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ATLANTA’S BURGER REVOLUTION REINVENTING FLINT, MI AFTER HOURS IN KANSAS CITY<br />

THERE’S NOTHING STOPPING YOU • JULY <strong>2011</strong><br />

YOUR OWN<br />

PRIVATE FLORIDA<br />

EXPLORE THE SUNSHINE STATE’S EPIC COAST AND<br />

DISCOVER WHY SUMMER IS THE BEST TIME TO VISIT<br />

Pg. 48<br />

FORKS ON THE ROAD<br />

THE NATION’S TASTIEST TRAILS<br />

Pg. 39<br />

COMPLIMENTARY COPY<br />

BUSINESS FASHION<br />

LOOK THE PART<br />

& LAND THE DEAL<br />

Pg. 32


2 MORE<br />

From May 16 through August 15, <strong>2011</strong>, earn<br />

Double A+ Rewards credits on every qualifying<br />

stay, starting with your 2 nd stay. Stay at<br />

Staybridge Suites ® or Candlewood Suites ® and<br />

you’ll start earning double on your 1 st qualifying<br />

stay. Now, go discover all the world has to offer<br />

and earn while you’re there.<br />

Register to earn online, or from your mobile device,<br />

at www.priorityclub.com/doubleatcredits or call<br />

1-888-560-5660 and enter promo code 9739.<br />

Must be a Priority Club ® Rewards member and must register member number in advance to participate in this promotion. To<br />

register or to obtain a list of participating airlines, complete offer details and Priority Club Rewards terms and conditions, visit<br />

www.priorityclub.com/double or call 1-888-211-9874. Frequency/partner credits may be issued in currencies other than miles.<br />

Merchandise is not available in all regions and may vary by country. Please visit priorityclub.com for a full list of redemption items.<br />

© <strong>2011</strong> InterContinental Hotels Group. All rights reserved. Most hotels are independently owned and/or operated.


FEATURES<br />

FOOD TRAILS//39<br />

Authentic culinary<br />

excursions or devious<br />

marketing gimmicks? Either<br />

way, your taste buds won’t<br />

be disappointed on these<br />

four delicious journeys.<br />

THIS PAGE: The Gulf of Mexico near the mouth of<br />

Miguel Bayou in Bradenton, FL, as viewed from old US 19<br />

ON THE COVER: The north side of the Skyway<br />

Fishing Pier State Park overlooking Tampa Bay in<br />

St. Petersburg, FL<br />

PHOTOGRAPHS BY<br />

CHUCK VOSBURGH<br />

OFF-SEASON, ON<br />

THE ROAD//48<br />

During the summer,<br />

Florida’s crowds disperse,<br />

leaving a treasure trove<br />

of beaches, hotels and<br />

restaurants behind for<br />

those in search of an epic<br />

adventure. To see it all, we<br />

cruised the entire coastline.<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong><br />

ISSUE 075


CONTENTS<br />

LET’S GO//009<br />

The top 10 must-dos<br />

in Huntsville/Decatur,<br />

AL//009<br />

This month’s greatest<br />

events//012<br />

Mirrored<br />

sunglasses//015<br />

Saving LA’s Watts<br />

Towers//016<br />

Local summer<br />

brews//017<br />

Summer beauty<br />

products//018<br />

Las Vegas’ top highroller<br />

suites//021<br />

BUSINESS//023<br />

Hardshell carry-on<br />

suitcases//023<br />

The pros and cons<br />

of going green in the<br />

hotel business//025<br />

High-profile<br />

chefs at hotel<br />

restaurants//029<br />

The season’s hottest<br />

business fashions:<br />

Atlantans dress to<br />

impress//032<br />

STAGE PRESENCE The Mutual Musicians Foundation has been<br />

the heart and soul of Kansas City’s jazz scene for 81 years.<br />

GO GUIDES//063<br />

The best places to shop, dine and explore in each city we serve<br />

ON THE TOWN<br />

ATLANTA//069<br />

FLINT, MI//090<br />

KANSAS CITY//104<br />

MORE FOR YOU//131<br />

See a list of more than 100 channels available onboard through<br />

Sirius XM Satellite Radio. Also, look over AirTran Airways’ programs,<br />

route map, clothing and inflight beverage offerings.<br />

THERE’S MORE//Check out the magazine at<br />

airtran.com/go or get the new Go app by<br />

scanning the code printed to the left using your<br />

iPhone or iPad.<br />

airtran.com/go<br />

EDITORIAL<br />

editorial@airtranmagazine.com<br />

Editor-in-Chief<br />

Orion Ray-Jones<br />

Executive Editors<br />

Sam Polcer, Brooke Porter<br />

Associate Editor<br />

Peter Koch<br />

Editorial Interns<br />

Dyan Neary, Andrew O’Reilly<br />

ART<br />

art@airtranmagazine.com<br />

Art Director<br />

Tony Judge<br />

Associate Art Director<br />

Jeff Quinn<br />

Photo Editor<br />

Erin Giunta<br />

ADVERTISING<br />

stephen.andrews@ink-global.com<br />

For Advertising Inquiries<br />

call toll-free 888-864-1733<br />

U.S. Group Publishing Director<br />

Steve Andrews<br />

Associate Publisher<br />

Greg Caccavale<br />

Senior Account Managers<br />

Dan DeLong, Tony Alexander,<br />

Lee Frazier<br />

Production Manager<br />

Joe Massey<br />

Production Controllers<br />

Grace Dinwiddie, Stacy Willis<br />

Marketing & Events Manager<br />

Nikkole Wyrick<br />

Sales & Marketing Coordinator<br />

Melinda Hanna<br />

INK<br />

Executive Creative Director<br />

Michael Keating<br />

Publishing Director<br />

Simon Leslie<br />

Chief Operating Officer<br />

Hugh Godsal<br />

Chief Executive<br />

Jeffrey O’Rourke<br />

Online Director<br />

Sal Lababidi<br />

AIRTRAN AIRWAYS<br />

Vice President of Marketing & Sales<br />

Tad Hutcheson<br />

Director of Marketing<br />

Samantha Johnson<br />

Go is published on behalf of AirTran<br />

Airways by Ink, 68 Jay Street, Suite<br />

315, Brooklyn, NY 11201 Tel: 347-294-<br />

1220 Fax: 917-591-6247<br />

© Ink All material is strictly copyright and all rights are<br />

reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced<br />

in whole or part without the prior written permission of<br />

the copyright holder. All prices and data are correct at<br />

the time of publication. Opinions expressed in Go are not<br />

necessarily those of the publisher or AirTran Airways, and<br />

AirTran Airways does not accept responsibility for advertising<br />

content. Any pictures or transparencies supplied<br />

are at the owner’s risk. Any mention of AirTran Airways or<br />

use of the AirTran Airways logo by any advertiser in this<br />

publication does not imply endorsement of that company<br />

or its products or services by AirTran Airways.<br />

POLCER<br />

SAM<br />

PUZZLES//142<br />

GO MAGAZINE APP<br />

FOLLOW US ON TWITTER<br />

JOIN US ON FACEBOOK<br />

Download our free<br />

twitter.com/AirTranGo<br />

facebook.com/AirTran.<br />

Crossword & Sudoku app at iTunes<br />

GoMagazine<br />

CENTER:<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 4<br />

GO MAGAZINE


It’s summer. Time to to your favorite vacation<br />

spot. A served chilled at 37 degrees is<br />

carbonated perfection. The ideal to attain<br />

refreshment nirvana. A billion barraging your<br />

mouth. With secret ingredients, perfectly balanced<br />

zesty warm and smooth going off like a line<br />

of synchronized swimmers. So refreshing and<br />

uplifting to keep you , and .<br />

Your thirst won’t know what hit it. So while you are on<br />

your way with , enjoy a Coke on us. A<br />

formula kept under and for 125 years.<br />

©<strong>2011</strong> The Coca-Cola Company.


DAN SELLERS<br />

CEO Greeting<br />

One Company, One Airline,<br />

One Family, One LUV!<br />

Does anyone know where this year has gone? Especially the last<br />

two months, which just seem to have fl own across the calendar.<br />

The reason for our nonstop pace is that a lot of news has been<br />

happening. Just last month, we celebrated our 40th Anniversary<br />

at Southwest Airlines. Other than our fi rst fl ight on June 17, 1971,<br />

the second most important day in our Company’s history may have just<br />

occurred on May 2, <strong>2011</strong>, when we closed the deal to acquire AirTran.<br />

July might seem anticlimactic after those two months, but it really isn’t<br />

because we are hard at work integrating our two carriers into one airline. Of<br />

course, all good things take time—change (and our hard work) will not be<br />

immediately noticeable. For now, Southwest and AirTran will continue to<br />

operate as two separate carriers as we work “behind the scenes” to integrate<br />

the operations and to eventually provide a consistent Customer Experience.<br />

In the meantime, Employees and Crew Members are continuing to do what<br />

they do best by delivering world-class Customer Service.<br />

All Customer travel plans and investments in each airline’s respective<br />

loyalty program are safe—Customers can continue to earn and redeem in<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 7<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

both programs independently.<br />

Customers will continue<br />

to book Southwest fl ights<br />

through southwest.com<br />

and AirTran fl ights through<br />

airtran.com. We will maintain<br />

our respective and separate<br />

operating and service policies<br />

as we work towards a Single<br />

Operating Certifi cate.<br />

Why is this merger<br />

important for you?<br />

Combined, we have the<br />

unique opportunity to extend<br />

our network into key markets<br />

that would be impossible<br />

independently—with the<br />

prospect to serve more than<br />

100 million Customers<br />

annually from more than<br />

100 diff erent airports in the<br />

US and near-international<br />

destinations. Over time, as<br />

we continue to combine the<br />

two networks, we will grow<br />

and expand our network to<br />

provide Customers more low<br />

fare options into marvelous<br />

new places. I’m excited<br />

just thinking about the<br />

opportunities.<br />

Once integration is<br />

complete in a couple of years,<br />

we will have one Brand, one<br />

Customer Experience, one<br />

livery, one operation under a<br />

Single Operating Certifi cate,<br />

and one Mission—to give<br />

the world the Freedom to<br />

Fly while spreading low<br />

fares farther.<br />

One thing won’t change,<br />

however. Your patronage<br />

means the world to us,<br />

and I hope you share my<br />

excitement and that of<br />

the Southwest Airlines<br />

Employees and AirTran<br />

Crew Members over this<br />

opportunity for growth. You<br />

can keep track of all the<br />

latest news at our web site,<br />

lowfaresfarther.com.<br />

Cordially,<br />

Gary Kelly<br />

Chairman, President and CEO


LET’S GO<br />

THE LIST<br />

Huntsville/Decatur, AL<br />

1<br />

Huntsville Botanical Garden<br />

Cool off this summer at HBG's outdoor aquatic garden,<br />

which features a tranquil, 110-foot-wide pool<br />

filled with giant Amazonian Victoria lilies. Indoors,<br />

thousands of native butterflies turn the garden’s<br />

9,000-square-foot nature center into a vibrant living canvas—<br />

not to mention the nation’s largest seasonal butterfly house—as<br />

the winged wonders fly between plants. 4747 Bob Wallace Ave<br />

SW, Huntsville; 256-830-4447; hsvbg.org<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 9<br />

GO MAGAZINE


LET'S GO<br />

THE LIST<br />

6<br />

Wheeler National<br />

Wildlife Refuge<br />

Birdbrains flock<br />

here for a rare<br />

glimpse of an<br />

endangered whooping<br />

crane from an<br />

enclosed observation<br />

building.<br />

Venture out on five<br />

designated nature<br />

trails for an upclose<br />

look at birds,<br />

mammals and other<br />

critters in their<br />

natural habitat.<br />

3121 Visitors Center Rd,<br />

Decatur; 256-350-6639;<br />

fws.gov/wheeler<br />

2 3 4 5<br />

US Space &<br />

Rocket Center<br />

Founded by famed<br />

rocket scientist Dr.<br />

Wernher von Braun,<br />

one of Earth’s largest<br />

space museums<br />

invites visitors to<br />

train like astronauts,<br />

experience four<br />

Gs of liftoff force<br />

and learn about<br />

Huntsville’s role<br />

in the race to the<br />

moon. One Tranquility<br />

Base, Huntsville; 800-<br />

637-7223; ussrc.com<br />

801 Franklin<br />

Chef Gina<br />

Morgan whips up<br />

unorthodox upscale<br />

American cuisine<br />

such as sweet<br />

tea-brined pork<br />

chops, which are<br />

far and away the<br />

local favorite. After<br />

dinner, stroll around<br />

the 200-year-old<br />

Twickenham<br />

Historic District<br />

for a peek at the<br />

city’s most stately<br />

homes. 801 Franklin St,<br />

Huntsville; 256-519-<br />

8019; 801franklin.net<br />

Huntsville Museum<br />

of Art<br />

Peruse the 2,500plus<br />

permanent<br />

works at the<br />

newly expanded<br />

leading visual arts<br />

institution. Be sure<br />

to scope out the<br />

rare assemblage<br />

of sterling silver<br />

animals created<br />

by Italian jewelry<br />

firm Buccellati. 300<br />

Church St S, Huntsville;<br />

256-535-4350;<br />

hsvmuseum.org<br />

3rd Friday<br />

Downtown<br />

The fun heats up as<br />

the sun goes down<br />

with live entertainment<br />

from local<br />

musicians, as well as<br />

after-hours shopping<br />

and sidewalk sales<br />

along Bank Street<br />

and Second Avenue<br />

on the third Friday of<br />

each month. On July<br />

15, bring a picnic<br />

to nearby Founder’s<br />

Park to hear Jeff<br />

Whitlow and the Old<br />

Barn Band. Downtown<br />

Decatur; 256-355-8993<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 10<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

Scene Restaurant<br />

& Lounge<br />

This is the place to<br />

mingle with the “it”<br />

crowd while sipping<br />

a cool drink. Order<br />

up a signature<br />

Monaco margarita<br />

(Chambord, Sauza<br />

Silver, Cointreau,<br />

fresh lime and<br />

lemon) and head out<br />

to the patio for some<br />

fun and flirting. 370<br />

The Bridge St, Huntsville;<br />

256-327-8347;<br />

sceneatmonaco.com<br />

Harrison Brothers<br />

Hardware<br />

At Alabama’s oldest<br />

operating hardware<br />

store, floor-to-ceiling<br />

shelves display<br />

old-fashioned tools<br />

and artifacts dating<br />

back to the late<br />

1800s alongside an<br />

eclectic mix of home<br />

and garden items<br />

like cookbooks,<br />

gourmet foods,<br />

tableware and local<br />

art. 124 Southside Sq,<br />

Huntsville; 256-536-<br />

3631; harrison<br />

brothershardware.com<br />

Big Bob Gibson<br />

Bar-B-Q<br />

Pitmaster Chris<br />

Lilly’s melt-in-yourmouth<br />

ribs strike<br />

the perfect balance<br />

between sweet and<br />

smoky, but it’s the<br />

barbecue chicken<br />

with white sauce—<br />

the original recipe<br />

from 1925—that<br />

receives top accolades<br />

from barbecue<br />

connoisseurs across<br />

the country. 1715<br />

Sixth Ave SE, Decatur;<br />

256-350-6969;<br />

bigbobgibson.com<br />

7 8 9 10<br />

Cotton Row<br />

Restaurant<br />

Located at what<br />

was once a gathering<br />

spot for local<br />

cotton traders, this<br />

downtown eatery<br />

features creations<br />

like seared scallops<br />

in caper-white<br />

wine sauce and<br />

peanut butter and<br />

jelly in phyllo from<br />

renowned chef<br />

James Boyce.<br />

100 Southside Sq,<br />

Huntsville; 256-<br />

382-9500; cottonrow<br />

restaurant.com


TWO<br />

VIEWS<br />

Outdoor Lounge at Viewpoint<br />

ONE<br />

ATLANTA<br />

A short walk from Twelve Fitness Center at Viewpoint Pool Lounge at Twelve Clubroom at Viewpoint<br />

Enjoy the views in one of Atlanta’s two premier condominiums.<br />

VIEWPOINT - Midtown<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

ONLY A FEW OF THESE HIGH RISE HOMES REMAIN!<br />

1 bedroom plus den from $220s<br />

404.961.7180<br />

viewpointmidtown.com<br />

Seller does not directly provide financing and does not guarantee that a purchaser will receive<br />

financing. Each purchaser must qualify for financing with a lender. The terms stated above are<br />

subject to change. See agent for more details. Information is believed to be accurate but is not<br />

warranted. Specifications, pricing and availability are subject to change without notice.<br />

TWELVE ENTENNIAL P Downtown<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

1 BR Homes from $125s<br />

2 BR Homes from $200s<br />

404.961.8888<br />

twelvecentennialpark.com


LET'S GO<br />

EVENTS EV<br />

July<br />

JUL U 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20<br />

<br />

JULY 1-4, 7-11<br />

Smithsonian Folklife Festival<br />

Washington, DC Meet a Colombian<br />

mompox drum maker, mingle with<br />

past and present Peace Corps<br />

volunteers, and explore the social<br />

history of rhythm and blues during<br />

this massive (free) display of cultural<br />

diversity on the National Mall.<br />

festival.si.edu<br />

JULY 7-17<br />

National Black Arts Festival<br />

Atlanta Concerts by The O’Jays and<br />

Omar Sosa, gallery shows from the<br />

likes of Trenton Doyle Hancock and<br />

an artists’ market will take place<br />

throughout the city, all to celebrate<br />

the art and culture of people of<br />

African descent. nbaf.org<br />

<br />

<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 12<br />

JULY 15-17<br />

Artscape<br />

Baltimore Charm City’s inimitable<br />

artistic side takes center stage at<br />

the largest free arts festival in the<br />

US, attracting 350,000 attendees<br />

over three days to see exhibits,<br />

outdoor sculptures, art cars, concerts<br />

and plays. This year marks the<br />

30th anniversary, so expect things<br />

to get bigger and—because this<br />

is Baltimore—weirder than ever.<br />

artscape.org<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

JULY 16<br />

Opening of Dinosaur Hall<br />

Los Angeles If the Natural History Museum’s<br />

old Dinosaur Hall was a “parking lot for<br />

bones,” as its paleontologists called it, the<br />

new one is an exotic car dealership. Part of<br />

the museum’s six-year transformation, it<br />

has doubled floor space and will display 20<br />

full skeletons, including a show-stopping<br />

trio of T. rex specimens. nhm.org<br />

BALTIMORE: LESLIE FURLONG; LOS ANGELES: KAREN KNAUER, COURTESY<br />

OF NHM; WASHINGTON, DC: JEFF TINSLEY, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION


21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 AUG U 01 02 03 04<br />

…<br />

AIRVENTURE: SCOTT SLOCUM<br />

JULY 25-31<br />

EAA AirVenture<br />

Oshkosh, WI (92 miles from<br />

Milwaukee) Warbirds, ultralights,<br />

helicopters… if it flies and doesn’t<br />

make a nest, it’s at this massive<br />

celebration of flying machines. Be<br />

sure to check out the world’s only<br />

airworthy B-29 Superfortress,<br />

the deceptively named FIFI.<br />

airventure.org<br />

…<br />

THROUGH JULY 24<br />

National KidsFest at<br />

Silver Dollar City<br />

Branson, MO Billed as “America’s biggest<br />

kidsfest,” this event at the history-themed<br />

Silver Dollar City fun park features<br />

30-plus rides and attractions including a<br />

circus, stunt dog show, banana split-eating<br />

contests and cartoon character meet<br />

‘n’ greets. bransonsilverdollarcity.com<br />

<br />

AUG. 5-7<br />

Seafair<br />

Seattle What was designed in<br />

the 1950s to attract tourists<br />

and highlight the city’s status as<br />

a boating capital has grown to<br />

include a milk carton derby, parade<br />

and air show. But the highlight is<br />

still the hydroplane race (the Albert<br />

Lee Cup), with some of the world's<br />

fastest boats. seafair.com<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 13<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

Midsummer<br />

Dreams<br />

Come July, the play’s<br />

the thing<br />

With Shakespeare<br />

shows in full swing.<br />

Not sure where to go?<br />

Pick your favorite work<br />

From the list below.<br />

ALL’S WELL THAT<br />

ENDS WELL<br />

Through July 27 • New York<br />

shakespeareinthepark.org<br />

ROMEO R & JULIET<br />

July J 2- 31 • Boulder, CO (42<br />

miles from Denver)<br />

coloradoshakes.org<br />

THE COMEDY OF ERRORS<br />

July 6-17 • Williamsburg, VA<br />

wm.edu/as/vsf<br />

TWELFTH NIGHT<br />

July 7-10, 14-17, 21-23 •<br />

New Orleans<br />

neworleansshakespeare.<br />

tulane.edu<br />

AS YOU LIKE IT<br />

Through July 23 • Dallas<br />

shakespearedallas.org<br />

THE TEMPEST<br />

Through July 23 • Atlanta<br />

gashakespeare.org<br />

THE MERCHANT<br />

OF VENICE<br />

Through July 24 •<br />

Washington, DC<br />

shakespearetheatre.org<br />

OTHELLO<br />

July 29, 31 • Houston<br />

houstonfestivals<br />

company.com


See Lennar first<br />

AND DISCOVER THE HOME YOU WANT<br />

AT THE PRICE YOU DESERVE.<br />

Lennar offers affordable, thoughtfully designed floor plans<br />

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Quick move-in homes are ready for you in these Atlanta-area communities:<br />

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Homes & Townhomes<br />

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Homes & Townhomes<br />

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New Communities Coming Soon in East Cobb!<br />

Robinson Manor & The Estates at Walden<br />

Call 404.931.7462 or tour online at LennarATF.com.<br />

Prices, features, and specifications are subject to change without notice. See a Lennar New Home Consultant for details. © <strong>2011</strong> Lennar Corporation.<br />

Lennar and the Lennar logo are registered service marks of Lennar Corporation and/or its subsidiaries. 6/11<br />

Gwinnett County<br />

Homes from $180s-$200s


1.<br />

Freeway<br />

Eyewear<br />

Freeway 10<br />

$100;<br />

freewayeyewear.com<br />

Mirror, Mirror<br />

2.<br />

Costa del<br />

Mar Fisch<br />

$169;<br />

costadelmar.com<br />

ROUNDUP<br />

Be the fairest of them<br />

all with a flashy<br />

pair of reflective<br />

sunglasses.<br />

1<br />

2<br />

3<br />

4<br />

5<br />

PHOTOGRAPH BY<br />

DAN MCCOY<br />

3.<br />

Dita Gold<br />

Condor<br />

$425; dita.com<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 15<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

