$

GO PARTY

Skybar

18 Battery Park Ave;

828-225-6998

With three wide balconies

extending from Asheville’s

historic Flatiron Building,

this bar is the perfect place

to imbibe on a warm summer

evening. Enjoy a cool breeze,

a tasty cocktail and fabulous

bird’s-eye views of the city

from a lofty café table.

FUN FACT!

GO GUIDES

Since its inception, the

Asheville Art Museum has

been housed in a private

home, the Asheville Civic

Center, a bank building, and

its current address, 2 South

Pack Square, where it has

three whole floors of art. An

expansion is scheduled to take

place later in 2011.

latitudelongitudecharms.com

everyone has an unforgettable place...

“its a charm with the exact coordinates

of the location I got married. I love it.”

Sara Blakely, founder of Spanx

Copyright 2008-2011. Latitude Longitude Charms®


GO GUIDES

Atlanta

georgia

by bret love

GO SHOP

The Beehive

1250 Caroline St, Ste C120;

404-350-3898; thebeehiveatl.com

Located in the Edgewood

Retail District near Little Five

Points, this diverse collective

has local artisans working

together under one roof. From

artwork and apparel to jewelry

and homemade foods, it’s

like an indie superstore for

stylish hipsters.

Cosabella

3400 Around Lenox Rd NE, Ste 216;

404-869-9622; cosabella.com

This new Italian clothing

designer’s second freestanding

store features all the

curve-hugging, shape-defining

jeans, swimwear, lingerie

and shapewear for which the

brand is known. There’s also an

eco-friendly line and a bridal

intimates collection.

Marietta Wine Market

18 Powder Springs St SE, Marietta;

770-919-1574;

mariettawinemarket.com

Located a block from Marietta’s

historic town square, this store

stocks more than 500 wines

and beers from around the

world, including its own Peach

Chardonnay. It also hosts

numerous events and tours,

such as wine tastings with

complimentary hors d’oeuvres

on Wednesdays and Saturdays.

GO SEE

White Water

250 Cobb Pkwy North, Marietta; 770-

424-9283: sixflags.com/whitewater

The largest waterpark in the

South (at 70 acres), White

Water has been helping kids

stay cool for nearly 30 years

now, with attractions ranging

from the mild (the Atlanta

Ocean Wave Pool, Captain

Kid’s Cover) to the wild (the

adrenaline-charged Dragon’s

Tail, Cliffhanger and Tornado)

Inside CNN StudioTour

1 CNN Center; 404-827-2300;

cnn.com/tour/atlanta

This behind-the-scenes tour

gives visitors an inside look at

the heart of one of the world’s

leading news organizations,

from the control room and black

box studio to the news room.

History buffs should check out

the interactive kiosks featuring

25 years of footage.

GO EAT

Sun In My Belly

2161 College Ave;

404-370-1088; suninmybelly.com

With scrumptious sandwiches,

breakfast served all day and

to-die-for fresh-baked goodies,

this homey café from former

Horseradish Grill executive

chef Alison Lueker is the

perfect spot to while away an

afternoon. Also stop by the

restaurant's location in the

Atlanta Botanical Gardens for

high tea. $

Pico Autentico

590 Mimosa Blvd, Roswell;

770-650-7877; picoautentico.com

This new Mexican joint

supplements gringo favorites

like tacos with delicious dishes

such as queso fundido fritters

and portobello torta. It also

offers live music on the expansive

outdoor patio and improv

comedy on Saturdays. $

Rail Kitchen & Bar

303 E Howard Ave, Decatur;

404-377-3550; raildecaturga.com

Owner/chef Teri Rogers

AUGUST 2011 66

re-imagined the space

formerly known as Farmstead

303, dropping the farm-totable

trend in favor of a more

budget-friendly, Southernstyle

comfort food concept.

Try the beer-battered fish

and chips, the North Carolina

barbecue plate and the

scrumptious, white chocolate

bread pudding. $$

Waterhaven Restaurant

75 Fifth St; 404-214-6740;

waterhavenatl.com

This farm-to-table joint located

in Midtown's Technology

Square is so devoted to

sustainable practices that it

donates its used fryer oil to be

turned into biodiesel. Try the

Georgia trout with apple wood

smoked bacon and mushroom

lasagna. $$$

GO PARTY

The Family Dog

1402 N Highland Ave NE; 404-249-

0180; thefamilydogatlanta.com

This new nightspot comes

from Ron Eyester (chef/owner

of nearby restaurant Rosebud)

and his business partner

Jason Chenette. The lively

atmosphere and well-crafted

cocktails—plus a menu

offering farm-to-table twists

on classic pub fare—ensure

that it will quickly become

a favorite Morningside

neighborhood hangout.

Deadwood Saloon

66 12th St NE; 404-671-4290;

deadwoodatlanta.com

We’re not exactly sure what

the Wild West has to do with

Atlanta, but this Midtown

saloon with its rustic decor

and mechanical bull is wagerin’

that partiers in search of

something different will be

eager to find out. With retro

music videos on Tuesdays,

poker on Wednesdays and

pool and darts nightly, there’s

always plenty of entertaining

options.

FUN FACT!

AROUND THE WORLD ONE BITE AT A TIME

The City of Atlanta’s

temperatures reach 90

degrees or higher more than

36 days per year on average,

and achieved a record high of

105 degrees in July 1980.

This Reynoldstown restaurant features communal dishes and

small plates from around the world. Chefs Duane Nutter and

Reginald Washington offer everything from sesame vegetable

ravioli and shrimp and grits to bahn mi (Vietnamese sandwiches),

while mixologist Jerry Slater creates 40 classically inspired

cocktails such as The House Manhattan. $$

H. Harper Station

904 Memorial Dr SE; 678-732-0415; hharperstation.com

www.visitroswellga.com

GO MAGAZINE


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GO GUIDES

Atlantic City

new jersey

Downbeach

Downbeach; ventnorcity.org

Venturing outside the

resort to the south you’ll find

the shore towns of Ventnor

and Margate, both of which,

along with Longport,make

up the Downbeach area.

Featuring an assortment of

shops, restaurants, beaches

and boardwalks, the area is

probably best known for

being the home of Lucy

the Elephant, a six-story

pachyderm-shaped building

that has been a National

Historic Landmark

since 1976.

FUN FACT!

Atlantic City will host an

international triathlon for

the first time on Sept. 18,

featuring a swim in the

Atlantic, a cycling course and a

10K run along the boardwalk.

Baltimore

maryland

Baltimore Grand Prix

baltimoregrandprix.com

The Village of Cross Keys

5100 Falls Rd; villageofcrosskeys.com

Ladies who lunch can spend

the day browsing—and snacking—at

this charming outdoor

shopping center that houses

a pleasant mix of upscale

chains; local shops stocked

with designer clothes, fancy

baubles and stuff for tots;

as well as salons such as the

Elizabeth Arden Red Door Spa.

by james marshall by jenn plum auvil

GO SHOP

GO EAT

Il Mulino New York

GO SHOP

The Shoppes at

At Trump Taj Mahal

2910 on the Square

The Water Club

1000 Boardwalk; 609-449-6004;

2910 O’Donnell St; 410-675-8505;

1 Renaissance Way; 609-317-8888;

ilmulino.com

2910onthesquare.com

thewaterclubhotel.com

This celebrated Manhattan

Pick the perfect present at

Whether or not you have a

dining destination hit the AC

this Canton gift shop from an

room booked at the 43-story

dining scene a few years ago, array of upscale knick-knacks

boutique hotel—the ultra-chic and brought with it its first-

with a modern twist, hand-

neighbor of the Borgata—you rate reputation for fine

crafted jewelry or Baltimore

can still experience the high-

Italian cuisine and solid

memorabilia like glasses

end shopping via a connecting service. Here it offers both

adorned with the Natty Boh

row of six intimate designer

formal and more casual

guy or hand-painted bricks

retail shops, including

trattoria-style dining

depicting classic Baltimore

Hearts on Fire, Hugo Boss,

experiences—but either way

rowhouses.

Just Cavalli and Fixation.

it’s the same extraordinary

food created by the same

Su Casa

GO SEE

world-class chefs. $$$$

901 S Bond St; 410-522-7010;

esucasa.com

Believe it Or Not!

Odditorium

GO PARTY

Whether you’re outfitting a

cozy summer beach house or

1441 Boardwalk; 609-347-2001;

40/40 Club

a swank bachelor pad, you’re

ripleysatlanticcity.com

2120 Atlantic Ave; 609-449-4040;

in luck at this Fells Point

This wacky attraction pays

4040club.com

furniture and accessories

tribute, in its own way, to the

This second location of hip-

shop with photos and prints,

oddities that once graced the hop mogul Jay-Z’s popular

textiles and funky home

resort’s famed boardwalk. The New York City sports-themed goods that give tchotchkes a

Odditorium, which looks like

club and lounge is nearly

good name.

it is about to be destroyed by as celebrity-studded as the

a giant wrecking ball, offers

original. It offers much more

visitors the chance to witness than just strategically placed

OFF TO THE RACES

extreme weirdness, such as a

lock of George Washington’s

hair and a 27-room miniature

wooden castle.

plasma TVs showing the

night's full gamut of sporting

events; there is also a

fantastic food menu, excellent

cocktails, private rooms and

seating areas, hip-hop dance

parties, and the real possibility

of running into Beyoncé—or at

least Allen Iverson.

Baltimore is revved up for the inaugural Grand Prix event Labor

Day weekend when downtown streets are transformed into

a professional race track with cars zooming by at top speeds

of 180mph. Get tickets and enjoy the festival with music and

special events throughout the weekend. Sept. 2-4.

AUGUST 2011 68

GO MAGAZINE

GO SEE

Summer Sounds

Concert Series

At Belvedere Square

Belvedere Ave and York Rd; belvederesquare.com

Locals convene at Belvedere

Square's outdoor market

Friday nights for this series

with good drinks, food from

the market’s restaurants (think:

grilled meats galore), live music

and enough room for wee ones

to twirl and spin to the tunes.

Little Italy Open

Air Film Festival

High and Stiles sts; littleitalymd.com

Bring a thick blanket (it’s on

concrete) or folding chair to the

Friday night open air movies in


cheery Little Italy. The season

kicks off with Moonstruck and

nod to the area's strong Italian

roots by closing with Cinema

Paradiso. Old-fashioned,

family-style generosity is

displayed with free admission

and popcorn.

Segs in the City

207 S Albemarle St; 800-734-7393;

segsinthecity.com

Explore Baltimore on an unconventional

set of wheels on a

motorized Segway city tour.

The City Safari offers a twohour

roll by the best waterfront

attractions around the Inner

Harbor and Fell’s Points,

including the Broadway Pier

and the USS Constellation.

Boordy Vineyards

12820 Long Green Pike, Hydes;

410-592-5015; boordy.com

Only 30 minutes from the city,

this Baltimore County winery

hosts fun events all summer

long. Stop in for a tasting,

peruse the fresh produce at

the Thursday night farmers

market, or dance under the

stars at one of the Saturday

night concerts.

GO EAT

Haute Dog Carte

6070 Falls Rd; 410-608-3500;

hautedogcarte.com

This stationary food truck

brings a taste of summer to Mt.

Washington, elevating the common

hot dog with its “fabulous

franks.” Fancy toppings include

homemade bacon marmalade

or tomato and onion jam, and

they perfectly complement

the juicy quarter-pound black

Angus dogs. $

Captain James

2127 Boston St; 410-327-8600;

captainjameslanding.com

Enjoy a favorite Maryland

pastime and get a little messy

while picking through a pile

of Old Bay steamed crabs.

Crack open some crabs—and

a few cold ones—and enjoy

the view from the seats on the

waterfront pier. $$

Pitango

802 S Broadway; 410-236-0741;

pitangogelato.com

Savor a taste of Italy with

wholesome gelato and

sorbet crafted from organic

ingredients and fresh fruit.

Go for a classic flavor like

basic crema or chocolate

hazelnut, or branch out with

crisp white grapefruit, tart

rhubarb or spicy chocolate

spiked with hot pepper. $$

Demi

510 E Belvedere, 443-278-9001

Though it shares restaurant

space with Crush, Demi has

its own personality and a

contemporary food style that

appeals to the Top Chef crowd.

Its upscale menu is peppered

with foodie terms such as sixminute

eggs, emulsions and

gastriques. $$

GO PARTY

Aqua Night Club

3401 Boston St; 443-682-4235;

aquaniteclub.com

The Canton Merritt Athletic

Club’s pool transforms into

this swanky poolside lounge

where Baltimore’s young and

beautiful sip cocktails and

strut their stuff.

FUN FACT!

In his 1981 memoir, John

Waters suggested the city

change its slogan to "Come to

Baltimore and Be Shocked!"

It never happened, but the

Chamber of Commerce did

print up bumper stickers,

which you can see driving

around Charm City to this day.

AUGUST 2011 69

Bermuda

by glenn jones

GO SHOP

P-Tech

5 Reid St, Hamilton; 441.295.5496;

ptech.bm

Forgot your favorite electronic

doodad at home? P-Tech can

get you what you need—digital

cameras, earphones or a cell

phone charger. Beyond tech,

it’ll also print your digital

vacation photos in a flash.

GO SEE

Bermuda Underwater

Exploration Institute

40 Crow Ln, Hamilton; 441-297-7219;

buei.org

Dive beneath Bermuda's

seas without getting your

hair wet. This museum is

the authority on the island’s

brilliant turquoise sea, with

exhibits showing off seashells,

bioluminescent creatures

from the blackest depths and

sunken treasure recovered

from local waters. Hands-on

exhibits let you try on scuba

gear and experience a Great

White shark attack unscathed.

GO EAT

Frog & Onion

Royal Naval Dockyard, Mangrove Bay;

441-234-7900; frogandonion.bm

If you think you like Bermuda’s

British flavor, then try putting

it in your food. In true English

pub fashion, find fish and

chips, bangers and mash

and locally made Dockyard

Brewing Co. beer served in full

English pint glasses (that’s 20

oz.). There’s live music every

day, so be sure to check the

calendar. $$

GO MAGAZINE

BERMUDA 101

GO GUIDES

Learn about Bermuda's

heritage at the Royal

Naval Dockyard, where

you can experience

cricket, croquet, local

dance, music and, of

course, traditional food.

Through Sept. 22.

Royal Naval Dockyard

Heritage Nights 2011

In the Victualling Yard, Royal

Naval Dockyard; 441- 239-

0514; thewestend.bm

Waterlot

At Fairmont Southampton Resort

Southampton; 441.238.8000;

fairmont.com/southampton

On Sundays, find a delightful

brunch of quality over quantity.

A perfect blend of post-church

locals and pre-beach visitors

mix as seamlessly as the

Hollandaise sauce on the eggs

Benedict. Ask for Barry. $$$$

GO PARTY

Non-Mariners Race

Mangrove Bay, Somerset

This event is more of a test of

what floats (care to ride a keg

or picnic table?) than a true

competition. The day begins

with a race of makeshift boats

on Mangrove Bay, and quickly

devolves into a day-long party.

Aug. 3.

FUN FACT

Gambling is legal once a

year in Bermuda—during the

Cup Match.

Daily Scheduled Segway Safaris

DC - Annapolis - Baltimore - Gettysburg

1 hour $45 2 hour $70

For Reservations Call

1-800-734-7393

www.segsinthecity.com


GO GUIDES

Bloomington/

Normal

illinois

by mary ann ford

GO SHOP

Third Sunday Market

At the Interstate Center

2301 W Market St, Bloomington;

217-202-2847;

thirdsundaymarket.com

Plan to spend several hours

browsing through the antique

furniture, sports memorabilia,

folk art, jewelry, glassware

and other flea market finds at

this sprawling indoor/outdoor

market with more than 450

dealers from 17 states.

GO SEE

Comlara Park

13001 Recreation Area Dr, Hudson;

309-434-6770;/

mcleancountyil.gov/parks

Pitch a tent and stay the

weekend or just pack a picnic

for a day of communing with

nature in this rural 2,200-acre

park. There are 10-plus miles

of wooded trails for hiking and

biking, and 900-acre Evergreen

Lake—home to Glasener

Beach—is stocked with prize

largemouth bass.

Miller Park

1020 S Morris Ave, Bloomington;

309-434-2260; cityblm.org/parks

This 68-acre crown jewel of

Bloomington’s park system.

has an 18-hole miniature golf

course, a spray park as well

as a zoo complete with tigers,

bears, reindeer and sea lions.

GO EAT

The Caboose

608 W Seminary Ave, Bloomington;

309-829-7895

Aptly named for its location

CORN BLUES

Little can beat fresh

boiled Central Illinois

sweet corn on a hot

August day—but add the

sounds of great blues

bands and it just gets

sweeter. Aug. 27-28.

Sweet Corn Blues Festival

North St from Fell Ave to the

Circle, Normal; 309-454-2444;

normal.org/uptown/

cornfest.asp

next to the city rail yards, this

out-of-the-way neighborhood

restaurant has been worth the

trek for more than 40 years,

as any local will tell you. Make

sure to try the taco salad or

gorge on the nightly all-youcan-eat

fried chicken

special. $$

GO PARTY

Fat Jack’s

511 N Main St, Bloomington;

309-821-9222; fatjacksinc.net

Kick back with a stogie in the

couch-filled cigar room, chill

with a craft beer or specialty

cocktail at the main bar or

bust a move on the dancefloor

to live DJ beats at this hotspot

in downtown Bloomington.

FUN FACT!

Renowned early-20th

century trapeze troupe The

Flying Wards spent their

winters training in a barn

in Bloomington.

Explore, Imagine, Create and Play at the Uptown Normal Children’s Discovery Museum!

Children’s Discovery Museum and Discover More! Store • 101 E. Beaufort St. • Normal, IL • 309-433-3444

For more information, including hours, admission, family programs, events and directions, visit: www.ChildrensDiscoveryMuseum.net

AUGUST 2011 70

Boston

massachusetts

by diane bair & pamela wright

GO SHOP

Stel’s

334 Newbury St; 617-262-3348;

shopstels.com

This comfy boutique, just steps

below the buzz on Newbury

Street, is a popular go-to stop

for young fashionistas. This

is the place to pick up a floral

maxi skirt by Suno or a Wings

& Horns Henley for your man.

Uncle Pete’s

125 Charles St, 617-391-0895;

unclepetesshop.com

Sleek, comfortable designs,

quality brands and modern

takes on classic clothing

define this hidden gem in

Beacon Hill. It features

fashions from talented, underthe-radar

designers like Band

of Outsiders and Society for

Rational Dress.

GO SEE

Shakespeare on

the Common

Parkman Bandstand, Boston Commons;

617-426-0863; commshakes.org

One of Boston’s most popular

summer events draws crowds

to the Commons to watch

theater under the stars. Pack

a picnic basket and bring a

blanket to this year’s free

performance of the Bard’s

All’s Well That Ends Well.

Through Aug. 14.

Charles Hayden

Planetarium

At the Museum of Science

1 Science Park; 617-723-2500;

mos.org

Sit back and gaze at the

stars at this newly renovated

GO MAGAZINE

planetarium, touted as the

most technologically advanced

digital theater in New England.

Daily shows take you on a

space odyssey in the new,

original show Undiscovered

Worlds: The Search Beyond

Our Sun.

Saint Anthony’s Feast

Across the North End, 617-723-8669;

stanthonysfeast.com

Named “The feast of all feasts”

by National Geographic

Magazine, Saint Anthony’s

Feast, which started in 1919,

is a celebration in honor of the

Italian patron Saint Anthony

and includes parades, religious

services, singers, music and an

abundance of Italian food, of

course. Aug. 26-29.

GO EAT

Toscanini’s

899 Main St, Cambridge; 617-491-

5877; tosci.com

There’s ice cream and then

there’s Toscanini’s. You're on

vacation, so treat yourself to a

double scoop of ultra-creamy,

made-on-site ice cream.

Flavors rotate, but go for

the burnt caramel if it's

available. $

GO PARTY

Trinity

61 Chatham St; 617-367-6172;

trinityboston.com

Locals and tourists alike

flock to this action-packed,

three-level singles hangout

located in the historic Faneuil

Hall area. Catch a Sox game

in the sports bar, play a

game of darts or dance to

DJ-mixed music.

FUN FACT!

The oldest mounted police unit

in the country was founded in

Boston in 1870.


Branson

missouri

by carol s. harris

GO SHOP

Lori’s Soap Market

At the Grand Village Shops

2800 W Hwy 76, Ste

525; 417-239-3390;

lorisoapmarket.com

Try hand-crafted, all-natural

soaps made with olive oil and

goat’s milk; they condition

even the most sensitive skin.

Only essential oils are used in

this shop’s products—

from soaps and lotions to

creams and salt scrubs—

to create scents like blackberry

vanilla and lemongrass.

GO SEE

River Run Outfitters

2626 State Hwy 165; 877-699-3474;

riverrunoutfitters.com

Record-breaking rainbow

and brown trout lurk in the

cold waters at the bottom

of Lake Taneycomo. This allinclusive

shop rents the gear

and boats (and sells licenses)

you need to go after ‘em.

For the best chance at

bringing home more than a fish

story, though, you’ll want to

hire the professional guides

to show you their favorite

fishing spots.

GO EAT

Panda House

2130 State Hwy 248; 417-335-2770

Oh, the choices you’ll have at

this 24-item oriental stir-fry

buffet and hot bar. The sweet

lemon chicken, savory bourbon

chicken and overstuffed

crab rangoon are local favorites.

Want more? The salad

and dessert bars await. Want

VISIT BRANSON!

more? The salad and dessert

bars await. Made-to-order

combination meals are also

available $

GO PARTY

Clear

At the Hilton Branson Convention Center

200 E Main St;

417-336-5400; hilton.com

This sleek, urban cocktail

lounge is the perfect place to

spend a mild summer night.

Sip the signature drink, April in

Paris (St. Germain, champagne

and muddled strawberries),

poolside in a cabana or cozy up

to a firepit with friends.

FUN FACT!