4.<br />

Oliver<br />

Peoples<br />

Jack One<br />

$365;<br />

oliverpeoples.com<br />

5.<br />

Silver Lining<br />

Opticians<br />

Beryllium<br />

$395; silverliningopticians.com<br />

LET'S GO


LET'S GO<br />

ART Will a new partnership between the City of Los Angeles and the<br />

Los Angeles County Museum of Art help save a local landmark?<br />

I<br />

t's one of the most awe-inspiring works of public art in Los Angeles,<br />

yet most people—we're talking tourists and locals—haven't ever seen it.<br />

According to a recent New York Times article, offi cials say that most of<br />

the 45,000 yearly visitors to the Watts Towers—a set of 17 outdoor steeland-mortar<br />

sculptures decorated with a mish-mash of broken glass, shells,<br />

pottery shards and tiles—are from overseas.<br />

Simon Rodia, an Italian immigrant and creator of the Towers—which<br />

he built between 1921 and 1954—would be pained to hear that. But<br />

attendance problems are only the beginning. For the last few decades,<br />

the City of Los Angeles has managed the site—which inspired the 2006<br />

documentary I Build the Tower—and budget restraints jeopardized ongoing<br />

conservation eff orts and limited tours to four days a week.<br />

All this is changing, thanks to a recent partnership with the Los<br />

Angeles County Museum of Art. According to Mark Gilberg, the director<br />

of LACMA’s conservation center, the plan calls for the museum to<br />

create a comprehensive conservation plan for the site. “This includes<br />

a potential long-term budget, staffi ng structure and daily maintenance<br />

of minor repairs,” he says. In February, the museum secured<br />

a $500,000 grant from the James Irvine Foundation to help develop<br />

this plan.<br />

The City is working with LACMA to start a shuttle bus service<br />

between the museum and the Towers in order to help overcome<br />

another major challenge: the location. The breathtaking structures<br />

(Olga Garay, executive director of the city’s Department of Cultural<br />

Aff airs, says she was “bowled over by their majesty” upon seeing<br />

them for the fi rst time) are far fa from LA’s tourist hotspots. It also<br />

doesn’t help that the area<br />

is mostly remembered as<br />

the site of not one, but two<br />

famous riots.<br />

As Garay says,<br />

“Increased access will<br />

indeed help us generate<br />

more interest in the Towers<br />

and build support for<br />

the artistic inspiration<br />

they represent.”<br />

Those are words<br />

Rodia would be<br />

overjoyed to hear.<br />

1727 E 107th St,<br />

Los Angeles<br />

213-847-4646;<br />

wattstowers.us<br />

JULY JULY <strong>2011</strong><br />

<strong>2011</strong> 11 16<br />

GO MAGA MAGAZINE<br />

AGAZINE<br />

100<br />

140<br />

15,000<br />

11,000<br />

By the Numbers<br />

HEIGHT (IN FEET)<br />

OF TALLEST TOWER,<br />

WHICH CONTAINS<br />

THE LONGEST<br />

SLENDER REINFORCED<br />

CONCRETE COLUMN IN<br />

THE WORLD<br />

LENGTH (IN FEET) OF<br />

THE “SOUTH WALL”<br />

GLAZED TILES USED<br />

PIECES OF<br />

POTTERY USED


Atlanta App-titude<br />

TECHNOLOGY If you’re one of the 34 million people who visits Atlanta this year, you may want a<br />

little help getting familiar with the city. Local Allison Weiss Entrekin dissects three of the most<br />

popular city iPhone apps, telling us which are peachy for visitors—and which are the pits.<br />

Atlanta: Travel Guide<br />

COST: $4.99<br />

TAG: “TRIPPY AUGMENTED REALITY”<br />

RATING: 1 OUT OF 5 THUMB TAPS<br />

This app commands its price tag because<br />

of its much-ballyhooed feature, Augmented<br />

Reality. Basically, you hold your phone in<br />

the air, turn a full circle and view onscreen<br />

pop-ups with hotels, restaurants and<br />

attractions. The problem? Atlanta isn’t laid<br />

out in a grid, so just because Bone’s Restaurant<br />

is 1.9 miles due south doesn’t mean<br />

you can walk (or drive) there in a straight line.<br />

The rest of the app is pretty much cut-andpasted<br />

from Wikitravel (minus links). The<br />

shopping section is especially thin, with just<br />

two locations—one of which has a nightlife<br />

description. And where are those interactive,<br />

zoomable maps promised by the creators?<br />

Apparently, hanging out with my $4.99.<br />

Atlanta Way<br />

COST: FREE<br />

TAG: “70+ ATLANTA APPS IN ONE PACKAGE!”<br />

RATING: 4 OUT OF 5 THUMB TAPS<br />

What do you get when you cross the Yellow<br />

Pages with Frommer’s? Something along<br />

the lines of this easy-to-use, burstingwith-info<br />

app. In addition to practical,<br />

oft-overlooked info like public restroom and<br />

ATM locations, it offers everything from the<br />

nightly comedy show schedule to the most<br />

kid-friendly restaurants. There’s even a category<br />

for nearby juice bars. Some sections<br />

could use improvement: The WiFi listings<br />

ought to tell you if the hotspots are free,<br />

and the nightlife portion needs descriptions<br />

instead of just addresses. Still, when you<br />

can find the closest Peruvian restaurant to<br />

your hotel and reserve a table with one touch<br />

of a button, you’re not doing too bad.<br />

DRINK<br />

Summer Suds<br />

Hot, muggy days call for cold, refreshing beers. Here are some of the<br />

best seasonal offerings from local craft brewers.<br />

Maharajah<br />

Cellar<br />

Door<br />

Guava<br />

Grove<br />

Hop Sun<br />

SOUTHERN TIER<br />

BREWING CO.<br />

Oberon<br />

Ale<br />

BELL'S BREWERY<br />

KALAMAZOO, MI<br />

(41 MILES FROM<br />

AVERY BREWING<br />

CO. BOULDER, CO<br />

(42 MILES FROM<br />

DENVER)<br />

Taste: Tangy<br />

(alcohol-soaked)<br />

STILLWATER<br />

ARTISANAL ALES<br />

BALTIMORE<br />

Taste: Sage-y<br />

with hints of<br />

pear and apple<br />

CIGAR CITY<br />

BREWING CO.<br />

TAMPA<br />

Taste: Sweet<br />

and peppery<br />

saison with<br />

guava funk<br />

LAKEWOOD, NY GRAND RAPIDS) grapefruit<br />

(81 MILES FROM Taste: Crisp,<br />

BUFFALO) citrusy<br />

Taste: A lemon bubblegum<br />

and freshly cut<br />

grass salad<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 17<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

Xtra Gold<br />

Atlanta Essential Guide<br />

COST: $2.99<br />

TAG: “GETTING THE INSIDE TIPS ON SEEING ATLANTA”<br />

RATING: 3 OUT OF 5 THUMB TAPS<br />

This app benefits from a creator with real<br />

local knowledge: Janice McDonald, author<br />

of Insiders' Guide to Atlanta. She defines<br />

Atlanta lingo like “the Connector” (where I-75<br />

and I-85 merge through downtown) and “ITP”<br />

(Inside the Perimeter), and also points visitors<br />

to unique offerings, only listing locally owned<br />

restaurants and dedicating an entire section<br />

to quirky gems like the Waffle House Museum.<br />

Still, her tastes aren’t everyone’s, and young<br />

bucks may yawn at her nightlife listings, which<br />

include mostly restaurants and—inexplicably—Zoo<br />

Atlanta. That said, this app is very<br />

convenient; each category can be sorted by<br />

name, distance, cost or neighborhood, and you<br />

can map anything from your exact location.<br />

Avatar<br />

Jasmine<br />

IPA<br />

CAPTAIN LAWRENCE<br />

BREWING CO.<br />

PLEASANTVILLE,<br />

Back-<br />

NY (9 MILES FROM<br />

WHITE PLAINS)<br />

Taste: Yeast and<br />

apricots with a<br />

sharp, hoppy bite<br />

ELYSIAN BREW-<br />

ING CO. SEATTLE<br />

Taste: Creamy,<br />

floral hops<br />

yard Ale<br />

FLYING DOG<br />

BREWERY<br />

FREDERICK, MD<br />

(45 MILES FROM<br />

WASHINGTON, DC<br />

Taste: Big,<br />

juicy smoked<br />

brisket<br />

Bitter<br />

Brewer<br />

SURLY<br />

BREWING CO.<br />

MINNEAPOLIS<br />

Taste: Malty<br />

caramel with<br />

piney hops<br />

and bits of<br />

orange


LET'S GO<br />

One of the best parts of summer is sampling the season’s tantalizing treats—<br />

from sweet sorbets to cool poolside drinks. These travel-friendly beauty<br />

goodies let you bring your summertime favorites on the road.<br />

Philosophy Pool<br />

Party Gel Trio<br />

Bring the party inside with allin-one<br />

shampoo, shower gel and<br />

bubble bath in summer cocktailinspired<br />

scents. Tiki torches not<br />

included. $25; philosophy.com<br />

Korres Pomegranate<br />

Balancing Moisturizer<br />

Tuck this in your carry-on<br />

and say “bon voyage!” to<br />

excess shine. The light<br />

cream gel formula keeps<br />

skin moisturized while<br />

regulating oil production.<br />

$32; korres.com<br />

Slatkin & Co. Filled Candle in<br />

Sparkling Mojito<br />

Conjure a breezy seaside soirée<br />

while luxuriating in the hotel tub<br />

with this sweet, mint- and<br />

sugar cane-infused<br />

candle. $3.50 for 1.6 oz;<br />

bathandbodyworks.com<br />

BEAUTY<br />

Treat Yourself<br />

BY CHRISTINA KALLERY LERY LERY LLERY<br />

Kimara Ahnert Vibran-<br />

C Lip Treatment SPF<br />

15 in Pink Grapefruit<br />

Not only will this balm<br />

protect your pout from<br />

sun damage, but it also<br />

nourishes with jojoba and<br />

avocado oils, smoothes<br />

lines and signs of aging with<br />

vitamin C, and imparts a<br />

pretty tint. $28; kimara.com<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 18<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

Lancôme Juicy Tubes Jelly<br />

in Raspberry Ice<br />

A cheerful pop of sheer coral with<br />

sun-kissed gold flecks will leave<br />

lips looking more delectable<br />

than fresh sorbet from a local<br />

creamery. $18; lancome-usa.com<br />

SUPER Hyper Hydrator<br />

Summon a tropical vibe<br />

wherever you go. Quench your<br />

complexion on the go with<br />

this nourishing coconut water<br />

moisturizer. Leave it in the minifridge<br />

for an extra invigorating<br />

rush. $40; getsuper.com<br />

Make Mak MM k UUU Up Fo FFF For EEEE Ever<br />

Powder Blush in<br />

Cotton Candy<br />

Reminiscent of a spun<br />

sugar treat straight from<br />

summer’s ubiquitous<br />

state fairs, this sweet,<br />

girly pink delivers a<br />

believable-looking<br />

flush—and stays put<br />

despite makeup-melting<br />

heat and humidity. $19;<br />

makeupforever.com


REPAIR AND PREVENT<br />

THE SIGNS OF SUN DAMAGE<br />

with a cosmeceutical skin care treatment that contains the highest<br />

concentration of active ingredients available without a prescription.<br />

Institut’ DERMed Brightening Treatment Kit<br />

A breakthrough brightening regimen that reduces the number, size and intensity of<br />

dark spots to visibly create a brighter and even toned complexion. This collection of five<br />

products work together to remove old pigmented sun-damaged skin cells and reduce<br />

the production of tyrosinase (the enzyme responsible for skin darkening), revealing a<br />

breathtaking youthful radiance.<br />

Purchase your Brightening Treatment Kit, ideal for summer travel, at www.idermedstore.com.<br />

Use Promo Code AT07 to receive FREE shipping on your order until July 31st.<br />

DRAMATIC, VISIBLE RESULTS<br />

FOR ACNE, AGING,<br />

HYPERPIGMENTATION,<br />

SENSITIVE, ROSACEA SKIN<br />

Welcome to Institut’ DERMed Clinical Skin Care <br />

offering a full spectrum of spa, clinical and medical<br />

professional and consumer products formulated by Master<br />

Esthetician Lyn Ross, Founder, and published author of “Your<br />

Guide to Beautiful Skin at Any Age”.<br />

Wholesale Distribution to the Aesthetic Industry:<br />

(866) 433 -7633<br />

Institut’ DERMed MediCllinical Spa in Atlanta<br />

(404) 261- 5199 (idermed.com)<br />

Institut’ DERMed College of Advanced Aesthetics<br />

(770) 454 - 7788<br />

3726 Roswell Rd, Atlanta, GA 30342 1.866.433.7633 idermed.com


2' 8"<br />

34' 0"<br />

11' 4"<br />

22' 8"<br />

2' 0"<br />

8' 6"<br />

2' 4"<br />

12' 2"<br />

5' 8"<br />

10' 2"<br />

8' 0"<br />

3' 4"<br />

5' 8"<br />

2' 8"<br />

2' 8"<br />

2' 6"<br />

Dream Suites<br />

11' 2" | BATHROOMS 6' 2"<br />

14' 0"<br />

Planet Hollywood Towers Westgate<br />

Four-bedroom penthouse<br />

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HOTELS<br />

See how Las<br />

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| TVS<br />

4' 0"<br />

20' 4"<br />

2' 0"<br />

| BEDROOMS<br />

2' 0"<br />

2' 8"<br />

2' 8"<br />

2' 0" 2' 0"<br />

16' 4"<br />

2' 0"<br />

2' 6"<br />

2' 6"<br />

13' 10"<br />

2' 6"<br />

2' 6"<br />

2' 6"<br />

4' 0"<br />

1' 6"<br />

2' 6" 2' 6"<br />

Four Seasons Hotel Las Vegas<br />

180 Degree Suite<br />

Caesars Palace<br />

Forum Tower Emperor’s Suite (also<br />

known as the Rain Man Suite)<br />

2' 6"<br />

13' 10"<br />

14' 0"<br />

2' 6"<br />

13' 10"<br />

2' 6"<br />

2' 6"<br />

1' 6"<br />

2' 0"<br />

2' 0"<br />

2' 6"<br />

2' 6" 2' 6"<br />

2' 6"<br />

2' 6"<br />

2' 6" 2' 6"<br />

1' 6"<br />

2' 6"<br />

2' 6"<br />

LET'S GO<br />

5' 0" 5' 8"<br />

9' 6"<br />

11' 4"<br />

16' 4"<br />

12' 0" 8' 2"<br />

13' 10"<br />

2' 6"<br />

14' 0"<br />

8' 0"<br />

2' 0"<br />

68' 0"<br />

5' 0" 5' 8"<br />

9' 6"<br />

11' 4"<br />

16' 4"<br />

12' 0" 8' 2"<br />

HOTEL32 at Monte Carlo<br />

Two-bedroom penthouse<br />

SKYLOFTS at<br />

MGM Grand<br />

Three-bedroom loft<br />

11' 2" 6' 2"<br />

17' 4"<br />

6,000 sf<br />

Bellagio<br />

Presidential Suite<br />

4,075 sf<br />

3,225 sf<br />

2,900 sf<br />

2,500 sf<br />

2,000 sf<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 21<br />

2' 8"<br />

The Venetian Las Vegas<br />

Chairman Suite<br />

11' 2" 6' 2"<br />

2' 8"<br />

2' 0"<br />

10,000 sf<br />

9,000 sf<br />

8,000 sf<br />

68' 0"<br />

2' 6"<br />

17' 4"<br />

The Palms<br />

Hugh Hefner Sky Villa<br />

14' 0"<br />

8' 0"<br />

13' 10"<br />

14' 0"<br />

2' 6"<br />

The Palazzo Las Vegas<br />

Chairman Suite<br />

ARIA<br />

Three-bedroom Sky Villa<br />

6,835 sf<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

2' 6" 2' 6"<br />

"<br />

1' 6"<br />

4' 0"<br />

2' 6"<br />

2' 6"<br />

2' 6"<br />

13' 10"<br />

2' 6"<br />

13' 10"<br />

2' 6"<br />

2' 0"<br />

16' 4"<br />

20' 4"<br />

2' 0"<br />

2' 0" 2' 0"<br />

Not-So-<br />

Standard<br />

Amenities<br />

2' 0" 2' 0"<br />

2' 8"<br />

2' 8"<br />

Vegas’ notorious<br />

games of oneupmanship<br />

have<br />

resulted in suites<br />

with some pretty<br />

special features.<br />

► Caesars Palace<br />

Absolut Suite:<br />

Bi-level<br />

lounge with<br />

dancefloor<br />

► The Palms<br />

Hardwood Suite:<br />

Basketball<br />

court<br />

► Hard Rock<br />

Penthouse Suite:<br />

Bowling 13' 10" lane<br />

2' 0"<br />

2' 0"<br />

10' 2"<br />

4' 0"<br />

2' 0"<br />

2' 8"


BIZ B IZ IZZ<br />

BITS B BIT BBITS TS T<br />

BUSINESS<br />

ECO-FRIENDLY HOTELS//25 HOTELS WITH CELEB CHEFS//29<br />

FASHION FOR BIZ TRAVELERS//32<br />

TOUGH<br />

LOVE<br />

These polycarbonate<br />

suitcases are as attractive as<br />

they are durable.<br />

PHOTOGRAPH BY<br />

CLAIRE BENOIST<br />

RIMOWA<br />

Salsa Air 22-inch<br />

Multiwheel $450,<br />

rimowa.com<br />

ZERO<br />

HALLIBURTON<br />

Ariose 20-inch<br />

Cabin Bag<br />

$425,<br />

zerohalliburton.com<br />

HEYS<br />

Forza 20.5-inch<br />

Carry-on<br />

$350, heysusa.com<br />

TUMI<br />

Vapor International<br />

Carry-on 2-Wheel<br />

$445, tumi.com<br />

ANTLER<br />

Liquis<br />

International<br />

Cabin Suitcase<br />

22-inch<br />

$299, antler.co.uk


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JULY <strong>2011</strong> 25<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

BUSINESS


BUSINESS<br />

In the family tree<br />

of green hotels, Kimpton<br />

is defi nitely the patriarch.<br />

In 1981, it became the fi rst company in the industry to put recycling bins in its guest<br />

rooms and swap its regular cleaners for non-toxic ones. Today, itemized bills are<br />

distributed on request to save paper, and some of the snacks it stocks in the mini bars<br />

are organic. For eco-conscious travelers, this all sounds great. But how does it sound to<br />

Kimpton execs charged with generating a diff erent kind of green?<br />

Like ka-ching.<br />

Niki Leondakis, president and chief operating offi cer of Kimpton Hotels and<br />

Restaurants, proudly references a <strong>2011</strong> hotel survey in which 23% of all respondents<br />

said they were “very likely” to choose Kimpton Hotels over its competitors because of its<br />

eco-friendly characteristics. To her, this validates the 30-year-old vision of the company’s<br />

founder, Bill Kimpton. “[He] knew that in order for environmental change to be<br />

sustainable and long-lasting, it must make good business sense,” she says. “Running an<br />

eco-friendly company is as important today as it ever was, if not more.”<br />

Kimpton isn’t alone. Many hotels that market themselves as green say they have<br />

netted more heads in beds as a result. Patricia Griffi n, president of Green Hotels<br />

Association, says her organization has members who have seen occupancy rates soar as<br />

much as 400% after they began showcasing themselves as eco-friendly, even during the<br />

current economic downturn.<br />

But don’t assume it’s just one green, happy world. Green Seal, the oldest independent<br />

nonprofi t environmental-certifi cation organization in the country, scoff s at the<br />

notion that all hotels claiming to be green really are. “Having a linen-reuse program in<br />

place doesn’t necessarily mean that the hotel is purchasing environmentally preferable<br />

cleaning products,” says Mark Petruzzi, Green Seal’s vice president of certifi cation. “And<br />

addressing energy use via more effi cient equipment doesn’t guarantee that the hotel is<br />

reducing trash generation.”<br />

According to Petruzzi, only 124 hotels in the country are currently Green Seal-certifi<br />

ed, a process that involves everything from installing low-fl ow toilets in the bathrooms<br />

($200 each) to donating leftover food to shelters<br />

(just a few dollars for gas). For Kimpton’s part,<br />

more than 48 of its hotels are Green Seal-certifi ed,<br />

and the rest are expected to gain certifi cation this<br />

year. The application alone starts at $1,350.<br />

Still, plenty of hoteliers who don’t meet Green<br />

Seal’s standards insist they have a right to call<br />

their properties green. Destination Hotels and<br />

Resorts, a collection of luxury accommodations<br />

across the country, does not have any Green<br />

Seal-certifi ed lodgings, but each of its full-service<br />

properties either has or is working toward Green<br />

Key certifi cation, a diff erent third-party ratings<br />

system that has less-stringent criteria and costs<br />

just $600 to join. Mark Hickey, Destination<br />

Hotels and Resorts’ senior vice president of hotel<br />

operations, calls the company’s green eff orts—like<br />

adding organic food to its restaurant menus,<br />

putting recycling bins in conference rooms and<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 26<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

organizing local “Green Teams” who hold<br />

recycling fairs to increase participation by<br />

hotel associates in sustainability eff orts—central<br />

to its corporate culture. Destination Hotels<br />

and Resorts markets these initiatives under<br />

the banner “Destination Earth,” and according<br />

to Hickey, they’ve helped the company lure<br />

thousands of new guests—especially ones who<br />

are traveling with meetings or conventions.<br />

“We have had many group clients choose to<br />

stay at our properties because of our commitment<br />

to the environment,” he says.<br />

Attracting corporate clients is a signifi cant<br />

reason for a hotel to consider going green.<br />

According to Petruzzi, many companies<br />

want to be able to claim that their meetings<br />

and events are environmentally friendly.<br />

“Increasingly, government and corporate<br />

travel is being encouraged or mandated toward<br />

green hotels,” he says. Organizations such<br />

as Meeting Professionals International, the<br />

Convention Industry Council and the Green<br />

Meeting Industry Council all encourage their<br />

members to partner with eco-friendly hotels;<br />

Meeting Professionals International even has<br />

a “sustainable event measurement tool” that<br />

allows planners to tally the environmental<br />

impact of their meetings so they can easily<br />

report it to their superiors. It all adds up to<br />

good PR for companies who want to say they<br />

hold responsible events—and good occupancy<br />

rates for hotels calling themselves green.<br />

Besides attracting more guests,<br />

another potential benefi t for hotels that<br />

go green is reduced energy costs. But<br />

are they always rewarded with budgetfriendly<br />

bills? It depends who you ask.<br />

Both Kimpton and Destination Hotels<br />

and Resorts say their energy costs have<br />

dropped as a result of their effi ciency<br />

measures (though neither will say how<br />

steep that plunge has been).<br />

But green building designer Neil<br />

Chambers of ChambersDesign warns<br />

that energy-effi cient gadgets don’t<br />

always equal lower numbers at the end<br />

of the month. “There’s what I call ‘dumb<br />

green’—when people use technology as<br />

a means to call themselves green and<br />

expect to save money,” says Chambers,<br />

who has worked on several hotel projects


in New York and South Carolina. He<br />

cites hotel developers who erect all-glass<br />

buildings in hot climates, then add higheffi<br />

ciency HVAC equipment (to the tune<br />

of about $250,000) and expect less-thanaverage<br />

energy bills.<br />

Chambers also chides hotels that take<br />

a one-green-solution-fi ts-all approach to<br />

energy effi ciency. These are the hotels<br />

that add the same number of solar<br />

panels (around $900 each) to their Chicago<br />

properties as they do to their Miami ones,<br />

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daylight throughout the year, making solar<br />

panels less eff ective. Another example?<br />

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properties around the country that off er<br />

natural heat (prices range from $75 to $125<br />

per square foot), even though “in the South,<br />

you’ll cook,” Chambers says. “We live in a<br />

society where we want the green answer<br />

that works everywhere; if you want to do a<br />

smart building, that’s not the approach.”<br />

With all of the costs involved, how is<br />

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dough supposed to go green? Destination<br />

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cient equipment yet, instead focusing<br />

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recognize (like eco-friendly shampoos<br />

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CARMINE LIDESTRI<br />

CELEBRITY FARE<br />

<br />

Restaurants from star chefs may<br />

be some hotels’ most enticing<br />

amenity, but at what cost—and<br />

are they here to stay?<br />

BY ROD O’CONNOR<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 29<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

BUSINESS<br />

STAR POWER Chef Dean<br />

Fearing, known as the “Father<br />

of Southwestern Cuisine,” at<br />

The Ritz-Carlton, Dallas<br />

When it comes to dining, New Orleans is a city that likes to give its<br />

visitors options. Fresh crawfi sh tails at Emeril Lagasse’s eponymous<br />

fl agship? Gumbo at August, the elegant eatery from acclaimed chef<br />

John Besh? Soft-shell crab at the 111-year-old institution Commander’s<br />

Palace? The choices are overwhelming.<br />

Unfortunately for the Royal Sonesta Hotel, despite stellar reviews and a beautiful<br />

courtyard setting just off the French Quarter, its restaurant was rarely mentioned in the<br />

same breath as those Big Easy foodie destinations. “It had nothing to do with quality,”<br />

says General Manager Al Groos. “It didn’t do all that well because most people do not<br />

want to go to a hotel restaurant.”<br />

That is, unless the hotel restaurant is helmed by a celebrity chef.<br />

So the owners of the 40-year-old hotel decided to shutter the old restaurant and<br />

launch Restaurant R’evolution, which opens later this year. Running the kitchen: John<br />

Folse, a 30-year veteran chef, Louisiana cookbook author and TV personality, and<br />

Chicago-based Rick Tramonto, a James Beard Award winner seen on Bravo’s Top Chef<br />

Masters. If all goes according to plan, the buzz surrounding this dream pairing will turn<br />

the modern Cajun/Creole eatery—which has a standalone entrance off bustling Bourbon<br />

Street—into an instant classic.


It wasn’t long ago, however, that hotel dining rooms didn’t need help from so-called<br />

<br />

BUSINESS<br />

“rock star” chefs. But in the 1990s, tastes started changing. “We noticed that guests<br />

would eat breakfast with us, and we would not see them again for the rest of the day,”<br />

says Vivian Deuschl, vice president of PR for the Ritz-Carlton Hotel Company, which<br />

claims a number of celebrity chef-driven restaurants, including Dallas local hero Dean<br />

Fearing’s hugely popular Southwestern eatery Fearing’s. “It didn’t seem as exciting to eat<br />

at a hotel as it did to seek out a hot restaurant.”<br />

Rather than compete with the sizzle of names like Wolfgang Puck and Alain<br />

Ducasse, shrewd hotels began recruiting them to open outposts on their properties. The<br />

trend spread like a grease fi re through the 2000s, with chefs like Emeril Lagasse and Joël<br />

Robuchon striking deals with brands across the country. “It gives the hotel another phenomenal<br />

amenity,” says Andrew Freeman, a San Francisco-based hospitality consultant.<br />

But as amenities go, it can be a hugely expensive one. Atlantis, a massive resort on<br />

Paradise Island, Bahamas, features restaurants from luminaries Jean-Georges Vongerichten,<br />

Nobu Matsuhisa and Bobby Flay. George Markantonis, president and managing<br />

director of the resort’s operator, Kerzner International Bahamas, says the up-front payment<br />

to snag a name of that caliber can cost between $100,000 and $500,000. That’s in<br />

addition to licensing deals that could require a 3% to 10% cut of the restaurant’s revenues.<br />

Peter Karpinski of the Denver-based Sage Restaurant Group says an investment of<br />

that size makes more fi nancial sense for resort properties bolstered by gambling and<br />

entertainment revenue. That’s the model that proliferated in Las Vegas, where dozens of<br />

star chefs participated in a land grab at the casino-resorts along the Strip starting in the<br />

mid-1990s. But for Chicago’s 332-room The Blackstone, a Renaissance Hotel—one of 65<br />

hotels Sage Restaurant Group owns and operates—the risks are too great.<br />

“You’d have to hope you were going to get a lift in other areas of the business to justify<br />

what I’d call a loss leader,” Karpinski says. “It can only work if you get huge revenues.<br />

But it’s really hard. Most restaurants would be happy to be making 10% [margins]. Well,<br />

you’re not going to have any margins on that business because you’re going to end up<br />

paying [the celebrity chef] that 10%.”<br />

For The Blackstone, Karpinski chose a diff erent route, hiring Philly-based rising<br />

star Jose Garces—who gained fame on Iron Chef soon after—as a “consulting executive<br />

chef ” to oversee menu development and other creative elements of its restaurant Mercat<br />

a la Planxa in 2008. He won’t reveal what Garces is<br />

paid, except to say it was substantially less than what it<br />

would take to land the likes of a Bobby Flay. Karpinski<br />

FRESH AND FAMOUS<br />

points out that, unlike some other celebrity chef deals,<br />

Scallops Tiradito from Nobu, one of<br />

three celebrity-chef restaurants at<br />

Atlantis in the Bahamas<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 30<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

TOP TOQUES<br />

Sage Restaurant Group<br />

(From top) Nobu<br />

Matsuhisa, Bobby Flay owns the business and<br />

and Eric Ripert<br />

the restaurant’s intellectual<br />

property. “We’ve<br />

outsourced the culinary<br />

piece to him,” he says.<br />

But according to<br />

Markantonis, paying top<br />

dollar for top-tier chefs<br />

has proven a winning<br />

hand for Atlantis,<br />

where the swanky<br />

Nobu increased annual<br />

revenues by 300% compared<br />

to the previous<br />

restaurant in the same<br />

space. Plus, he cites the<br />

intangible benefi ts. “We<br />

have higher occupancies<br />

and, in many cases,<br />

higher room rates based<br />

on the amenities we<br />

off er,” Markantonis says.<br />

“If you only have buff ets,<br />

maybe your rate can be<br />

$100 per night. But if you off er a huge complement<br />

of gourmet restaurants, maybe you can<br />

charge $300.”<br />

The combined forces of a well-run hotel<br />

and a savvy restaurateur can also serve as a<br />

lifeline when margins are tight, adds Tramonto,<br />

who operates a lounge and steakhouse<br />

at a Westin in suburban Chicago. (And with<br />

US occupancy rates still lagging due to the<br />

economy—in February, occupancy was 55.7%,<br />

well below the 20-year average of 62%—hotels<br />

can use all the help they can get.) “You can<br />

feed off each other’s brands and marketing and<br />

clientele, and it becomes a little bit easier in<br />

the hard times,” he says. (Unfortunately, that<br />

synergy still couldn’t save his Italian concept,<br />

which didn’t survive the hotel’s drop in business<br />

that followed the economic crash.)<br />

The key to a winning partnership,<br />

Tramonto stresses, is creating agreements that<br />

challenge both sides to succeed. “With some<br />

of these deals, [the chefs] are not motivated<br />

because they’re taking all the money off the<br />

top,” he says. “But the hotel has to make money<br />

as well…. It’s like having a great pre-nuptial.<br />

It has to be a win-win.” For example, with<br />

Restaurant R’evolution, instead of a massive<br />

up-front licensing fee, Tramonto and Folse will<br />

split revenues with the Royal Sonesta. And, as


Groos puts it, “We have a business agreement<br />

where, if the restaurant does well,<br />

they will get compensated and the hotel<br />

will get compensated.”<br />

But while Folse and Tramonto will be<br />

a constant presence at the restaurant, more<br />

established stars like Ducasse, Puck and<br />

Flay entrust the day-to-day cooking to local<br />

lieutenants—which is one obstacle of such<br />

partnerships. “The downside has been that<br />

hotels wanted celebrity chefs to come to<br />

their city, but there wasn’t much commitment<br />

on the part of the chef to make that<br />

place home,” Folse says. “The public came<br />

to realize that the chef ’s name is on the<br />

building, but they’re nowhere around.”<br />

For her part, Deuschl—who says<br />

Chef Eric Ripert is required to make a<br />

certain number of appearances at his<br />

successful Ritz-Carlton spots in DC and<br />

Philadelphia—argues that as long as the<br />

restaurants are run well and getting good<br />

reviews, it shouldn’t matter whether the<br />

celebrity chef is actually in the kitchen.<br />

“You’ll get your 15 minutes of fame,” she<br />

says. “But if the word [on the street] is<br />

sloppy service, or they don’t change the<br />

menu enough, you’re going to fi nd it’s not<br />

a winning proposition.”<br />

Still, there are some in the industry<br />

who believe the entire celebrity chef trend<br />

has already gone stale. The number of<br />

high-profi le closings certainly supports<br />

that argument: Top Chef’s Tom Colicchio<br />

packed up two spots in Atlanta earlier<br />

this year after failing to come to terms<br />

with the new owners of The Mansion on<br />

Peachtree hotel. And in Las Vegas, Charlie<br />

Trotter shuttered his two restaurants in the<br />

Palazzo in 2010.<br />

“I don’t know how many more celebrity<br />

chef outlets we would open [in Atlantis]<br />

because there is [the risk] of oversaturation,”<br />

Markantonis says. “In Las Vegas, it<br />

was great 10 years ago. But today I think<br />

all of that celebrity chef chatter has turned<br />

into exactly that: chatter. Background<br />

noise. Because every single restaurant has<br />

a celebrity chef.”<br />

Freeman agrees. “The world is<br />

changing… and [diners] are interested in<br />

discovering something new,” he says. “I<br />

think you are going to see hotels wanting<br />

to do more deals with interesting young<br />

chefs on their way up.”<br />

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BUSINESS<br />

Regardless of what industry you’re you you’re ’ re<br />

trying to conquer, the clothes es you<br />

wear are key to landing the client,<br />

li<br />

getting the job or making the sale. So<br />

before you pack your bags and d head<br />

out of town for your next meeting, ng, take<br />

notes from these Atlantans modeling odeling<br />

the season’s latest looks.<br />

BY BROOKE PORTER<br />

PHOTOGRAPHS BY JOSH MEISTER<br />

STYLING BY MELISSA ANDERSON<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 32<br />

GO MAGAZINE


THE LOOK<br />

Recent Emory<br />

University graduate<br />

going to interview at t<br />

a consulting fi rm<br />

THE MODEL: The Serbia-born Ana<br />

Nikolic graduated from Emory in<br />

May with degrees in International l<br />

Studies and Economics. Her<br />

senior honors thesis was on the<br />

most-favored nation principle of<br />

the World Trade Organization and d<br />

how it applies to dispute settlement nt<br />

proceedings.<br />

STYLIST NOTE: “Not only are the<br />

pieces of this outfi t smart for a work ork<br />

environment, but they can also be e<br />

paired with other pieces in her closet oset<br />

to achieve a ‘going out’ look.”<br />

THE LOOK<br />

Film producer going g<br />

to Hollywood to meet et<br />

with a movie studio<br />

THE MODEL: Will Packer is the cofounder<br />

of the production company ny<br />

Rainforest Films (which hit it big<br />

in 2007 with Stomp the Yard, set in n<br />

Atlanta) and was called one of the e<br />

“10 Producers to Watch” in 2007 by by<br />

Daily Variety. His next project, Act t<br />

Like a Lady, Think Like a Man (based sed<br />

on Steve Harvey’s bestseller), is<br />

currently in production.<br />

STYLIST NOTE: “For something more re<br />

casual, Will can play down his look ok<br />

by leaving his jacket in the car and d<br />

simply wearing his Bugatchi shirt<br />

with his suit pant.”<br />

blouse: Ann Taylor<br />

Shoes: Aldo<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 33<br />

GO MAGA MAGAZINE<br />

MAGA MAGAZINE ZINE<br />

Suit: Hugo Boss<br />

Shirt: Bugatchi<br />

Shoes: Aldo


BUSINESS<br />

Shirt, pants and tie: J.Crew<br />

Shoes: Aldo<br />

THE LOOK LO OOK<br />

Tech startup sttartup<br />

entrepreneur entreprreneur<br />

going<br />

to to mee meet t with<br />

venture venturee<br />

capitalists<br />

THE MODEL: Michael M Tavani—an<br />

entrepreneur entreprene eur who recently<br />

won “Mobile “Mobiile<br />

Marketer of the<br />

Year” at the thee<br />

Tech Marketing<br />

Awards—is s the th he co-founder and<br />

COO of Scoutmob, Sc cout tmob, which off ers<br />

instant deals dea als at local restaurants<br />

and shops s via viaa<br />

its website and<br />

smartphone smartphon ne app. a It launched<br />

in Atlanta, Atlanta a, Ne New ew York and San<br />

Francisco in 2010, 2 and added 10<br />

more cities, citie es, including in ncluding Boston,<br />

Chicago, Dallas, Dall D las, LA and Seattle,<br />

in April.<br />

STYLIST NOTE: NO OTE: “This “ classic buttonbutton- up from J. J Crew Cre ew is a versatile piece<br />

every guy y should<br />

own.” own.”<br />

THE LOOK<br />

Board Boardd<br />

member<br />

going goingg<br />

to give give a<br />

keynote keynoote<br />

speech at<br />

a a conference<br />

connference<br />

THE MODEL: In addition to being<br />

the managing mannaging<br />

shareholder of the<br />

Atlanta offi ooffi<br />

ce of international<br />

law fi rm<br />

m Greenberg Traurig LLP,<br />

Ernest Greer GGreer<br />

serves on the fi rm’s<br />

executiv executive ve committee and is chair<br />

of the Atlanta A litigation practice.<br />

He also sits on a number of board boards<br />

in the metro-Atlanta m<br />

community,<br />

community<br />

includin including ng the Georgia Chamber<br />

of Com Commerce. mmerce.<br />

STYLIST T NOTE: “For a guestspeaking<br />

speakin ng engagement, try a shar sharp,<br />

sophisticated sophist ticated look that takes a ddip<br />

into the<br />

e fashion world.”<br />

Suit: S Hugo Boss<br />

Shirt and tie: Dav David Donahue<br />

Pocket square: J.Z J.Z. Richards<br />

Shoes: Aldo<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 34<br />

GO MAGAZINE


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BUSINESS<br />

Suit: Hugo Boss<br />

Shirt: Nordstrom Smartcare<br />

Tie: Ermenegildo Zegna<br />

Shoes: Aldo<br />

THE TH HE LOOK<br />

Manufacturer Maanufacturer<br />

going<br />

to meet with a<br />

supplier suppplier<br />

to demand<br />

better<br />

rates<br />

THE MODEL:<br />

Tommy Harper is a<br />

gene general eral manager of Woodhaven<br />

Furn Furniture niture Industries, a division<br />

of Atlanta-based A<br />

Aaron’s Inc,<br />

whic which ch produces more than<br />

1,50 1,500 0 units of upholstery and<br />

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sets of bedding a day. The<br />

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Har Harper per leads an initiative at<br />

Woo Woodhaven odhaven that helped the<br />

com company mpany recycle more than 10<br />

mill million ion pounds of material in<br />

2010<br />

0 and reduced waste sent to<br />

land landfi dfi lls by 92%.<br />

STYLIST STYL LIST NOTE: NOTE: “A red tie with a<br />

dark<br />

k suit is a great way to look<br />

confi<br />

fi dent and powerful.”<br />

THE TH HE LOOK<br />

Small-business<br />

Smmall-business<br />

owner ow wner going to<br />

run runn<br />

a booth at a<br />

trade traade<br />

show<br />

THE MODEL:<br />

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o has no formal business<br />

or jewelry-making jeewelry-making<br />

train-<br />

ing) ing) creates Smart Glass<br />

Jewe Jewelry—which elry—which is made with<br />

recy recycled ycled glass—out of a stu-<br />

dio in i Edgewood. Plate keeps<br />

her<br />

business very local with a<br />

spec special cial line of products made<br />

from<br />

m Coca-Cola bottles.<br />

STYLIST STYL LIST NOTE:<br />

“During a trade<br />

show, showw,<br />

instead of dressing in<br />

a standard sta<br />

andard corporate look<br />

that can easily blend in with<br />

a wave of tradesmen, dress in<br />

something comfortable and<br />

approachable.”<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 36<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

Bl Blouse, shoes h and d<br />

necklace: Anthropologie<br />

Pants: J.Crew<br />

Earrings and bracelet:<br />

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FOOD TRAILS//39 FLORIDA OFF-SEASON ROAD TRIP//48<br />

FOOD<br />

TRAILS<br />

They say that one of the best ways to get<br />

to know a place is with your taste buds.<br />

These four culinary journeys take<br />

that sentiment seriously, so<br />

loosen that belt and don’t<br />

spoil your appetite.<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 39<br />

GO MAGAZINE


FOOD TRAILS<br />

THE<br />

SMALL<br />

On Maine’s Beer Trail, independent Jcraft<br />

brewers prove that bigger’s not always better.<br />

STORY AND PHOTOS BY PETER KOCH<br />

BATCHJust<br />

a couple blocks up from the ocean, gulls whirl<br />

above Shipyard Brewing Co., which chugs along inside<br />

a sprawling 19th-century foundry building in Portland,<br />

ME. My tour guide, Ben Meisner, has already rattled off<br />

the brewery’s history and screened a fi lm about its fi ne<br />

English-style beers, but none of that prepares me for what<br />

comes next, inside the belly of its production facility.<br />

Here, a web of conveyor belts and machinery crashes and<br />

booms, churning out 159 bottles of the good stuff every<br />

minute with wicked effi ciency. Meisner has to shout to be<br />

heard above the din. My fi rst stop on the Maine Beer Trail,<br />

this isn’t the quaint brewery I was expecting.<br />

Despite the noise, Shipyard makes a fi tting start to<br />

the trail. Founded in 1994 by Mainer Fred Forsley and<br />

Master Brewer Alan Pugsley, Shipyard boasts yearly<br />

production of more than 76,000 barrels, making it far<br />

and away the state’s biggest microbrewery, with its closest<br />

competitor producing roughly a quarter of that. But it’s<br />

because of that size that Forsley has taken a natural leadership<br />

role in the state’s brewing industry, steering the<br />

Maine Brewers’ Guild and, in 2009, rallying a disparate<br />

group of 25 brewers—from one-man operations on up to<br />

Shipyard—to launch the Maine Beer Trail.<br />

The Beer Trail is a group of friendly competitors from<br />

every corner of the state who’ve banded together to get<br />

their simple message—“Maine makes fantastic beers”—<br />

out to the world. It may seem counterintuitive to help each<br />

other in such a saturated market—Maine has the fourth<br />

highest number of breweries per capita of any state—but<br />

Forsley doesn’t see it that way. “There’s so much competi-<br />

POUR HOUSE<br />

tion on the national level from big beer [companies] that<br />

Sheepscot Valley’s Steve<br />

Gorrill pulls a pint<br />

most of us prefer to work together as friends,” he says.<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 40<br />

GO MAGAZINE


BREW CREW<br />

(clockwise from far<br />

left): A sampler from<br />

Topsham, one of Sea<br />

Dog Brewing’s three<br />

brewpubs; Nathan<br />

Sanborn of Rising<br />

Tide; Shipyard’s<br />

bottling line<br />

SHIPYARD<br />

BREWING CO.<br />

Tours: Tuesdays,<br />

5:30pm<br />

86 Newbury St;<br />

800-273-9253;<br />

shipyard.com<br />

RISING TIDE BREWING<br />

COMPANY<br />

Tours: by appointment<br />

1 Industrial Way #2;<br />

270-370-2337;<br />

risingtidebrewing.com<br />

ALLAGASH BREWING<br />

COMPANY<br />

Tours: Mon to Fri, 11am,<br />

1pm and 3pm; Sat,<br />

1pm and 3pm<br />

50 Industrial Way;<br />

207-878-5385;<br />

allagash.com<br />

MAINE BEER<br />

COMPANY<br />

Tours: Fridays, 2pm<br />

1 Industrial Way, #3;<br />

207-221-5711;<br />

mainebeer<br />

company.com<br />

MARSHALL WHARF<br />

BREWING COMPANY<br />

Tours: by appointment<br />

2 Pinchy Ln, Belfast,<br />

ME (106 miles from<br />

Portland); 207-<br />

338-1707;<br />

marshallwharf.com<br />

SHEEPSCOT VALLEY<br />

BREWING COMPANY<br />

Tours: by appointment<br />

74 Hollywood Blvd,<br />

Whitefield, ME (60<br />

miles from Portland);<br />

207-549-5530;<br />

sheepscotbrewing.com<br />

SEA DOG BREWING<br />

COMPANY<br />

Tours: none<br />

1 Bowdoin Mill Island,<br />

Suite 100, Topsham,<br />

ME (26 miles from Portland);<br />

207-725-0162;<br />

seadogbrewing.com<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 41<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