Taney County’s Murder

Rocks served as the hideout

for Civil War outlaw Alf

Bolin and his gang, who

ambushed unsuspecting

travelers on the Springfield-

Harrison road.

at

4 Days

3 Nights Terms

MARK OF THE OZARK

Ozarks radio pioneer

Ralph Foster was one of

the largest benefactors

of this eclectic museum,

which contains 40,000

square feet of Ozarks

cultural display as well as

pop culture artifacts such

as The Beverly Hillbillies

truck, donated by

producer Paul Henning.

The Ralph Foster Museum

Opportunity Ave, 417- 334-

6411; rfostermuseum.com

Clarion

at the

Palace

AUGUST 2011 71

Buffalo/

Niagara

new york

by jana eisenberg

GO SHOP

Allen Street Dress Shop

89 Allen St; 716-883-0871;

thedressshop.com

This tastefully curated

shop in the hip Allentown

neighborhood features

bright, flowy women’s

clothing, bags and jewelry

in both classic and modern

styles—or, as the website

puts it, "beautiful clothing for

interesting women."

GO SEE

Videosphere: A

New Generation

At Albright-Knox Art Gallery

1285 Elmwood Ave;

716-882-8700;

albrightknox.org

The gallery’s first-ever exhibit

of new media drawn from

its collections reiterates its

commitment to contemporary

art. Included are two-dozen

artists who work with

computer graphics and/

or animation, the internet,

video and repurposed old

technologies. Through Oct. 9.

Lewiston Art Festival

Center St, Lewiston;

716-754-0166;

artcouncil.org

Historic Lewiston closes its

main drag for this two-day

celebration of visual arts.

Enjoy a variety of food,

vendors and live entertainment

while you peruse the works

of more than 170 carefully

curated artists. “College Alley”

features student work, and a

KidZone keeps the rugrats—

ahem, future Picassos—busy

For For FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFoooo Foooooooooooo FFFFo Fooor

rr rr r ONLY ONLY OO

OON ONNL NNNNNNNN NNNNNNNNLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL NNLLYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY LLLYY LY LLLYY LYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY

GO MAGAZINE

with creative activities.

Aug. 13-14.

GO EAT

Bingo's Dim Sum House

3202 Sheridan Dr, Amherst;

716-833-8811

This family operation is the

only place to get fresh dim sum

daily. The bustling new venture

brings in delectable dishes—

tasty little buns, dumplings

and other small bites—fresh

from owner Billy They’re served

traditionally, in stackable

bamboo baskets. $

Amy’s Place

3234 Main St; 716-832-6666

This cash-only University

Heights café is known for its

breakfast as well as fingerlickin’

vegan/vegetarian and

Mediterranean eats. Go for

diner classics, or order

an enormous signature dish,

like the “Margie Meal”—

charbroiled chicken, fajita

fries, tomatoes and garlic

spread, all wrapped in

a pita. $

GO PARTY

Water Street Landing

115 S Water St, Lewiston;

716-754-9200;

waterstreetlanding.com

Live music, a full bar and an

up-close view of the mighty

Niagara River are all par for

the course at this riverside

classic. Chill with a drink on

the patio, or duck into the

on-site River Sidebar for

tasty bar treats like

Buffalo-style chicken wings.

FUN FACT!

GO GUIDES

In the 1800s, packet boat

travelers on the Erie Canal

made it from Albany to

Buffalo in an average of

five days.

$149 $149 855-SHO-TIME (746-8463)

and restrictions apply.

www.ticketbranson.com


GO GUIDES

Cancun

mexico

by catherine gordon

GO SHOP

Casa Palacio

At La Isla Shopping Village

Blvd Kukulcan KM 12.5;

+52 998-193-1490;

casapalacio.com.mx

Step through the doors of

this luxury interiors store

and you’ll enter a

contemporary haven of

good taste. Simple yet sleek

offerings from international

designers can be found here,

including kitchenware from

Mango Leaf that’s crafted

from bamboo.

GO SEE

Punta Sur Sculpture

Garden

At Garrafon Reef Park

Punta Sur, Isla Mujeres;

998-193-3360;

garrafon.com

Rent a golf cart to reach the

rocky southern tip of Isla

Mujeres, where you’ll discover

an outdoor sculpture garden

filled with modern creations

by famed Mexican artists

like Jose Luis Cuevas.

Clamber up the lighthouse for

stunning views of Cancun.

Cenotes

25 miles south of Cancun

Boca Del Puma, Puerto Morelos;

+52 998-241-2855;

bocadelpuma.com

If too much time at the beach

dries you out or burns you

up, take a refreshing dip in

the underground fresh water

sinkhole at Boca Del Puma.

Mayan legend claims that

these crystalline waters

have healing qualities, so

that lobster-red skin should

heal in no time.

GO EAT

La Pasteleria

Ave Coba, Downtown; 998-884-3420

For those with a sweet tooth,

indulge with breakfast at

one of Cancun’s best-kept

secrets. The café’s in-house

bakery produces French

pastries and cakes that will

have you begging for more. $$

Yamamoto

Ave Uxmal 31, Downtown;

998-887-3366;

yamamoto-cancun.com

Though this is the oldest

Japanese restaurant in town,

it still holds its own with

exquisitely presented sushi

finely crafted from oceanfresh

crab and shrimp. After a

healthy meal of sushi, indulge

in the delectable fried ice

cream with strawberry jam

lurking on the dessert

menu. $$$

GO PARTY

Mandala

Blvd Kukulcan KM 9, Hotel Zone;

998-848-8380;

mandalanightclub.com

With its Hindu-themed interior

and expertly mixed cocktails,

this new club is dripping with

exclusivity. You'll feel like

you're in an Enrique Iglesias

music video, as you watch

beautiful club-goers bump

and grind on the dancefloor

or lounge in the various VIP

sections, while DJs lay down

the latest beat-filled tracks.

FUN FACT!

The sand on the beaches of

Cancun is made from

crushed coral, which is cool to

the touch and won’t burn

your feet.

AUGUST 2011 72

Charleston

west virginia

by sheila mcentee

GO SHOP

Gallery Eleven

1025 Quarrier St;

304-342-0083;

galleryeleven.com

Perhaps you fancy an

exquisite, hand-blown glass

vase by Ron Hinkle, a Celtic

pendant by silversmith Anita

Gallagher or a whimsical

watercolor cat by Sonja

Adkins. This creative

cooperative features works

by numerous local painters,

potters, jewelers and stainedglass

artists. Many

a handsome keepsake has

been found here.

The Peanut Shoppe

126 Capitol St; 304-342-9493

The aroma of fresh-roasted

peanuts, warm from Delbert

Moore’s original Planters

roaster, has drawn folks

into this Charleston icon

since 1950. A variety of

nuts and nut mixes (made

daily by Moore’s daughter

and grandson), candies and

homemade caramel corn

keeps them coming back.

GO SEE

West Virginia

Power Baseball

601 Morris St; 304-344-2287;

wvpower.com

Looking for some wholesome,

summertime fun? Sit back,

sip a brew, and watch the

home team—the Pittsburgh

Pirates affiliate—face off

against the Greensboro

Grasshoppers (Aug. 1-4),

Charleston RiverDogs

(Aug. 10-13), the Delmarva

GO MAGAZINE

Shorebirds (Aug. 18-21) and

the Lexington Legends (Aug.

26-30). Mondays are Family

Buck Night, when tickets,

popcorn, hotdogs and soda

only cost $1. Friday night

games feature fireworks.

GO EAT

Ellen’s Homemade

Ice Cream

223-225 Capitol St;

304-343-6488

West Virginia Symphony

flutist Ellen Beal is also

renowned for dishing out

Charleston’s best ice cream.

Espresso Oreo and raspberry

chocolate chip are year-round

favorites, but the summertimeonly

fresh peach is out of this

world. Not an ice cream eater?

Ellen also sells coffee, soups,

salads and wraps. $

Lola’s

1038 Bridge Rd; 304-343-5652

Arrive early and dine on the

deck, or chat on the front

porch of this bright little

eatery that’s locally renowned

for its artisan pizzas made

with goat cheese, roasted

eggplant, spicy shrimp and

other fresh ingredients. $$

GO PARTY

Impulse Nightclub

205 Capitol St; 304-342-9614

Just gotta dance? Bright

lights, a state-of-the-art

sound system and a hot mix

of music give this popular

nightclub a big-city feel. Sip

a variety of specialty drinks

at the bar or in the VIP area,

reserved for private parties.

FUN FACT!

West Virginia is the only state

located wholly within the

Appalachian Mountains. About

80% of the state is forestland.


Charlotte

north carolina

GO SHOP

Doncaster Charlotte

131 Providence Rd, 704-370-0433;

doncastercharlotte.com

State your needs (skirts,

slacks, jackets, shorts), then

pick your fabrics, colors and

styles—and Doncaster will

take care of the rest. This is

the only walk-in shop of the

high-end women’s clothier that

otherwise only sells its goods

nationally via consultants.

GO SEE

Cruise-In Saturdays

210 S Main St, Mooresville;

704-664-5455;

mooresvillenccruisein.com

The movie American Graffiti

SMALL-TOWN FUN

The bedroom community

of Matthews retains its

small-town ways—and

celebrates them with a

parade, competitions and

concerts after dark. Not

up for corndogs or ’cue?

You’re just a short walk

from the fine fusion fare

at Café 157.

Matthews Alive Festival

120 S Trade St, Matthews;

704-321-7275 ext.322;

matthewsalive.org

becomes reality one Saturday

a month at ’50s-style drive-in

What-A-Burger, when owners

of stellar pre-’79 muscle cars

show off their vehicles. Aug. 6,

Sept. 3 and Oct. 1.

Whitewater River Jam

At US National Whitewater Center

5000 Whitewater Center Pkwy; 704-

391-3900; usnwc.org/riverjam

Every Thursday, get your

workout in the form of

kayaking, canoeing or the

biking/hiking trails at this

public adventure facility before

unwinding at sunset with a free

outdoor concert at its River’s

Edge Bar & Grill.

GO EAT

Cajun Queen

1800 E Seventh St; 704-377-9017;

cajunqueen.net

Business is brisk at the city’s

top Cajun restaurant, which

offers classic fare such

as gumbo, étouffée. The

blackened pork tenderloin with

chorizo-black bean sauce,

chipotle chili cream and fried

plantains won't disappoint. $$

GO PARTY

Revolution Pizza

& Ale House

3228 N Davidson St; 704-333-4440;

revolutionpizza.com

You’ll be blown away by

the huge selection of craft

beers available by the glass

or pitcher at this restaurant

and bar, located in a historic

home. Sip Heinzelmannchen—

German-brewed in tiny Sylva,

NC—on the fabulous patio.

FUN FACT!

Charlotte-based snack food

maker Lance started in 1913

with one man, founder Philip

Lance, hawking peanuts on

downtown street corners.

Chicago

illinois

by john bordsen by rod o'connor

GO SHOP

Hard Boiled Records

and Video

2010 W Roscoe St; 773-755-2619;

hardboiledrecords.blogspot.com

This tiny, charming survivor

shows that, even in the iTunes

era, there’s still a market for

vinyl in all its crackly glory.

The focus is on indie bands,

and the staff isn’t afraid to

tout its taste—which is a

good thing.

Lori’s Shoes

824 W Armitage Ave; 773-281-5655;

lorisshoes.com

Footwear fanatics swear by

this Lincoln Park emporium,

known for stocking designer

shoes up to 30% off

department store prices.

Whether the goal is trendy,

classic or expensive Italian,

this shop carries everything

you could ever want. (Consider

yourself warned.)

Paper Doll

2048 W Division St; 773-227-6950;

paperdollchicago.com

Racks bursting with witty

cards, T-shirts designed by

local artists, and gift ideas

ranging from journals and

guidebooks to scented

candles keep this Wicker Park

boutique perennially popular.

Don’t forget to say hello to

Maude, the shop’s adorable

house pug.

GO SEE

Green City Market

1750 N Clark St; 773-880-1266;

greencitymarket.org

New vendors at the 2011

edition of the Windy City’s

showcase farmers market,

held every Wednesday and

Saturday in lakefront Lincoln

Park, include ready-to-eat

treats from Las Manas

Tamales and artisan breads

from Bennison’s Bakery.

Motor Cocktail: Sound

and Movement in Art in

the 1960s

At the Museum of Contemporary Art;

220 E Chicago Ave; 312-280-2660;

mcachicago.org

This exhibit, built around

Jean Tinguely’s rotating

1965 scrap-metal sculpture

Motor Cocktail, promises a

full sensory experience. The

pieces, all from the 1960s,

explore themes of sound and

movement and include a pianolike

“musical sculpture” played

by on-site musicians.

Ravinia Festival

418 Sheridan Rd, Highland Park;

847-266-5100; ravinia.org

Every summer, picnic baskets

in hand, Chicagoans flock to

the lawn portion of the Martin

Theatre and Bennett Gordon

Hall in the north suburbs

to listen to everything from

classical music to rock and

country acts under the stars.

This month's highlights include

Lyle Lovett (Aug. 21) and Gipsy

Kings (Aug. 25).

Taste of Greece

100-400 S Halsted St;

847-509-8050;

greektownchicago.org

The West Loop is the epicenter

of Chicago’s sizeable Greek

population, and every summer,

this tight-knit enclave rolls

out the welcome mat to

share customary grilled lamb

and octopus, flaky pastries

and two stages presenting

traditional Greek music and

dance. Aug. 27-28, from

noon to 11pm.

Make it a night to remember at The Redhead Piano Bar!

AUGUST 2011 73

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GO GUIDES

continued on page 78 ►

16 W. Ontario St.312-640-1000


ON THE TOWN

CHICAGO

IN BRIEF BY SAM POLCER

BY THE NUMBERS

15

height (in stories) of the

Ferris wheel at Navy Pier

NEWS FLASH

A World for Words •

The Poetry Foundation

headquarters, which

opened in June, is

Chicago’s first building

dedicated to poetry

and the first permanent

home for the

100-year-old Poetry

magazine. It includes a

nearly 4,000-squarefoot

public garden.

poetryfoundation.org

+ Building Bloom •

Speaking of gardens, a

AUGUST 2011 74

1,450

height (in feet)

of Willis Tower,

the tallest

building in

the Western

Hemisphere

300,000+

works in the

Art Institute

of Chicago's

collection (of

which only 4%

is on view)

2.2 MILLION

exhibition space

(in square feet)

in McCormick

Place, Chicago's

premier convention

center

vegetable- and herbfilled

one is growing

on the rooftop of the

Palmer House Hilton.

The on-site eateries

will use the bounty, and

there are plans for a

beehive. palmerhouse

hiltonhotel.com

GO MAGAZINE

AUGUST AVERAGES:

83˚F

3.9 in. 65˚F

TIME ZONE:

Central

AREA CODES:

312, 773

FOUNDED:

1871

POPULATION:

2,695,598

GET AROUND:

Chicago Transit Authority (CTA)

bus and el; water taxi

AIRPORT: Midway International

Airport

WEBSITE: explorechicago.com

* asterisk if necessary

CULTURE CALENDAR

Through Aug. 21

GREASE

There's no better place to

hang with the Greasers and

Pink Ladies from Rydell High

than the city where the play

was fi rst performed. The

American Theater Company

based this revival (with a few

new twists) on early rehearsal

and production drafts of the

1971 show. atcweb.org

Sept. 1-4

CHICAGO JAZZ FESTIVAL

The longest running of the

city’s lakefront festivals,

this massive, free event

features world-renowned

singer Cassandra Wilson

on Saturday and Grammy

Award-winning trumpeter

Roy Hargrove closing

things out Sunday evening.

chicagojazzfestival.us


ON THE TOWN: CHICAGO

STREET SCENE: NORTH CLARK STREET BY ROD O’CONNOR

Once boasting the largest concentration of Swedes outside of Stockholm, Chicago’s North Side

Andersonville neighborhood still proudly wears its Scandinavian heritage on its blue-and-yellow sleeve.

Stroll the mostly independent shops along its North Clark Street commercial corridor and discover smart

design, funky shopping and, yes, Swedish meatballs.

1. Swedish American Museum

5211 N Clark St

Two permanent exhibits—one for kids

and one for adults—tell the story of

Swedish immigration to Chicago. Little

ones can play aboard a recreation of a

19th-century steamship while the adults

will learn about cultural traditions,

Swedish home life and legendary Swedish-

American writers like poet Carl Sandburg,

who gave Chicago its enduring nickname:

“City of Big Shoulders.” 773-728-8111;

swedishamericanmuseum.org

TOWARDS DOWNTOWN

1

2 3

W FARRAGUT AVE

4

4. Svea

5236 N Clark St

The blue-and-yellow canopy (the colors

of the Swedish fl ag) gives it away: This

homey storefront café is the ’hood’s best

place to taste authentic Scandinavian

treats. The aff ordable menu delivers

hearty belt-busters like pancakes with

lingonberries, plump Swedish falukorv

sausages, traditional limpa bread (sweet

Swedish rye) and, of course, meatballs

doused in rich gravy. 773-275-7738

5

W BERWYN AVE

2. Las Manos Gallery

5220 N Clark St

There’s a good chance the person greeting

you at this funky art gallery also has his

name on the work that adorns its walls.

Many of the rotating featured artists

are locals, as are many of the buyers,

who snatch up aff ordable art that could

include anything from light installations

to textural woodworks to powerful paintings

of everyday Chicago go street scenes.

773-728-8910; lasmanosgallery.com

osgallery.com

W SUMMERDALE AVE

5. Andersonville Galleria

5247 N Clark St

Nowhere better represents Andersonville’s

dedication to independent retailers

than this 7,000-plus-square-foot indoor

bazaar, where more than 90 artists and

vendors share one handsome, exposedbrick

space. The building, once home to

an historic Swedish deli, features stalls

selling handmade jewelry, gourmet toff ee,

and coff ee mugs depicting Chicago’s

iconic “L” station stops. 773-878-8570;

andersonvillegalleria.com

AUGUST 2011 75

GO MAGAZINE

3. Scout

5221 N Clark St

The name of this vintage and repurposed

furniture shop, the anchor of North Clark

Street’s burgeoning design strip, refl ects

owner Larry Vodak’s tireless dedication

to unearthing cool pieces with potential,

like a re-lacquered mid-century Wakefi eld

dresser and artwork made from recycled

bike tire inner tubes. As employee Sheryl

Ridenour Ridenour puts it: “Everything Ever in here has

had a former life. Or tw two or three.” 773-

275-5700;

275 scoutchicago

scoutchicago.com

W BALMORAL AVE

6. In Fine Spirits

5418-5420 N Clark St

Pop into this friendly neighborhood wine

shop—preferably during the free fi rst-

Friday (craft beer) or every-other-Saturday

(wine) tastings—and stock up on vintages

that put a premium on value (more than

half the inventory is priced under $20). Or

duck into the sleek yet casual next-door

bar for fl ights, cask ales, impeccably

crafted cocktails and top-notch charcuterie.

773-506-9463; infinespirits.com

6

W RASHER AVE


ON THE TOWN: CHICAGO

HOT SAUCE BY ROD O’CONNOR

Known for his innovative

work in the kitchen, Grant

Achatz continues to

spice things up at his new

cocktail spot.

Foodies know superstar

chef Grant Achatz for his

boundary-pushing Chicago

fine-dining destinations.

At Alinea, currently ranked

the No. 6 restaurant in the world

by Restaurant Magazine, he uses

cutting-edge science to craft emotional,

multi-sensory experiences like plates on

top of pillows of lavender-scented air.

Last spring, he unveiled Next, an ultraambitious

encore that requires online

tickets in lieu of standard reservations

and has an ever-changing menu that

rotates between the food of another

place and/or time (next up: Thailand).

In April, Achatz entered the

cocktail world with The Aviary, a lounge

presenting mind-bending drinks such

as a server-shattered ice balloon that

spills an Old Fashioned into a rocks

glass. Here, Achatz dishes on his

inspirations, Chicago’s cocktail scene

and what he likes to

quaff after a long shift.

What drove you to open

a cocktail lounge?

“Cocktail culture in

America has gained a

tremendous amount

of momentum over

the last five years. But

everybody was gravitating

to pre-Prohibition

cocktails and bartenders

with handlebar

mustaches—traveling

back in time. We saw

an opportunity to do

the same thing we’d done with Alinea

in terms of gastronomy to help push

the cocktail movement into the future.

We’re basically challenging every

aspect of the cocktail world, including

the vessel in which it’s served, and

really trying to make it interactive, fun,

delicious and progressive.”

AUGUST 2011 76

The Aviary

955 W Fulton Market;

312-226-0868;

theaviarychicago.com

What doors do cocktails open for you

creatively? “Well, I think it’s important

to realize that anything can compose

a cocktail. That’s what The Aviary is

trying to express. Classically, within

the cocktail world, there’s a foundation

of about five drinks. Everything else is

a variation of that. It’s kind of like the

mother sauces in French cooking. But

we’re approaching it more conceptually:

If we want to involve an esoteric

flavor like truffle, which is clearly not

a classic cocktail ingredient, we can

say, ‘Hey, truffle goes really well with

Campari. Let’s make a black truffle

negroni.’ We can push them in any

direction we want.”

Where do you like to drink locally?

“My favorite places are The Violet Hour,

The Drawing Room, Sable Kitchen

& Bar and a bar called the Whistler.

And then there’s a little restaurant in

Bucktown called Duchamp.

It has a really solid cocktail

program.”

What’s your poison?

“The one criteria is that it’s

a well-made drink. If you’re

going to have a Sazerac,

it’s got to be in perfect

balance. And if you’re going

to have a sour or something

shaken with an egg white,

then that frost has got

to be creamy and huge.

Otherwise, it really doesn’t

matter. I don’t have a go-to

spirit. I’m not that guy who

goes, ‘Oh, I can only drink gin’ or ‘I can

only drink bourbon.’ Whatever is well

crafted, I’m open to it.”

So you’re not the guy who takes

a pull off a bottle of Johnny Walker

Red after a long shift? [Laughs] “No,

that’s not me.”