Six miles away, on Portland’s northwestern edge, I<br />

fi nd a nascent brewer, Nathan Sanborn, laboring away<br />

in the modest industrial garage that houses Rising Tide<br />

Brewery. Sanborn’s operation, open since October, is a<br />

one-man show. He puts 60 to 70 hours a week into the<br />

job, brewing three styles of beer—copper, stout and pale<br />

ale—in tiny, 90-gallon batches, then fermenting, bottleconditioning,<br />

capping, labeling and shipping it by hand.<br />

Though the physical work is his alone to bear, he’s<br />

had plenty of support from fellow brewers. Allagash<br />

Brewing Company, renowned for its creative Belgianstyle<br />

ales, is just down the road and sends its visitors<br />

there after tours. And David and Daniel Kelban, the<br />

brothers who founded the slightly older Maine Beer<br />

Company in the same building as Rising Tide, often<br />

help him work through the hiccups of a new brewery.<br />

My next appointment brings me over glacierscoured<br />

hills and through a crazy quilt of fi elds and<br />

forests to the northern tip of rugged Penobscot Bay.<br />

Here, down on Belfast’s working waterfront, tucked next<br />

to a lobster pound, Marshall Wharf Brewing concocts<br />

some of Maine’s most inventive beers. When I arrive,<br />

owner David Carlson is next door tending bar at Three<br />

Tides, his one-time martini bar that has 17 Marshall<br />

Wharf beers on tap. Among them are singular choices<br />

like Illegal Ale-ien, a wheat-Kolsch hybrid brewed with<br />

blue agave nectar; Deep Purple Rauchbier, a robust<br />

German-style smoked beer that’s rather accurately<br />

described as “bacon in a glass”; and Pemaquid Oyster<br />

Stout, a chocolaty variety that’s brewed with 10-dozen<br />

live oysters in every 200-gallon batch. It’s evident that<br />

having such a small operation—just seven barrels per<br />

batch in a 300-square-foot brewery—is what gives<br />

Marshall Wharf so much freedom to experiment.<br />

The last stop on my trip along the trail takes me into<br />

the fallow farm country surrounding Whitefi eld. Here,<br />

Steve Gorrill, brewer/owner of Sheepscot Valley Brewing<br />

Company, works by himself on a seven-barrel system in a<br />

barn beside his house. For about fi ve minutes, I examine<br />

shiny fermenters and buckets while he holds court about<br />

his fermentation times and beer styles, until I’m plum<br />

out of questions. In the lull, Gorrill asks, “Want a beer?”<br />

He hands me a Pemaquid Ale, a Scottish ale with a<br />

hoppy fi nish that pours a beautiful amber color. We clink<br />

glasses, and, for the next hour or so, have a meandering<br />

conversation about hiking, local politics and, of course,<br />

brewing. Before I leave, he invites me to a secret happy<br />

hour and recommends a “pie lady”—a Maine phenomenon—down<br />

the road who bakes wild blueberry pies with<br />

melt-in-your-mouth crusts. It’s not the standard tour—but<br />

by now I’ve come to expect that of Maine breweries.<br />

ALTERNATE ROUTE Searching for something a bit stronger than beer? Head to Lexington, KY, and hit the Kentucky Bourbon Trail (no small-batch operation in itself, with 1.5 million<br />

visits in the last five years), where you’ll learn about the area’s rich distilling history and, of course, taste the good stuff. kybourbontrail.com


FOOD TRAILS<br />

LIQUID<br />

GOLD<br />

Skip the vineyards and<br />

hit the olive oil trail in<br />

Napa and Sonoma.<br />

BY AMY WESTERVELT<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 42<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

I<br />

In my early 20s, I had the good fortune of spending a<br />

couple of years in Bologna, Italy. The handmade pasta,<br />

the Bolognese sauce, all those wonderful Emilia-<br />

Romagna wines! It was an amazing food experience,<br />

but what delighted me most was the small-batch olive<br />

oil. Every family either made their own or had relatives<br />

who did, and each table was set with an unmarked<br />

green glass bottle of the stuff . Every bottle told the story<br />

of the land that had birthed it and the family who had<br />

nurtured it.<br />

Today, olive oil tastings in California’s wine country<br />

remind me of those years in Bologna. Sure, the experience<br />

is a bit more formal, but the net result is the same:<br />

Each farm imbues the oil with diff erent characteristics.<br />

The added bonus? Hitting a few olive oil tours makes for<br />

a nice break from wine tastings (and the crowds that go<br />

with them).<br />

I start my journey through the Golden State’s oils<br />

at McEvoy Ranch, a beautiful spot in the hills above<br />

Petaluma. When Nan McEvoy bought the 550-acre<br />

ranch and began making olive oil 20 years ago, “The<br />

local agricultural community all told her that olive<br />

trees wouldn’t grow here,” our guide says. “We’re too<br />

close to the ocean, so between the temperature and<br />

the soil, they told her it wasn’t likely. But Mrs. McEvoy<br />

likes a challenge.”<br />

As we stroll through olive groves, past the chicken<br />

coop and the sheep, alongside catchment ponds and<br />

lavender fi elds, and fi nally into the mill on the Orchard<br />

Walk and Mill Tour ($30), our guide explains that both<br />

STOCKFOOD


the orchards and mill are certifi ed organic, and that<br />

McEvoy produces its own organic compost and uses<br />

renewable energy (including some from its own windmill).<br />

This commitment to purity is evident in McEvoy’s<br />

single organic extra virgin Tuscan blend olive oil. Even<br />

sipped from a small cup (compostable, naturally), it’s<br />

delicious—grassy and peppery, everything a good olive<br />

oil should be. (Note: The ranch is not open to the public;<br />

check the website for tour off erings.)<br />

The next morning, I head over to Round Pond<br />

Estate in Rutherford. It’s a beautiful estate, and the tour<br />

includes a walk along the grounds, an up-close look at<br />

the olive press, then a tasting of handcrafted oils—extravirgin<br />

Italian and Spanish, as well as blood orange<br />

and Meyer lemon—in dark blue glass cups (so tasters<br />

won’t be swayed by the oils’ color, which has nothing<br />

to do with their quality). As our “olive oil educator” Jill<br />

tells us about olive color (all varieties start out green<br />

and turn black, depending on how ripe they get) and<br />

Italian versus Spanish olive oil (Italian is more pungent<br />

and peppery, Spanish more buttery and smooth), she<br />

explains that proprietor Ryan MacDonnell takes a very<br />

hands-on approach, which includes helping with the<br />

actual blending of the oils. The result is four amazing<br />

oils—and I can’t help but buy one of each.<br />

In an old butler building just down the road from<br />

MCEVOY RANCH<br />

On Petaluma Point<br />

Reyes Rd, Petaluma<br />

(51 miles from San<br />

Francisco);<br />

866-617-6779;<br />

mcevoyranch.com<br />

ROUND POND<br />

ESTATE<br />

886 Rutherford Rd,<br />

Rutherford (72 miles<br />

from San Francisco);<br />

888-302-2575;<br />

roundpond.com<br />

ST. HELENA<br />

OLIVE OIL CO.<br />

8576 St Helena Hwy,<br />

Rutherford (71 miles<br />

from San Francisco);<br />

800-939-9880;<br />

sholiveoil.com<br />

LONG MEADOW<br />

RANCH<br />

738 Main St, St.<br />

Helena (75 miles<br />

from San Francisco);<br />

707-963-4555;<br />

longmeadow<br />

ranch.com<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 43<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

BEAUTY IN A BOTTLE<br />

(clockwise from left) Long Meadow<br />

Ranch processing; McEvoy Ranch; the<br />

finished product at Long Meadow Ranch<br />

Round Pond, St. Helena Olive Oil Co. harvests from 12<br />

Napa Valley growers and presses the olives at McEvoy<br />

Ranch’s mill before bottling it on-site. According to<br />

founder Peggy O’Kelly, it is the fi rst olive oil producer<br />

in the US to off er a retail tasting room experience<br />

(and a free one, at that). In addition, olive oil sensory<br />

evaluation classes can be prearranged. “It’s all about<br />

the ingredients,” is O’Kelly’s motto; she is vigilant about<br />

choosing and harvesting the best olives, as evidenced<br />

by her Italian-style oils, which have a slightly mellower<br />

fl avor than McEvoy’s. I especially love the packaging: a<br />

dark, almost black, bottle with a tea-stained, stamped<br />

paper label tied around the neck.<br />

I fi nish the trip in St. Helena, at Long Meadow<br />

Ranch. Like McEvoy, Long Meadow is a fully functioning<br />

ranch. Its Napa Valley Dream tour ($150) takes<br />

groups not only through the olive groves, but also to see<br />

the other crops and livestock. It ends with a threecourse<br />

pairing featuring LMR wines and olive oils.<br />

If you’re running short on time, Long Meadow off ers<br />

simpler tastings—but for me the meal is the perfect way<br />

to spend an afternoon: a leisurely, lingering experience<br />

that reminds me of all those lovely days I spent in Italy.<br />

ALTERNATE ROUTE Wine on your mind? Napa and Sonoma aren’t your only options. Budget Travel readers recently voted the Finger Lakes region near Rochester, NY, the world’s<br />

most beautiful wine region. Pick from the area’s four wine trails. fingerlakeswinecountry.com


FOOD TRAILS<br />

THE VALUE<br />

OF PIE<br />

Selling a culinary legacy<br />

in the heartland isn’t as<br />

easy as it seems.<br />

BY GARIN PIRNIA<br />

WWhen it comes to desserts, very few are so iconic to a<br />

place that it’s included in the name. Key lime pie. New<br />

York cheesecake. Recently, Indiana has claimed its<br />

own: Hoosier pie, made from a simple recipe featuring<br />

sugar and cream. In 2009, state senators gathered at<br />

the capitol and adopted a resolution to make the treat—<br />

known for decades as “sugar cream pie”—the offi cial<br />

state pie.<br />

But how did this dessert that many outside of the<br />

state have never even heard of become government<br />

business, and then get its own sanctioned culinary<br />

trail, the Hoosier Pie Trail? I headed to Winchester<br />

(93 miles northeast of Indianapolis), the “pie capital<br />

of Indiana” and home to Wick’s Pies Inc—the world’s<br />

largest producer of Hoosier pies and the brand served at<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 44 GO MAGAZINE


TOP RIGHT: DANESE KENON/THE INDIANAPOLIS STAR<br />

the capitol when the resolution was passed—to fi nd out.<br />

I had a notion that the wholesome state of Indiana had<br />

succumbed to the same temptation that visitor’s bureaus<br />

all over the country have lately: to brand and market<br />

anything that might bring in a few extra tourist dollars,<br />

with authenticity nothing more than an afterthought.<br />

At Mrs. Wick’s Pies, the restaurant adjacent to the<br />

Wick’s Pies factory, any doubt about the importance<br />

of the sugar cream pie to Indiana’s culinary history<br />

is quickly dismissed when I learn that the recipe for<br />

their company’s claim to fame dates back to the 19th<br />

century. Moreover, sugar cream pies are allegedly as old<br />

as the state itself: Even though it is often mistakenly<br />

attributed to the Amish, the state’s Quaker settlers from<br />

North Carolina fi rst made the so-called “desperation<br />

pie” when fresh fruits and other ingredients were scarce<br />

as far back as 1816. So the pie is legit, and a partnership<br />

between the Indiana Foodways Alliance and Ball<br />

State University brought the proposal to the<br />

government’s attention.<br />

But one restaurant does not a culinary trail make,<br />

so the next day I drive 53 miles west to the Cabbage<br />

Rose Eatery in Pendleton, along with IFA’s president,<br />

Maureen Lambert. There, sipping on strawberry<br />

iced teas in the converted old two-story house, she<br />

tells me that the reason for the trail isn’t just to bring<br />

money into the state; it’s to bring folks to places they<br />

might not normally go. “People are surprised,” she<br />

says. “Sometimes they’re just small diners that look<br />

like holes-in-the-wall, but the food is fantastic.” IFA,<br />

a membership organization with a logo depicting a<br />

Hoosier pie, was offi cially founded in 2007 to develop<br />

and promote culinary culture after a study revealed<br />

“68 authentic rural culinary tourism sites in eight<br />

Northeastern Indiana counties alone.” It subsequently<br />

SO SWEET (from<br />

left) The Wick’s<br />

Pies factory;<br />

Triple XXX Family<br />

Restaurant (which,<br />

while on the Hoosier<br />

Pie Trail, offers<br />

14 other kinds of<br />

pie); Cabbage Rose<br />

Eatery<br />

MRS. WICK’S PIES<br />

100 Cherry<br />

St,Winchester<br />

(94 miles from<br />

Indianapolis);<br />

765-584-7437;<br />

wickspies.com<br />

CABBAGE ROSE<br />

EATERY<br />

118 N Pendleton Ave,<br />

Pendleton (44 miles<br />

from Indianapolis);<br />

765-778-1944<br />

TRIPLE XXX FAMILY<br />

RESTAURANT<br />

S.R. 26 & W Salisbury<br />

St, West Lafayette<br />

(70 miles from<br />

Indianapolis);<br />

765-743-5373;<br />

triplexxxfamily<br />

restaurant.com<br />

ALTERNATE ROUTE Bona fide culinary trail or marketing gimmick? Decide for yourself on the Sweet & Salty Trail near Harrisburg, PA. Either way, you’ll forego gas station snacks as<br />

you drive from potato chip and pretzel factories to a candy museum and Hershey’s Chocolate World. padutchcountry.com<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 45<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

created a series of culinary trails to attract attention to<br />

otherwise-untraveled areas.<br />

A look at IFA’s site reveals not only trails highlighting<br />

Indiana-only foods like the Hoosier pie, but things<br />

like tenderloin, pizza and candy, as well as trails devoted<br />

to tea rooms and counties rather than specifi c items.<br />

Even the Hoosier Pie Trail isn’t solely focused on Hoosier<br />

pies; it also includes places that feature homemade<br />

fruit or cream pies. Why so many trails? Doesn’t this<br />

lack of discrimination cheapen things a bit?<br />

To Lambert, the ends justify the means. “Dining is<br />

one of the top three favorite tourist activities, and our<br />

goal is to get people off the beaten path of fast food and<br />

to eat local cuisine that some may not have in their state<br />

or part of the world,” she says.<br />

One place on the Hoosier Pie Trail that people are<br />

certainly beating a path to is the family-owned Triple<br />

XXX Family Restaurant in West Lafayette. Indiana’s<br />

fi rst drive-in (est. 1929) has received attention from<br />

many media outlets, including the Food Network—<br />

which featured its peanut-butter burgers, among other<br />

favorites—and the people there know the diff erence that<br />

culinary tourism can make. “It’s just been an absolute<br />

godsend, in this economy, that people are taking the<br />

time to get here,” says Greg Ehresman, who owns the<br />

restaurant with his wife, Carrie.<br />

Peanut-butter burgers aside, Ehresman says the pies<br />

(he off ers 14 varieties) are gaining in popularity. “Cherry<br />

pie seems to be one of the all-time favorite fruit pies,<br />

without a doubt,” he says. “Then I would have to say it’s<br />

a toss up between the chocolate cream and the coconut<br />

cream. The peanut butter cream takes off periodically.”<br />

While he doesn’t mention Hoosier pie (it’s not even<br />

on the menu), if the folks at IFA get their way, that won’t<br />

be the case for long.


FOOD TRAILS<br />

FIRED UP<br />

Texas Hill Country barbecue<br />

spots compete to be known as<br />

the best in the state.<br />

BY JAY CHESHES<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 46<br />

TThere<br />

are a few things you should know before heading<br />

into mid-Texas on the barbecue trail. For one,<br />

don’t expect your meat to come with sauce unless the<br />

pitmaster’s a maverick—in which case it might show<br />

up unbidden drenched in a sweet and spicy tomato<br />

concoction. And don’t look for a plate—the barbecue in<br />

these parts is served on scrunched butcher paper. Ditto<br />

for forks—the big stack of sliced white bread is there for<br />

ripping and wrapping. Lastly, go hungry.<br />

San Antonio is a good place to begin your journey<br />

onto the Southern Foodways Alliance’s Southern BBQ<br />

Trail. Though not known as a barbecue town—Tex-Mex<br />

is the signature cuisine here—it’s the gateway to Hill<br />

Country, home of the best slow-cooked smoked meat<br />

the Lone Star State has to off er. About an hour from<br />

San Antonio, Luling is your fi rst stop for a barbecue<br />

breakfast; City Market opens bright and early (sausage<br />

is ready at 7am; brisket and ribs at 9:30). Joe Capello has<br />

run the pits at this legendary ’cue joint since 1969, serving<br />

three meats and two sides (pinto beans and potato<br />

salad), and that’s pretty much it.<br />

Don’t be fooled by the clean-cut surroundings: The<br />

oak-smoked pork ribs, beef sausage and brisket are as<br />

old school as they come. Like so many Hill Country<br />

barbecue spots, this one evolved from a venerable meat<br />

market. The German and Czech immigrants who settled<br />

the area long ago brought their butchering skills—along<br />

with their knack for turning meat scraps into delectable<br />

sausage, which is as much a part of the barbecue<br />

tradition in these parts as anything else. At City Market,<br />

the plump peppery links, delicious caramelized ribs<br />

and rich, fatty brisket are all fi shed to order from big,<br />

weathered smokers and piled onto paper from inside a<br />

walk-in hotbox at the back of the dining room.<br />

Like all of the state’s best known ’cue spots, City<br />

Market has partisans who’ll swear it’s the best in Texas.<br />

GO MAGAZINE


WYATT MCSPADDEN<br />

Serious barbecue, as the plaques and trophies that fi ll<br />

so many smoke-fi lled dining rooms attest, is intensely<br />

competitive here. In Lockhart, up the road 15 miles, the<br />

sign into town announces you’re entering the “Barbecue<br />

Capital of Texas.” Kreuz Market, founded in 1900, was<br />

once the only draw here—until an intense sibling feud<br />

broke the business in two.<br />

In 1999, Nina and Rick Schmidt—whose father<br />

Edgar “Smitty” Schmidt bought the original place<br />

from the Kreuz family in 1948—disagreed about the<br />

future direction of the business. Nina, who owns the<br />

nearly century-old building, stained black from many<br />

decades of smoke, didn’t want to extend the lease on the<br />

barbecue restaurant inside, which her brother ran. He<br />

responded by moving Kreuz into a new warehouse-style<br />

structure a half-mile away. Three weeks later, Nina<br />

opened Smitty’s Market in the original space.<br />

The new Kreuz breaks from tradition at every turn—<br />

serving jalapeno-cheese sausages and shipping across<br />

the country. The restaurant off ers an encyclopedic selection<br />

of barbecued meats that includes prime rib and pit<br />

ham. Meanwhile, Smitty’s remains a purist operation,<br />

with just classic meats on the menu (brisket, sausage<br />

and ribs) sold from a blackened room where wood pyres<br />

lay smoldering on the fl oor at your feet. In March 2010,<br />

the squabbling siblings took their barbecue battle to the<br />

national airwaves, agreeing to a showdown with a blind<br />

taste-test on the Travel Channel’s Food Wars. Though<br />

Kreuz came out on top, the plump and juicy beef-andpork<br />

sausage and moist, fatty brisket at Smitty’s were, in<br />

fact, among the best that I tasted on my barbecue tour.<br />

Smitty’s ribs were outshone only by the caveman<br />

VIEW TO A GRILL<br />

(clockwise from<br />

opposite left) One of<br />

Kreuz’s massive pits; an<br />

assortment of Kreuz’s<br />

offerings, some of which<br />

stray from tradition;<br />

Louie Mueller Barbecue;<br />

John Fullilove, pitmaster<br />

and manager at Smitty’s<br />

CITY MARKET<br />

663 East Davis St,<br />

Luling (61 miles<br />

from San Antonio);<br />

830-875-9019<br />

KREUZ MARKET<br />

619 N Colorado St,<br />

Lockhart (62 miles<br />

from San Antonio);<br />

512-398-2361;<br />

kreuzmarket.com<br />

SMITTY’S MARKET<br />

208 S Commerce St,<br />

Lockhart (62 miles<br />

from San Antonio);<br />

512-398-9344;<br />

smittysmarket.com<br />

LOUIE MUELLER<br />

BARBECUE<br />

206 W Second St,<br />

Taylor (115 miles<br />

from San Antonio);<br />

512-352-6206;<br />

louiemueller<br />

barbecue.com<br />

SOUTHERN BBQ TRAIL<br />

southernbbqtrail.com<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 47<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

beef ribs at Louie Mueller’s namesake spot, an hour’s<br />

drive farther northeast in Taylor. This monster operation,<br />

founded in 1949, occupies a cavernous space. Just<br />

one dinosaur rib—at least that’s what they look like—is<br />

enough for a meal. The beef brisket, in a pastrami-thick<br />

layer of peppery rub, is the other house specialty. Both<br />

were developed by Louie’s son Bobby (who took over<br />

in 1974). Louie’s grandson Wayne currently runs the<br />

business, taking over when Bobby passed away in 2008<br />

(two years after the restaurant was recognized as an<br />

American classic at the James Beard Awards).<br />

While there are plenty more barbecue spots out on<br />

the trail—which goes up across Texas into remote cowboy<br />

country—afi cionados often agree that Louie Mueller<br />

belongs at the top of the list. Take a week, hit the road<br />

hungry, taste and compare. But be ready to loosen your<br />

belt if you want to become an expert.<br />

ALTERNATE ROUTE The rivalries between Texas barbecue joints are nothing next to the one in North Carolina, where two very different styles—Eastern and<br />

Lexington—vie for dominance. Try both on the North Carolina Barbecue Society Historic Barbecue Trail. ncbbqsociety.com


Off-season,<br />

ON THE<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 48<br />

GO MAGAZINE


BY<br />

ROD<br />

O’CONNOR<br />

No traffi c? Check.<br />

No lines, crowds or<br />

high-season prices?<br />

Check, check and<br />

check. During the<br />

summer, a drive along<br />

Florida’s entire coast<br />

is an epic adventure,<br />

complete with secret<br />

surf spots, oceanfront<br />

oyster shacks and<br />

charming hotels, all<br />

imbued with the kind<br />

of Southern hospitality<br />

you can only fi nd in the<br />

Sunshine State.<br />

PHOTOLIBRARY ROAD<br />

ILLUSTRATIONS BY ANDREW DEGRAFF


The words “The Best Burrito You’ll Ever Eat” scream off<br />

the bright-yellow sign, yanking my attention just before<br />

a sweeping turn on State Road A1A. Driving south,<br />

we’ve just hit another spectacularly scenic stretch<br />

of this artery that slices through Florida’s east coast<br />

barrier islands. To my right is the Intracoastal Waterway; to my left,<br />

the twinkling-blue Atlantic. Windows down, inhaling the salty air,<br />

the open road is unfurling in front of us. Still, something about that<br />

sign’s bold claim convinces me to do a quick 180.<br />

My wife Jen and I enter Robburrito’s in Melbourne Beach, and<br />

discover perhaps the perfect roadside eatery. Strings of lights hang<br />

from the ceiling. Posters of Zappa, Elvis and the Stones fi ll every<br />

square inch of the walls. A table of teenage surfers scarf down tacos<br />

as the owner, Glenn Boykin, a hippy-ish woman in her fi fties, greets<br />

us from behind a tin counter and delivers the restaurant’s spiel:<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 50<br />

The meat and fi sh are smoked on-site, everything is hand-chopped.<br />

She’s especially proud of her salsas, walking us through each one in<br />

order of heat.<br />

We could use a break from seafood, so we order the pork burrito.<br />

Chatting with Boykin and her pony-tailed husband, Robb, we learn<br />

the couple used to run a Mexican restaurant in Atlanta before<br />

escaping to this quiet beach town. “When we saw this strip we said,<br />

‘This is what we’re looking for… Old Florida,’” Robb says. “This<br />

place is paradise.”<br />

We’ve only covered 200 of the more than 1,400 miles we’ll rack<br />

up during our weeklong road trip along both coasts of Florida. But<br />

basking in the sun with the ocean lapping the shore a few yards<br />

away, sipping bottles of cold beer, we know this relaxing detour was<br />

the right move. And while the burrito may not be the best ever, it’s<br />

defi nitely one of the most memorable.<br />

OFF-SEASON DEALS ➜ JACKSONVILLE “20% Less Stress, More Fun in Jacksonville” promotion gives 20% off many hotels, attractions, transportation and restaurants. Through Sept. 30; jaxsummer.com ➜<br />

GO MAGAZINE


Ed Chiles<br />

OWNER<br />

Sandbar Restaurant, Anna<br />

Maria (100 Spring Ave;<br />

941-778-0444;<br />

groupersandwich.com)<br />

How is Anna Maria Island<br />

different from the rest<br />

of Florida? “There are no go-carts,<br />

no amusement parks, no chain<br />

restaurants. It’s just this quaint town.<br />

People often say, ‘There’s something<br />

about this place.’<br />

They don’t know<br />

exactly what it is,<br />

but they feel it in<br />

their skin.”<br />

What’s it like during<br />

the summer?<br />

“Summers are<br />

laidback. The fishing<br />

is tremendous. You have some of the<br />

best tarpon fishing, and the snook<br />

and red fish are real good in the<br />

summertime. It’s a great time to bring<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 51<br />

PHOTOLIBRARY<br />

Pit Stops<br />

Just because the open<br />

road keeps calling<br />

doesn’t mean you<br />

can’t relax and enjoy a<br />

proper meal.<br />

BEACH DINER<br />

Locals flock to this laidback,<br />

nautical-themed diner<br />

for omelets and Southern<br />

specialties on the route from<br />

Jacksonville to its Atlantic<br />

coast beaches. 501 Atlantic Blvd,<br />

Atlantic Beach; 904-249-6500;<br />

beachdiner.com<br />

ROBBURRITO’S<br />

Keep your eyes peeled<br />

for this friendly roadside<br />

mom-and-pop eatery, which<br />

specializes in house-smoked<br />

pork and brisket served amid a<br />

museum’s worth of rock-androll<br />

ephemera. 315 Ocean Ave,<br />

Melbourne Beach; 321-729-6244;<br />

robburritos.com<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

CITY SEAFOOD<br />

This no-frills market and<br />

dockside eatery near Big<br />

Cypress National Preserve<br />

doles out fresher-thanfresh<br />

shrimp, grouper and<br />

oysters (not to mention<br />

frog’s legs and gator). Dine<br />

on wooden benches overlooking<br />

the Barron River. 702<br />

Begonia St, Everglades City, 239-<br />

695-4700; cityseafood1.com<br />

ATLAS OYSTER HOUSE<br />

Great views of Pensacola<br />

Bay provide the backdrop<br />

for Florida-meets-Southern<br />

cuisine, best exemplified by<br />

the “World-Famous Grits a<br />

Ya-Ya”: Gulf shrimp sautéed<br />

with spinach, mushrooms<br />

and bacon served over<br />

real-deal smoked Gouda<br />

cheese grits. 600 S Barracks St,<br />

Pensacola, 850-437-1961;<br />

atlas.goodgrits.com<br />

SANDBAR RESTAURANT<br />

You’ll be having the grouper<br />

sandwich—blackened—at<br />

this Anna Maria Island<br />

institution with tables so<br />

close to the water, your toes<br />

are literally in the sand.<br />

100 Spring Ave, Anna Maria,<br />

941-778-0444;<br />

groupersandwich.com<br />

your family. The July 4th fireworks<br />

over the water are the darndest show<br />

you’ll ever see. It’s pretty impressive<br />

for a small town.”<br />

How did the son of a governor end<br />

up in this particular part of Florida?<br />

“This is where I grew up. I’m from<br />

Lakeland, about an hour and 20<br />

minutes from here, and everyone from<br />

Lakeland came to the beach here at<br />

Anna Maria. I’ve been coming here<br />

since before I can remember. It’s in<br />

my soul.”<br />

STUART (41 miles from West Palm Beach) // Play unlimited rounds of golf on an 18-hole course with “The Unlimited Golf Package” at the 200-acre Hutchinson Island Marriott Beach Resort & Marina. Through Sept. 30;


Waves of Solitude<br />

Drop in at these Atlantic coast surf<br />

spots for off-season bliss.<br />

HANNA PARK BEACH<br />

Northeast Florida’s in-the-know surfers venture about<br />

8 miles north of always-busy Jacksonville Beach to hit<br />

Hanna Park. One of the area’s most consistent surf breaks<br />

(especially during north swells) is “The Poles,” named after<br />

the pilings that mark the Mayport Naval Station boundary.<br />

jaxshells.org/jaxshell1.htm<br />

SEBASTIAN INLET STATE PARK<br />

The summertime crowds are thinner at this popular park in<br />

Melbourne Beach (82 miles from Orlando)—so now is the<br />

perfect time to carve its 3 miles of Atlantic beach shoreline.<br />

Top breaks include the “First Peak,” located next to the<br />

north jetty, and the legendary “Monster Hole” off the south<br />

side of the inlet.<br />

floridastateparks.org/sebastianinlet<br />

DEERFIELD BEACH<br />

These cove-like beaches 22 miles north of Ft. Lauderdale<br />

offer breaks for every skill level—and much less<br />

competition in the off-season. Seasoned surfers can catch<br />

powerful wave ranges north of International Pier, while the<br />

softer waves south of Tower #9 are perfect for beginners.<br />

deerfield-beach.com<br />

Glenn insists we make another stop at nearby Sebastian Inlet,<br />

a state park 16 miles down the highway. It’s a windy afternoon, and<br />

surfers are paddling among the whitecaps as we walk the jetty where<br />

the Indian River Lagoon meets the ocean. A fi sherman dragging a<br />

cooler of bait tells me this is one of the coast’s longest piers, perfect<br />

for deepwater catch like snook and shark. I ask what he expects to<br />

reel in, and he shrugs. “Not sure. I’m just wasting time,” he says.<br />

We’re doing the same thing—albeit, with a purpose: To prove<br />

that Florida, with its mix of exhilaratingly wide-open causeways<br />

and densely forested rural byways, is the perfect candidate for an<br />

epic American road trip. That it off ers just as much excitement as<br />

a coastal drive along that state out west—you know, the one that<br />

the Terminator used to run. The truth is, Florida’s 1,350 miles of<br />

shoreline dwarfs California’s 840; in the US, it’s second only to<br />

Alaska, which boasts more than 6,600 miles of coast but, alas, not<br />

many driveable roads—and far fewer beachfront burrito stands.<br />

As we meander from Jacksonville down the east coast to Ft.<br />

Lauderdale, across Alligator Alley to the Gulf Coast, back north<br />

through Tampa and past the “Forgotten Coast” to Pensacola, we discover<br />

that the off -season is the perfect time for such an adventure:<br />

No snowbirds clogging the highways, no Spring Breakers doing keg<br />

stands on the beach. Only fellow in-the-know visitors and the locals<br />

who never leave because, well, why would you?<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 52<br />

WE START OUR journey in Jacksonville, where we arise early at the<br />

basic-yet-comfortable Hyatt Place, slightly groggy after a late fl ight.<br />

But we’re quickly energized by shrimp and grits at the laidback<br />

Beach Diner on our way to the Atlantic, where we meet up with<br />

State Road A1A.<br />

This storied pavement, which extends all the way to Key West,<br />

has led many a college student south to Spring Break nirvana and,<br />

until the late-1950s, served as part of NASCAR’s Daytona Beach<br />

and Road Course. In Miami it becomes Collins Avenue, the address<br />

of South Beach’s ritziest resorts. After a quick stop to survey the<br />

powdery sands of unpopulated Jacksonville Beach, we enter the<br />

72-mile section of A1A designated an offi cial National Scenic Byway,<br />

a mostly two-lane stunner that passes ocean bluff s, dense foliage<br />

and the impeccably manicured TPC Sawgrass golf course in Ponte<br />

Vedra Beach, home to The Players Championship.<br />

A1A leads us straight into St. Augustine, the former Spanish<br />

foothold and the mainland’s oldest continuously inhabited<br />

European settlement. At fi rst glance, we fear we’ve reached a tacky<br />

tourist trap with its ghost tours and “Fountain of Youth” theme<br />

park. But we’re soon beguiled by this very European-feeling town<br />

and easily kill half a day soaking up the views from its 17th-century<br />

fort and wandering the narrow, brick-lined streets of its historic<br />

center, making a quick stop for Jen to survey the buttery handbags<br />

marriott.com ➜ FT. LAUDERDALE “Vacation Like a VIP” package includes room upgrade, valet parking and $100 resort credit that can used for spa treatments, golf, food and more at 13 of the area’s<br />

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at leather-maker Dan Holiday’s simple shop on Aviles Street. The<br />

aff able 75-year-old was drawn to St. Augustine after “mustering out<br />

of the Navy” in 1959, and has been here ever since.<br />

Leaving the past behind, we venture farther south—toward<br />

the future. With puff y clouds hiding the late-afternoon sun, we<br />

cruise through Titusville, nicknamed “Space City,” and across the<br />

causeway to the island refuge home of Kennedy Space Center.<br />

There’s nary a tour bus in sight as we pull to the front of the massive<br />

parking lot and catch the last tour of the day, which includes a peek<br />

(from the observation gantry) at the space shuttle Endeavour, still<br />

waiting for the go-ahead after a much-delayed launch.<br />

After successfully avoiding the crowds at two major tourist destinations,<br />

we’re quickly learning that Florida’s warmer months are<br />

indeed the perfect time to visit. Kicking back on the open-air porch<br />

of Fishlips Waterfront Bar & Grill, a Port Canaveral sports bar, we<br />

devour peel-and-eat shrimp while a cruise ship putters by in the<br />

darkness. A rowdy, ladies-night crowd is just getting started when<br />

we escape to the Four Points by Sheraton Cocoa Beach, exhausted.<br />

Tomorrow, South Florida is calling us.<br />

ITS PARTY-HEARTY Spring Break reputation still lingers, but over<br />

the years, Ft. Lauderdale has evolved into something far more<br />

intriguing: Miami’s chilled-out little sister. We arrive with the dusk<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 53<br />

Mike Stevens<br />

CAPTAIN<br />

Chase-n-Fins Aquatic Charters,<br />

Pensacola Beach (850-492-<br />

6337; chase-n-fins.com)<br />

What’s the No. 1 reason to<br />

visit Pensacola? “The beach;<br />

we’ve got the emerald coast<br />

waters, we’ve got the sugarwhite<br />

sands. And we’ve got<br />

the National Naval Aviation<br />

Museum—it’s one of the<br />

biggest tourist draws in<br />

the area.”<br />

What does this area have<br />

that’s unlike anywhere else?<br />

“Solitude. And the nature<br />

darkening the navigable here is genuinely unspoiled.<br />

inland canals that give I grew up in South Florida, in<br />

the city its nickname, Boca Raton, and that’s what<br />

the “Venice of America,” drew me here: The lack of<br />

and immediately join commercialism. For me, these<br />

the well-dressed couples pristine beaches are what<br />

promenading past the Florida is all about. You can<br />

posh shops of the down- find places where you feel like<br />

town “style mile,” Las you’re on your own little island.”<br />

Olas Boulevard. After<br />

a dinner of yellowtail Is summer a good time for<br />

ceviche and red snapper dolphin sightings? “Absolutely.<br />

at the sleek Johnny V, I We have nice flat waters during<br />

chat up the owner, Chef the summer, which makes it a<br />

Johnny Vinczencz, and great time to spot dolphins.“<br />

he directs us to Parrot<br />

Lounge for a nightcap.<br />

A wild hotspot in the ’80s, tonight—an off -season weeknight—the<br />

brick walls of this endearing dive hold but a handful of locals nursing<br />

craft beers. We join them for a round before returning to our<br />

river-view room at the Riverside Hotel. Built in the 1930s, it exudes<br />

a hospitable, Old South vibe with original Mexican tile fl oors and<br />

subtropical breezeways. We wish we could stay here for a week, but<br />

upscale hotels. Through Oct. 15; sunny.org/vip ➜ SANIBEL ISLAND (25 miles from Ft. Myers) // Many hotels on the island, including the Sanibel Sunset Beach Resort, are offering a “Summer Escape”<br />

GO MAGAZINE


y morning we’re on the move again, ready to<br />

traverse the state via a section of Interstate 75<br />

called Alligator Alley.<br />

Cutting south on pastoral State Road 29<br />

into Big Cypress National Preserve, we’re on a<br />

mission to spot the alley’s namesake reptiles.<br />

And sure enough, within seconds of reaching<br />

the viewing area at the lush H.P. Williams<br />

Roadside Park, two gators appear, lazily<br />

sunning themselves along the murky edge of<br />

a canal. It’s easy to lose track of time among<br />

the clusters of bulbous, otherworldly cypress<br />

trees, their exposed roots reminding me of<br />

Yoda’s bog in The Empire Strikes Back. After<br />

a few hours spotting herons and egrets, we’re<br />

tempted to diverge by the tourist trap sign<br />

for the Skunk Ape Research Headquarters in<br />

Ochopee. Having seen enough wildlife for one<br />

day, we press on, hoping to make it to Sanibel<br />

Island in time for a Gulf sunset. But we can’t<br />

resist another seafood stop. For Midwesterners<br />

like us, the fresher-than-fresh catch available<br />

throughout the state makes every unassuming<br />

eatery feel exotic. In Everglades City, we<br />

stumble upon City Seafood, a bi-level dockside<br />

shack so rickety it looks like it might fall into<br />

the Barron River. But the lightly breaded grouper,<br />

gulped down at a creaky wooden bench, is<br />

hands down the best meal of our trip.<br />

Sated for the moment, we backtrack north<br />

on 29 and make a quick left at Tamiami Trail<br />

(pronounced “tammy-ammy”), which runs<br />

east-west from Miami (where it’s better known<br />

as Little Havana’s “Calle Ocho”) to Tampa.<br />

Careening past Naples, hugging the Gulf on a<br />

northwest slant to Sanibel Island, we reach our<br />

room at Casa Ybel just in time for a showstopper<br />

sunset—the seashell-carpeted shoreline<br />

bathed in a warm, orange light.<br />

The next morning, we explore the undeveloped<br />

point on the easternmost end of the<br />

island. A white-planked boardwalk cuts through the dense fl ora and<br />

leads us to Sanibel’s oldest, and perhaps most reliable, resident: a<br />

rust-colored lighthouse that’s guided boats safely past Ybel Point for<br />

127 years. Beneath it we fi nd a quaint, cove-like beach where a small<br />

crowd of kids wades in ankle-deep water, oohing and aahing at two<br />

dolphins playing hide-and-seek near the shoreline.<br />

Crossing over the three dramatic bridges connecting the island<br />

to the mainland, we reunite with the Tamiami, speeding by strip<br />

malls and golf courses, on our way north to Anna Maria Island.<br />

There were no bridges when the City Pier was built here in 1911, so<br />

sportsmen came by steamer. One hundred years later, people come<br />

for the same reasons: the quiet, the family atmosphere and the<br />

excellent fi shing. There are no big-name hotel chains or large condo<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 56<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

Frying in Florida?<br />

When summer weather<br />

makes you wither, these<br />

cool remedies do the trick.<br />

promotion, good for a free fourth night, $20 gas credit, 20% off selected resort activities and more. Through Aug. 31; luxuryresorts.com/escape ➜ CLEARWATER (18 miles from Tampa) // With


Melissa Henneman<br />

PARK RANGER<br />

Big Cypress National<br />

Preserve, Ochopee (72<br />

miles from Ft. Myers;<br />

33100 Tamiami Trail E;<br />

239-695-4758)<br />

What’s Big Cypress<br />

National Preserve’s claim<br />

to fame? “We have some of<br />

the most pristine and accessible<br />

areas of the Cypress Swamp, which<br />

BŪCCAN<br />

Palm Beach<br />

What says summer more than<br />

a tall, sweating glass of iced<br />

tea? How about a stiff version<br />

that adds vodka, basil, agave<br />

nectar and fresh-squeezed<br />

citrus from Chef Clay Conley’s<br />

hotspot, perfectly located a<br />

block from the beach? 350<br />

S County Rd; 561-833-3450;<br />

buccanpalmbeach.com<br />

KERMIT’S KEY WEST<br />

KEY LIME SHOPPE<br />

Key West<br />

You wouldn’t visit Paris without<br />

trying pain au chocolat, would<br />

you? In sweltering heat, the<br />

island’s famously tart treat is<br />

best eaten chocolate-dipped<br />

and frozen on a stick. 200-A<br />

Elizabeth St; 305-296-0806;<br />

keylimeshop.com<br />

south Florida<br />

used to be<br />

covered with. If<br />

you really want<br />

to see what Old<br />

Florida looked<br />

like, this is a<br />

good place.”<br />

What sort of<br />

natural beauty<br />

can people expect to see in July<br />

and August? “The orchids are<br />

MIAMI BEACH CINEMATHEQUE<br />

Miami Beach<br />

After years of operating in<br />

bare-bones fashion, this<br />

gem of an art-house cinema<br />

moved to a bona fide theater<br />

in Historic City Hall in February.<br />

Choose from its calendar of<br />

classics, festival winners and<br />

foreign films. 1130 Washington<br />

Ave, South Side, Ground Floor;<br />

305-673-4567; mbcinema.com<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 57<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

blooming in the wet season, which<br />

is summer here. We get the<br />

afternoon or evening thunderstorms…<br />

it means increased<br />

humidity, and the plants really take<br />

off. Everything is so lush. “<br />

If you only have time for one stop,<br />

where should it be? “H.P. Williams is<br />

one of the oldest roadside parks in<br />

the state. There’s a boardwalk above<br />

the canal, which is a magnet for<br />

wildlife year-round.”<br />

THE FLORIDA AQUARIUM<br />

Tampa<br />

My, what big teeth you have!<br />

Certified divers aged 15 and<br />

older can see for themselves<br />

when diving with sand tiger<br />

sharks up to 10 feet long, as<br />

well as moray eels, sea turtles<br />

and tarpon, in a 500,000gallon<br />

saltwater tank. 701<br />

Channelside Dr; 813-273-4000;<br />

flaquarium.org<br />

COCO KEY WATER RESORT<br />

Orlando<br />

At this exotic, canopycovered<br />

tropical island in<br />

the heart of amusement<br />

park-central, even nonresort<br />

guests can access<br />

the lagoons, interactive<br />

jungle gym and adventure<br />

slides. 7400 International Dr;<br />

877-875-4681;<br />

cocokeywaterresort.com<br />

a five-night stay at the Hyatt Regency Clearwater Beach Resort & Spa, get a $500 Welcome Credit, good for anything from drinks at the bar to a round of golf. Through summer;