Home Remedy

Most of The Aviary’s cocktails are too complex for even the most

ambitious home bartender. Here’s an exception:

Coffee

2 oz double brewed coffee

1 oz Flor de Cana 7 yr rum

1/2 oz Galliano Ristretto

GO MAGAZINE

Combine ingredients in a cocktail

shaker and shake well. Strain

liquid mixture over three ice

cubes made of milk and serve.


ON THE TOWN: CHICAGO

CHI-TOWN’S CHUCKWAGONS BY ROD O’CONNOR

A new side of the Windy City’s culinary scene is gaining speed.

Chicago is a latecomer to the

food truck trend that has the

nation’s other foodie capitals

afl utter. The reason? An

embarrassingly draconian

ordinance that prohibits onboard cooking.

But the law couldn’t stall the growing fl eet

of mobile chefs who hit the pavement

anyway, steering clear of trouble by serving

gourmet prepackaged fare from their

tricked-out rides.

I set out to discover if the city’s

burgeoning four-wheeled food purveyors

can sustain one hungry man for 48 hours.

Armed with nothing but a hearty appetite

and a Twitter account, I aim to fi nd out.

DAY ONE: At “Big Blue,” the inthe-know

handle for the cutesy Flirty

Cupcakes truck, I try the Curious George,

a banana-chocolate cupcake with salted

caramel buttercream frosting that, I

rationalize, can be considered breakfast

because it contains fruit. It’s rich and

delicious, like a decadent piece of banana

bread, and the sugar rush sustains me for

most of the morning. That is, until I learn

that the 5411 Empanada truck is due to

arrive a few miles away in mere moments.

By the time I catch up with the skyblue

former UPS truck, there’s a line down

the block. I wait it out and am rewarded

Flirty Cupcakes

@FlirtyCupcakes

5411 Empanadas

@5411empanadas

Gaztro-Wagon

@wherezthewagon

Sweet Ride

@SweetRideChi

Tamalli Space

Charros

@tamalespace101

Haute Sausage

@hautesausage

with three

perfectly puff y

baked pastries.

I fall in love

with the dough’s

pleasant chew and

the super-fresh fi llings:

creamy sweet

corn, garlicky beef

and moist ham

and cheese.

During the

evening commuter

rush I track the

Gaztro-Wagon, a

postal truck-turned-“naan-wich” slinger,

which nestles ever-changing fancy fi llings

(duck confi t, lobster salad) between freshly

baked Indian fl atbread. I snatch up the last

lamb gyro, savoring every last bite of the

sandwich’s juicy, fl avorful ribbons of meat

and caramelized vegetables.

DAY TWO: If a cupcake can be considered

breakfast, then so can a whoopie

pie. I start with a visit to Sweet Ride, a

pink truck adorned with adorable racing

fl ames. None of the passersby appear to be

judging me for starting my day munching

on addictive, heart-shaped red velvet cake

sandwiches.

For lunch, I catch the Tamalli Space

AUGUST 2011 77

GO MAGAZINE

Charros truck. Its signature masa tubes

showcase Mexican fl avors like spicy,

cochinita pibil-style shredded pork—a

yummy take on the traditional Yucatan

dish—as well as more refi ned options like

the earthy (and tasty) roasted beet and

goat cheese.

Even more fun than the tamales,

which are fantastic, are the sombrero and

Mexican wrestling mask-clad gentlemen

who take your order. According to their

Twitter feed, which announces every landing

of their “tamale spaceship,” the truck

was inspired by the “stridentist movement.”

I have no idea what that means,

but I do know that this is hands-down my

favorite food truck.

For my fi nal meal, I track down the

no-frills Haute Sausage. The menu deftly

balances regional classics (the cheddartopped

Sheboygan brat nails every detail)

and exotic fare like the beef and lamb

boerewors chakalaka with South African

spices. After thoroughly enjoying my

streetside brat, I chat up owner Rich Levy,

who explains that his “Afro-Midwestern”

sausages honor his current address, as well

as his former home in South Africa. “This

is my life story, done through encased

meats,” he says. Much like the story of

Chicago’s rise as a food truck player, it’s a

tale I plan to devour over and over again.


GO GUIDES

◄CHICAGO cont'd

GO EAT

The Wieners Circle

2622 N Clark St;

773-477-7444; wienercircle.net

Most of Chicago’s legendary

hot dog stands steam their

links. This Lincoln Park stalwart

goes the charbroiled route,

resulting in a savory smokiness.

Grab one with everything and a

sack full of greasy yet delicious

fries and dine al fresco at the

Clark Street picnic tables. $

Ruxbin

851 N Ashland Ave;

312-624-8509; ruxbinchicago.com

Fine dining is broken down to

the barest essentials at this

tiny BYO hotspot. Somehow,

the dining room’s salvaged

and repurposed aesthetic

radiates warmth, not hipster

pretentiousness. The menu

changes seasonally, but

staples include mussels

swimming in a sake tomato

broth. $$$

Sunda

110 W Illinois St;

312-644-0500; sundachicago.com

Fresh modern Pan-Asian

BATTER UP

You can’t beat fun at the old ballpark.

That old adage certainly rings true at

cozy Elfstrom Stadium in west suburban

Geneva—home to the Kansas

City Royals minor-league affiliate

Kane County Cougars—where

fans can trot the bases after every

home game, gape at choreographed

fireworks shows, and catch future

All-Stars before they hit the big time.

Don’t forget the Cracker Jacks.

cuisine refuses to cede

the spotlight at this always

packed scenester hangout.

Try the crab-crusted ahi tuna

or the seared Kobe

beef tartare and settle in

for an evening of peoplewatching.

$$$

GO PARTY

Lux Bar

18 E Bellevue Pl;

312-642-3400;

luxbar.com

This elegant, multi-level

bar is as close as it gets for

Gold Coasters seeking a

neighborhood saloon where

everyone knows their name.

The well-heeled crowd is

equally comfortable watching

the Cubs or Sox game on

the 16 LED flat-screen

televisions downstairs or

dancing to DJs spinning in the

upstairs lounge.

FUN FACT!

In 1930, Hostess Bakery in

the Chicago suburb of Schiller

Park created one of the

world’s most popular desserts:

the Twinkie.

Kane County Cougars Home Games

Aug. 6-12; 17-19; 27-30

At Elfstrom Stadium, 34W002 Cherry Ln, Geneva;

630-232-8811; kccougars.com


Columbus

ohio

by betsa marsh

GO SEE

Ohio State Fair

At the Ohio Expo Center & State Fair

717 E 17th Ave;

888-646-3976; ohiostatefair.com

Where else are you going to

bite into a deep-fried Mars

bar except in your dreams?

Or admire a butter cow? This

legendary fair features prize

farm animals, as well as exotic

ones in the petting zoo, thrill

rides, roving performers, horse

shows and helicopter rides.

Through Aug. 7.

Music in the Park

At Friendship Park

150 Oklahoma Ave, Gahanna;

614-342-4250;

gahanna.gov

Boogie among the begonias

every Friday evening, when

local acoustic (Aug. 5)

Bluegrass (Aug. 12) and Blues

(Aug.19) bands rock the

bandstand at Friendship Park.

Through Aug. 19.

Reynoldsburg

Tomato Festival

At Huber Park

1520 Davidson Dr, Reynoldsburg;

614-866-4888;

reynoldsburgtomatofestival.org

Reynoldsburg proudly claims

to be the “birthplace of the

commercial tomato.” At this

annual summer fest, sip on

free tomato juice, listen to

local singers and marvel

at the unfortunate specimen

that wins the “most oddly

formed tomato” contest—one

of many tomato-related

competitions. This one-ofa-kind

event also offers

games, live music, a cruise-in

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GO MAGAZINE

car show and pig races.

Aug. 19-20.

GO EAT

Lemongrass

Fusion Cuisine

641 N High St;

614-224-1414;

lemongrassfusion.com

This serene space is a Zen

spot for sipping plum wine and

savoring a lemongrass sushi

roll made with tuna, salmon

and smoked barbecue eel. Or

try the sampler platter for a

taste of three local favorites:

seafood rangoon, chicken

satay and spring rolls. $$$

Mitchell’s Steakhouse

45 N Third St;

614-621-2333;

mitchellssteakhouse.com

Mitchell’s grills ’em all. This

re-imagined steakhouse tops

them, too, with gorgonzola

crust, cognac peppercorn or

bacon. The sides are just as

tempting, and have recently

included jalapeño scalloped

potatoes and green beans with

walnut brown butter. $$$$

GO PARTY

Dick’s Den

2417 N High St;

614-268-9573;

dicksdencolumbus.com

Jazz cats have been hanging in

the den for decades, drawn by

live music at least four nights

a week. Tuesdays are for bluegrass,

but it’s all jazz all the time

come the weekend. The cover

charge is rarely more than $5,

and the drinks are dirt-cheap.

FUN FACT!

Flying from Columbus,

Geraldine “Jerrie” Mock

became the first woman to fly

an airplane around the globe

in 1964.


Dallas/

Ft. Worth

texas

by amy anderson

GO SHOP

The Gypsy Wagon

2928 N Henderson Ave; 214-370-

8010; the-gypsy-wagon.com

Stopping by this funky gift shop

is like a visit to your crazy worldtraveling

aunt’s house. Find

Voluspa candles, 19th-century

furniture, patchwork pillows, Old

Gringo cowboy boots, vintage

saris and handmade jewelry.

Pumps

103 E Virginia St, Ste 101, McKinney;

972-562-4555;

gottahavemypumps.com

Visit quaint downtown McKinney

and rest your tootsies

while you treat them to the

finest in footwear styles by

Kelsi, Pura Lopez, Chic Mihara

and more. Find hats, jewelry

and handbags, to boot.

GO SEE

Ellis County Museum

201 S College St, Waxahachie;

972-937-0681;

waxahachiechamber.com

More than 30 movies,

including Bonnie and Clyde

and The Trip to Bountiful,

have been filmed in pictureperfect

Waxahachie and its

surroundings, just south

of Dallas. Swing by this

downtown museum to pick up

information for a driving tour of

film locales.

Sixth Floor Museum

411 Elm St; 214-747-6660; jfk.org

Housed in the former Texas

School Book Depository, this

exhibit brings to life the tragic

death and legacy of John F.

Kennedy in a series of black-

and-white photographs

and installations like a

recreation of sniper Lee

Harvey Oswald’s nest.

GO EAT

Railhead Smokehouse

120 S Ranch House Rd, Willow Park;

817-441-2523; railheadbbq.net

Located near Fort Worth,

this smokehouse is the real

deal. Get smoked meats (even

salami) fresh from the pit

and smothered in homemade

sauce, with beans, potato

salad or coleslaw. The “biggest

acts in Texas music” keep the

place hopping Tuesday, Friday,

Saturday and Sunday. $$

Horne & Dekker's Sunday

Hangover Brunch

2323 N Henderson Ave;

214-821-9333;

horneanddekker.com

Overindulge at the hotel bar?

Head to here for the Walk of

Shame, a signature hangover

recipe of Zwack, ginger beer,

mint and a little hair of the

dog. If shame’s too bitter, try a

mimosa with your sea bass and

scallop cakes. Sundays 11am

to 3pm. $$

GO PARTY

Barcadia

1917 N Henderson Ave;

214-821-7300; barcadiabars.com

All your favorite arcade games

like Ms. Pac-Man, Galaga and

Space Invaders bleep and

bloop here alongside oversized

versions of Jenga and Connect

4. Just a seventh grader’s

fantasy? Not with 24 different

beers on tap, happy hour until

8pm and 1940s pin-up art on

the walls.

FUN FACT!

Dallas' City Hall was designed

by I.M. Pei.

AUGUST 2011 79

Dayton

ohio

by russell florence, jr.

GO SHOP

Basically British

502 E Third St; 937-222-1488;

basically-british.com

This high-ceilinged

Anglophile's dream specializes

in imported food and

merchandise from England

(as well as South Africa and

Australia). After enjoying high

tea, browse candy, food and

tea in the gift shop.

GO SEE

Dayton Aviation Heritage

National Park

16 S Williams St

937-225-7705 ; nps.gov/daav

Highlights of this planethemed

park include the

collection of vintage bicycle

memorabilia, a replica of

Wilbur and Orville's shop and

an authentic Wright brothers'

airplane on permanent display.

GO EAT

Mr. Lee’s Fine Dining

+ Sushi Bar

7580 Poe Ave;

937-898-3860; mrlees.com

Mr. Lee’s delivers some of the

best Asian cuisine in town in

an elegant and opulent interior.

It’s got all the favorites, from

General Tso’s chicken to Hunan

fried rice, as well as a full sushi

menu and a monthly food and

wine pairing. $$$

Oakwood Club

2414 Far Hills Ave; 937-293-6973;

theoakwoodclub.com

This sophisticated fine-dining

spot serves a hearty assortment

of meat and seafood

GO MAGAZINE

entrées. Start with the surf

such as Maryland crab cake

before moving on to the turf

in the form of filet mignon or

a New York strip sirloin steak.

And after one bite of the

chocolate “Terminator” cake,

you’ll definitely be back. $$$

GO PARTY

Wiley’s Comedy Nightclub

101 Pine St; 937-224-5653;

wileyscomedyclub.com

If you’re in the mood for a

good laugh, stop by Dayton’s

oldest comedy club. Established

and up-and-coming

comedians have entertained

audiences at this venue in the

historic Oregon District for

more than 25 years.

FUN FACT!

Rob Lowe was raised in

Oakwood, a Dayton suburb,

and performed at the Dayton

Playhouse in his youth.

RIDE AWAY

GO GUIDES

This amusement park is

one of Southwest Ohio’s

premier attractions.

Explore the kid-friendly

Planet Snoopy; hop

on the Beast, the

world’s longest wooden

rollercoaster; or swallow

your stomach on the

315-foot-tall Drop Tower.

Kings Island

6300 Kings Island Dr, Mason;

513-754-5700; pki.com


ON THE TOWN

DAYTON, OH

IN BRIEF BY SAM POLCER

BY THE NUMBERS

70

length (in miles) of paved recreational

trails within Five Rivers MetroParks

NEWS FLASH

Seeing Green •

In June, Dayton

welcomed its first

eco-friendly hotel, the

111-room Holiday

Inn Express & Suites

Dayton South - I-675.

The energy-efficient

building uses solar

panels to heat all of

its water. hiexpress

.com + Shining Star

• In April, Boonshoft

Museum of Discovery

welcomed the Sun

AUGUST 2011 80

1,000

works of art

on view at any

given time from

the Dayton

Art Institute’s

26,000-piece

collection

1 MILLION

boxes of candy

produced

annually by local

company Esther

Price Candies

1.3 MILLION

annual attendance

of the

National Museum

of the US Air

Force, Ohio’s

most-visited free

tourist attraction

Room, where visitors

can learn about their

favorite star. It features

a striking 32-inch

diameter sphere

that uses internal

projectors to simulate

what the sun looks like.

boonshoftmuseum.org

GO MAGAZINE

AUGUST AVERAGES:

3.3 in. 65˚F

GET AROUND:

RTA bus

85˚F

TIME ZONE:

Eastern

AREA CODE:

937

FOUNDED:

1896

POPULATION:

1,173,547*

AIRPORT: Dayton International

Airport

WEBSITE: daytoncvb.com

*in metropolitan area

CULTURE CALENDAR

Aug. 31 to Sept. 5

MONTGOMERY COUNTY FAIR

Nothing says summertime

like a good county fair, so

get out the gingham for this

annual event. A rodeo, petting

zoo, pig races, demolition

derby and interactive science

exhibits are among the many

attractions, along with virtually

every type of competition

ever associated with a blue

ribbon. montcofair.com

Sept. 2-4

GIANT SCALE RADIO-

CONTROLLED MODEL

AIRCRAFT AIR SHOW

You know those tiny, balsawood

planes you used to glue

together? You won’t fi nd ’em

here. Model jets, ’copters and

warbirds too big for a casual

fl ight over your local park take

off on the runway behind the

National Museum of the US

Air Force.

nationalmuseum.af.mil


ON THE TOWN: DAYTON, OH

LOCAL FACES BY KATIE MAURER

An award-winning chef, a British expat and a surrealist artist/gallery owner have all found a home in Dayton.

Anne Kearney

Owner/chef at Rue Dumaine Restaurant,

James Beard Award winner for ″Best Chef

Southeast″ (2002)

Why did you open an American bistro in

Dayton after running a restaurant in New

Orleans for nine years? “Dayton is my

hometown; I was away for almost 20 years

and I wanted to bring my travels back

home. Many diff erent countries have an

infl uence on cuisine in New Orleans, so

there are lots of cultural infl uences there

that I wanted to bring here. I off er Creole

Cajun specials on Wednesdays.”

And you and your husband are happy to be

home? “Now our families are close. While

we are busy running a business, Tom

and I have enjoyed watching our families

grow. We have enjoyed becoming part of

our community. We shop locally to help

keep the local economy rolling. I use local

artisan bread bakers and cheese makers.”

What are some of your favorite places to eat

around town? “Meadowlark Restaurant,

Sidebar and The Flying Pizza. Each off ers

personal, unique cuisine, and you can

tell they care about what they are doing.

Brunch at Meadowlark is my favorite way

to spend a Sunday morning.”

What are some of your favorite things to do

in Dayton outside the kitchen? “Walking

with our dogs (Demi and Morel) through

Grant Park, boxing at Drake’s Downtown

Gym and Pilates at Practice Yoga.”

Terry Ronald

Owner of Basically British Foods and Gifts

Why did you open a British tearoom and shop

in Downtown Dayton? “There’s actually

a fairly sizeable British population

here, with large companies like NCR,

Meadwestvaco and Wright-Patterson

Air Force Base bringing people here. But

more than anything, there’s always been

an interest in British things in America.”

Why are Americans so intrigued with Britain,

the monarchy and so on? “The perceived

style of manners, politeness, education

and elegant social life, along with the long

national history, epitomized by the many

very old buildings and castles and the

untouched countryside, are probably all

factors. Of course, as I often tell people,

I come from Liverpool, so I’m not sure I

can claim to be the embodiment of all of

those characteristics—I believe Liverpool

is regarded as being ‘diff erent’ by the rest

of the country.”

What can visitors expect to find in your

store? “We have small ceramic trinket

boxes with [pictures of the new royal

couple] and other decorations, loose tea

caddies, tins of shortbread, silver-plated

engraved teaspoons with decorative

handle attachments and decorated

tapestry cushions.”

And, of course, afternoon tea. “We have

a new menu every month with typical

British dishes made from scratch.”

AUGUST 2011 81

GO MAGAZINE

Amy Kollar Anderson

Surrealist artist and gallery coordinator at

Rosewood Gallery

Why is Dayton a great place to make art?

“It has a fantastic and supportive artist

community, with artists working in

every medium imaginable. We also have

a variety of large venues where artists

can fi nd inspiration, like the Schuster

Performing Arts Center, Dayton Contemporary

Dance Company and the Dayton

Art Institute. Since rent is aff ordable,

it’s also possible for small groups to

become successful, like The Zoot Theatre

Company, The Circus Creative Collective

and Garden Station.”

Is any of your art inspired by Dayton? “Stares

is inspired by the Dayton Art Institute’s

front stairway, but I added a bit of a surreal

twist by turning the rails into eyeballs. And

Woodland Sperrit uses the landscape at

Woodland Cemetery as the background.

The ghostly fi gure is referencing Paul Laurence

Dunbar, a famous African-American

Daytonian poet who is buried there. The

spelling of ‘sperrit’ is taken from one of his

poems, which were sometimes written in

African-American dialect.”

What makes your gallery different from

others? “We are a nonprofi t space. This

allows us to show a more diverse variety

of work, such as audio/video installations,

and have individual shows as opposed to

presenting a ‘gallery store,’ since sales are

not our main focus.”


Get the free mobile app at

http://gettag.mobi

Yes Yes

That That

We’re We’re

Close Close

Dayton International Airport

· Centrally located near major cities –

Columbus, Cincinnati, Indianapolis

· Easy access via two interstate

highways – I-75 and I-70

· Parking within easy walking distance

to your gate


ON THE TOWN: DAYTON, OH

PATENT SEARCH BY KATIE MAURER

No other city its size has been the site of as many inventions as

Dayton. Here’s how to appreciate some of its claims to fame.

Invention: ICE CREAM CONE

Where to fi nd it: Young’s Jersey Dairy

The origins of this invention may be up for debate, but the

creamy deliciousness of Young's homemade ice cream and

gelato (more than 110 rotating fl avors) is unarguable. The

1.1 million annual visitors also come for the petting zoo,

corn maze, miniature golf, batting cages and driving range.

6880 Springfield-Xenia Rd, Yellow Springs (30 miles from Dayton);

937-325-0629; youngsdairy.com

Invention: AIRPLANE

Where to fi nd it: National Museum of the United

States Air Force

The Wright brothers may have fi rst taken off in North

Carolina, but they developed their little project here in

Dayton—and needless to say, the city is quite proud of them.

This free museum at Wright Patterson Air Force Base is

among the many fl ight-focused attractions in town. It began

in 1923 inside a hangar at Dayton’s McCook Field—and

today it’s home to everything from the 1909 Wright fl yer and

JFK’s Air Force One (plus eight other presidential aircraft)

to a collection of intercontinental ballistic missiles.