Johnny Vinczencz<br />

CHEF<br />

Johnny V, Ft. Lauderdale<br />

(625 E Las Olas Blvd, 954-<br />

761-7920;<br />

johnnyvlasolas.com)<br />

How do you describe<br />

your cuisine? “I’m originally<br />

from St Louis. My food is<br />

what happens when you take<br />

a boy from the Midwest, put<br />

him in Florida, and infuse<br />

some Spanish and Caribbean<br />

influences.”<br />

What’s your favorite dish<br />

on the menu right now?<br />

“We just came up with a new<br />

truffled mushroom-andpotato-stuffed<br />

snapper. It<br />

looks intimidating—it’s a big<br />

piece of fish—but it’s light.<br />

I know small plates are a<br />

trend, but if I pay $35 for an<br />

entrée, I want something<br />

to eat.”<br />

Any tips for those visiting<br />

Ft. Lauderdale in the<br />

off-season? “There are so<br />

many cool things happening.<br />

I always send people to the<br />

local places. Parrot Lounge<br />

is a great bar and it’s been<br />

here forever. LaSpada’s<br />

serves the best hoagies<br />

I’ve ever had. The lines are<br />

shorter during the summer.<br />

You can’t get in there<br />

in-season.”<br />

Pearls of the Panhandle<br />

Seafood lovers should remember<br />

to stop for oysters on Florida’s<br />

Forgotten Coast.<br />

More than 90% of Florida’s oyster haul<br />

comes from Apalachicola Bay (192 miles<br />

from Pensacola) on the Panhandle, where<br />

the fresh water that feeds the bay combines<br />

with the salt water of the Gulf of Mexico<br />

to create a unique sweet-and-salty flavor<br />

profile. “Depending on which way the winds<br />

are blowing, they’re not always salty,” says<br />

Milan Mullins, a shucker at Papa Joe’s, an<br />

oyster shack overlooking Scipio Creek Marina<br />

in downtown Apalachicola. “But they’re always<br />

good.” Try them raw, baked Rockefeller-style<br />

(with spinach and herbs) or topped with bacon<br />

and gooey cheddar. To get slurping, head to:<br />

PAPA JOE’S OYSTER BAR & GRILL<br />

301 Market St #B; 850-653-1189<br />

UP THE CREEK RAW BAR<br />

317 Water St; 850-653-2525<br />

THAT PLACE OFF 98<br />

17 Avenue E; 850-653-9898<br />

complexes here—this is a beach town that feels<br />

like a real town.<br />

According to Ed Chiles, who owns Anna<br />

Maria’s popular Sandbar Restaurant, by the<br />

time the secret got out about this picturesque<br />

community’s white-sand beaches and lush<br />

mangroves in the 1980s, strict zoning laws<br />

were already in place. He points proudly to a<br />

row of new, brightly colored two-story buildings<br />

on Pine Avenue with big, welcoming front<br />

porches. Handsome shops fi ll the ground-fl oor<br />

spaces; above are guesthouses. “This place<br />

is low-rise, high character,” says Chiles, who<br />

shares the gift of gab with his late father, Lawton<br />

Chiles, Florida’s governor in the 1990s.<br />

The scorching temperature drops 10<br />

degrees as we duck across a small trail<br />

winding through a meticulously recreated<br />

native landscape, and pop out near the small<br />

history museum. Looking at the displays of old<br />

photographs, it’s easy to see why locals want to<br />

keep Anna Maria the same. The quaintness is<br />

almost surreal, but nothing compared to what<br />

we would see at our next museum stop. We end<br />

our day an hour north in St. Petersburg, at the<br />

cool geodesic dome that’s home to mindbending<br />

works by Salvador Dalí. Its winding<br />

staircase is meant to evoke Dalí’s appreciation<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 58<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

for the building blocks of nature—appropriate,<br />

since we’re about to enter the deep woods of<br />

northwest Florida.<br />

SPANISH MOSS APPEARS on the trees—and<br />

semis carrying livestock replace Jeeps with<br />

surfb oards—as we slog 120 miles north up<br />

Route 19. After 50 miles or so, the road diverges<br />

inland for most of the more desolate stretches<br />

of the drive, curving toward the Panhandle. At<br />

Route 24, a two-lane artery brings us to Cedar<br />

Key, a tiny fi shing village that was once a major<br />

port and timber industry hub.<br />

If Anna Maria Island is sleepy, rustic<br />

Cedar Key looks like it needs to be jostled<br />

awake. Its dusty downtown is dominated by a<br />

cluster of 19th-century structures on Second<br />

Street—some dilapidated, others beautifully<br />

restored. Completing a loop around the village,<br />

we see scattered folks enjoying the waterfront:<br />

A young couple casts for fi sh knee-deep in<br />

the Gulf; a teenager kayaks lazily along the<br />

horizon. The quiet is occasionally broken by<br />

the electric hum of golf carts, seemingly the<br />

preferred mode of transport.<br />

A docent at the historical museum had told<br />

me Cedar Key was Florida’s “Final Frontier,”<br />

so I’m not sure what to expect as we cut<br />

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SCUBA DIVING/<br />

SNORKELING<br />

Ft. Lauderdale area<br />

Dive to the ocean floor<br />

to explore Greater Ft.<br />

Lauderdale’s 80-plus<br />

shipwrecks and<br />

artificial reefs. At nearby<br />

Lauderdale-By-The-<br />

Sea, you can swim to a<br />

three-tier natural coral<br />

reef system that’s just<br />

100 yards from shore.<br />

southfloridadiving.com<br />

BIKING<br />

Sanibel Island (25 miles<br />

from Ft. Myers)<br />

With more than 23 miles<br />

of bike paths, this Gulf<br />

Coast paradise is best<br />

Sweat it Out<br />

Embrace the heat with these<br />

outdoor adventures.<br />

explored on two wheels.<br />

Rent a ride from Billy’s<br />

Rentals before cruising<br />

through mangroves—<br />

and spotting blue herons<br />

and egrets—in the J.N.<br />

Ding Darling National<br />

Wildlife Refuge. Then<br />

pedal to the island’s<br />

easternmost end to<br />

the Sanibel Lighthouse,<br />

which first guided ships<br />

here in 1884.<br />

billysrentals.com<br />

through pine forests towards the “Forgotten Coast.” Rumor has<br />

it this mid-Panhandle area, consisting primarily of undeveloped<br />

land stretching from St. Mark’s National Wildlife Refuge on the<br />

east to the town of Mexico Beach on the west, got its name after its<br />

towns were accidently left off a state tourism map. It’s remote, sure,<br />

but once Route 98 becomes the Big Bend Scenic Highway, and I<br />

start to whip around sharp turns with scenery that vacillates from<br />

untouched wilderness to unobstructed Gulf views, I start to doubt<br />

the story’s credibility. No one could ever forget a place this beautiful.<br />

The oyster shacks start to appear, and we’re tempted to get our<br />

fi x of Apalachicola Bay’s claim to fame. But we press on and arrive<br />

at The Gibson Inn, a restored Victorian hotel in the 1830s port city<br />

of Apalachicola, just in time for happy hour. Jinny Trammell at the<br />

front desk tells me all about the area’s status as an oyster capital.<br />

Most boats hand-tong the tasty mollusks, she explains, something<br />

I’ll see fi rsthand when I drive along the bridge to the barrier island<br />

of St. George. That evening, we hoof it through the blink-and-you’llmiss-it<br />

historic downtown to Papa Joe’s, a rollicking no-frills eatery<br />

at the Scipio Creek Marina. Bellying up to the bar, we watch grizzled<br />

shuckers pull our dinner—two-dozen delicious sweet-and-salty<br />

oysters—from a steel trough. And they’re just as good as advertised.<br />

It’s only another 150 miles to Pensacola, so we take our time on<br />

our fi nal day of driving. Just past Panama City Beach, I follow a<br />

pack of Harleys onto County Highway 30A, an 18-mile scenic highway<br />

that passes through a series of villages, each more charming<br />

than the last. We stop in Seaside, a master-planned community of<br />

cottages founded in 1979 that was cast as the perfect small town in<br />

the 1998 fi lm The Truman Show. A line of retro-cool Airstream food<br />

trucks grabs our attention, and we order fresh-fruit smoothies and<br />

gourmet grilled-cheese sandwiches and enjoy them in the shade of<br />

a majestic oak tree in secluded Ruskin Park.<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 60<br />

FISHING<br />

Anna Maria Island<br />

(18 miles from<br />

Sarasota/Bradenton)<br />

Choose from charters,<br />

three fishing piers or just<br />

let ’er fly at Anna Maria<br />

Island’s more low-key<br />

fishing spots: the back<br />

bays and canals that<br />

boast snook, trout and a<br />

multitude of other tasty<br />

catch. annamariaislandlongboatkey.com<br />

KAYAKING<br />

Cedar Key (130 miles<br />

from Tampa)<br />

Book a three-hour<br />

rental to paddle along<br />

the “Hidden Coast” sur-<br />

HYATT PLACE JACKSON-<br />

VILLE AIRPORT<br />

14565 Duval Rd,<br />

Jacksonville; 904-741-<br />

4184; hyatt.com<br />

KENNEDY SPACE CENTER<br />

SR 405, Kennedy Space<br />

Center; 866-737-<br />

5235; kennedyspace<br />

center.com<br />

FISHLIPS WATERFRONT<br />

BAR & GRILL<br />

610 Glen Cheek Dr,<br />

Port Canaveral;<br />

321-784-4533;<br />

fishlipswaterfront.com<br />

FOUR POINTS SHERATON<br />

4001 N Atlantic Ave,<br />

Cocoa Beach; 321-<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

rounding the secluded<br />

fishing village of Cedar<br />

Key. You’ll find reefs,<br />

sandbars, salt marsh<br />

and wooded islands<br />

(plus plenty of birdwatching<br />

opportunities)<br />

along this calm-watered,<br />

undeveloped coastline.<br />

kayakcedarkeys.com<br />

PARASAILING<br />

St. Pete Beach (28 miles<br />

from Tampa)<br />

There’s nothing more<br />

exhilarating than<br />

soaring above the<br />

Gulf and watching the<br />

action on the beach<br />

from the sky. Sign up for<br />

parasailing—and any<br />

783-8717; starwood<br />

hotels.com<br />

PARROT LOUNGE<br />

911 Sunrise Ln,<br />

Ft. Lauderdale;<br />

954-563-1493;<br />

parrotlounge.com<br />

RIVERSIDE HOTEL<br />

620 E Las Olas Blvd, Ft.<br />

Lauderdale; 954-467-<br />

0671; riversidehotel.com<br />

CASA YBEL RESORT<br />

2255 W Gulf Dr, Sanibel<br />

Island; 800-276-4753;<br />

casaybelresort.com<br />

SANIBEL HISTORICAL<br />

MUSEUM & VILLAGE<br />

950 Dunlop Rd,<br />

other water sport—at<br />

TradeWinds Resorts’<br />

Sun Sports (open to<br />

non-guests).<br />

tradewindsresort.com<br />

DOLPHIN VIEWING<br />

Pensacola<br />

Catch bottlenose<br />

dolphins doing what<br />

they do best (looking<br />

adorable)—plus scan<br />

for leatherneck turtles,<br />

manta rays, pelicans<br />

and ospreys—during<br />

a leisurely cruise of<br />

Pensacola Bay and<br />

Santa Rosa Sound<br />

through Chase-N-Fins<br />

Aquatic Charters.<br />

chase-n-fins.com<br />

MY PULSE RACES as we hit the home stretch. Crossing the<br />

barrier island of Santa Rosa, we race past sugar-white sand and<br />

emerald water and cross over Pensacola Bay. We hear the sound<br />

of a Dixieland band as we pass downtown Pensacola’s Seville<br />

Quarter entertainment district, its iron railings and elegant<br />

architecture reminding us very much of New Orleans, just a<br />

three-hour drive away. There’s a Crawfi sh Festival happening;<br />

a pretty girl with a ponytail and a comforting drawl hands us<br />

Styrofoam containers overfl owing with fresh crawdads. We dig<br />

in, sitting at a park bench, and stare past the palm trees and<br />

sawgrass into the wide-open bay. Amazing views, killer seafood,<br />

Southern hospitality. This place has it all. And it only took us<br />

1,400 miles to realize it.<br />

Sanibel; 239-472-4648;<br />

sanibelmuseum.org<br />

THE DALÍ MUSEUM<br />

1 Dalí Blvd, St. Petersburg;<br />

727-823-3767;<br />

thedali.org<br />

CEDAR KEY HISTORICAL<br />

SOCIETY MUSEUM<br />

Corner of Second St<br />

and SR24, Cedar Key;<br />

352-543-5549;<br />

cedarkeymuseum.org<br />

THE GIBSON INN<br />

51 Avenue C, Apalachicola;<br />

850-653-2191;<br />

gibsoninn.com<br />

See sidebars for more<br />

contact information<br />

& Girls Clubs of Central Florida. Sept. 1-30; orlandomagicaldining.com ➜ You can get great deals on car rentals with AirTran Airways partner, Hertz. Visit airtran.com for more information.


Historic Homes • Edison’s Laboratory • Museum<br />

Tropical Gardens<br />

Open Daily Year Round 9 to 5:30<br />

Winner of the<br />

National Trust for Historic Preservation Stewardship of a Historic Site<br />

2350 McGregor egor Blvd. • Fort Myers, FL 33901 • 239.334.7419 • www.efwefla.org


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here from<br />

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to raise our<br />

family in a diverse, walkable<br />

and affordable community.<br />

We chose Shorewood,Wis.<br />

because of its superior<br />

school system, beautiful<br />

landmark homes and its<br />

close proximity to<br />

downtown Milwaukee.<br />

“Our family enjoys all the<br />

benefits of a closely knit<br />

community with small-town<br />

charm, yet convenient to<br />

big-city attractions. We are<br />

extremely lucky to live in<br />

Shorewood and wouldn’t<br />

live anywhere else.”<br />

BALTIMORE’S HISTORIC<br />

SEE IT FROM A NEW ANGLE<br />

EXPLORE BALTIMORE<br />

WITH RANGER-LED AND<br />

SELF-GUIDED WALKING TOURS<br />

Baltimore National Heritage Area<br />

walking tours are a unique way to see the<br />

city’s vibrant neighborhoods.<br />

Fell’s Point tours depart from the<br />

Fell’s Point Visitors Center at 1724-26 Thames Street<br />

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON ALL<br />

HERITAGE AREA TOURS<br />

Visit the Inner Harbor Visitors Center<br />

OR CALL 443-984-2369<br />

ONLINE AT www.starspangledtrails.org<br />

VILLAGE OF SHOREWOOD, WIS.<br />

“WE WOULDN’T LIVE ANYWHERE ELSE”<br />

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REQUEST A FREE INFORMATIONAL WALKING KIT<br />

Visit shorewoodtoday.com or call 414.847.2700


GO GUIDES<br />

ON THE TOWN<br />

ATLANTA//69 FLINT//90 KANSAS CITY//104<br />

AKRON/CANTON 64<br />

ALLENTOWN/BETHLEHEM 64<br />

ARUBA 65<br />

ASHEVILLE 65<br />

ATLANTA 66<br />

ATLANTIC CITY 80<br />

BALTIMORE 80<br />

BERMUDA 81<br />

BLOOMINGTON/NORMAL 82<br />

BOSTON 82<br />

BRANSON 83<br />

BUFFALO/NIAGARA 83<br />

CANCUN 84<br />

CHARLESTON, WV 84<br />

CHARLOTTE 85<br />

CHICAGO 85<br />

COLUMBUS 86<br />

DALLAS/FT. WORTH 87<br />

DAYTON 87<br />

DENVER 88<br />

DES MOINES 88<br />

Looking for a beer festival in Denver, improv<br />

comedy in Las Vegas or pie in Durham, NC?<br />

Look no further: Our local writers give you the<br />

scoop on the best sights, shops and eateries in<br />

every AirTran Airways destination.<br />

(And if you want to share your insider knowledge, send recommendations<br />

to editorial@airtranmagazine.com. Your hometown faves<br />

just might show up in a future issue.)<br />

DETROIT 89<br />

FLINT 89<br />

FT. LAUDERDALE 96<br />

FT. MYERS 96<br />

GRAND RAPIDS 100<br />

HARRISBURG 100<br />

HOUSTON 101<br />

HUNTSVILLE/DECATUR 101<br />

INDIANAPOLIS 102<br />

JACKSONVILLE 102<br />

KANSAS CITY 110<br />

KEY WEST 110<br />

KNOXVILLE 111<br />

RESTAURANT GUIDE $=Less than $20; $$ =$20-$30; $$$=$30-$45; $$$$ =$45–$75; $$$$$=More than $75<br />

Prices are for appetizer, entrée and dessert for one person.<br />

All distances are from the airport, except where noted.<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 63<br />

LAS VEGAS 111<br />

LEXINGTON 112<br />

LOS ANGELES 112<br />

MEMPHIS 113<br />

MIAMI 114<br />

MILWAUKEE 114<br />

MINNEAPOLIS/ST. PAUL 115<br />

MOLINE/QUAD CITIES 116<br />

MONTEGO BAY 116<br />

NASSAU/PARADISE ISLAND 117<br />

NEW ORLEANS 117<br />

NEW YORK CITY 118<br />

NEWPORT NEWS/WILLIAMSBURG 119<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

SCHOOL’S IN SESSION Gazing at fish at the Georgia Aquarium<br />

ORLANDO 119<br />

PENSACOLA 120<br />

PHILADELPHIA 121<br />

PHOENIX 121<br />

PITTSBURGH 122<br />

PORTLAND 122<br />

PUNTA CANA 123<br />

RALEIGH/DURHAM 123<br />

RICHMOND 124<br />

ROCHESTER 124<br />

ST. LOUIS 125<br />

SAN ANTONIO 125<br />

SAN FRANCISCO 126<br />

SAN JUAN 126<br />

SARASOTA/BRADENTON 127<br />

SEATTLE 127<br />

TAMPA 128<br />

WASHINGTON, DC 128<br />

WEST PALM BEACH 129<br />

WHITE PLAINS 130<br />

WICHITA 130


GO GUIDES<br />

Akron/Canton<br />

ohio<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Don Drumm Studios<br />

& Gallery<br />

437 Crouse St, Akron; 330-253-6268;<br />

dondrummstudios.com<br />

For one-of-a-kind jewelry,<br />

housewares and other items<br />

with artistic flare, head to<br />

Drumm’s, which features<br />

handmade works from more<br />

than 500 North American<br />

artists. The shop’s signature<br />

pewter style is recognized<br />

around the nation.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Clay's Park Resort<br />

13190 Patterson St NW, North Lawrence;<br />

330-854-6691; clayspark.com<br />

What better way to escape<br />

the scorching summer sun<br />

than to spend the day in this<br />

new water adventure park?<br />

Slip down dual, 150-foot<br />

water slides into the 10-acre<br />

lake, or drop in on zip lines.<br />

For fun without getting wet,<br />

Clay's Park features miniature<br />

golf, hiking, fishing and<br />

outdoor sports like volleyball<br />

and basketball.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Heggy's Nut Shop<br />

3200 W Tuscarawas St, Canton;<br />

330-454-6611; heggysnutshop.com<br />

A small diner with a large<br />

following, Heggy's has been<br />

a local favorite for generations.<br />

Hearty chili, burgers, coneys<br />

and buttered fries are sure<br />

to satisfy. Just remember to<br />

save room for the homemade<br />

candy or ice cream, and order<br />

a bag of freshly roasted<br />

nuts to go. $<br />

GAME-DAY DEALS<br />

Piatto Novo<br />

1989 Front St, Cuyahoga Falls; 330-<br />

920-7530; piatto-novo.com<br />

Expertly prepared Italian<br />

cuisine and breathtaking views<br />

of the Cuyahoga River gorge<br />

and cascading falls are the<br />

trademarks of this romantic<br />

restaurant located within<br />

the Sheraton Suites hotel. A<br />

successful dinner starts with<br />

the lobster bisque. $$$$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

The Warehouse<br />

520 E Fourth St, Canton; 330-639-<br />

4180; thewarehouseincanton.com<br />

One of the few dance clubs<br />

around, this 5,000-squarefoot<br />

newcomer includes two<br />

bars, a dancefloor and lounge.<br />

Wednesday is indie dance<br />

night, featuring guest DJs.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

Fifty percent of America’s<br />

population lives within a 500mile<br />

radius of Akron.<br />

Allentown/<br />

Bethlehem<br />

pennsylvania<br />

by kristin lindsey by lisa gotto<br />

Canal Park, home to<br />

the Akron Aeros, is the<br />

perfect place to enjoy the<br />

amenities of an MLB park<br />

without the Major League<br />

prices. Weekly promotions<br />

include buy one,<br />

get one free ticket Tuesdays,<br />

Thirsty Thursday<br />

($1 12-oz. draft beers<br />

and $1 sodas) and Friday<br />

Night Fireworks.<br />

Canal Park<br />

300 S Main St, Akron; 330-<br />

253-5151; akronaeros.com<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 64<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Dale & Georgia Boutique<br />

and Barkery<br />

403 Northampton St, Easton; 610-<br />

438-5573; daleandgeorgia.com<br />

This divine doggy emporium<br />

offers only the most stylish<br />

in canine couture, luxurious<br />

accessories and yummy tailwagging<br />

rewards created in<br />

its own on-site bakery. And<br />

lest your feline feel slighted,<br />

there are purr-fectly suitable<br />

selections and nibbles for your<br />

kitten, as well.<br />

GO SEE<br />

SteelStacks<br />

101 Founders Way, Bethlehem; 610-<br />

332-1300; artsquest.org<br />

This art and cultural campus,<br />

built on the former Bethlehem<br />

Steel plant site, is anchored<br />

by the 65,000-square-foot<br />

ArtsQuest Center, a multimedia-rich<br />

and technologically<br />

wired community gathering<br />

space. Visitors can take in an<br />

independent film or art exhibit,<br />

tour a state-of-the-art public<br />

broadcasting station, then<br />

enjoy the sounds of live music<br />

at the two-floor Musikfest Café.<br />

Kutztown Folk Festival<br />

Kutztown; 888-674-6136;<br />

kutztownfestival.com<br />

This quintessential country<br />

fair, now in its 62nd year,<br />

showcases all the bucolic<br />

aspects of rural life. Taste<br />

bread fresh from a 19thcentury<br />

oven, then browse<br />

open-air aisles of homespun<br />

crafts including quilts and<br />

handmade wood furniture.<br />

The kids will love the animals,<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

the candy apples and the<br />

singalongs, and you’ll love a<br />

day in the country. July 2-10.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Jumbars<br />

1342 Chelsea Ave, Bethlehem;<br />

610-866-1660; jumbars.com<br />

Offering all the ambience of a<br />

water-colored European bistro,<br />

this is the perfect place to stop<br />

for a big breakfast or lunch.<br />

Come in for made-to-order<br />

creations like the pulled-pork<br />

panini, chicken crêpes and<br />

roasted duck salad, and finish<br />

with a slice of fruit pie. $<br />

The Bay Leaf<br />

935 W Hamilton St, Allentown;<br />

610-433-4211; allentownbayleaf.com<br />

In-the-know locals always<br />

take out-of-town friends here<br />

for its inspired menu of New<br />

American and Asian-influenced<br />

cuisine. Fresh plates of stir-fry<br />

Siamese chicken in a Thai<br />

curry sauce and rack of lamb<br />

in a cognac rosemary sauce<br />

blend well with this restaurant’s<br />

cozy, candlelit vibe. $$$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

Level 3<br />

2805 Center Valley Pkwy, Center Valley;<br />

610-798-9000; level3lounge.com<br />

Located on the rooftop of Melt,<br />

this swanky nightspot thumps<br />

with the beats of an in-house<br />

DJ on Friday and Saturday<br />

nights. Partake in the premium<br />

bottle service in a cozy nook,<br />

or get comfortable in a private<br />

cabana (complete with fire pit)<br />

on the large outdoor terrace.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

Easton's State Theatre for the<br />

Arts is inhabited by a ghost<br />

that theater staff dubbed<br />

“Fred,” after a former theater<br />

manager. Fred has been<br />

sighted more than 10 times.


Aruba Asheville<br />

at this charming 17th-century<br />

European-inspired inn created<br />

by Austrian owner expats<br />

homesick for authentic<br />

stroganoff and schnitzels. You<br />

north carolina<br />

by susan campbell<br />

can also enjoy a salute to the<br />

tropics with fish, seafood and<br />

by constance e. richards<br />

GO SHOP<br />

West Indian ribs. $$<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Palm Beach Plaza<br />

95 L.G. Smith Blvd; 297-586-0045;<br />

GO PARTY<br />

Antique Tobacco Barn<br />

75 Swannanoa River Rd; 828-252palmbeachplaza.com<br />

Kukoo Kunuku Party Bus<br />

7291; atbarn.com<br />

This brand-new, modern mall<br />

Pick-up and drop off from hotels; 297- With more than 75 dealers<br />

spans three levels and is home<br />

586-2010; kukookunuku.com<br />

and rows and rows of antiques<br />

to scads of classy boutiques<br />

Let the good times literally roll<br />

skillfully set up in smart<br />

and artisan shops, as well as a aboard this wacky bar-hopping vignettes, this is the catchall<br />

food court, multiplex cinemas bus that makes stops at secret for antiques from the North<br />

glow-in-the-dark bowling and<br />

watering holes and for an<br />

Carolina mountains. From<br />

the high-tech Fun City arcade. authentic Aruban dinner. The<br />

old-timey butter churns to the<br />

wheels go round to a lively island odd Duncan-Fife cupboard, this<br />

beat for a real parranda (party). is the place to find gently—or<br />

Maraca shaking required.<br />

not-so-gently—used items from<br />

yesteryear, including jewelry,<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

hats, books and kitchenware.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Land Sailing<br />

With Aruba Active Vacations<br />

Pick-up and drop-off from resorts;<br />

297-586-0989; aruba-activevacations.com<br />

Imagine a cart attached to a<br />

billowing sail that's powered<br />

by Aruba’s steady trade winds,<br />

and you’ll understand why the<br />

Dutch call it “blokarting.” Once<br />

those wheels start turning, you<br />

move like the wind at speeds<br />

up to 35mph. Protective gear<br />

and instruction are included.<br />

Butterfly Farm<br />

J.E. Irausquin Blvd, just across from<br />

Divi Phoenix Resort; 297-586-3656;<br />

thebutterflyfarm.com<br />

Witness the magic of metamorphosis—from<br />

caterpillar<br />

to chrysalis to colorful, exotic<br />

winged-wonders that flit about<br />

you in tropical gardens. For<br />

the best interactions, visit in<br />

the early morning when the<br />

butterflies are most active.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Amadeus<br />

249 Tanki Leendert; 297-587-3644;<br />

amadeusaruba.com<br />

Mozart’s music sets the stage<br />

VIRGIN GORDA<br />

BVI, US<br />

Aruba’s most famous icon, the<br />

Divi-Divi tree, points southwest<br />

due to the prevailing trade<br />

winds from the northeast.<br />

SIR CUSTODIAN<br />

Aruban diver Castro Perez<br />

always cleaned garbage<br />

from the coral reefs to<br />

keep them healthy—and<br />

was knighted last year by<br />

Holland's Queen Beatrix<br />

for his efforts. In 1994, he<br />

founded this annual initiative,<br />

which now attracts<br />

close to 1,000 volunteers<br />

for a comprehensive<br />

beach and reef clean-up.<br />

July 2-3.<br />

Aruba Reef Care Project<br />

297-582-3777<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 65<br />

GO SEE<br />

The Altamont<br />

18 Church St; 828-274-8070;<br />

myaltamont.com<br />

Another theater has opened<br />

its doors in Asheville—this one<br />

on a leafy side street with a<br />

full art gallery. The 120-seat<br />

black box theater is housed in<br />

a renovated LEED-certified<br />

building from 1895. Furnished<br />

short-term rental suites<br />

upstairs mean that visitors<br />

can watch local theater right<br />

downstairs.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Bouchon Street Food<br />

62 N Lexington Ave; 829-350-1140;<br />

ashevillebouchon.com<br />

This dressed-down outpost of<br />

Bouchon—set on an open-air<br />

courtyard behind the main<br />

restaurant—is the perfect<br />

place to outfit your next picnic<br />

or al fresco dinner. Choose<br />

from crêpes-to-go, salads,<br />

baguette sandwiches, cheese<br />

and paté plates, French onion<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

soup, authentic paper cones<br />

of “frites” and bistro glasses of<br />

wine served outside. There’s<br />

a small interior bar and booth<br />

area in case it rains. $<br />

Cúrate<br />

11 Biltmore Ave; 828-239-2946;<br />

curatetapasbar.com<br />

Spanish for “cure yourself,”<br />

this new traditional tapas<br />

restaurant serves up creamy<br />

chicken fritters, stuffed piquillo<br />

peppers and other small plates,<br />

as well as tableside-made<br />

cocktails like the cava sangria<br />

and a gin and tonic with an<br />

edible flower. Chef/owner Katie<br />

Button is an alumna of Ferran<br />

Adria’s famed elBulli in Spain;<br />

with her family, she has created<br />

a hip dining/drinking/socializing<br />

venue downtown. $$$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

Bele Chere<br />

Downtown Asheville; 828-259-5800;<br />

belecherefestival.com<br />

Over the past 33 years, this<br />

event has morphed from a<br />

small crafts gathering on a<br />

single street to a downtownwide<br />

celebration of arts,<br />

crafts, music, food, drink<br />

and general weirdness. The<br />

festivities—which transform<br />

much of downtown into a<br />

pedestrian zone—include<br />

restaurants serving “street”<br />

food, merchants selling handmade<br />

wares, and live music on<br />

multiple stages. July 29-31.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

GO GUIDES<br />

Since its inception, the<br />

Asheville Art Museum has<br />

been housed in a private<br />

home, the Asheville Civic<br />

Center, a bank building and<br />

its current address, 2 South<br />

Pack Square, where it has<br />

three whole floors of art. An<br />

expansion is scheduled to take<br />

place later in <strong>2011</strong>.<br />

latitudelongitudecharms.com<br />

everyone has an unforgettable place...<br />

“its a charm with the exact coordinates<br />

of the location I got married. I love it.”<br />

Sara Blakely, founder of Spanx<br />

Copyright 2008-<strong>2011</strong>. Latitude Longitude Charms®


GO GUIDES<br />

Atlanta<br />

georgia<br />

by bret love<br />

GO SHOP<br />

The Beehive<br />

1250 Caroline St, Ste C120;<br />

404-350-3898; thebeehiveatl.com<br />

Located in the Edgewood<br />

Retail District near Little Five<br />

Points, this diverse collective<br />

has local artisans working<br />

together under one roof. From<br />

artwork and apparel to jewelry<br />

and homemade foods, it’s<br />

like an indie superstore for<br />

stylish hipsters.<br />

Cosabella<br />

3400 Around Lenox Rd NE, Ste 216;<br />

404-869-9622; cosabella.com<br />

Open since May in the Around<br />

Lenox shopping center, this<br />

Italian clothing designer’s<br />

second freestanding store<br />

features all the curve-hugging,<br />

shape-defining jeans, swimwear,<br />

lingerie and shapewear<br />

for which the brand is known.<br />

There’s also an eco-friendly<br />

IDOL CHATTER<br />

DIANA DEGARMO (SeaSeason 2)—Snellville native ive<br />

DeGarmo, has appeared red<br />

in Broadway productions ions<br />

of Hairspray and Hair. r.<br />

MICHAEL JOHNS (Season Season<br />

7)—Johns lived in Buckhead ckhead<br />

for six years before his is Idol<br />

line and a bridal intimates<br />

collection.<br />

Marietta Wine Market<br />

18 Powder Springs St SE, Marietta; 770-<br />

919-1574; mariettawinemarket.com<br />

Located a block from Marietta’s<br />

historic town square, this store<br />

stocks more than 500 wines<br />

and beers from around the<br />

world, including its own Peach<br />

Chardonnay. It also hosts<br />

numerous events and tours,<br />

such as wine tastings with<br />

complimentary hors d’oeuvres<br />

on Wednesdays and Saturdays.<br />

GO SEE<br />

National Black Arts<br />

Festival<br />

Numerous venues;<br />

404-730-7315; nbaf.org<br />

This annual summer celebration<br />

of African-American culture<br />

includes a tribute to Black<br />

Visual Art of the last 100<br />

years, a “Legends Celebration”<br />

of the music of the O’Jays, the<br />

NBAF Gala: A Salute to the<br />

Silver Screen, a performance<br />

by DanceAfrica Atlanta and a<br />

three-day festival in Centennial<br />

Park. July 14-17.<br />

When Constantine Maroulis comes to The Fox Theatre<br />

(660 Peachtree St Ne, foxtheatre.org) as the star of Rock<br />

Of Ages (July 5-10), he’ll be the second former American<br />

Idol to pass through town recently. (Anthony Fedorov<br />

starred in June’s Joseph & the Amazing Technicolor<br />

Dreamcoat.) Here are three Atlanta-connected<br />

contestants who've had intriguing post-Idol careers:<br />

app appearance. Then he sang<br />

for<br />

extreme sports legend<br />

Sh Shaun White's 2009 DVD,<br />

Don't Don Look Down. Radical!<br />

VANESSA VAN OLIVAREZ (Sea-<br />

son 2) 2)—Atlanta-based Olivarez<br />

has a ppromising<br />

alt-country<br />

band, Granville Automatic.<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 66<br />

White Water<br />

250 Cobb Pkwy North, Marietta; 770-<br />

424-9283: sixflags.com/whitewater<br />

The largest waterpark in the<br />

South (at 70 acres), White<br />

Water has been helping kids<br />

stay cool for nearly 30 years<br />

now, with attractions ranging<br />

from the mild (the Atlanta<br />

Ocean Wave Pool, Captain<br />

Kid’s Cover) to the wild (the<br />

adrenaline-charged Dragon’s<br />

Tail, Cliffhanger and Tornado).<br />

GO EAT<br />

Pico Autentico<br />

590 Mimosa Blvd, Roswell;<br />

770-650-7877; picoautentico.com<br />

This new Mexican joint<br />

supplements gringo favorites<br />

like tacos with delicious<br />

dishes such as queso fundido<br />

fritters and portobello torta.<br />

It also offers live music on the<br />

expansive outdoor patio and<br />

improv comedy on Saturdays. $<br />

H. Harper Station<br />

904 Memorial Dr SE; 678-732-0415;<br />

hharperstation.com<br />

This Reynoldstown restaurant<br />

features communal dishes and<br />

small plates from around the<br />

world. Chefs Duane Nutter<br />

and Reginald Washington<br />

offer everything from<br />

sesame vegetable ravioli and<br />

shrimp and grits to banh mi<br />

(Vietnamese sandwiches),<br />

while mixologist Jerry Slater<br />

creates 40 classically<br />

inspired cocktails. $$<br />

BYOBakeshop Dinners<br />

903 Peachtree Street NE;<br />

404-892-9322; byobdinners.com<br />

By day, this rustic Midtown<br />

bakery is filled with the aroma<br />

of fresh-baked bread, but<br />

come the evenings of the<br />

first Thursday, Friday and<br />

Saturday of the month, it’s<br />

all about three-course familystyle,<br />

BYO dinners. For just<br />

$40, you can dig into seasonal<br />

www.visitroswellga.com<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

American cuisine<br />

like wedge salad, buttermilkfried<br />

chicken with spiked<br />

honey, whipped potatoes<br />

and braised collards, and<br />

blueberry shortcake “jars.”<br />

Best of all, they send you<br />

packing with a pastry for<br />

breakfast. July 7-9. $$$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

The Family Dog<br />

1402 N Highland Ave NE;<br />

404-249-0180;<br />

thefamilydogatlanta.com<br />

This new nightspot comes<br />

from Ron Eyester (chef/owner<br />

of nearby restaurant Rosebud)<br />

and his business partner<br />

Jason Chenette. The lively<br />

atmosphere and well-crafted<br />

cocktails—plus a menu<br />

offering farm-to-table twists<br />

on classic pub fare—ensure<br />

that it will quickly become a<br />

favorite Morningside neighborhood<br />

hangout.<br />

Museum Bar<br />

181 Ralph David Abernathy Blvd SW;<br />

404-343-2086;<br />

atlantamuseumbar.com<br />

Open since February in a<br />

Mechanicsville space that<br />

was formerly a church dating<br />

back to the 1800s, this<br />

15,000-square-foot, threelevel,<br />

five-bar club is vying to<br />

be Atlanta’s hottest nightspot.<br />

With crystal chandeliers, a VIP<br />

area with an oversized, custom<br />

bed and a menu by former Hell’s<br />

Kitchen contestant Jason Ellis,<br />

locals aren’t betting against it.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

Buckhead owes its name to<br />

Henry Irby, who shot a buck in<br />

the 1800s and mounted its<br />

head prominently on the wall of<br />

his general store, then a popular<br />

outpost for locals and travelers.<br />

The name stuck, despite later<br />

efforts to change it.


Welcome to Hyatt Place ® Atlanta/Buckhead.<br />

Hyatt Place combines style and innovation to create a<br />

completely new hotel experience. The spacious<br />

guestrooms are stylishly furnished with a Hyatt Grand<br />

Bed, Cozy Corner sofa-sleeper, 42" flat-panel HDTV<br />

and an in-room refrigerator. You’ll also enjoy free Wi-Fi,<br />

complimentary continental breakfast, and freshly prepared<br />

food served 24/7.<br />

888 HYATT HP (888 492 8847)<br />

HyattPlaceBuckhead.com<br />

Hyatt Place Atlanta/Buckhead<br />

3242 Peachtree Road NE • Atlanta, GA 30305<br />

404 869 6161<br />

The trademark HYATT and related marks are trademarks of Hyatt Corporation. © 2009 Hyatt Corporation.<br />

All rights reserved.


ON THE TOWN<br />

ATLANTA<br />

IN BRIEF BY BROOKE PORTER<br />

BY THE NUMBERS<br />

15<br />

4.5<br />

tons of popcorn<br />

served at The<br />

Fox Theatre<br />

per year. Don’t<br />

miss Fiddler on<br />

the Roof July<br />

19-24.<br />

128<br />

age of Grant<br />

Park, Atlanta’s<br />

oldest public<br />

park<br />

274<br />

games in the<br />

Southeast<br />

Kickball Fest,<br />

the largest<br />

size (in acres) of the Atlanta<br />

open adult<br />

Botanical Garden’s Storza Woods,<br />

kickball tourney<br />

the only remaining mature hardwood<br />

forest inside Atlanta city limits.<br />

NEWS FLASH<br />

Magic Mountain •<br />

Stone Mountain’s<br />

all-new Lasershow<br />

Spectacular debuted<br />

in May, updating<br />

Georgia’s No. 1<br />

attraction with an<br />

unprecedented digital,<br />

multi-dimensional<br />

projection that’s taller<br />

than the Statue of<br />

Liberty. stonemoun<br />

tainpark.com + If You<br />

Build It… • Atlanta is<br />

getting its very own<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 69<br />

in the US. Get<br />

your kicks July<br />

29-30.<br />

Legoland Discovery<br />

Center, which is<br />

scheduled to open<br />

March 2012 at Phipps<br />

Plaza; 250,000 Legos<br />

will be used to create<br />

a replica Atlanta<br />

skyline inside. legoland<br />

discoverycenter.com<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

JULY AVERAGES:<br />

88˚F<br />

4.2 in. 67˚F<br />

TIME ZONE:<br />

Eastern<br />

AREA CODES:<br />

404, 770,<br />

678, 470<br />

FOUNDED:<br />

1837<br />

POPULATION:<br />

5.47 million*<br />

GET AROUND:<br />

Metro Atlanta Rapid Transit<br />

Authority (MARTA) bus and rail<br />

AIRPORT: Hartsfield-Jackson<br />

Atlanta International Airport<br />

WEBSITE: atlanta.net<br />

* in metropolitan area<br />

CULTURE CALENDAR<br />

Through Aug. 13<br />

SAMSāRA<br />

One of three artists to receive<br />

this year’s Working Artist Project<br />

award from the Museum of<br />

Contemporary Art of Georgia,<br />

Caomin Xie incorporates<br />

architectural and mechanical<br />

images in his mandala-like<br />

paintings. The next WAP<br />

exhibit, featuring works by the<br />

video/fi lmmaker and installation<br />

artist Micah Stansell,<br />

opens Aug. 27. mocaga.org<br />

Sept. 2-5<br />

DRAGON*CON<br />

This annual event transforms<br />

Atlanta into a massive playground<br />

for science-fi ction and<br />

fantasy fanatics with costume<br />

contests, writing workshops,<br />

autograph sessions and, of<br />

course, ,p plenty yof ggaming. g<br />

Events take<br />

place at fi ve<br />

area hotels.<br />

dragon<br />

con.org


ON THE TOWN: ATLANTA<br />

SHOW BUSINESSES BY BRET LOVE<br />

1<br />

Estella Boutique<br />

Owned by Tameka Raymond<br />

(Usher’s ex-wife), this<br />

classy boutique brings<br />

contemporary fashion to<br />

the OTP ’burbs (specifically,<br />

historic Roswell) and features<br />

a “Shabby Chic” room<br />

filled with one-of-a-kind<br />

designer samples. 1159<br />

Canton St; 770-594-<br />

3333; shopatestella.com<br />

2<br />

Wear<br />

This shop was once<br />

co-owned by Chris Glavine<br />

(wife of ex-Braves pitching<br />

ace Tom), who has lent<br />

support to the shop since<br />

its move to Alpharetta.<br />

The trendy boutique<br />

appeals to upscale<br />

suburbanites with a taste<br />

for designer T-shirts and<br />

blouses. To add to its<br />

celeb appeal, ex-Atlanta<br />

Hawks center Jon Koncak<br />

helps run the store.<br />

8470 Holcomb Bridge<br />

Rd, Ste 140, Alpharetta;<br />

770-518-1234<br />

It’s no secret that Atlanta attracts more<br />

than its fair share of big names from the<br />

film, TV and music worlds. And some have<br />

put down roots, opening restaurants,<br />

bars and boutiques around town.<br />

6<br />

Dolce Enoteca e<br />

Ristorante<br />

Ashton Kutcher is partowner<br />

of this Atlantic<br />

Station Italian joint, where<br />

the experience is as<br />

much about the swinging<br />

Hollywood swank—moody<br />

lighting, ritzy chandeliers,<br />

white leather booths—as<br />

it is the menu offerings.<br />

261 19th St NW;<br />

404-872-3902;<br />

dolcegroup.com<br />

75<br />

7<br />

Straits<br />

Rapper-turned-actor<br />

Ludacris was so<br />

impressed by Chef<br />

Chris Yeo’s San<br />

Francisco-based restaurant<br />

that he brought<br />

it home, where Asian<br />

fusion signature dishes<br />

such as Fuji apple<br />

prawns and kung pao<br />

chicken lollipops attract<br />

a flossy crowd of bigname<br />

locals and foodies<br />

alike. 793 Juniper St<br />

NE; 404-877-1283;<br />

straitsatl.com<br />

6<br />

3<br />

Emerlyn & Ester<br />

Recently opened by R&B<br />

singer Ne-Yo and his<br />

girlfriend, Monyetta Shaw,<br />

this trendy Buckhead<br />

boutique offers women’s<br />

clothing, jewelry and<br />

accessories from indie<br />

designers like Gypsy 05,<br />

Twisted Hearts, Face<br />

Connection and Camilla &<br />

Marc. 3209 Paces Ferry<br />

Pl NW; 404-848-8494;<br />

emerlynandester.com<br />

285<br />

5<br />

3<br />

9<br />

4<br />

7<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 70<br />

8<br />

1<br />

20<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

400<br />

4<br />

Buckhead Bottle Bar<br />

Atlanta Hawks center<br />

Zaza Pachulia may have<br />

thrown up a brick with his<br />

last restaurant venture,<br />

Fifth Street Café (which<br />

opened and closed in less<br />

than six months), but his<br />

latest collaboration with<br />

restaurateur A.D. Allushi<br />

adds a sleek, sophisticated<br />

vibe to Buckhead’s<br />

more casual nightlife<br />

scene. 268 E Paces Ferry<br />

Rd NE; 404-474-9892;<br />

buckheadbottlebar.com<br />

8<br />

Watershed<br />

This hip Decatur<br />

restaurant/wine bar<br />

set in a converted gas<br />

station is like your<br />

favorite sweater: cozy<br />

and casual—just like<br />

the music of one of its<br />

owners, Indigo Girl Emily<br />

Saliers. Chef Joe Truex’s<br />

menu focuses on traditional<br />

Southern cuisine,<br />

with wines selected by<br />

Saliers herself.<br />

406 West Ponce De<br />

Leon Ave;404-378-<br />

4900; watershed<br />

restaurant.com<br />

T<br />

140<br />

85<br />

2<br />

5<br />

Justin’s<br />

It might seem strange<br />

that an NYC transplant<br />

should be one of Atlanta’s<br />

most popular Southern-<br />

Caribbean eateries, but<br />

the upscale takes on soul<br />

food favorites—such as<br />

fried chicken, catfish and<br />

pork chops—at media<br />

mogul P. Diddy’s flashy<br />

Buckhead bar/restaurant<br />

are much adored.<br />

2200 Peachtree Rd<br />

NW; 404-603-5353;<br />

justinsrestaurant.com<br />

A<br />

9<br />

Gladys Knight & Ron<br />

Winans’ Chicken &<br />

Waffles<br />

Legendary soul diva<br />

Knight didn’t just take<br />

the midnight train to<br />

Georgia—she partnered<br />

with gospel legend Ron<br />

Winans in 1997 and<br />

opened this Atlanta landmark<br />

(now with multiple<br />

locations) dedicated to<br />

those who love “brinner.”<br />

529 Peachtree St<br />

NE; 404-874-9393;<br />

gladysandron.net


Saturday, July 30, <strong>2011</strong><br />

Summer<br />

Fourth Annual Chattahoochee River<br />

Splash<br />

www.visitsandysprings.org<br />

1-866-511-7742<br />

Make a big splash at the coolest<br />

event this summer in Sandy<br />

Springs, located just 10 minutes<br />

north of Atlanta. Float from Morgan<br />

Falls Dam to Powers Island in a<br />

kayak, canoe, or raft. Beat the heat<br />

in your six-mile journey of discovery<br />

down the Chattahoochee River. Bring<br />

your own non-motorized boat or rent<br />

<br />

Call the CRNRA Park at 678-538-1280 to<br />

<br />

The event takes place from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.<br />

Treat yourself to some of our award winning...<br />

REGENCY SUITES<br />

975 West Peachtree Street<br />

at 10th Street<br />

Atlanta, GA 30309<br />

1-800-642-3629<br />

www.RegencySuites.com<br />

Southern Hospitality


ON THE TOWN: ATLANTA<br />

PUTTING THE ART IN PARTY BY ASHLEY HESSELTINE<br />

A new crop of art collectives is repurposing<br />

raw spaces around the city, hosting musicfilled<br />

and drink-fueled events that bring art<br />

to a non-gallery crowd.<br />

MASTERPIECES<br />

IN THE MAKING<br />

Mark your calendar<br />

for these upcoming<br />

art parties.<br />

CREATIVE<br />

THINKING<br />

(Top and center)<br />

Dashboard;<br />

(Bottom) Streetela<br />

Living Walls<br />

This conference dedicated to<br />

“street art and urbanism” is<br />

taking place Aug. 12-14, with<br />

a party on the 13th featuring<br />

live music, art and surprises<br />

(so we’re told).<br />

livingwallsconference.com<br />

BURNAWAY<br />

The arts advocacy online mag<br />

I<br />

can see and hear the party from blocks away. Cars line the street and<br />

fi ll every makeshift parking lot around. On a street that’s usually dark<br />

at 10pm, 900 Dekalb Ave. glows like an orb, complete with light projections<br />