1100 Spaatz St; 937-255-3286; Wright-Patterson AFB;

nationalmuseum.af.mil

Invention: BACKPACK PARACHUTE

Where to fi nd it: Skydive Greene County

Ohio’s longest-running drop zone celebrates its 50th

anniversary this year, so mark the occasion with a tandem

jump or solo dive from a twin-turbine Westwind or a Cessna

182. While you can be too young to take to the sky (minimum

age is 18), you’re never too old—an 80-year-old WWII veteran

who fought in Normandy made a jump last year. 177 S

Monroe-Siding Rd, Xenia (29 miles from Dayton); 937-372-0700;

skydiveohio.com

Invention: MOVIE PROJECTOR

Where to fi nd it: Little Art Theatre

Contrary to popular belief, Thomas Edison didn’t invent what

was then called the phantascope. It was Dayton local Charles

Francis Jenkins—although he didn't actually create it in his

hometown. Jenkins eventually sold the rights to his business

partner, who then sold the rights to Edison (who renamed it

the Vitascope). See its modern incarnation at this 1929 singlescreen

nonprofi t cinema, which plays the best in current

foreign, independent, documentary and select Hollywood

fi lms. A tip: Tickets are $6 on Mondays. 247 Xenia Ave, Yellow

Springs (30 miles from Dayton); 937-767-7671; littleart.com

Invention: RING-PULL CAN OPENER

Where to fi nd it: AleFest

Have you noticed that cans are the latest rage in premium

beer? See for yourself at AleFest, taking place Aug. 27

at Dayton’s Carillon Historical Park. This 13th-annual

celebration of craft beer will feature more than 300 varieties

that you can taste for $24 in advance or $40 the day of the

event. 1000 Carillon Blvd; alefest.com

AUGUST 2011 83

GO MAGAZINE

INVENTION INVENTORY

More Dayton developments:

improved versions

of artificial heart

and kidney,

cash register,

portable crib,

LCD technology,

electric cash

register, ethyl

(lead) gasoline,

improved

version of filter

cigarettes,

improved version

of ice cube

tray, incentive

stamp (although

disputed),

microencapsula-

tion technology

(used in mood

rings), motorized

wheelchair


Dayton, Ohio

EXPERIENCE THE THRILL of

OVER 100 YEARS of AVIATION.

The National Aviation Heritage Area welcomes you to our

upcoming fly-ins. You don’t need to own a plane to enjoy the

sights and sounds of the event. Bring your whole family and

see some amazing vintage aircraft.

HISTORIC GRIMES FIELD

Mid-Eastern Regional Fly-In

September 10 & 11, 2011

www.merfi.com

HISTORIC WACO FIELD

WACO Fly-In

September 16–18, 2011

www.WACOAirMuseum.org

The National Aviation Heritage Area is also home to

the Air Force Marathon, September 17, 2011.

Visit www.usafmarathon.com for more information.

visitNAHA.com

Oceanfront

Excellence

The Atlantic Ocean serves as the dramatic

backdrop for the AAA Five–Diamond rated

Ponte Vedra Inn & Club. 250 luxurious

rooms and suites, beach, golf, tennis, fitness,

spa, fine dining, shopping and awardwinning

hospitality since 1928. Attractive rates and

packages are available.

Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida

Oceanfront. Just 20 minutes from Jacksonville


CHRIS GLASS

ON THE TOWN: DAYTON, OH

INDIE ICONS BY DON THRASHER

Dayton has an extraordinarily rich rock legacy, having given rise to such seminal alt/indie acts as The Breeders,

Guided By Voices, Brainiac and others. We caught up with a couple of the city’s headliners.

Kelley Deal has traveled

the world as a member

of The Breeders, but

the native of northern

Dayton suburb Huber

Heights settled down in

her hometown. Here,

she reveals the top spots

where you can experience

local indie culture

fi rsthand.

Favorite record shop:

“Omega Music carries CDs, DVDs and stuff ,

but the big draw is the huge selection of

vinyl. They have tons of used records—and

new, sealed stuff , too.”

Favorite coffee spot:

“Pick up your coff ee at Press, the new locally

owned coff ee place on Wayne Avenue, and

then walk the few blocks down Fifth Street.

You can make a day of it because there are

art galleries and places to shop and eat on

the way.”

Favorite local radio station:

“I’m addicted to NPR, but for music I

usually listen to either WYSO (91.3 FM) or

WDPR (88.1 FM). Those guys are really

supportive of what’s going on in Dayton.”

Favorite live music venues:

“Canal Street Tavern is an icon. This is

their 30th year, and they have music six

nights a week. South Park Tavern and Blind

Bob’s also book some good stuff . Not a lot of

big national acts schlep through here, and

that’s actually one of the things that makes

Dayton an interesting place. We have

to make our own bands and entertain

ourselves; that’s why there’s such

good musical diversity.”

Omega Music

318 E Fifth St; 937-275-9949;

omegamusicdayton.com

Press

257 Wayne Ave; 937-286-4585

Canal Street Tavern

308 E First St; 937-461-9343;

canalstreettavern.com

South Park Tavern

1301 Wayne Ave; 937-586-9526;

southparktavern.com

Blind Bob’s

430 E Fifth St; 937-938-6405;

blindbobs.com

AUGUST 2011 85

GO MAGAZINE

W

I

N

G

T

I

P

S

Dayton-native Robert Pollard,

the frontman of indie act

Guided By Voices, is known

worldwide for writing short,

catchy songs—but he’s also

something of an afi cionado of

spicy chicken wings.

“Dayton does chicken wings better than most

other places I’ve been. I prefer the drums to the

flappers, and I can’t take them too hot. I want a

little bit of burn, but I don’t want to be in pain. I get

around to some bars and most all of them have

good chicken wings. Originally my favorite was

the barbecued donkeys from Roosters, but Little

York Tavern, Toll House Tavern, Wings Sports Bar

and Fricker’s locations have good ones.”


Hilton Garden Inn is conveniently

located on I-77, Exit 113 at the

Akron-Canton Airport. Offering full

service amenities with time and

money saving value, value we cater to

our guest’s comfort. Guests enjoy

the on-site Great American Grill

restaurant, Pavilion Lounge, indoor

pool and whirlpool, and complimentary

wireless HSIA throughout the

hotel. Each room offers a flat panel

LCD 37” TV with On-Demand movies,

video games and complimentary

HBO, microwave and refrigerator.

5251 Landmark Blvd.,

North Canton, Ohio 44720

330-966-4907 fax: 330-966-5265

www.akroncantonairport.hgi.com

Holiday Inn

Express & Suites

Akron Regional Airport Area













898 Arlington Ridge East Akron, OH 44312

330.644.5600 888.HOLIDAY

www.hiexpress.com/akronsouth

1787 thorn drive

Uniontown (green), ohio 44685

cambriasuitesakron.com

330.899.1990


Denver

colorado

by lori midson

GO SHOP

Eco-POLITAN

437 S Wadsworth Blvd; 303-989-

2229; eco-politan.com

A one-stop shop for

environmentally conscious

parents, this shrine to earthfriendly

baby essentials such

as cloth diapers and diaper

bags also offers books and

classes on making your own

healthy baby food at home.

Perpetual Clothing

2027 W 32nd Ave; 303-953-0816;

perpetualclothingdenver.com

Find trendy and contemporary

second-hand fashions at

this loveable little boutique.

Designer labels range from

True Religion and Elie Tahari

to Kenneth Cole and Kate

Spade—and, of course,

they cost a fraction of the

retail price.

GO SEE

Cherry Creek

Fresh Market

First Ave and University Blvd; 303-

442-1837; coloradofreshmarkets.

com/markets.html

Farmers, flower growers and

gourmet food trucks convene

at this dynamic and awardwinning

open-air urban market.

Pick up fresh, local produce,

gourmet cheese, baked goods

and tons of other local specialties.

Saturdays through Oct.,

Wednesdays through Sept.

GO EAT

Lao Wang Noodle House

945 S Federal Blvd; 303-975-2497

The grungy interior may be

AHOY, MATE!

Navigate your way

through more than 200

artifacts pulled from the

wreck of the Whydah, the

first fully authenticated

pirate ship ever to be

discovered in US waters.

Through Aug. 21.

Real Pirates

At the Denver Museum of

Nature & Science

2001 Colorado Blvd; 303-

370-6000; dmns.org

forgettable, but the delectable

food is not. Items such as

beef noodle soup with bok

choy, pan-fried pork and

vegetable pot stickers and

Shanghai soup dumplings

filled with broth will be

remembered long after you’re

back home. $

GO PARTY

Star Bar

2137 Larimer St; 720-328-2420;

starbardenver.com

Colorado craft beer lovers

congregate en masse at this

kitschy Ballpark neighborhood

watering hole that hosts live

music and karaoke parties. It

hosts a killer happy hour and

features local brews on draft

and in cans.

FUN FACT

Keith Richards of The

Rolling Stones once tossed a

television out of a window at

Denver's Brown Palace Hotel.

If you’re looking at this

banner so are your clients

To advertise in call our

sales team at 888.864.1732

AUGUST 2011 87

Des Moines

iowa

by christine riccelli

GO SHOP

Chocolaterie Stam

2814 Ingersoll Ave;

515-282-9575, stamchocolate.com

Exquisite European chocolate

stars at this inviting shop.

Run by a member of the Stam

family—which started the

business in the Netherlands in

1913—it features rich, finely

crafted bonbons as well as

truffles, cookies, coffee

and gelato.

GO SEE

Adventureland

Amusement Park

3200 Adventureland Dr, Altoona; 515-

266-2121; adventureland-usa.com

This thrill seekers' paradise is

Iowa’s largest amusement

park. It provides fun for every

age with more than 100 rides,

(both in the water and on dry

land), shows and attractions.

PAST TIME

Experience Iowa’s past at this

500-acre outdoor museum in

suburban Des Moines. Walking

trails and tractor-drawn

carts connect three working

farms—a 1700 Ioway village

and 1850 and 1900 farms— —

where costumed interpreters

work the land, prepare meals

and do other chores as the

people did then. You can pitch h

right in; help dig out an Indian n

canoe or churn butter. Next,

stroll the 1875 re-created

Living History Farms ms

GO EAT

Open Sesame

313 E Locust St;

515-288-3151

Since its opening in January,

this casual Lebanese café has

drawn raves for its authentic

and flavorful renderings of

Mediterranean dishes, such as

falafel, kafta (spiced ground

sirloin patties) and baba

ghanoush. $$

GO PARTY

The House of Bricks

525 E Grand Ave; 515-727-4370,

thehouseofbricks.com

This lively East Village bar is

downtown’s live music capital,

hosting rock, blues and indie

music acts and presenting

edgy comedy shows, poetry

slams and open-mic nights.

If you’re hungry, order from a

menu filled with bar standards

like potato skins, deli

sandwiches and burgers.

FUN FACT!

11121 Hickman Rd, Urbandale; 515-278-5286; lhf.org

GO MAGAZINE

GO GUIDES

The 45-story, 630-foot-tall

801 Grand is Des Moines’—

and Iowa’s—tallest building.

frontier town, which includes

shops, homes and businesses,

such as a milliner, plus a rural

chapel and schoolhouse.


GO GUIDES

Detroit

michigan

by ellen piligian

GO SHOP

Dancing Eye Gallery

101 N Center St, Northville;

248-449-7086;

dancingeyegallery.blogspot.com

Primarily known for its tiles by

more than 50 ceramic artists

from around Michigan, this

gallery in charming Northville

also sells handmade jewelry,

apparel and other gift items.

GO SEE

Cranbrook House

and Gardens

380 Lone Pine Rd, Bloomfield Hills;

248-645-3147;

cranbrook.edu/housegardens

Take in the Sunken Garden

and myriad sculptures among

the 40 acres of Cranbrook’s

campus gardens by bike, on

foot or on a guided tour. It

features a 1908 English Arts

and Crafts-style home, the

oldest surviving manor home in

metro Detroit.

Woodward Dream Cruise

Woodward Ave between Ferndale and

Pontiac; woodwarddreamcruise.com

Don your poodle skirt and

saddle shoes when the world's

largest one-day celebration

of classic car culture rolls into

town. Around 40,000 custom

and collector muscle cars will

be on display. Aug. 20.

GO EAT

Detroit Seafood Market

1435 Randolph St; 313-962-4180;

thedetroitseafoodmarket.com

Enjoy the swanky setting

(exposed brick, high ceilings

and floor-to-ceiling windows)

at one of the city’s newest

restaurants. Along with fresh

catches like perch and Chilean

sea bass, try Chef Leonardo’s

lobster mac and cheese and

blackened rib eye. $$$

GO PARTY

Majestic Theatre

4120 Woodward Ave; 313-833-9700;

majesticdetroit.com

Music lovers looking for top

national acts should make

a night of it at one of the

city’s best live music venues.

Located in Detroit's cultural

center, the 1915 former movie

theater has hosted the likes of

Buddy Guy and Los Lobos.

FUN FACT!

Michigan is the boating

capital of the US, with more

registered boats than any

other state.

LOVE THY

NEIGHBOR(HOOD)

When former handyman

Jim Geary decided that

a corner bar was the

one thing missing from

his historic Woodbridge

neighborhood, he bought

a building and restored

it himself, using wood

salvaged from a church.

“I wanted to give my

neighbors a place to walk

to,” he says.

Woodbridge Pub

5169 Trumbull; 313-833-

2701; woodbridgepub.com

FLINT CULTURAL

CENTER

AUGUST 2011 88

Flint

michigan

by liz shaw

GO SHOP

Sullivan’s Irish Alley

104 E Main St, Flushing; 810-487-

2473; sullivansirishalley.com

One hundred thousand

welcomes await at this

family-owned gift emporium.

Need a Celtic knot bead for a

true love’s bracelet or an Irish

patchwork walking hat? If it

has to do with the Emerald

Isle, you’re likely to find it here,

including rare pieces

like Ogham (ancient script)

wish plaques.

GO SEE

Flint Children’s Museum

1602 W University Ave;

810-767-5437;

flintchildrensmuseum.org

Learning is fun at this museum

that uses hands-on science

and creative play to teach

kids how the world works. This

month’s theme is “Up, Up and

Away"and visitors will learn

about flight by conducting

outdoor experiments, like

sending stomp rockets into

the sky.

Back to the Bricks

Cruise Weekend

407 S Saginaw St, Flint;

810-695-2894; backtothebricks.org

Legendary drag racer Big

Daddy Don Garlits and his

infamous Swamp Rat headline

the entire weekend of this

annual open-air celebration

that will showcase about

30,000 classic cars. Activities

include movie screenings,

hot dog lunches and, of

course, Saturday’s car show.

Aug. 16-20.

GO MAGAZINE

GO EAT

Chutney Bazaar

5454 Perry Rd, Grand

Blanc; 810-603-1499;

chutneybazaar.com

Shop Bollywood DVDs and

imported goodies while

munching a handmade

veggie samosa at this

no-frills Indian grocerturned

deli. It’s perfect

for a midday curry fix—

especially the aloo tikki

chaat (spicy peas spooned

over potato cakes). $

Churchill’s

340 S Saginaw St;

810-238-3800;

churchillsflint.com

Founded in 1980 when the

University of Michigan’s Flint

campus was itself just a young

thing, this longtime downtown

favorite calls itself the city’s

original college bar. Thursdays

$1 pitchers and well drinks

from 9pm to midnight and

Mexican Wednesdays always

draw crowds of ravenous

students looking for a sweet

deal. $

GO PARTY

Fenton Winery

& Brewery

1545 N Leroy St, Fenton;

810-373-4194; fentonwinery.com

Head to this sleek bistro-like

spot for craft brews, small

plates, quiet conversation and

occasional live music. After

indulging in the decadent

cherry chocolate port over

cheesecake, stop by the

bar to say hello to the superfriendly

owners.

FUN FACT!

“The Rock” (located at

Hammerberg Road and W

12th Street) has been the

local graffiti artists’ community

billboard for decades.

FlintCulturalCenter.org

for more info

Flint Institute of Arts • Flint School of Performing Arts • Flint Symphony Orchestra

Flint Youth Theatre • Sloan Museum • Longway Planetarium • The Whiting


Ft. Lauderdale

florida

by jan norris

GO SHOP

Flora Ottimer’s

Children’s Boutique

713B E Las Olas Blvd; 954-463-2292;

floraottimer.com

This shop has been dressing

tots in stylish and classic togs

for 65 years. Find labels such

as Florence Eiseman, toys

from Gund, collectible dolls

from Madame Alexander and

Corolle, and gifts for newborns

like blankets and onesies.

GO SEE

Young at Art

Children’s Museum

11584 W State Rd 84, Davie; 954-

424-0085; youngatartmuseum.org

Art education is child’s play

at this hands-on center with

exhibits and activities for

every age. Youngsters can

learn about art, music and

culture from around the world

in the Global Village, while

artist Kenny Scharf’s Closet is

a Day-Glo world to explore.

GO EAT

Food Truck Rally

At Seminole Hard Rock Casino

1 Seminole Way, Hollywood; 866-502-

7529; seminolehardrockhollywood.com

Every Thursday night this

summer, 20-plus gourmet

food trucks roll in at 6pm

bearing haute street food such

as Korean barbecue, sushi,

artisan pizza and cupcakes. $

Big City Tavern

609 E Las Olas Blvd; 954-727-0307;

bigtimerestaurants.com

Recently redecorated with

sports memorabilia, vintage

13051 Bell Tower Drive

239-482-2900 • 1-877-2CROWNE

cpfortmyers.com

BEST OF BURGERS

The gourmet burger trend

has gripped South Florida

with its newest chain

BurgerFi, which stands

for the “burgerfication”

of the nation. Homemade

frozen custards, cupcakes,

beer and wine are

also on offer. $

BurgerFi

4343 N Ocean Dr,

Lauderdale-by-the-Sea;

954-489-0110; burgerfi.com

beauty queen photos and

lanterns, this American-fare

favorite also kicked up its

menu, with dishes such as

agnolotti and braised pork

shoulder, pizza bianca and

chicken Milanese. Eat outside

on the greened-up patio. $$$

GO PARTY

McSorley’s Beach Pub

837 N Ft Lauderdale Beach Blvd;

954-565-4446;

mcsorleysbeachpub.com

Sit on the outside sundeck

here with a cold mug and get

your Irish on while watching

the beach scene. Play beer

pong in the more casual game

room; or go for cocktails in the

lounge, where there’s a cigar

and spirits night.

FUN FACT!

Ft. Lauderdale’s beach starred

in two movies: Where the Boys

Are (1960) and Elvis’ Girl

Happy (1965).

Ft. Myers

florida

by libby mcmillan

GO SHOP

Babs Bead Warehouse

16205 S Tamiami Tr Ste #4;

239-432-1778

Trollbeads are a draw, but this

better-than-average bead

shop also carries Swarovski

crystal, gemstones and

sterling silver components.

Wannabe jewelry makers can

sign up for one-day classes.

Bait N Wait

17885 San Carlos Blvd; 239-466-

8737; baitnwait.com

Anglers feel mighty welcome

at this tiny green shop on

the way to Ft. Myers Beach.

Services include rod and reel

repair, local fishing advice and

tall tale swapping. That you

can purchase bait here is a

given, but customers can also

find gifts for the fishermen in

their lives.

GO SEE

Sanibel Lighthouse

Eastern end of Periwinkle Way;

This iconic lighthouse has

crowned Sanibel’s east

end since 1884, and it’s

still operational (a 1972

Coast Guard effort to

decommission it was stamped

out by outraged locals). The

beachgoers lounge beneath its

tower, and seashell fanatics

scour the sand for the coveted

“miniatures” that are often

found here.

Alegría

At Germain Arena

11000 Everblades Pkwy, Estero; 239-

948-7825; germainarena.com

This awe-inspiring spectacle,

Cooper Hotels. Your Upscale Choice in Fort Myers, Florida.

AUGUST 2011 89

GO MAGAZINE

is Cirque du Soleil's newest

show. Alegría, which means

“jubilation” in Spanish,

questions how power is

handed down over time, and

covers ancient monarchies to

new democracies. Aug. 10-14.

Perseids Meteor Shower

Sanibel and Captiva islands

With no streetlights and only

minimal beach lighting due to

turtle nesting season, there’s

no finer place to take in this

stunning meteor shower than

Ft. Myers’ outlying islands.

Aug. 12-13.

GO EAT

Sweet Melissa’s Cafe

1625 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel Island;

239-472-1956;

sweetmelissacafe.net

Chef Melissa Talmage lures

devoted foodies to her

Sanibel haven with small

plates like crispy soft-shelled

crab and bourbon-glazed pork

belly and entrees like ovenroasted

cobia and pan-seared

duck breast. Soothing live

acoustic jazz sets the mood

Tuesday, Thursday and Friday

nights. $$$$

GO PARTY

Gator Lanes

7050 Crystal Dr;

239-939-0048; gatorlanes.net

This popular bowling alley gets

packed on weekend nights;

crowds start arriving around

10pm and keep on coming. It’s

a fun venue, with a full bar and

music. Be sure you arrive early

enough to snag a lane!

FUN FACT!

GO GUIDES

Many beachfront

accommodations offer steep

last-minute discounts until

November or December, when

occupancy rises again.

Fort Myers Airport/FGCU

Bell Tower Shops Airport/FGCU

5255 Big Pine Way

239-275-6000 • 1-800-CALL-HOME

homewoodsuitesftmyers.com

16410 Corporate Commerce Way

239-210-7200 • 1-877-STAY-HGI

fortmyersairportfgcu.hgi.com

16450 Corporate Commerce Way

239-210-7300 • 1-800-CALL-HOME

fortmyersairportfgcu.homewoodsuites.com


In the heart of Sanibel’s

Favorite Shopping Plaza




YOUR FIRST STOP

Be sure to stop by the Visitor Center at the Sanibel

& Captiva Islands Chamber of Commerce when

you arrive. You will find us in a colorful island-style

building on your right-hand side, the 2nd driveway

immediately aer you drive onto the island. Open 365

days a year, our staff is here to answer your questions

from 9am – 5pm every day of the week. You will also

find that islanders are very knowledgeable and helpful

outside these hours.

NATURE AND WILDLIFE

Our islands provide a nature vacation for the entire

family like no other - from the avid nature lover to the

budding naturalist, there’s something for everyone.

More than half the islands are devoted to wildlife and

are protected for wildlife and nature.

ADVERTISEMENT




Sanibel’s

Seafood

Specialists

Since 1978

239-472-3128

239-472-HIKE






239-472-1998



www.prawnbroker.com

COME VISIT SANIBEL & CAPTIVA ISLANDS IN

FLORIDA TO DISCOVER PARADISE FOR YOURSELF.

Sanibel and Captiva Islands in Southwest Florida are the perfect choice for your getaway vacation, whether you are

looking for a romantic stay, a family trip or a nature retreat. The lush and tropical islands are located south of Tampa

and just north of Naples. Our nearest airport is Southwest Florida International Airport (RSW), located in Fort Myers,

which is 23 miles from Sanibel Island and 33 miles from Captiva Island. Our islands are the perfect home for your

getaway. Enjoy 15 miles of unspoiled beaches, 22 miles of bike paths, 50 species of fish, 230 types of birds, 250 types

of shells and 0 stop lights. We have many different attractions, such as the Ding Darling Wildlife Refuge and the

nature preserve. Outdoor activities include fishing, shelling, biking, bird watching, boating, golfing, and snorkeling…

to name just a few. Sanibel Island measures roughly 12 miles long and three miles across at its widest. Little sister

Captiva Island has more compact measurements of approximately four miles long and half a mile wide.

Our J.N. “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge

covers more than 5,000-acres of wildlife, home to

numerous exotic birds, raccoons, oer, alligators

and other wildlife. The refuge features delightful

footpaths, winding canoe trails and a five-mile scenic

drive, all of which are lush with seagrape, wax and salt

myrtles, red mangrove, cabbage or Sabal palms and

other native plant varieties. You can take a wildlife

tour, either by car or by bike, which is a five mile,

one-way scenic road which runs along the bay side of

Sanibel. Alternatively, you can take an informational

tram tour through the refuge.

SHELLING

The best shelling in the world is found on the beaches

of Sanibel and Captiva Island. There is a geographic

reason for this, the Islands do a twist and turn along

A

Sanibel Tradition for more than 30 Years


the coastline to form the Sanibel

and Captiva ‘shelf’, among a string

of other more orderly, straightand-narrow

islands. The east-west

torque of Sanibel’s south end acts

like a shovel scooping up all the

seashells that the Gulf imports

from The Caribbean and other

southern seas.

The abundance and variety of shells

have made Sanibel and Captiva

Islands shell-obsessed. Known

as the ‘Shell Capital of the World’

people come to our islands from all

over the world, drawn by the song of

the seashell. They parade along the

sands doubled over in a stance that’s

been dubbed the Sanibel Stoop or

the Captiva Crawl - come try it out

for yourself and see which suits

you best. Be sure to stop into the

Bailey-Mahew’s Shell Museum to

learn everything you need to know

on shelling.

FISHING

The pristine waters surrounding

Sanibel Island and Captiva Island

provide excellent opportunities for

fishermen of all skill levels; from

the novice to the World Record

seeker. The warm waters of the

gulf provide great breeding and

living grounds for many species

of fish, including redfish, speckled

trout, snook, tarpon and more.

Whether offshore, inshore, back

bay, pier, beach or wade fishing, fish

can be found here year round.

DINING

Restaurateurs and chefs from

all over the globe have come to

Sanibel and Captiva Islands to add

their creative influences to our

island melting pot of restaurants.

The result? Some of the most

delightfully inventive cuisine you’ll

discover anywhere.

No maer your taste, you’ll find

culinary delights to match every














Island Vacations

of Sanibel & Captiva, Inc.

appetite, each reflecting the savory

spirit of our tropical paradise.

SHOPPING

Our islands offer quaint & friendly

shopping. With a broad array of

locally owned retail businesses on

the islands, we are sure to have what

you need. Looking for a pharmacy,

book store, new swim suit or









Sea Shells of Sanibel welcomes you

to your home away from home.

Conveniently located just a short walk from the

pristine bluewaters of the Gulf of Mexico and some

of the finest, unspoiled shelling beaches in the world,

you are in the heart of Sanibel Island and all the

natural beauty it has to offer. ~ Sanibel Island Style

MENTION THIS AD

AND RECEIVE 10% OFF

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sunglasses? Check out our online

directory at sanibel-captiva.org to

find the retailer just for you.

WHAT TO BRING?

Our easy-going, outdoor lifestyle

translates to casual, informal aire,

both day and night. Shorts and

sandals are the norm. Restaurants

range from simple outdoor cafes

to elegant candlelit dining rooms;

none requires jackets or ties. Retail

establishments generally request

shirts and shoes.

PLAN FOR SUNSHINE

Our winters are mild (average

daytime temperatures in the 70s

and 80s) and dry (it rains just

enough to keep our islands lush).

Summer temperatures, ranging

from the high 80s to low 90s, are

tempered by cooling sea breezes

and brief aernoon showers,

followed by more sunshine and

glorious sunsets.

THE ISLANDS OF SANIBEL

AND CAPTIVA - NATURALLY

YOU’LL LOVE US

www.sanibel-captiva.org


ADVERTISEMENT

Walk-In Rentals Available

Vacation Rentals | Seasonal Rentals

For Sanibel and Captiva rentals: 800.656.9111 | RoyalShell.com

For Bonita, Estero and Naples rentals: 855.213.3311 | RoyalShellRentals.com

For SW Florida real estate sales: 800.805.0168 | RoyalShellRealEstate.com

American Realty of Captiva

captiva-island.com

(800) 547-0127

Captiva Island Inn

captivaislandinn.com

(800) 454-9898

Casa Ybel Resort

casaybelresort.com

(800) 276-4753

Blue Giraffe

mybluegiraffe.com

(239) 472-2525

Courtney’s

courtneyssanibel.com

(239) 472-4646

Doc Ford’s

docfordssanibel.com

(239) 472-8311

Bailey’s General Store

baileys-sanibel.com

(239) 472-1516

Captiva General Store

captivaislandstore.com

(239) 472-2374

Congress Jewelers

congressjewelers.com

(239) 472-4177

WHERE TO SHOP

Holiday Inn

sanibelbeachresort.com

(800) 443-0909

Island Vacations

sanibelislandvacations.com

(888) 451-7277

Pink Shell Resort

pinkshell.com

(866) 976-8493

Lazy Flamingo

lazyflamingo.com

(239) 472-5353

(239) 472-6939

Over Easy Café

overeasycafesanibel.com

(239) 472-2625

Pinocchio’s

pinocchiosicecream.com

(239) 472-6566

Jerry’s Foods of Sanibel

jerrysfoods.com

(239) 472-9300

Shiny Objects

shopshinyobjects.com

(239) 472-1660

Shop on Sanibel

shoponsanibel.com

(239) 472-2783

WHERE TO STAY

WHERE TO DINE

Reservation Central

rescen.com

(800) 290-6920

Royal Shell Vacations

royalshell.com

(800) 656-9111

Select Vacation Properties

selectvacationproperties.com

(866) 455-0028

Sanibel Café

sanibelcafe.com

(239) 472-5323

Sweet Melissa’s

sweetmelissascafe.net

(239) 472-1956

The Lighthouse Café

lighthousecafe.com

(239) 472-0303

Adventures in Paradise

adventureinparadise.com

(239) 472-8443

Captiva Cruises

captivacruises.com

(239) 472-5300

Key West Express

seakeywestexpress.com

(800) 593-7260

WHERE TO PLAY

‘Tween Waters Inn

tween-waters.com

(800) 223-5865

VIP Vacation Rentals

viprental.com

(877) 273-3992

West Wind Inn

westwindinn.com

(866) 318-8466

Thistle Lodge Restaurant

thistlelodge.com

(239) 472-9200

Traders

traderssanibel.com

(239) 472-7242

Traditions on the Beach

traditionsonthebeach.com

(239) 472-4559

Pirate Cruise

saltysams.com

(800) 776-3735

Sanibel Recreation Center

mysanibel.com

(239) 472-0345

YOLO Watersports

yolo-jims.com

(239) 472-9656

www.sanibel-captiva.org


ON THE TOWN

GRAND RAPIDS, MI AUGUST

IN BRIEF BY SAM POLCER

BY THE NUMBERS

92

2,200

animals at John

Ball Zoo, one of

the country’s

oldest

1,500

size (in acres)

of Millennium

Park, one of the

largest urban

parks in the US

3,391,722

times “The

Grand Rapids

LipDub”—the

longest and

largest lip-sync

video ever

length (in miles) of the Fred Meijer

made—has

White Pine Trail—the longest rail trail been viewed

in Michigan—which runs from Grand

Rapids to Cadillac

NEWS FLASH

Deeper Shade of

Green • Last month,

CityFlats Hotel Grand

Rapids became

this eco-friendly

city’s newest green

accommodations. The

28-room boutique

hotel is home to

CityBru Coffee, which

offers fair-trade coffee

24/7. cityflatshotel

.com + Nice to Meat

You • The 1913

Room at the Amway

AUGUST 2011 93

on YouTube

at press time.

(Check it out!)

Grand Plaza Hotel (and

the state’s only

AAA Five-Diamond

restaurant) closed a

few months ago to

make way for Ruth’s

Chris Steak House,

opening next month.

amwaygrand.com

GO MAGAZINE

AVERAGES:

80˚F

3.8 in. 59˚F

GET AROUND:

The Rapid (bus)

AIRPORT: Gerald R. Ford

International Airport

TIME ZONE:

Eastern

AREA CODE:

616

FOUNDED:

1850

POPULATION:

1,323,287*

WEBSITE: experiencegr.com

*in Seven County CSA Area

CULTURE CALENDAR

Aug. 8-13

ROCK THE RAPIDS

The delightfully incongruous

lineup at this

festival—now entering its

third year—includes such

musical heavyweights as Alice

Cooper, Willie Nelson, Stone

Temple Pilots, Ludacris,

Blake Shelton and Lynyrd

Skynyrd, who may or may not

play “Freebird” after you’ve

shouted it for the 12th time.

rocktherapids.com

Though Aug. 21

LAURA FORD: ACTUAL,

FACTUAL FABLES

Welsh-born sculptor Laura

Ford, known across Europe

for her highly inventive

fi gures and animal forms, gets

her fi rst US solo exhibition

at the Frederik Meijer

Gardens & Sculpture

Park. Be sure to

check check out The

Great Indoors,

Indoors,

featuring fi ve

larger-than-life

deer made

of cloth and

leather.

meijergar

dens.org


ON THE TOWN: GRAND RAPIDS, MI

WHAT GOES AROUND BY AMY S. ECKERT

From fine-dining restaurants with linen and crystal to casual grab-and-go eateries, Grand Rapids’ chefs

wouldn’t consider buying anywhere other than local. It’s easy to find family-owned produce farms, artisanal

creameries, organic meat producers and even small-scale honey and maple syrup providers in Michigan,

each with a passion for fine flavor and sustainability. It all adds up to a community of restaurateurs

exceptionally proud of their menus—and happy to tell you who else is doing it right.

Adriano Moscatelli

Owner, Tre Cugini

122 Monroe Center St NW;

616-235-9339;

trecugini.com

-Grand Rapids’ premier

authentic Italian restaurant

serves up local berries and

veggies and Great Lakes

seafood (plus a delectable

house-made mozzarella).

Moscatelli likes:

Six.One.Six

Because: “Their emphasis

has always been on quality,

local food. For people

looking for a sophisticated

hotel setting and New

American cuisine, you can’t

go wrong.”

Justin Dalenberg

Executive Chef, JW Marriott

and Six.One.Six

235 Louis Campau NW; 616-

242-1448; ilove616.com

-Taking its name from

Grand Rapids’ area code,

Six.One.Six follows the

100-mile rule (serving only

ingredients sourced within

100 miles of the restaurant).

The menu divulges

exactly which orchard,

creamery or freshwater

stream contributed to

your dinner.

Dalenberg likes:

The Green Well Gastro Pub

Because: “The Green

Well definitely puts Grand

Rapids’ best foot forward

when it comes to [quality]

local ingredients. I’m from

Colorado, a big farm-totable

state. But I’ve never

seen anything like Grand

Rapids, where the whole

community is committed to

local food.”

Rob Tamburello

General Manager, The

Green Well Gastro Pub

924 Cherry St SE; 616-808-

3566; thegreenwell.com

-In addition to ripe, freshpicked

produce and other

local ingredients, The

Green Well is just as interested

in other elements of

the slow food movement,

like environment stewardship

and stimulating the

local economy.

Tamburello likes:

Bistro Bella Vita

Because: “Bistro Bella Vita

embodied the local food

philosophy 14 years ago,

before anyone around here

knew what it was. They still

epitomize a commitment

to quality and have been

instrumental in Grand

Rapids’ movement toward

buying local. But they also

take great concern for

their staff, and it shows in

the level of service.”

AUGUST 2011 94

GO MAGAZINE

Brad Teachout

General Manager, Bistro

Bella Vita

44 Grandville Ave SW;

616-222-4600;

bistrobellavita.com

-Local and sustainable

from its inception in 1997,

Bistro Bella Vita was one

of Grand Rapids’ first slow

food restaurants. It has

inspired a community of

locavores with its Great

Lakes whitefish, organic

meats and produce and

its firm commitment to

recycling.

Teachout likes:

San Chez, a Tapas Bistro

Because: “San Chez really

relies on local produce. I

love their organic hydroponic

vegetables, which

are grown locally and on

the menu year-round. San

Chez also goes so far as to

compost and recycle.”

Cindy Schneider

Co-owner and General

Manager, San Chez, a

Tapas Bistro

38 Fulton St W; 616-774-

8272; sanchezbistro.com

-In addition to composting

food waste and using only

recycled, dye-free paper

products, this downtown

bistro seeks out small,

local growers when they

build their menu because

it’s the surest way of

guaranteeing good flavor.

Schneider likes:

Tre Cugini

Because: “Tre Cugini is

small, with a beautiful view

of Rosa Parks circle. The

food is classically Italian.

I’m really fond of the

calamari, and the Caesar

salad is outstanding.”


ON THE TOWN: GRAND RAPIDS, MI

FIRST PRIZE BY RENE WISELY

One might be forgiven

for thinking that Grand

Rapids is an unlikely site

for an event that gives

out the world’s largest

art prize, but the city

has a creative spirit that

rivals that of much bigger

places. Rick DeVos—

founder of the aptly

named ArtPrize—shares

his top local art spots.

The Th The he fi first fi first-ever rst rs rsstt -ev -e -ev ev ever er eer Art ArtPri Art ArtPri ArtPrize Pri Prize Pri Prize ze zze

ze

drew dre ddre drew wt w wt w thousands

tthou

tthou

hou hhou h san sands ands ds

La Grande Vitesse,

Alexander Calde

What is

ArtPrize?

This three-year-old

worldwide competition

is described as "part

arts festival, part social

experiment, part civic

project." Artists are

responsible for securing

a venue—from an office

building to a restaurant

to in (yes, in) the Grand

River—to display their

creation. ArtPrize is the

only art competition in

which the public decides

who wins (via internet and

mobile devices) the grand

prize of $250,000, with

$474,000 total awarded.

In 2010, more than

1,713 artists from 44

states and 21 countries

participated,

with 465,538 votes

cast. Sept. 21 to

Oct. 9; artprize.org

AUGUST 2011 95

What is the best public sculpture in town?

“Alexander Calder’s 1969 La Grande Vitesse (shown below) is

Grand Rapids’ signature piece. It sits outside City Hall and is

beautiful. It’s important historically because it was the fi rst

federally funded piece of civic art in the US by the National

Endowment for the Arts.”

What’s Grand Rapids’ best-kept art secret?

“The Urban Institute for Contemporary Arts is

Michigan’s largest contemporary arts center. It [just moved]

to a new location so it is more visible and hopefully not a

secret anymore.”

What’s the best bet for families?

“The Frederik Meijer Gardens & Sculpture Park is a fantastic

spot for families. You can hit a lot of art there, it’s got great

on-site parking, and it’s open year-round. The Grand Rapids

Art Museum is another good one.”

Have you purchased any art from the ArtPrize artists?

“My folks have. They purchased the winner of the inaugural

ArtPrize, Ran Ortner’s work, and put it at their Reserve wine

bar. It was one of those ‘wow’ pieces.”

Why should someone come to Grand Rapids during ArtPrize?

“The city is transformed into a massive gallery district with

art popping up in completely unexpected places, like in a

restaurant or on a bridge. You can’t go anywhere and not talk

about what you’ve seen or what you need to see. It’s a giant

city-wide party.”

GO MAGAZINE

Urban Institute for

Contemporary Arts

2 Fulton St W;

616-454-7000; uica.org

Frederik Meijer Gardens

& Sculpture Park

1000 E Beltline Ave NE;

888-957-1580; meijergardens.org

Grand Rapids Art Museum

101 Monroe Center;

616-831-1000; artmuseumgr.org

Reserve

201 Monroe Ave NW;

616-855-9463; reservegr.com


COOL CITY. HOT ART.

GRAND RAPIDS MICHIGAN

Taste-full Design Restaurants emphasize deliciously creative farm-to-table cuisine.

Scan the

QR Code

with your

Smart Phone

for more

information.

Nature’s Masterpiece Area beaches are ranked among the world’s

best.

Beautiful Dreamer “Few cities anywhere do more to support

creativity,” says Men’s Journal.

B

Eye Candy City streets are lined with art, especially during the colossal ArtPrize competition.


ON THE TOWN: GRAND RAPIDS, MI

A COASTAL RETREAT BY AMY S. ECKERT

Just a few miles from Grand Rapids, a golden stretch of sugar sand entices summertime visitors with

handsome lighthouses, wildflower-strewn hiking trails and independently owned eateries. See it all on this

weekend-long getaway.

1 Hit the road early for the 35-mile

drive along I-96 to Grand Haven, set

right on Lake Michigan. Begin your day

with a breakfast of locally grown

blueberries and homemade granola at

Morning Star Café.

2 Grand Haven’s picturesque red

lighthouse watches over Grand Haven

State Park, where campers, day-trippers

and locals sun themselves, swim and

stroll the pier.

3 Take a short walk along the boardwalk

before veering off to Harbor Avenue,

home to Pronto Pup, a local favorite

selling corndogs since 1947. Meander up

to Washington Avenue and poke around

the boutiques until dinner, checking out

the strappy sandals and cool linen shirts.

4 With its three eateries, The Kirby

House on Washington satisfi es every

mealtime craving: premium steaks at the

Grill Room, stir-fries and burgers at the

Kirby Grill and wood-fi red pies at the

rooftop K2 Pizzeria. (There's also a lowerlevel

nightclub.)

5 Once the sun sinks below the waves,

Grand Haven's musical fountain leaps into

action, accompanied by a soundtrack that

changes nightly, from Sousa marches to Led

Zeppelin hits. Watch from the screened-in

7

9

8

6

10

11

2

31

porch at the Harbor House Inn B&B

before heading to your room for the night.

6 The next morning, hop in the car for

a drive along Lakeshore Drive to Tunnel

Park in Holland. The wide, sandy strand

draws beachgoers with a playground,

picnic facilities and a concrete walkway

that tunnels through a giant dune.

7

3

4

5

196

1

AUGUST 2011 97

96

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GRAND

START / END

RAPIDS

7 It’s about a 7-mile drive to New

Holland Brewing Company's pub

for lunch. Feast on a house-made corned

beef sandwich while sipping locally

brewed craft beer.

8 Spend the afternoon at Windmill

Island Gardens, home to a 250-year-old

Dutch windmill set amid brilliant petunias

and marigolds, an antique carousel and a

miniature Dutch village.

9 Stay overnight at the stylish CityFlats

Hotel, a LEED-certifi ed green oasis where

each of the 56 rooms is uniquely designed.

10 Come morning, dig into a veggie

frittata at the hotel’s rooftop eatery before

heading to Saugatuck, 11 miles southwest

on US-31. Stop by Saugatuck Dunes

State Park, where footpaths lead over

the wooded dunes and pass nodding red

columbines and aromatic peppermint on

their way to the beach.

11 Sample Michigan rieslings and pinot

noirs at The Round Barn Winery tasting

room in downtown Saugatuck. Then, it’s

fresh spinach pie and house-roasted coff ee

at nearby Uncommon Grounds before

the 40-mile drive back to Grand Rapids

via I-196.


DON’T TAKE OUR

WORD FOR IT.

Ask Fortune magazine. The New York Times. National

Public Radio’s Marketplace Report. The Wall Street Journal.

And the nearly 1.3 million people who live and work here.

West Michigan is where it all comes together for business. It’s where privatepublic

partnerships result in over $1 billion of investment in medical research

and healthcare. It’s where companies find a pro-business climate, a talented

workforce, and a central location between Detroit and Chicago.

That is why industry giants like Amway, Perrigo, Herman Miller,

Spectrum Health, Steelcase, and more call West Michigan home.

West Michigan is also home to:

The 8th largest biopharmaceuticals cluster in the U.S.

The 2nd most philanthropic community in the U.S.

The 2nd most LEED-certified buildings per capita in the U.S.

14 area colleges and universities

Visit www.rightplace.org or call 616.771.0325 to

learn more about doing business in West Michigan.


GRAND RAPIDS: GUY ORR

Grand Rapids

michigan

by amy eckert

GO SHOP

Martha’s Vineyard

200 Union Ave NE;

616-459-0911;

marthasvineyardgr.com

More than 3,000 wine

labels fill the shelves of this

two-story Heritage Hill shop,

making it one of Michigan’s

largest. Shop from varietals

produced in Michigan and

around the world, including

the largest selection of

Bordeaux wines in the state.

GO SEE

Holland State Park

2215 Ottawa Beach Rd, Holland;

616-399-9390;

michigan.gov/holland

Golden sand dunes and

pristine beaches stretch as

far as the eye can see at this

Lake Michigan park. But don't

just sit around and soak up

the sun: You can climb the

dunes, play in the surf and

shoot photographs of Big

Red lighthouse.

GO EAT

One Stop Coney Shop

154 Fulton St E

616-233-9700;

onestopconeyshop.com

Order ’em deep-fried and

smothered with barbecue

sauce, topped with bacon

and ranch or Grand Rapids

style, with chili and dill

shreds. There are more than

15 hot dogs from which to

choose at this downtown stop,

including vegetarian—and a

cone of Belgian frites

makes a great side. $

SWING WING

THIS HIS

WAY

All summer, one of the

nation’s largest swing

dance societies offers

free swing dancing

lessons to music ranging

from Big Band classics

to Lady Gaga. Tuesdays,

7pm to 10pm.

Grand Rapids Original

Swing Society

At Rosa Parks Circle; 155

Monroe Center St; grandrap

idsoriginalswingsociety.com

GO PARTY

The Viceroy

53 Commerce Ave;

616-774-8423; viceroygr.com

We've done the work for you

by tracking down the address

and finding the secret key

code. Type in “1-9-3-0” to

gain entry to this downtown

speakeasy, which is fire engine

red and black inside. Cocktails

rule here, from classics like

Sazeracs and Sidecars to

inventive concoctions like the

Cherry Rumble (made of rum,

Michigan tart cherry shrub,

dried cherry tincture and

sparkling wine).

FUN FACT!

With twenty-four public

golf courses, many of which

are only 15 minutes from

downtown, Grand Rapids has

one of the nation’s highest

ratios of public golf courses to

population.

AUGUST 2011 99

Harrisburg

pennsylvania

by christine conard schultz

GO SHOP

Bogey’s Corner

Unique Pup-tique

413 Walnut St; 717-233-0487

This boutique offers classy

duds and fancy toys for

pups and the people who

love them. Choose from

jewelry, accessories and petthemed

gifts.

GO SEE

Little League World Series

At Lamade Volunteer Stadiums,

539 US Highway 15, Williamsport;

570-326-1921; littleleague.org

Cheer on the little sluggers as

16 American and international

teams compete to win this

year’s championship title

at the annual Little League

World Series Championship.

Admission to all games is free.

Aug. 18-28.

GO EAT

Miso Sushi and Grill

4620 Jonestown Rd; 717-526-4088;

misosushibar.com

This quaint spot is quickly

becoming a local favorite for

its larger-than-average sushi

rolls. Going raw? Try an orange

flamingo roll (spicy salmon

with homemade wasabi). Want

grilled? Go for a dish with

homemade teriyaki sauce. The

chef is known for surprising

guests with creations (on the

house). $$

Accomac Inn

6330 River Dr, York; 717-252-1521;

accomacinn.com

This award-winning spot

serves French-American

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GO GUIDES

cuisine in a building that’s as

old as the nation itself. Enjoy

gourmet presentations like a

half duck flambéed tableside

with breast and leg confit,

parsley potatoes, veggies

and rhubarb-sage jus—inside

or on the porch that overlooks

the Susquehanna River. $$$$

GO PARTY

Dockside Willies

449 S Front St, Wormleysburg; 717-

730-4443; docksidewillies.com

Recent renovations bring

this local hotspot new life

overlooking the Susquehanna

River from the west bank.

There’s top-notch pub grub,

awesome deck seating and a

great beer list, including

local micros.

FUN FACT!

Pennsylvania still has one

whole county with no traffic

lights: Forest County.

COLOR-FULL

Seen now by more than

600,000 people, this

original Sight & Sound

production unfolds in

front of, beside and above

you in a lavish theatrical

production, alive with

colorful characters, live

animals and memorable

lyrics. Through Oct. 22.

Joseph

At Sight & Sound Theatre

Rt 896, 300 Hartman Bridge

Rd, Ronks; 800.377.1277;

sight-sound.com


GO GUIDES

Houston

texas

by joann takasaki

GO SHOP

Gentlemen’s Tonic

1180 Uptown Park Blvd;

713-892-8383; gentlemenstonic.com

This is the place for men

who want a little pampering.

Head here for a classic,

straight-razor shave—then

take home all of the grooming

products to recreate the

moment at home.

GO SEE

Saint Arnold’s Brewery

2000 Lyons Ave; 713-686-9494;

saintarnold.com

Nothing takes the edge off

Houston’s summer heat like a

frosty, cold beer. And there

are few better places to

have one than right from the

source at the city's oldest

microbrewery.

American Cowboy

Museum

11822 Alameda Rd; 713-478-9677;

americancowboymuseum.org

In the middle of the city

stands the Taylor-Stevenson

Ranch, a 150-year-old fully

functioning ranch, complete

with goats and peacocks.

Visitors can go on hotrail

rides within sight of the

skyline and learn about

Western heritage.

GO EAT

Kasra Persian Grill

9741 Westheimer Rd;

713-975-1810; kasrahouston.com

Can’t make it to Tehran this

summer? Let your taste buds

take a trip that won’t cost

a bundle, starting with the

light, bright cucumber yogurt

scooped up with flatbread.

Follow it up with the Cornish

hen kabob or the beef-y

sultani. $$

GO PARTY

Notsuoh

314 Main St; 713-409-4750;

notsuoh.com

You can enjoy serious

conversation about the

meaning of life, the quadratics

of chess or the a-rhythmic

syncopations of the drummer

on stage at this laidback bar.

Or, you can simply eavesdrop

while sipping your beverage of

choice or enjoy Wednesdays

open-mic poetry night at 9:30,

and free jazz on Wednesday

and Thursdays.

FUN FACT!

There is such a thing as a

state pastry—and Texas has

the sopapilla (honey cake).

EAT FOR A CAUSE

Do some good by going

out to eat. Two-course,

$20 lunches and threecourse,

$35 dinners are

offered at more than 100

restaurants throughout

the city during the month

of August, and a portion

of proceeds benefit the

Houston Food Bank.

Aug. 1-31.

Houston Restaurant Week

Various restaurants

houstonrestaurantweek.com







AUGUST 2011 100

Huntsville/

Decatur

alabama

by karen beasley

GO SHOP

Ayers Farm

Family Market

2015 Memorial Pkwy, Huntsville;

256-533-5667;

ayersfarmersmarket.com

This family-owned farm

stand has supplied locals

with homegrown goods for

more than 30 years, including

fresh organic produce from

the nearby Amish community.

Summer months feature some

of the best figs, peaches,

cantaloupe, apples, tomatoes

and watermelon available

for miles.

GO SEE

EarlyWorks Museums

Downtown Huntsville;

256-564-8100;

earlyworks.com

This hands-on history museum

complex is the largest in

the South. The EarlyWorks

Museum consists of three

attractions: a children’s

museum, the Alabama

Constitution Village and the

Historic Huntsville Depot. All

three bring Alabama history

to life through exhibits like

a 16-foot talking tree and a

46-foot river keelboat.

Cook’s Natural

Science Museum

412 13th St SE, Decatur;

256-350-9347;

cookspest.com/education/museum

This free museum—first

created by Cook’s Pest Control

to train its employees—has

one of the largest bug

collections in the South. It

features more than 2,000

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artifacts, including wildlife

common to northern Alabama

along with an assortment of

exotic insects, rocks, minerals,

mounted birds and animals,

seashells and coral.

GO EAT

Let’s Do Lunch

435 Holly St NE, Decatur;

256-340-2637

This popular lunch spot is

known for its thick chicken

salad sandwiches, served on

fresh, homemade sourdough

bread. The pasta salads

are delicious, and the fruit

tea has just the right touch

of sweetness and is a nice

complement to the hearty

sandwich. $

City Cafe

101 First Ave SE, Decatur;

256-353-9719

At this blue-plate diner,

rub elbows with local

businesspeople and politicians

over breakfast or lunch while

getting caught up on the

news of the day or simply

exchanging local gossip. $

GO PARTY

The Station

340 The Bridge Street Town Centre,

Huntsville; 256-327-8880;

thestation.net

You could spend hours here

without getting bored, as this

family entertainment center

has it all: an arcade,

12 bowling lanes, billiards,

live music, a restaurant, lounge

area with a bar, an outdoor

patio and VIP areas.

FUN FACT!

Weighing a whopping

111 pounds, the secondlargest

blue catfish in the

world was reeled in from

Wheeler Lake in 1996.


Indianapolis

indiana

by susan j. guyett

GO SHOP

Bundy Decoy

16506 Strawtown Ave, Noblesville;

765-734-1198; bundyducks.com

Discover unique American folk

art in the form of beautiful,

hand-crafted wooden ducks

at this 30-year-old family

business in Noblesville.or keepsakes

such as custom hunting

knives and walking sticks.

GO SEE

The Lawn at White

River State Park

801 W Washington St; 800-665-

9056; inwhiteriver.wrsp.in.gov

Al fresco concerts are

scheduled all summer long

at this riverside state park in

the heart of downtown. The

schedule includes Wiz Khalifa

(Aug. 2), The Decemberists

(Aug. 5), Ke$ha (Aug. 23) and

Guster (Aug. 29).

GO EAT

Locally Grown Gardens

1050 E 54 St; 317-255-8555;

locallygrowngardens.com

It may look like a sketchy

gas station, but the smell of

smoked pork and freshly baked

bread proves otherwise. CIAtrained

chef/owner Ron Harris

roasts pork daily and crafts it

into the perfect pulled-pork

sandwich. $$

GO PARTY

The Red Room

6335 Guilford Ave; 317-257-1344;

theredroomindy.com

This upscale club is loverlooks

a busy corner in Broad Ripple,

and offers fancy cocktails,

munchies and a chance to

meet friendly strangers. Get

your groove on Wednesday

nights, when salsa dance

lessons are offered.

Slippery Noodle Inn

372 South Meridian St;

317-631-6974;

slipperynoodleinn.com

The owners here swear it’s

Indiana’s oldest bar, open since

1850 when it served as a way

station on the Underground

Railroad. These days the

focus is on serving live blues

seven nights a week alongside

good drinks (and there’s a full

menu in case you get peckish).

FUN FACT!

At 842 feet, one of the highest

points in Indianapolisis located

in Crown Hill Cemetery at the

grave of famous Hoosier poet

James Whitcomb Riley.

CIVIL WAR ZONE

Experience how Hoosiers

reacted to Confederate

Gen. John Hunt Morgan’s

1863 raid on Indiana and

explore the raided town

of Dupont, complete

with actors, video and

interactive exhibits.

1863 Civil War Journey:

Raid on Indiana

At Conner Prairie Interactive

History Park, 13400

Allisonville Rd; 317-776-

6006; connerprairie.org

AUGUST 2011 101

Jacksonville

florida

by lilla ross

GO SHOP

The Green Alligator

3581 St Johns Ave; 904-389-3099;

thegreenalligator.com

This specialty toy store has

treats for all kids, from toddlers

on up to teens, including

puzzles, trains, cranes, dolls,

flying saucers and even a

little bling for the princess in

your life.

Tres Leches Desserts

1839 N Pearl St; 904-551-4375;

treslechesdesserts.com

This hometown bakery has

redefined decadent with its

chocolate ganache "spiderweb"

cake, the Southern

carrot cake with pecans and its

signature tres leches cake.

GO SEE

Savage Ancient Seas

At Museum of Science & History

1025 Museum Cir; 904-396-6674;

themosh.org

Get a glimpse of the fearsome

creatures that roamed

the seas millions of years

ago. Think 10-foot-long sea

turtles, Pteranodons with

33-foot wingspans and

50-foot-long shark ancestors

called Megalodons. They’re all

from the private collection of

paleontologist Mike Triebold.

Through Oct. 30.

The Riverwalk

Downtown on the St. Johns River;

downtownjacksonville.org

Take a stroll through the

heart of downtown along

the St. Johns River. The

well-lit boardwalk is lined with

restaurants, businesses and

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GO GUIDES

high-rise residences, as well as

a shopping center and marina.

GO EAT

Casa Marina

At Casa Marina Hotel

691 N First St, Jacksonville Beach;

904-270-0025; casamarinahotel.com

Dine on Chef Aaron Webb’s

“new beach” cuisine, which

features local seafood, while

watching the waves on the

Atlantic. Grab a lunch of crab

cakes, goat cheese salad and

mahi calypso—then burn

it off with a stroll along the

surf line. $$

Nippers Beach Grille

2309 Beach Blvd, Jacksonville Beach;

904-247-3300;

nippersbeachgrille.com

Chef Kenny Gilbert of Top Chef

fame offers Caribbean cuisine

with a Southern bent. Try the

fried green tomatoes and

conch fritters with your crispy

ginger beer pork belly. For

dessert, there's no question:

the guava duff cake. Also,

don’t miss the pig roast the

first Sunday of every month. $$

GO PARTY

Plush

845 University Blvd N;

904-743-1845; plushjax.com

This 12,000-square-foot,

multilevel super club is

so big that there are five

fully-stocked bars to serve its

thirsty revelers. The dancefloor

is packed nightly and

live DJs crank out the

hottest beats.

FUN FACT!

Buried in the mud of the

St. Johns River is the

wreckage of a Civil War

steamboat called the Maple

Leaf, which was sunk by a

Confederate torpedo in 1864.


GO GUIDES

Kansas City

missouri

by mary bloch

GO SHOP

Churchill in Fairway

5240 Belinder Ave; 913-262-5240;

shopatchurchill.com

Browse an eclectic mix of fine

jewelry and high fashion clothing

at this shop, which peddles

everything from ancient

coin cuff links and turquoise

necklaces to python clutches

and couture gowns.

GO SEE

Bruce Watkins Cultural

Heritage Center

3700 Blue Pkwy;

816-513-0700

This educational facility is

a tribute to Kansas City’s

early African-American

pioneers, while also serving

as a showcase for local and

regional performing artists.

The permanent exhibits

portray African-American art

and cultural history.

The Money Museum

1 Memorial Dr; 816-881-2683;

kansascityfed.org/moneymuseum

Where but at the Federal

Reserve can you watch millions

of dollars being processed

or hold a gold bar worth

$400,000? Visitors can gawk

at a 450-plus-piece collection

of coins minted under every

US president since George

Washington.

GO EAT

Carmen's Park Place

11526 Ash St; 913-327-7115;

carmenscafekc.com

The Italian and festive tapas

menu is a hit at this upscale

WE ALL SCREAM

This is what happens

when a nationally

acclaimed chocolatier

is set loose with an ice

cream maker. Among

the concoctions here

are pineapple-cilantro

sorbet, goat cheese with

wildflower honey, French

lavender and Venezuelan

spiced chocolate.

Glacé Artisan Ice Cream

4960 Main St; 816-561-

1117; glaceicecream.com

neighborhood trattoria.

Diners favor the mouthwatering

variety of spiedini, pastas

and the special bread dipping

sauce, made at the table

with olive oil, basil, garlic,

red and black peppers and

grated Parmesan. $$$

GO PARTY

The Indie Bar

1228 Main St; 816-283-9900;

midlandkc.com/indieonmain.php

This music-centric bar on the

ground floor of the Midland

Theatre is the perfect place to

stop by either before or after

a live show. What’s more,

ticket holders will have a

chance to enter the venue

before the doors are opened

to the public.

FUN FACT!

Missouri is the only state in the

US to have two Federal Reserve

headquarters, one in Kansas

City and one in St. Louis.




AUGUST 2011 102

Key West

florida

by josie gulliksen

GO SHOP

Key West Aloe

419 Duval St; 305-293-1885;

keywestaloe.com

Your skin will love you for

paying a visit to this shop,

founded by two enterprising—

and sunburned—New Yorkers

on vacation here. Besides

skincare products, it sells

hair care products and body

splashes, all made from

nature’s soothing plant,

aloe vera.

GO SEE

Nancy Forrester’s

Secret Garden

1 Free School Ln; 305-294-0015;

nancyforrester.com/garden.html

The secret's out. This

off-the-beaten-path spot is

like a mini rainforest in the

middle of rocky Key West. It’s

home to swaying palm trees in

every shade of green, colorful

bougainvilleas, spice trees and

delicate orchids.

Curry Mansion Inn

511 Caroline St; 305-294-5349;

currymansion.com

This gorgeous inn is named

for Florida's first millionaire,

William Curry, a broke

Bahamian who made his

fortune by stealing from

shipwrecked travelers. It

features ornate architecture

reminiscent of the plantations

in the Deep South. And even if

you're not spending the night

(rooms are available in the

guest wing and in The James

House across the street),

you can still appreciate the

Tiffany glass sliding doors,

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an 1853 Chickering piano and

Haviland china in this mansionturned-museum.

GO EAT

Conch Republic

Seafood Company

631 Greene St; 305-294-4403;

conchrepublicseafood.com

This open-air and

environmentally conscious

restaurant on the waterfront

comes complete with an

on-site conch farm. Appetizers

liked smoked fish dip and

coconut shrimp make great

starters before the fresh local

catch (which you can get

seared or blackened). $$

Pisces

1007 Simonton St;

305-294-7100; pisceskeywest.com

You can’t miss this lemon

yellow eatery, famous for

its signature lobster “tango

mango”: lobster flambéed in

cognac with shrimp in saffron

butter, mango and basil.

Filet mignon, prawns and the

freshest fish possible round

out the menu. $$$

GO PARTY

d’vine Wine Gallery

At The Gardens Hotel

526 Angela St; 305-294-2661;

gardenshotel.com

If the Duval Crawl is not your

scene, this wine gallery might

be the perfect alternative. Sit

in the lovely garden and help

yourself to a taste, half-glass

or glass of any of 36 vintages,

using a high-tech Enomatic

dispensing system. It's open

Wednesday through Sunday,

5pm to 10pm.

FUN FACT!

From 1828 to 1850, Key

West was the richest city per

capita in the US.


Knoxville

tennessee

by rose kennedy

GO SHOP

Hanson Gallery

5607 Kingston Pike; 865-584-6097;

hansongallery.com

Fine crafts from regionally and

nationally acclaimed artists at

this shop include East Tennessee

landscapes from Robert

Batey and horse sculptures

from Jeri Hollister

GO SEE

Big South Fork

Scenic Railway

100 Henderson St, Stearns;

606-376-5330; bsfsry.com

Scope out lush fall foliage on a

16-mile roundtrip rail journey

that descends 600 feet into

the gorge at Big South Fork

National River and Recreation

Area before stopping at Blue

Heron Coal Mining Camp.

GO EAT

The Grill at Highlands Row

4705 Old Kingston Pike; 865-851-

7722; thegrillathighlandsrow.com

This restaurant serves

sophisticated Southern cuisine

in an architecturally Old World

space. The shrimp and grits

is the showstopper, along

with the 8-oz. petite tender

(which combines the qualities

of sirloin and filet mignon).

Top it all off with a moonshine

cocktail. $$$

Feast with the Beasts

At the Knoxville Zoo

3500 Knoxville Zoo Dr;

865-637-5331; knoxville-zoo.org

The Knoxville Zoo cordially

invites you to party your tail

off at this annual 21-and-

older event. Thirty-five local

restaurants and vendors

ranging from Italian to

barbecue will set up shop in

the zoo, so you can snack while

strolling among the wildlife.

Aug. 20.

GO PARTY

Cotton Eyed Joe

11220 Outlet Dr;

865-675-4563; cottoneyedjoe.com

Put on your dancin' boots to

mingle with urban cowboys

at this real country club,

named after a classic line

dancing song. There's even a

mechanical bull.

FUN FACT!

Knoxville native James E.

“Buck” Karnes helped rally the

117th Infantry in a charge

that broke the Hindenburg Line

and forced the Germans into

a retreat in WWI, receiving the

Congressional Medal of Honor.

CAFFEINE OVERDOSE

This tiny café has

a sublime selection

of exotic premium

chocolates, along with

some toothsome baked

goods (bacon-chocolate

chip cookies are a

recent example) and darn

good cups of java and

sweet lattes. $$

Coffee and Chocolate

327 Union Ave; 865-688-

9244; coffeeandchocolate

knoxville.com

AUGUST 2011 103

Las Vegas

nevada

by lisa plummer

GO SHOP

The Guinness Store

At The Shoppes at Mandalay Place

3950 Las Vegas Blvd S;

702-632-9333; mandalaybay.com

Fans of the famed Irish

stout will go bananas in this

1,500-square-foot gift shop

chock-full off all things Guinness,

including beer cozies,

hats, T-shirts, ties, Christmas

ornaments, authentic pouring

spoons and coffee mugs for

the morning after.

GO SEE

CSI: The Experience

At the MGM Grand Hotel & Casino

3799 Las Vegas Blvd S;

702-891-7006; mgmgrand.com

Test your forensic skills as

you piece together clues in

one of three crime scene

mysteries, with 15 lab

stations, 15 suspects and

three killers. Based on the hit

TV show, this entertaining,

hands-on experience will

get you thinking like a real

investigator. (Find the killer

and you receive an official

CSI diploma!)

Mystère

At Treasure Island Hotel & Casino

3300 Las Vegas Blvd S; 702-894-

7722; treasureisland.com

With its signature style that

blends grace, acrobatics

and inspiring imagery,

Cirque du Soleil has created

another classic, high-energy

experience. Get to the

theater early for pre-show

entertainment—but watch

out for the usher with the

crooked tie!

GO MAGAZINE

The Improv at Harrah’s

At Harrah’s Las Vegas

3475 Las Vegas Blvd S;

702-369-5223; harrahslasvegas.com

Need a good belly laugh?

Look no further than this

intimate, informal comedy

club, voted the city’s best

comedy club for four years

in a row by the Las Vegas

Review-Journal, featuring

a weekly rotating roster of

new as well as established

comedic talent.

GO EAT

Kahunaville Island

Restaurant & Party Bar

At the Treasure Island Hotel & Casino

3300 Las Vegas Blvd S; 702-894-

7390; kahunaville.com

This fun, faux-island paradise

comes complete with tiki

décor, dancing waterfalls and

tasty American and Hawaiian

fare. Great for families by day,

it becomes a grown up hotspot

by night with themed drinks

mixed by flashy bartenders

to help put you in the party

spirit. $$

GO PARTY

S The Nightclub

At Encore Las Vegas

3131 Las Vegas Blvd S; 702-770-

0097; xslasvegas.com

From the glitter-laden tile

staircase to the gold-plated,

10-foot chandelier above

the dancefloor, this place

oozes opulence. Experience

the ultimate indulgence by

ordering the club’s signature

drink, the Ono, for a mere

$10,000.

FUN FACT!

GO GUIDES

The Mirage, considered Vegas'

first “mega resort” hotel and

casino, opened in 1989 with a

price tag of $630 million (equal

to $1.09 billion today).

OutrageousCabins.com

865 366 7012

1426 Upper Middle Creek Rd, Sevierville, TN 37876

Enjoy your Tennessee dream rental in Pigeon Forge, Gatlinburg, Smoky Mountains,

atop of the mountain splendor for an unforgettable view. What are you waiting for?


GO GUIDES

Lexington

kentucky

by patti nickell

GO SHOP

Bluetique

235 Woodland Ave;

859-309-1310

This shop offers trendy yet

affordable styles. You are likely

to find both sorority girls and

their mothers shopping for

everything from leggings to

little black dresses.

GO SEE

Victorian Square

W Main St and N Broadway; victoriansquareshoppes.com

This colorful collection of

1880s Victorian buildings is

home to shops, restaurants

and bars facing a central

atrium. De Vassa Bar & Café

is known for its Brazilian foods

and live entertainment, and the

Artists Attic lets visitors watch

artists at work.

Lexington’s Farmers

Market

Cheapside between Main and Short sts;

859-608-2655; lexingtonfarmersmarket.com

The place to go on a Saturday

morning for produce and

flowers, as well as for samples

of everything from local wine

to artisanal cheeses. Some

70 vendors have stalls under

the elegant glass pergola,

while violinists compete with

Bluegrass fiddlers for tips.

GO EAT

The Merrick Inn

1074 Merrick Dr; 859-269-5417;

thermerrickinn.com

This elegant eatery's leafy

urban setting gives it a country

PARK PIROUETTES

This open-air event aims

to prove that Lexington

can support two ballet

troupes by showing their

differences. The Kentucky

Ballet will perform

classical pieces while the

Lexington Ballet will be

presenting contemporary

work. Aug. 4-7

Ballet Under The Stars

At Woodland Park

601 E High St; 859-288-

2925; lexingtonky.gov

inn feel, with a menu described

as “signature Southern.” Make

sure to try the fried banana

peppers, a Lexington

tradition. $$

GO PARTY

The Beer Trappe

811 Euclid Ave;

859-309-0911;

thebeertrappe.com

Draft Magazine calls this one

of America’s Top 100 beer

bars. With eight rotating taps

for tastings, flights or full

pours, it offers accessible

crafts like Magic Hat #9 or

rare brews such as North

Coast Old Rasputin. Oh, and

there are more than 400

bottles. Thirsty yet?

FUN FACT!

The Lexington Cemetery,

the burial place of Henry

Clay and Confederate Gen.

John Hunt Morgan, is a

national arboretum.

AUGUST 2011 104

Los Angeles

california

by scott huver

GO SHOP

Planet Blue Malibu

3835 Cross Creek Rd; 310-317-9975;

shopplanetblue.com

Planet Blue’s original flagship

outpost in the Malibu

Country Mart remains young

Hollywood’s hippest source

of the easiest, breeziest and

beachiest couture, where

Vanessa Hudgens, Ashley

Tisdale and Kim Kardashian

snare SoCal styles suitable

for either clubhopping or just

hangin’ out surfside.

Creature Features

280 W Sierra Madre Blvd; 626-355-

9100; creaturefeatures.com

This house of horrors offers

fans of sci-fi, fantasy and

spine-tingling cinema a

comprehensive selection of

merchandise, music, memoirs

and memorabilia. Geek gods

like FX master Ray Harryhausen

occasionally stop by for

coveted signings.

GO SEE

Cuban Film Posters: From

Havana to the World

At The Academy of Motion Picture Arts

& Sciences Grand Lobby Gallery

8949 Wilshire Blvd; 310-247-3000;

oscars.org

More than 100 visually

dynamic handmade silkscreen

prints of movie posters

created by the Cuban Film

Institute fill the Oscar

headquarters’ sweeping lobby,

from international releases

like A Clockwork Orange and

Schindler’s List to homegrown

films like Strawberry and

Chocolate. Through Aug. 28.

GO MAGAZINE

The Groundlings Theater

7307 Melrose Ave; 323-934-4747;

groundlings.com

The improv training ground

that taught the likes of Will

Ferrell, Kristen Wiig and Kathy

Griffin how to mine for laughs

offers an ongoing assortment

of hilarious stage shows

(like Thursday’s long-running

“Cookin’ With Gas”) featuring

a troupe of tomorrow’s

comedy superstars.

Walt Disney’s Fantasia

At The Hollywood Bowl

2301 N Highland Ave; 323-850-2000;

hollywoodbowl.com

Conductor John Mauceri

waves his magic wand—er,

baton—over the Bowl’s orchestra,

which plays classical

music as accompaniment to

Fantasia, Disney’s groundbreaking

1940 animated

film. The show culminates

in a fireworks display that’s

almost as colorful as Mickey’s

sorcerer apprenticeship.

Aug. 19-21.

Supercars: When Too Much

is Almost Enough

At Petersen Automotive Museum

6060 Wilshire Blvd; 323-930-2277;

petersen.org

Powerful, prestigious and

expensive, the “supercars”

on display—including a

1939 Bugatti 57C Atalante,

1985 Lamborghini Countach,

2005 Maserati MC-12 and

1971 De Tomaso Pantera

owned by Elvis Presley—

illustrate a history of high

performance and pristine

design. Through Feb. 5.

GO EAT

Pink’s

709 N La Brea Ave; 323-931-4223;

pinkshollywood.com

There’s only one Pink’s,

serving up wondrous wieners

from the same nondescript


shack at the corner of

Melrose and La Brea since

1939—and that’s why the

lines extend even longer than

their “Stretch Chili Dog.” $

John O’Groats

10516 Pico Blvd; 310-204-0692;

ogroatsrestaurant.com

For LA power-breakfasting—in

jeans instead of Armani—nothing

beats this Westside spot.

Go for the Huevos O’Groats (a

biscuit-dough tortilla stuffed

with eggs, cheese, black

beans, onions, peppers, salsa

and sour cream) with a sweet

stack of pumpkin pancakes on

the side. $$$

Dan Tana’s

9071 Santa Monica Blvd; 310-275-

9444; dantanasrestaurant.com

For nearly 50 years, the

deceptively modest-looking

Italian bistro has been a

freewheeling epicenter of

elbow-rubbing (literally—it’s

cozy) for generations of

Hollywood’s elite. (Regular

George Clooney has a

veal cutlet named after

him). The menu’s hidden

gem: the garlicky Chicken

Vesuvius. $$$$

ITS A MAD MAD WORLD

Jeff Beacher is the reigning

impresario of contemporary

vaudeville and carnival acts.

The man behind buxom

burlesque dancers and orange

Oompa Loompas brings his

sideshow stylings to a “secret”

baroque theater hidden behind

a swiveling bookcase, complete

with birdcage banquettes

reserved for VIP guests like

Leonardo DiCaprio, Ashley

Greene and Zac Efron. “It's a

GO PARTY

Voyeur

7969 Santa Monica Blvd; 310-255-

1111; voyeur7969.com

Celebrities like Justin

Timberlake and Paris Hilton are

drawn to this exotic nightclub

where the star-studded (and

star-searching) clientele

lounges on Chesterfield sofas,

listens to celeb-DJ-powered

dance tracks and watches

dancers undulate above

the crowd.

The Hotel Café

1623 1/2 N Cahuenga Blvd;

323-461-2040; hotelcafe.com

The ideal place to discover

the singer-songwriters

who will be occupying your

iPod in the near future, this

shadowy watering hole isn’t

just a showcase for the most

promising musicians in town,

it’s also the center stage of

their (very) social scene.

FUN FACT!

Once pulp writer Edgar Rice

Burroughs’ ranch, LA’s Valley

neighborhood of Tarzana is

named after his famed

creation: Tarzan of the Apes.

little different,” understates

actor David Arquette, who

hosts several of the shows that

pal Kelly Osbourne just joined

as creative director. Wednesdays

through Saturdays.

Beacher's Madhouse

At the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel

7000 Hollywood Blvd; 323-785-3036; beachersmadhouse.com

AUGUST 2011 105

Memphis

tennessee

by bianca phillips

GO SHOP

Bubble Bistro

425 N; Watkins St; 901-272-2300;

bubblebistro.com

Fresh, handmade vegan soaps

come in scents like mango

papaya, green tea, lemon, and

even beer (the Pale Ale Beer

Bar is a must-smell). There

are also hand-cut soaps,

homemade hair products, bath

salts, body masks and a line of

men’s products.

GO SEE

Shelby Farms Greenline

Starts at Tillman St near Walnut Grove

Rd; shelbyfarmsgreenline.org

This paved 7-mile path runs

the length of an abandoned rail

track from Midtown to Shelby

Farms Park. Note: There are

various access points along

the route.

GO EAT

Flying Fish

105 S Second St; 901-522-8228;

flyingfishinthe.net

Fried catfish is the star menu

item at this no-frills, counterservice

seafood joint, where

hundreds of singing Billy Bass

plaques decorate the walls.

Popular selections include

crawfish (“mud bugs”), snow

crab legs and grilled barbecue

shrimp. $

Jasmine Thai &

Vegetarian Restaurant

916 S Cooper St; 901-725-0223

Don’t let the name fool you.

There’s plenty of meat such

as chicken and beef on the

menu at this quaint eatery. The

GO MAGAZINE

friendly staff is happy to help

customers decipher dishes on

the massive menu. Vegetable

curries can be prepared

without fish sauce, making

them suitable for vegetarians.

GO PARTY

Dublin House

2021 Madison Ave; 901-278-0048

Guinness, Harp and

Smithwick's flow like water at

this Midtown pub. Pool tables,

darts and flat-screen TVs

will entertain you should the

conversation lull.

FUN FACT!

GO GUIDES

BLOOMS AND BEATS

Pack a picnic and a few

lawn chairs and head to

the lush Memphis Botanic

Garden for performances

by 90s rockers the Goo

Goo Dolls (pictured)

and singer-songwriter

Michelle Branch. Aug. 12.

Live at the Gardens

Summer Concert Series

At Memphis Botanic Garden;

750 Cherry Rd.; 901-576-

4107; liveatthegarden.com

Soul man Rev. Al Green

presides over the Full Gospel

Tabernacle Church (787

Hale Rd) in Whitehaven.

Respectful visitors are

welcome for Sunday services.

Green likely won’t be singing

“Let’s Stay Together,” but

you may hear him bust out

some gospel tunes.


GO GUIDES

Miami

florida

by jessica sick

GO SHOP

Item

1673 Meridian Ave, Miami Beach; 305-

673-1600; myfavoriteitem.com

This new boutique just off

Lincoln Road will inspire a jaunt

to The Vineyard (its other locale

is in Provincetown). Beachperfect

dresses, swim trunks

and accessories are all in stock

Isa Boutique

3400 N Miami Ave; 786-558-8027;

isa-boutique.com

Owner Isabel Aguiar is all

about offering customers a

personal and upscale shopping

experience at this new shop in

the up-and-coming Midtown

neighborhood. It offers a

perfectly curated collection of

labels such as Sheri Bodell and

J Brand.

GO SEE

Miami Beach

Cinematheque

At Historic City Hall

1130 Washington Ave, Miami Beach;

305-673-4567; mbcinema.com

One of the more popular (and

only) art cinemas in town, Cinematheque’s

new, fancier digs

have been years in the making.

With the doors officially open,

guests can enjoy stadium

seating, hi-def projection and

gourmet café dining.

GO EAT

Makoto

At Bal Harbour Shops

9700 Collins Ave, Miami Beach; 305-

864-8600; makoto-restaurant.com

If you’re looking to dine somewhere

quiet and understated,

skip this recommendation.

Morimoto-trained chef Makoto

Okuwa helms the kitchen

at this gradiose new space,

designed by Stephen Starr of

Budakkan and Morimoto fame.

Try the kurobuta pork belly and

foie gras gyoza. $$$

Andalus

35 NE 40th St; 305-400-4324;

andalusmiami.com

Despite the “small plates”

concept at this authentic

Spanish restaurant, don’t

expect to go home hungry.

Tapas such as cod carpaccio

and grilled cuttlefish with aioli

are sure to satiate even the

hungriest diner. $$$

GO PARTY

Kill Your Idol

222 Espanola Way, Miami Beach;

305-672-1852

If a group of hipsters opened

a college bar, it would look

like this spot tucked off busy

Washington Avenue. Funky

décor—pinball machine, board

games, Bruce Lee statue—

compliment reasonable drink

prices (by SoBe standards,

of course).

Bolero Room

At the Electric Pickle

2826 N Miami Ave, Wynwood; 305-

456-5613; electricpicklemiami.com

Featuring an eight-foot chandelier,

brick walls and vintage

Air Force photos, the newly

designed space above the

dancefloor has a speakeasy

style that will make you want

to order an Old Fashioned.

FUN FACT!

Miami Beach’s Art Deco

District contains the world’s

largest collection of Art Deco

architecture, with more than

800 buildings representative

of the style.

AUGUST 2011 106

Milwaukee

wisconsin

by jeanette hurt

GO SHOP

Elite Repeat

2205 N Calhoun Rd, Brookfield; 262-

789-9359; eliterepeatclothing.com

Looking for some Jimmy

Choos on a Payless budget?

Pay a visit to this amazing

consignment shop, where you'll

find everything from Armani to

St. John.

Mars Cheese Castle

2800 120th Ave, Kenosha;

800-655-6147; marscheese.com

One of the biggest cheese

stores in Wisconsin got even

larger. The new digs are

truly palatial, and there are

even more cheeses, sausages

and Badger state gifts to

be found.

bigfoot bike and skate

2481 S Kinnickinnic Ave; 414-332-

3479; bigfootbikeandskate.com

Looking to outfit your BMX

bike, find a new pair of

WISCONSIN DOES IT BETTER

There's plenty of good, oldfashioned

fun at the 160th

Wisconsin State Fair, from

meeting Big Jake (the world’s s

largest horse) to stuffing your r

face in the cream-puff-eatinggcontest to jamming with

MC Hammer. The strangest

tradition, however, may be

the dog weddings. Monday

through Thursday, six lucky

canine couples will be tying

Wisconsin State Fair air

640 S 84th St, West Allis; 800-884-3247; 3247;

wistatefair.com

GO MAGAZINE

rollerblades or get some

skateboarding safety gear?

This funky sports shop

boasts a knowledgeable

staff and great selection for

active bikers, skateboarders,

rollerbladers and even roller

derby enthusiasts. Plus, they

do repairs.

GO SEE

Palermo’s Pizza

Factory Tours

3301 W Canal St; 414-455-0383;

palermospizza.com/tours.aspx

Ever wonder how they make

those tasty frozen pies?

Ponder no further after taking

the Palermo’s Pizza factory

tour, available on Fridays at

1:30pm (call ahead to reserve

a spot). Tours includes a slice

of cheesy, pan-style goodness.

Jazz in the Park

At Cathedral Square Park; 414-271-

1416; easttown.com

Considered Milwaukee’s most

popular free music event, this

summer series features both

national and local acts every

Thursday night. Enjoy wine

and beer specials during happy

hour (5pm to 6pm).

the leash—er, knot—under

the officiating eye of an Elvis

impersonator who will help

them exchange split doggie

ID tags in lieu of rings. Their

bridal parties will then share in

a champagne toast (actually a

bowl of colored water).


Irish Fest

At Henry Maier Festival Park

200 N Harbor Dr; 414-476-3378;

irishfest.com

Experience a wee bit

o’ magic at the world’s

largest Irish festival. From

whiskey tastings, Irish dogs

(think setters, terriers and

wolfhounds) and music from

the likes of Gaelic Storm and

The Elders, it’s a weekend

of Erin go Braugh (Gaelic for

“Ireland forever”). Donate

school supplies on Thursday

for free admission.

Aug. 18-21.

Mexican Fiesta

At Henry Maier Festival Park, 200

N Harbor Dr; 414-383-7066;

mexicanfiesta.org

Enjoy the food, music and

culture of Mexico at this

annual fest on Milwaukee's

lakefront fairgrounds. Besides

tacos and enchiladas, make

sure to try the pan de feria,

a bread baked fresh every

day that is specially made for

fairs and markets. Get in free

Friday from noon to 3pm. Aug.

26-28.

GO EAT

Sobelman’s Pub and Grill

1900 W St Paul Ave;

414-931-1919;

milwaukeesbestburgers.com

The web site says it all—

Milwaukee’s best burgers.

With 12 different varieties

of fresh black Angus beef

burgers to choose from, this

joint is a meat lover’s paradise.

Be sure to check out the

seasonal patio. $

Pizzeria Picola

7606 W State St, Wauwatosa;

414-443-0800; pizzeriapiccola.com

Don’t expect large pies, but

do expect some of the best

Neopolitan-style pizzas in

town. These delicate, thin-

crusted beauties are topped

with fresh mozzarella, woodroasted

vegetables and more,

and even cater to gluten-free

diets. Try the “Four Seasons,”

with prosciutto, artichokes,

olives and provolone. On

sunny days, enjoy the pleasant

sidewalk patio. $$

GO PARTY

Victoria’s on Potter

1100 E Potter Ave; 414-226-5120;

The old View Inn was a dive,

but Barnacle Bud owner Gene

McKiernan has transformed

it into a cozy tavern with

just the right amount of

attitude. Peanuts in shells are

served in stainless steel dog

dishes—and feel free to toss

empty ones on the floor. And

there's no Wi-Fi here; instead,

try your hand at typing on an

old typewriter while enjoying a

perfectly mixed Old Fashioned

or cold brew.

Trocadero

1758 N Water St;

414-272-0205; ztrocadero.com

When this East Side French

enclave reopened last year,

it wasn’t just the dining

room that got a facelift. The

menus—for drinks and eats—

changed, too. In fact, forget

the French wines and order

one of dozens of top-notch

tequilas, including the $52

Gran Patron Bordeos. What

hasn’t changed, thankfully, is

Troc’s tremendous patio.

FUN FACT!

You don’t have to go to the

Wisconsin State Fair to get

your cream puff fix. You can

also pay a visit to the fair’s

Cream Puff drive-thru from

6am to 8am Aug. 4-14. Just

make sure to order ahead on

the Cream Puff Hotline,

414-266-7111.

AUGUST 2011 107

Minneapolis/

St. Paul

minnesota

by sarah barker

GO SHOP

Design Collective

1311 26th St W, Minneapolis; 612-

377-1000; designcollectivempls.com

Up-and-comers, Etsy lovers

and Project Runway stars hang

around this hotspot for local

designers. You’ll find handmade

clothing, jewelry, bags

and paper goods, made with

both love and pragmatism, like

the Irely underwear with a tiny

cash pocket.

GO SEE

Minnesota Fringe Festival

79 13th Ave NE Minneapolis; 612-

872-1212; fringefestival.org

The only sane way to choose

from the more than 170

homegrown performances—

theater, dance, music,

comedy and every possible

combination thereof—is to go

with your gut and see what

happens. The Fringe takes

place at 15 venues throughout

the Twin Cities. Aug. 4-14.

Caponi Art Park

1220 Diffley Rd, Eagan; 651-454-

9412; caponiartpark.org

Contemplate the nature of

art in this 60-acre forest that

is studded with the work of

sculptor Anthony Caponi.

GO EAT

Barbette

1600 W Lake St, Minneapolis;

612-827-5710; barbette.com

Prix-fixe Mondays—four local

and sustainable courses for

$32—are an excellent value,

but the food is more memorable

than the price. Steamed

GO MAGAZINE

mussels, parsnip agnolotti

and steak helene with braised

kale and horseradish make

for a mouthwatering French

meal. $$$

GO PARTY

Lord Fletcher’s

Old Lake Lodge

3746 Sunset Dr, Spring Park; 952-

471-8513; lordfletchers.com

Minnesota’s version of

a drive-in lets you park

your boat and navigate its

waterside deck. It’s hard to

say whether it’s the live music,

the righteous cocktails, the

$4 burgers/$1.75 beers on

Mondays or the blond ‘n’ tans

that reel so many in to this

Lake Minnetonka classic.

FUN FACT!

GO GUIDES

Local baseball commentator

Halsey Hall used the phrase

“Holy Cow” in a broadcast well

before it became a hallmark of

Harry Caray and Phil Rizzuto.

Play.

ALL IS FAIR

Send your adrenaline

through the roof at the

12-day Minnesota State

Fair. From horse shows

to fine art, rides and

porkchop-on-a-stick, the

fair’s many attractions

draw roughly 1.8 million

visitors per year. Aug. 25

through Sept 5.

Minnesota State Fair

1265 Snelling Ave N, St. Paul;

651-288-4400;

mnstatefair.org


GO GUIDES

Moline/

Quad Cities

illinois/iowa

by phil roberts

GO SHOP

Trash Can Annie

Vintage Clothing

418 E Second St, Davenport, IA;

563-322-5893; trashcanannie.com

From poodle skirts to

debutante dresses and frilly

hats, vintage duds are always

in style at Annie’s, clothier to

the likes of Natalie Merchant

and Chicago’s Steppenwolf

Theatre Company. Annie

also sells old-fashioned

clothes, from the 1870s to

1970s, to everyday men,

women and children.

GO SEE

Mississippi Valley Fair

2815 W Locust St, Davenport, IA;

563-326-5338; mvfair.com

Deep-fried Twinkie, pickle

or Snickers bar, anyone?

Thousands of folks attend

this largest-in-the-region fair

for its offbeat food, big-name

grandstand acts (Darius

Rucker and Miranda Lambert,

to name a couple), giant

carnival, agricultural displays

and free attractions. The 92nd

fair runs Aug. 2-7.

GO EAT

Mulkey’s Restaurant

3800 14th Ave, Rock Island;

309-788-1441;

mulkeysrestaurant.weebly.com

While the restaurant serves

dinner, the best time to come

is in the morning, when you

can congregate with others

at the counter and start

your day with hot coffee, a

homemade breakfast, like

the “traditional favorite” (two

eggs, two pancakes, two

bacon or sausage) and good

conversation. This spot has

been a Rock Island tradition

since 1955. $

GO PARTY

Kelly’s Irish Pub

and Eatery

2222 E 53rd St, Davenport, IA;

563-344-0000

Every day is St. Patrick’s

Day at this neighborhood

bar, which beckons customers

with a giant green shamrock

painted on the street out front.

On days when it’s really not,

though, you can still settle in

with a Guinness and watch

your favorite sporting event

on the flatscreen TVs.

FUN FACT!

From December 1863 to

July 1865, Arsenal Island

housed Confederate soldiers

captured in the Civil War.

THE DAILY GRIND

Tour this authentic

Dutch windmill in the

Mississippi River town

of Fulton, IL and watch it

grind approximately one

bushel of grain every 10

minutes. On your way out,

purchase the buckwheat,

corn, rye and wheat

flours it produces.

De Immigrant Windmill

10th Ave and First St,

Fulton, IL; 815-589-4545;

cityoffulton.us

AUGUST 2011 108

Montego Bay

jamaica

by latoya west

GO SHOP

Bob Marley Experience &

Theatre

At Half Moon Shopping Village, Rose

Hall; 876-953-3449

Honor the 30th anniversary

of Bob Marley’s passing at

this shop, which is the perfect

space to absorb all things

Marley—a documentary on the

big screen, music and images—

and take a piece of the legend

away via memorabilia such as

CDs, T-shirts and books.

GO SEE

Appleton Express

From local hotels to Appleton

Rum Distillery St. Elizabeth Parish;

876-952-3692; appletonrumtour.com

Named for a train that once

carried day-trippers across the

island, this tour takes visitors

to the legendary Appleton

Distillery aboard a luxury bus,

where they can learn how the

favorite local rum is made,

from start to finish (plus get

a complimentary bottle to

take home). Trips leave from

Montego on Tuesday through

Thursday, and also stop at

Ipswich Caves.

GO EAT

Le Chalet

32 Gloucester Ave;

876-952-5240

This restaurant is a pleasant

surprise on Montego Bay’s

hip strip. It serves up

Jamaican, European and Asian

dishes for lunch and dinner.

Make sure to try the curried

lobster as it's known to be the

best in town. $

GO MAGAZINE

Calabash Restaurant

At Winged Victory Hotel

5 Queens Dr; 876-952-3891

This spot, perched on a hill

500 feet above the sea, is

known for its fine food, excellent

service and star-studded

crowd. The extensive menu

includes Jamaican staples like

she-crabs, as well as other

favorites like filet mignon and

poached fish. $$

International

Reggae Wine Festival

At Cinnamon Hill in Rose Hall;

240-330-5127;

internationalreggaewinefestival.com

Celebrate some of Jamaica’s

finest exports at this festival

that is set against the breathtaking

view of the Caribbean

Sea. Wander over the scenic

golf course as you sample an

assortment of foreign and local

wines and foods, crafts and

fashion, all while live performers

entertain with reggae

songs. Aug. 13.

GO PARTY

Margaritaville

Gloucester Ave, Montego Bay

876-952-4777;

margaritavillecaribbean.com

These Jimmy Buffet-themed

restaurants are studded all

over the US, but the Caribbean

branch of the chain has an

advantage over some of the

rest: It’s actually on a beach in

a tropical paradise. It serves

52 varieties of margaritas.

FUN FACT!

Port Royal was labeled the

“wickedest city on earth”

during the 1600s, when it was

a haven for murderous pirates.

A 1692 earthquake effectively

destroyed the original city,

partially submerging it and

finishing the job that the

world’s navies couldn’t.


Nassau/

Paradise Island

bahamas

by michelle petty

GO SHOP

My Ocean

Charlotte St near W Bay St;

242-325-3050

This sweet-smelling shop is

a celebration of authentically

Bahamian products. Sisters

Tanya and Helen Klonaris

hand-roll scroll soaps in bright

island colors and 14 calming

fragrances that range from

mild to invigorating. The soaps

are infused with indigenous

herbs such as rooster comb

and granny bush, as well as

hibiscus and tangerine oil.

GO SEE

Bahama Booze Cruise

Paradise Island; 242-393-2973;

boozecruisebahamas.com

This all-inclusive harbor

cruise is not only a fun way

to discover Nassau from

the water, it also comprises

unlimited drinks such as the

Goombay Smash and the

Yellow Bird, as well as a native

lunch. Though there is a lot of

partying going on to upbeat

island music, you can also take

it easy as the cruise also stops

to explore local reefs and

secluded beaches .

Majestic Lady

Dinner Cruise

Hillside Manor; 242- 322-2606;

majestictoursbahamas.com

You can either get down

on the dancefloor after

sipping tropical cocktails

and devouring buffet-style

Bahamian dishes, or simply sit

back, relax and digest while

you enjoy the leisurely cruise

along Nassau’s scenic harbor

aboard this 75-foot, tripledeck

catamaran.

GO EAT

Via Caffé

Parliament St and Woodes

Rodgers Walk; 242-322-7209;

viacaffebahamas.com

The panini at this ultramodern

Italian cafe are

served with a side of fresh,

crunchy salad, making for

a healthy, delicious lunch

combination. Try the sinfully

delicious black forest cake

with a cup of freshly brewed

Italian coffee. Afternoon happy

hour is the perfect time to

unwind with a margarita. $$$

Go Green Café

Downtown, East St N; 242-322-8539;

gogreencafebahamas.com

This casual diner has it all:

guava-and cream cheesestuffed

French toast,

scrumptious sandwiches,

healthy salads, down-home

soups, Bahamian chicken

souse with Johnny cakes, and

seafood quiche, to name just

a few. $$

GO PARTY

Luna Nightclub

West Bay St; 242-325-6881

Overlooking Saunders Beach,

this grand nightclub boasts

indoor and outdoor dancing

and can comfortably host up

to 5,000 people. Lounge

around or enjoy the sea

breezes in the outdoor

party area.

FUN FACT!

There are about 340 sunny

days per year in The Bahamas.

No wonder the Hotel and

Steam Ship Service Act

officially promoted Nassau as

a fashionable winter season

resort in 1898,

AUGUST 2011 109

New Orleans

louisiana

by kevin allman

GO SHOP

Scriptura

5423 Magazine St; 504-897-1555;

scriptura.com

You’ll never want to send an

e-mail again after visiting this

charming paperie that sells

whimsical notebooks, creamy

writing papers, fountain

pens and other high-end

accessories. The custom

printing and invitations are

a local favorite, and the

wrapping papers just might

outshine the gift.

GO SEE

Old Ursuline Convent

1100 Chartres St; 504-529-3040

The oldest building in the

Mississippi Valley (built in

1752), this space has been

many things, including a

convent, an orphanage and

a hospital. Today, visitors

can view the oldest surviving

example of the French colonial

period in the US on daily tours

(except Sunday).

GO EAT

Cochon

930 Tchoupitoulas St;

504-588-2123;

cochonrestaurant.com

Cajun swamp-rustic meets

hip gourmet, as Donald

Link serves up all manner

of pork dishes, alligator

and oysters, along with

housemade pates, sausages,

salumi, mustards and

pickles. Cochon’s highmeets-low

ethos is perfectly

encapsulated in its collection

of moonshine whiskeys. $$$

GO MAGAZINE

GO PARTY

Snug Harbor Jazz

Bistro

626 Frenchmen St;

504-949-0696; snugjazz.com

This is a place where serious

jazz happens every night.

We mean serious, as the jazz

room is no cell phones and no

chattering—just great music

in an intimate space. Ellis

Marsalis and Charmaine Neville

are two of the impressive

house acts at this casual spot,

that also has a lively restaurant

and bar up-front. We suggest

getting all of your socializing

out of your system there

before entering the jazz room.

FUN FACT!

GO GUIDES

MUFFULETTA MAGIC

Muffulettas are enormous

indigenous New Orleans

sandwiches; seeded

loaves stuffed with Italian

meats and cheeses and

garlicky olive salad. The

original can be found at

Central Grocery (923

Decatur St), but locals

swear by the version at

Serio's Mike PO-Boys

& Deli (133 Saint

Charles Ave).

In New Orleans, “debris” isn’t

something in a dumpster.

It’s the roast beef trimmings

from the bottom of the pan,

and it’s pronounced “DAY-bree.”

The juicy morsels are often

found on po’boys or as a savory

topping on mashed potatoes.


GO GUIDES

New York

new york

by dyan neary

GO SHOP

Angel Street Thrift

118 W 17th St; 212-229-0546;

angelstreetthrift.org

Thrift isn't synonymous with

cheap at this hip Chelsea

clothier, but with a carefully

curated selection of brands

like Prada, Burberry and

Diesel, you won’t mind. The

spacious interior layout,

attentive staff and stunning

window displays mimic those

of an upscale boutique. Best of

all, proceeds benefit families

affected by HIV/AIDS and

mental illness.

GO SEE

Movies With A View

At Pier 1, Harbor View Lawn

334 Furman St, Brooklyn; 718-802-

0603; brooklynbridgepark.org

This free summer event

features a new series of New

York City-themed films every

year, projected on a large

screen beneath the backdrop

of the Brooklyn Bridge and an

inimitable city skyline. Pack

your favorite blanket and arrive

early for a good spot on the

lawn. This month, enjoy classics

like Breakfast at Tiffany’s

(Aug. 11) Crooklyn (Aug. 18)

and Rosemary's Baby (Aug.

25).Thursdays, 6pm to 11pm.

Mark di Suvero at

Govenor’s Island

Govenor’s Island, ferries leave from

10 South St; 212-440-2200;

govisland.com

About a dozen of the iconic

sculptor’s large-scale works,

some never before seen,

will be sprinkled across the

172-acre Governor’s Island,

a former military base. Apart

from having stunning views

of Manhattan, the exhibition

will be the largest outdoor

presentation of Suvero’s steel

sculptures in New York since

the early ’70s. Open Friday to

Sunday, through Sept. 25.

GO EAT

Bao Noodles

391 Second Ave; 212-725-7770;

baonoodles.com

This informal Gramercy

noodle shop serves heaping

portions of hearty Vietnamese

at affordable prices. Order

homestyle finger foods like

banh mi served with a side of

taro fries and spicy mayonnaise.

Not exotic enough? The

crispy whole snapper (and we

mean whole) should satisfy,

especially when paired with

a refreshing Danang Delight

cocktail (fresh lychee, ginger,

mint, Canton, citrus vodka). $$

La Palapa

77 St. Marks Pl; 212-777-2537

lapalapa.com

Named for a palm-leaf beach

shelter, this East Village

Mexican restaurant features

happy hour deals six days a

week and a back garden that

almost makes you feel like

you’re relaxing with your feet

in the sand. The two owner/

chefs make a point of using

fresh herbs in the food and

fresh juices in the margaritas.

Try the skirt steak in a tequila

marinade or the cheesestuffed

chile relleno. $$$

Quattro

Gastronomia Italiana

At Trump SoHo

246 Spring St; 212-842-4500; quattronewyork.com

Helmed by wunderkind Italian

chef Fabrizio Carro—whose

twin brother, Nicola, runs the

AUGUST 2011 110

original Quattro in Miami—this

sleek restaurant pays more

than just lip service to authenticity.

As many ingredients as

possible, from salt on up to

Mediterranean seafood, are

imported from Italy. The result

is handmade pastas, rich

sauces and prime cuts of meat

served in a bi-level space that

toes the line between elegant

and over-the-top. $$$$

GO PARTY

Arthur’s Tavern

57 Grove St; 212-675-6879;

arthurstavernnyc.com

Since 1937, this quaint West

Village venue has hosted live

jazz, blues, Dixieland and R&B

seven days a week. It’s the

city’s longest continually run

jazz club, and is known for

its internationally acclaimed

house bands and legendary live

performers (Charlie Parker and

HUNGRY, HUNGRY HIPSTERS

Flannel-clad hipsters, gourmet

food trucks, and striking

views of Manhattan characterize

Sunday's Brooklyn Flea

in Williamsburg. Named “one

of the great urban experiences

in New York” by The

The Brooklyn Flea

27 N Sixth St, Williamsburg; brooklynflea.com

GO MAGAZINE

Roy Hargrove were regulars.)

The strange décor includes

year-round Christmas and Easter

decorations and the crowd

is packed like a pre-hurricane

grocery store. But it all adds to

the charm of what may be the

most authentic free jazz spot

this side of the Mississippi.

(Le) Poisson Rouge

158 Bleecker St; 212-505-3474;

lepoissonrouge.com

Artists and hipsters hang out

at this lounge that features

art, eclectic gigs, theater

and dance performances.

Amenities include a top-notch

sound system, two bars and

a large fish-tank chandelier

swimming with red fish.

FUN FACT!

New York City was the US

capital for one short year, from

1789 to 1790.

New York Times, it features

hundreds of specially curated

vendors that sell everything

from local crafts and antique

furniture to homemade jam

and beef jerky. (Also on

Saturdays in Ft. Greene.)


Newport News/

Williamsburg

virginia

by jessica carlson

GO SHOP

The Velvet Shoestring

311 Second St, Williamsburg; 757-

220-9494; thevelvetshoestring.biz

Expensive taste on a

shoestring budget? Then this

consignment home furnishings

store is right up your alley.

Snag incredible deals on

high-quality furniture, lamps,

accessories and art.

GO SEE

Trail of the Tiger

At the Virginia Zoo

3500 Granby St, Norfolk;

757-441-2374; virginiazoo.org

A regional landmark for more

than a century, this 53-acre

zoo recently unveiled a new

exhibit that features Malayan

tigers, orangutans, tapirs

and birds. The Asian-themed

landscape is best viewed from

a series of tall, thatched-roof

pagodas.

Hampton Regatta

E Mercury Blvd Bridge, Mill Creek,

Hampton; 757-329-4502;

hamptoncupregatta.org

More than 70 of the world’s

fastest boats return to

Hampton to compete in the

oldest continuously running

hydroplane boat race in the

country. Aug. 6-7.

GO EAT

Stove, The Restaurant

2622 Detroit St, Portsmouth;

757-397-0900; stoverestaurant.com

Find Southern cuisine with a

twist at this eccentric eatery

in nearby Portsmouth. Don’t

miss a pre-dinner cocktail

FOOD IS BLISS

Eighteenth centurythemed

massages and

scrubs may be the main

draw here, but the new

lunch menu will leave

you in a similar state of

bliss. It features light and

healthy dishes like the

Shrimp with Citrus Salad

to complement the spa’s

signature treatments.

Spa of Colonial Williamsburg

307 S England St,

Williamsburg; 757-220-

7720; history.org/spa

in the Cougar Lounge, the

restaurant’s cozy, wild animalthemed

bar. $$

GO PARTY

Luckie’s Dueling Pianos

1990 Power Plant Pkwy, Hampton;

757-224-5968;

luckiesduelingpianoshampton.com

Every Friday and Saturday

night, pianists take requests

and try their hand at top-40

hits and oldies alike. If pianotunes

aren’t your style, stop by

Wednesday nights, when a

DJ spins ’80s favorites.

FUN FACT!

The first Southern reading

of the Emancipation Proclamation

took place under

an oak tree on the campus

of Hampton University.

The “Emancipation Oak”

still stands, and has been

designated as one of the 10

Great Trees of the World by the

National Geographic Society.

Orlando

florida

by terry ward

GO SHOP

Kathmandu

23 S Court Ave; 407-316-0026;

tribalasia.com

From items used in Buddhist

rituals to bohemian jewelry

from Bali and musical

instruments from Nepal,

the goods at this downtown

Orlando shop incite serious

wanderlust. It’s a good place to

find a unique gift.

Z Gallerie

At The Mall at Millenia

4200 Conroy Rd; 407-264-0710;

zgallerie.com

Affordable, chic home décor

is the name of the game at

this living accessory store

inside Orlando’s glitziest mall.

Whether you’re looking for

funky outdoor throw pillows

for your patio or a piggy bank

shaped like an owl, you’ll find

it here.

Brazil Food Mart

3120 S Kirkman Rd; 407-293-3330;

brazilfoodmart.com

Stop by this ethnic grocery

store in MetroWest to pick up

some typical Brazilian goodies

to bring home, including

bacalhau (dried cod fish), mate

(tea) and hair products straight

from the streets of Brazil.

GO SEE

Orlando Wetlands Park

25155 Wheeler Rd, Christmas; 407-

568-1706; cityoforlando.net

Pack a picnic and grill out in

the pavilions at this pretty

park east of Orlando where

boardwalks stretch into the

wetlands. You might spot

Text Branson or Orlando to 77007 for Discount Offers!

AUGUST 2011 111

GO MAGAZINE

GO GUIDES

alligators, gopher turtles, snapping

turtles, ospreys or ibises

in the green, green surrounds.

Blue Man Group

6000 Universal Blvd; 407-258-3626;

blueman.com

Always performed by a group

of three men, this all-senses

experience is a nationwide

phenomenon. The nearly twohour

show (no intermission)

has the audience riveted with

music, humor and abstract

painting processes that have

to be seen to be believed.

Orlando’s version plays out

in a purpose-built theater at

Universal CityWalk.

Lakeridge Winery

19239 US Highway 27 N, Clermont;

352-394-8627; lakeridgewinery.com

It’s no Napa Valley—but it’s

not every day you get to see

wine produced in the nation’s

swampiest state. (Florida

even grows a “swamp grape.”)

This 127-acre estate west of

Orlando in surprisingly hilly

surrounds has complimentary

tours and tastings daily.

Florida Cultural Tours

407-504-4405;

floridaculturaltours.com

Book one of these exciting

tours to learn more about the

city’s African-American history,

ogle homes of the rich and

famous during the Gardens

and Lakes Tour, or customize

your own. There’s even a

Dinearound Tour, during which

you bus around for a multicourse

dinner at some of the

area’s top restaurants.

GO EAT

Muchos Tequila and Tacos

101 S Eola Dr; 407-843-9676;

muchotequilaandtacos.com

This big, boisterous Mexican-

American restaurant in

downtown Orlando does

continued on page 112 ►


GO GUIDES

◄ orlando cont'd

standard Mexican fare—

fajitas, chimichangas,

burritos—as well as

unexpected twists like al

pastor tacos with pineapple

and salsa verde. There are

more than 130 tequilas on

the menu and flights let you

sample your share. $$

Drunken Monkey

Coffee Bar

444 N Bumby Ave; 407-893-4994;

drunkenmonkeycoffee.com

Orlando has few true coffee

bars, but this kickback spot

near downtown qualifies as

such. In addition to drinks

like the Tantric Mayan (a mix

of espresso and cinnamon),

there are hearty sandwiches

and good vegetarian soups

on offer. Locals gather here

for improv nights and to play

board games. $

Ocean Prime

7339 W Sand Lake Rd; 407-781-

4880; oceanprimeorlando.com

Sure, it's part of a national

chain—but the seafood at this

classy restaurant in the new

Rialto shopping complex is

fresh and carefully prepared.

SURF'S UP

This bronze statue

welcoming visitors to

Cocoa Beach (just east

of Orlando) honors the

town's most famous

native son: surfing legend

Kelly Slater. Visit the

nearby Cocoa Beach Surf

Museum to see an exhibit

honoring the 10-time

world champion's waveriding

achievements.

At Triangle Park, on

State Road A1A

Try the blackened snapper with

jalapeño corn tartar. $$$

GO PARTY

Stardust Lounge

431 E Central Blvd; 407-839-0080

A local hidden gem, this

swanky underground club

evokes Las Vegas with red

leather booths and mood lighting.

The music—mostly '80s

and '90s hits—is retro cool all

the way.

Bullitt Bar

33 E Pine St; 407-420-1111

In the town that spawned

boy bands like 'N Sync, it’s

refreshing to find a true rock

bar. Vintage auto accessories

and signs pair with brick

walls for a grungy-chic

atmosphere,at this new bar

where the music is all rock, all

the time.

FUN FACT!

Walt Disney World Resort is

the largest single-site

employer in the US, with more

than 58,000 “cast members”

onboard to make all that

magic happen.

AUGUST 2011 112

Pensacola

florida

by karen crawford

GO SEE

Evenings in Olde

Seville Square

At Seville Square Park

Government and Alcaniz sts; 850-

438-6505; pensacolaheritage.org

Pack a blanket, a bottle of

vino and a picnic basket and

head out to enjoy free live

music under the stars, ranging

from big band to bluegrass,

every Thursday evening

through Aug. 18

Light of the Moon

Haunted Tours

At Pensacola Lighthouse

2081 Radford Blvd, Pensacola; 850-

393-1561; pensacolalighthouse.org

Up for a bone-chilling experience

along the bay? Step back

in time and listen to ghostly

tales of blood-stained rooms

and murders as you climb to

the top of one of America's

most haunted lighthouses,

which was featured on

Syfy's hit show Ghost Hunter's.

Aug. 12-13.

GO EAT

Jerry's Drive-In

2815 E Cervantes; 850-433-9910

Should you find yourself

craving a big slice of

Americana, greasy spoon

style, look no further. This

local hole-in-the-wall has been

proudly serving up some of

the area's best burgers,

shakes, and fries for more than

50 years. $

McGuire's Irish Pub

600 E Gregory St; 850-433-6789;

mcguiresirishpub.com

Since 1977, McGuire's

GO MAGAZINE

HOME AWAY

This swanky home and

garden store is known

for its eclectic product

mix including furniture,

accessories and gift

items from all over the

world. Take home a vase,

sculpture or framed art,

but be warned: The store

is so beautifully designed,

you'll want to move in.

duh

501 Ninth Ave; 850-439-

0640; duhpensacola.com

has been famous for its

home-brewed Irish Red beer,

mouthwatering steaks, juicy

giant burgers and traditional

Irish fare. Don't forget to sign

a dollar bill and tack it up

before you head out. $$$

GO PARTY

Wisteria Tavern

3808 N 12th Ave; 850-433-9222;

wisteriatavern.com

Craving a house party, but

don't want to play host?

Head down to the place

that locals call the "Wis."

Nestled among canopied live

oaks in the historic East Hill

neighborhood, you'll feel right

at home in this tiny converted

cottage bar, a local favorite.

FUN FACT!

Pensacola was the site of

the nation's oldest European

settlement, destroyed by a

hurricane in 1559.

ORLANDO: TERRY WARD


EDWARD SAVARIA

Philadelphia

pennsylvania

by pam george

GO SHOP