(one reads “4 U ATL”). Carnivores—a local band—is rocking<br />

out, and hundreds of people, many of whom arrived on bike or skateboard,<br />

are milling around, drinking cheap beer and noshing on goods from three<br />

food trucks. And I haven’t even made it inside.<br />

This is the launch party for Streetela, a co-op with a varying number<br />

of relatively unknown urban/street artists. For one night only, their work<br />

(some of which you can fi nd on abandoned buildings throughout the<br />

city) will be displayed for all to see and purchase in a 5,000-square-foot<br />

industrial space. Works vary from wall art to mixed media and sculpture—<br />

and it’s aff ordable; prices range from about $10 to $1,200, most falling in<br />

the $100 to $200 range. In the center of the room is a colorful installation<br />

of wooden blocks by artist/woodworker Evereman; individual blocks are<br />

for sale at $1 to $200 (for antique walnut). On one wall is a huge grinning<br />

mouth from street artist Olabad’s “Smile” series; upon closer inspection,<br />

it’s covered in wheatpaste hearts, available to take home for $10 apiece.<br />

Streetela is just one of several new groups throwing “art parties” that<br />

attract anywhere from 500 to 1,000 people. There’s always live entertainment<br />

(fi re dancers and drummers made appearances at art collective<br />

Dodekapus’ circus of a launch party in April 2010), and the venues are a<br />

far cry from whitewashed galleries (BURNAWAY, an online arts advocacy<br />

magazine, threw a fundraiser last year at the rustic cotton-gin-turnedartists-compound<br />

on the Westside known as The Goat Farm). “People<br />

are desperate for something diff erent,” says Nathan Bolster, Streetela<br />

co-founder.<br />

Beth Malone, the co-founder of Dashboard—an art co-op that throws<br />

two “roll-out shows” a year to announce, promote and sell the works of its<br />

new crops of artists—echoes this sentiment. “We’re giving people who don’t<br />

go to traditional galleries an entry point,” she says. At a Dashboard bash,<br />

it’s not uncommon to be analyzing a painting, such as Johnathan Welsh’s<br />

Impending, which depicts a stoic man under a dark cloud, only to be interrupted<br />

by a circus troupe performance—or to feel slightly disturbed by Katy<br />

Malone’s latex Skin House while a live band jams behind you.<br />

While these high-energy events bring much-needed attention to<br />

budding artists, there is some concern that the party aspect will go too<br />

far. “Everyone is doing this to support the artists,” says Jeremy Abernathy,<br />

editor-in-chief of BURNAWAY, which is planning another event in September.<br />

“But at the same time, I have mixed feelings. I think that some of the<br />

parties are branded as ‘exhibitions,’ yet the primary goal is to have a party,<br />

and the art can suff er.”<br />

While the free concert and aff ordable eats at the Streetela launch were<br />

defi nite draws (especially for a Saturday night), 28 works were sold and the<br />

artists collectively took home $4,700. It’s not a fortune, but it’s a start… and<br />

that’s something worth throwing a party for.<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 72<br />

will have its second fundraiser<br />

in September. Its website is<br />

also a prime source for art<br />

happenings around the city.<br />

burnaway.org<br />

Flux Projects<br />

This organization funds and<br />

promotes art projects and<br />

events throughout the city.<br />

On Sept. 30, it will host its<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

signature (and free) FLUX<br />

event, with video projections,<br />

multiple dance pieces,<br />

parades and fire spectacles.<br />

fluxprojects.org<br />

Dashboard Co-op<br />

In the fall, Dashboard will<br />

throw another super-soirée<br />

to introduce its new crop of<br />

artists. dashboardco-op.org<br />

TOP, CENTER: DASHBOARDCO-OP.ORG


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ON THE TOWN: ATLANTA<br />

WELL DONE BY BRET LOVE<br />

Atlanta’s best chefs reinvent the burger joint.<br />

FLIP's pork belly melt burger with a<br />

side of caramelized Brussels sprouts<br />

few years ago, fancy fare was the hottest thing on<br />

Atlanta’s dining scene. But in the wake of the fl agging<br />

economy, a bevy of burger joints have popped up, eliciting<br />

battle cries from devout Yelpers eager to crown the city’s next<br />

big cheese.<br />

Richard Blais threw the gauntlet down when he partnered<br />

with Barry Mills to open FLIP burger boutique in October 2008.<br />

The celebrity chef (recently crowned winner of Top Chef All-Stars)<br />

was coming off the failure of his upscale restaurant BLAIS and<br />

was attracted by the challenge of creating what Mills calls “fi ne<br />

dining between two buns.”<br />

“Closing my restaurant was tough, but I’m stronger and<br />

smarter for it,” Blais says. “FLIP is a more recession-friendly<br />

restaurant, and it was fun to take something as common as burgers<br />

and give it a twist, with modern design, beautiful aesthetics<br />

and a creative menu.” That menu—including signature items<br />

such as the rBQ burger (with pulled brisket, coleslaw, rBQ sauce<br />

and smoked mayo) and blackened shrimp burger—immediately<br />

resulted in lines out the door, not to mention contenders hoping<br />

to replicate FLIP’s success.<br />

In Decatur, George Frangos (formerly of Concentrics<br />

Restaurants) opened Farm Burger, off ering grass-fed and locally<br />

sourced fare. At favorite Holeman & Finch Public House, Chef<br />

Linton Hopkins garnered attention by off ering just 24 burgers<br />

per night at 10pm sharp. The time is announced via bullhorn,<br />

creating a bit of fanfare—and sometimes they sell out in less<br />

than a minute. (Hint: The burger is also a staple of its Sunday<br />

brunch.) And Chef Shaun Doty shut down Shaun’s, a four-yearold<br />

fi ne-dining restaurant in Inman Park, in order to focus on<br />

Yeah! Burger (which Bon Appétit named as one of its favorite<br />

burger spots in America).<br />

Focusing on organic, locally sourced and seasonally available<br />

fare, Doty’s venture with partner Erik Maier allows guests to customize<br />

burgers with a vast array of options, including sunfl ower<br />

sprouts, bacon jam and cage-free fried eggs. In Doty's view, the<br />

burger boom can be chalked up to a return to simplicity.<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 74<br />

Grass-fed beef burger from Yeah! Burger<br />

“A burger resonates with people because it’s like a childhood<br />

souvenir and it transcends classes,” he says. “When the economy<br />

went south, people started to return to more simple values. But<br />

people are also more informed about the way that eating impacts<br />

our health and our environment.”<br />

Now, what was once a mere trend has erupted into a fullblown<br />

free-for-all. Grindhouse Killer Burgers, which has earned<br />

rave reviews for its angus burgers,<br />

recently expanded into a second<br />

Atlanta location. Boardwalk<br />

Fresh Burgers & Fries is opening<br />

a location at Ansley Mall, the fi rst<br />

of a reported 50 new franchises<br />

it plans to open in Georgia.<br />

And the NYC-based 5 Napkin<br />

Burger is taking over some prime<br />

Midtown real estate, opening<br />

at the corner of 10th Street and<br />

Piedmont Avenue.<br />

Whether the burger boom<br />

is based on consumer demand<br />

or the attractive profi t margin it<br />

off ers owners, Doty suggests that<br />

its impact can only be positive.<br />

“I’m not afraid of competition,<br />

because as chefs we innovate and<br />

constantly improve our product.<br />

If chefs and consumers demand<br />

higher quality, that’s a great thing<br />

for our American food culture.”<br />

In other words, no matter who<br />

comes out on top once the Atlanta<br />

burger battle’s dust has settled,<br />

it’s the customer who is ultimately<br />

the real winner.<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

FLIP burger boutique<br />

1587 Howell Mill Rd NW;<br />

404-352-3547;<br />

flipburgerboutique.com<br />

Farm Burger 410B W Ponce<br />

de Leon; 404-378-5077;<br />

farmburger.net<br />

Holeman & Finch Public<br />

House 2277 Peachtree Rd,<br />

Ste B; 404-948-1175;<br />

holeman-finch.com<br />

Yeah! Burger 2 locations;<br />

404-496-4393;<br />

yeahburger.com<br />

Grindhouse Killer Burgers<br />

2 locations;<br />

grindhouseburgers.com<br />

Boardwalk Fresh<br />

Burgers & Fries<br />

2 locations; boardwalk<br />

freshburgersandfries.com<br />

FLIP: HEIDI GELDHAUSER FOR THE REYNOLDS GROUP; YEAH! BURGER: SARAH DORIO


Enjoy the Southeast’s favorite family friendly<br />

sports restaurant and bar. Serving the best<br />

wings, burgers, salads and more. Operating<br />

in Georgia, Tennessee and North Carolina.<br />

www.tacomac.com<br />

THE SOUTHEAST’S<br />

LARGEST SELECTION OF<br />

WORLD CLASS BEER!


Georgia<br />

PROMOTIONAL // JULY <strong>2011</strong><br />

Georgia<br />

On My Mind People<br />

Old live oaks with Spanish moss<br />

Adult’s Tasting<br />

Tours and Tastings<br />

www.chateauelan.com or 678.425.0900<br />

100 Tour De France, Braselton, Georgia<br />

Tastes of Braselton<br />

are often surprised to learn that Georgia is the largest<br />

state east of the Mississippi, and with its size comes a<br />

very diverse and large number of travel options. From the<br />

beaches to the mountains, from the Okefenokee Swamp to<br />

the myriad lakes, there is no shortage of outdoor activities. For those<br />

who love the links, the state is filled with beautiful golf courses,<br />

and history buffs will delight in the rich Native American and Civil<br />

War history. The following are just a few reasons why you should<br />

consider a trip to the Peach State.<br />

Georgia played a significant role during the Civil War, and<br />

the state offers a number of legendary battlegrounds to tour. The<br />

Chickamauga-Chattanooga National Military Park, located less than<br />

two hours north of Atlanta, is home to more than 1,400 monuments<br />

and historical battle markers. Closer to the city, you’ll find Kennesaw<br />

Mountain National Battlefield Park, where some of the heaviest<br />

fighting of the Atlanta Campaign took place. While in the area, be<br />

sure to visit historic Marietta, Kennesaw and Acworth.<br />

Native American history also abounds in the state. You might<br />

want to start in Cartersville at the Etowah Indian Mounds, the most<br />

intact Mississippian Culture site in the Southeastern US. While in<br />

the area, make sure to check out the Booth Western Art Museum and<br />

the Tellus Science Museum. Driving north, you can follow the scenic<br />

route of the Chieftains Trail through the Appalachian foothills.<br />

While you’re in North Georgia, there are many non-historyrelated<br />

things to see and do. The area is basically the foothills of the<br />

Kid’s Tasting<br />

Tours and Tastings<br />

www.mayfielddairy.com or 1-888-298-0396<br />

1160 Broadway Ave., Braselton, Georgia<br />

www.braselton.net or 706.654.3915 | I-85 Exits 126 & 129 | 30 Minutes North of Atlanta | Braselton, Georgia


Georgia<br />

PROMOTIONAL // JULY <strong>2011</strong><br />

Blue Ridge Mountains, and is dotted with pristine lakes, rivers and<br />

waterfalls. Whitewater rafting can be found, and a trip to Tallulah<br />

Falls in Tallulah Gorge State Park offers some wonderful hiking<br />

opportunities. Quaint mountain towns dot the landscape, the<br />

most notable of which are Helen, Dahlonega, Ellijay and Dillard.<br />

Dahlonega was the site of the second significant gold rush in the<br />

US back in 1828. Not far from Dahlonega is Cleveland, the site of<br />

Babyland General Hospital. This attraction was the birthplace of<br />

Cabbage Patch Kids, and not too long ago, it opened a wonderful new<br />

facility that is a must-see for anyone with young children.<br />

Moving south of Atlanta, it’s less than two hours to Pine<br />

Mountain, where you’ll find Callaway Gardens, a fabulous 13,000acre<br />

resort complex and gardens. A quick hop down the road is<br />

Warm Springs, home to President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s beloved<br />

Little White House. Continue south and you’ll find Plains, the birth<br />

place of another US president, Jimmy Carter.<br />

Continue farther south and you’ll hit Waycross, home to<br />

an historic downtown area and restaurants offering real downhome<br />

cooking. Waycross happens to be on the northern tip of the<br />

Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge, which presents even more<br />

opportunity to commune with nature.<br />

It’s time to head east, where you’ll find more than 100 miles of<br />

coastline on the Atlantic Ocean. Georgia’s coastline is protected by<br />

many barrier islands offering a wide range of vacation options. Sea<br />

Island, which has hosted the G8 Summit in the past, is the place to<br />

go if you want to rub elbows with the upper crust. For a more casual<br />

From Left: Canoeing the Okefenokee Swamp; Tallulah Gorge State Park<br />

experience, head to St. Simons, Tybee or Cumberland islands. And<br />

with a lot of history and a vibrant waterfront, Savannah is Georgia’s<br />

second largest city and is the northernmost point on Georgia’s coast.<br />

As you can see, a vacation to the state of Georgia presents a<br />

host of varied options. The state is so large that it would be nearly<br />

impossible to cover everything in just one visit, so why not come<br />

two or three times? The Southern hospitality will make you want to<br />

come back anyway.


Closer to home<br />

(and your budget.)<br />

Whether you prefer the authenticity<br />

of a tent, the comfort of a cottage<br />

or the convenience of a lodge,<br />

Georgia State Parks and Historic Sites<br />

can accommodate the size of your<br />

family and your budget. Find out more<br />

at www.GeorgiaStateParks.com today!<br />

Visit Us In Our<br />

New Home<br />

FREE ADMISSION!<br />

Witness A Delivery<br />

Adopt A ’Kid<br />

Mon–Sat: 9–5<br />

Sun: 10–5<br />

“Book Birthday and Ballroom Events”<br />

Cabbagepatchkids.com<br />

: @cpkusa<br />

<br />

© <strong>2011</strong> O.A.A., Inc.


GO GUIDES<br />

Atlantic City<br />

new jersey<br />

GO SHOP<br />

The Shoppes at<br />

The Water Club<br />

1 Renaissance Way; 609-317-8888;<br />

thewaterclubhotel.com<br />

Whether or not you have a<br />

room booked at the 43-story<br />

boutique hotel—the ultra-chic<br />

neighbor of the Borgata—you<br />

can still experience the highend<br />

shopping via a connecting<br />

row of six intimate designer<br />

retail shops, including Hearts<br />

on Fire, Hugo Boss, Just<br />

Cavalli and Fixation.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Believe it Or Not!<br />

Odditorium<br />

1441 Boardwalk; 609-347-2001;<br />

ripleysatlanticcity.com<br />

Paying tribute, in its own way,<br />

to the oddities that once graced<br />

the resort’s famed boardwalk,<br />

this wacky attraction offers<br />

visitors the chance to witness<br />

extreme weirdness, including<br />

a lock of George Washington’s<br />

hair and a 27-room miniature<br />

wooden castle.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Il Mulino New York<br />

At Trump Taj Mahal<br />

1000 Boardwalk; 609-449-6004;<br />

ilmulino.com<br />

This celebrated Manhattan<br />

dining destination hit the AC<br />

dining scene a few years ago,<br />

and brought with it its firstrate<br />

reputation for fine Italian<br />

cuisine and solid service. Here<br />

it offers both formal and more<br />

casual trattoria-style dining<br />

experiences—but either way<br />

it’s the same extraordinary<br />

LET IT SHINE E<br />

food created by the same<br />

world-class chefs. $$$$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

40/40 Club<br />

2120 Atlantic Ave; 609-449-4040;<br />

4040club.com<br />

This second location of hip-hop<br />

mogul Jay-Z’s popular New<br />

York City sports-themed<br />

club and lounge is nearly<br />

as celebrity-studded as the<br />

original. It offers much more<br />

than just strategically placed<br />

plasma TVs showing the<br />

night's full gamut of sporting<br />

events; there is also a fantastic<br />

food menu, private rooms and<br />

seating areas, hip-hop dance<br />

parties, and the real possibility<br />

of running into Beyoncé—or at<br />

least Allen Iverson.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

The Trump Taj Mahal Casino<br />

Resort in Atlantic City is built<br />

with four and a half times more<br />

steel than the Eiffel Tower.<br />

Baltimore<br />

maryland<br />

by james marshall by jenn plum auvil<br />

Celebrating its 154th<br />

year, this national treasure<br />

offers a chance to climb<br />

the tallest lighthouse<br />

in New Jersey, and the<br />

third tallest in America.<br />

Gorgeous views of the<br />

Atlantic City skyline await<br />

at the top of this historic<br />

structure’s 228 steps.<br />

Absecon Lighthouse<br />

31 S Rhode Island<br />

Ave; 609-449-1360;<br />

abseconlighthouse.org<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 80<br />

GO SHOP<br />

2910 on the Square<br />

2910 O’Donnell St; 410-675-8505;<br />

2910onthesquare.com<br />

Pick the perfect present at<br />

this Canton gift shop from an<br />

array of upscale knick-knacks<br />

with a modern twist, handcrafted<br />

jewelry or Baltimore<br />

memorabilia like glasses<br />

adorned with the Natty Boh<br />

guy or hand-painted bricks<br />

depicting classic Baltimore<br />

rowhouses.<br />

Sixteen Tons<br />

1100 W 36th St; 410-554-0101;<br />

shop16tons.com<br />

Hampden’s newest addition<br />

outfits fashionable men with<br />

high-quality, hip jeans, shirts<br />

and pants for less than $100<br />

per garment.<br />

Su Casa<br />

901 S Bond St; 410-522-7010;<br />

esucasa.com<br />

Whether you’re outfitting a<br />

cozy summer beach house or a<br />

swank bachelor pad, you’re in<br />

luck at this Fells Point furniture<br />

and accessories shop with<br />

photos and prints, textiles and<br />

funky home goods that give<br />

tchotchkes a good name.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Baltimore Symphony<br />

At the Meyerhoff<br />

1212 Cathedral St; 410-783-8000;<br />

bsomusic.org<br />

Enjoy a new spin on old<br />

favorites as the Baltimore<br />

Symphony Orchestra pays<br />

homage to musical icons like<br />

the Beatles with the Classical<br />

Mystery Tour—A Tribute to<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

the Beatles (July 14-15), film<br />

composer John Williams of<br />

E.T. and Star Wars fame (July<br />

22-23) and classic Gershwin<br />

(July 28-29).<br />

Summer Sounds<br />

Concert Series<br />

At Belvedere Square<br />

Belvedere Ave and York Rd;<br />

belvederesquare.com<br />

Locals convene at Belvedere<br />

Square's outdoor market<br />

Friday nights for this series<br />

with good drinks, food from<br />

the market’s restaurants (think:<br />

grilled meats galore), live music<br />

and enough room for wee ones<br />

to twirl and spin to the tunes.<br />

Little Italy Open<br />

Air Film Festival<br />

High and Stiles sts; littleitalymd.com<br />

Bring a thick blanket (it’s on<br />

concrete) or folding chair to the<br />

Friday night open air movies in<br />

cheery Little Italy. The season<br />

kicks off with Moonstruck and<br />

nod to the area's strong Italian<br />

roots by closing with Cinema<br />

Paradiso. Old-fashioned,<br />

family-style generosity is<br />

displayed with free admission<br />

and popcorn.<br />

Segs in the City<br />

207 S Albemarle St; 800-734-7393;<br />

segsinthecity.com<br />

Explore Baltimore on an<br />

unconventional set of wheels<br />

on a motorized Segway<br />

city tour. The City Safari<br />

offers a two-hour roll by the<br />

best waterfront attractions<br />

around the Inner Harbor and<br />

Fell’s Points, including the<br />

Broadway Pier and the USS<br />

Constellation.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Haute Dog Carte<br />

6070 Falls Rd; 410-608-3500;<br />

hautedogcarte.com<br />

This stationary food truck<br />

brings a taste of summer<br />

FLICKR: CAITE MAIRE


BOTTOM: LESLIE FURLONG; TOP: ALEX MASTERS FOR BERMUDACUPMATCH.COM<br />

to Mt. Washington, elevating<br />

the common hot dog with<br />

its “fabulous franks.” Fancy<br />

toppings include homemade<br />

bacon marmalade or tomato<br />

and onion jam, and they<br />

perfectly complement the<br />

juicy quarter-pound black<br />

angus dogs. $<br />

Captain James<br />

2127 Boston St; 410-327-8600;<br />

captainjameslanding.com<br />

Enjoy a favorite Maryland<br />

pastime and get a little messy<br />

while picking through a pile<br />

of Old Bay steamed crabs.<br />

Crack open some crabs—and<br />

a few cold ones—and enjoy<br />

the view from the seats on the<br />

waterfront pier. $$<br />

Pitango<br />

802 S Broadway; 410-236-0741;<br />

pitangogelato.com<br />

Savor a taste of Italy with<br />

wholesome gelato and<br />

sorbet crafted from organic<br />

ingredients and fresh fruit. Go<br />

for a classic flavor like basic<br />

crema or chocolate hazelnut,<br />

or branch out with crisp white<br />

grapefruit, tart rhubarb or<br />

spicy chocolate spiked with<br />

hot pepper. $$<br />

ART ATTACK!<br />

The country’s largest<br />

free arts festival takes<br />

over 12 city blocks for<br />

three days of artistic<br />

fun in Charm City with<br />

live music on three<br />

stages, 175 tents of<br />

artists’ wares, rows of<br />

wacky decorated art<br />

cars, hands-on fun for<br />

the kids and fair food<br />

galore. July 15-17.<br />

Artscape<br />

artscape.org<br />

GO PARTY<br />

Elliott’s Pour House<br />

3728 Hudson St; 410-276-2200;<br />

elliottspourhouse.com<br />

Catch an O’s game at this<br />

unassuming sports bar with<br />

a friendly crowd, laidback<br />

attitude and impressive beer<br />

list boasting a wide selection<br />

of organics and microbrews<br />

you’ll want to brag about to<br />

fellow beer lovers.<br />

Club Charles<br />

1724 N Charles St; 410-727-8815<br />

Cross your fingers for a John<br />

Waters sighting at this Station<br />

North staple where hipsters<br />

and MICA students mingle<br />

after the indie theater across<br />

the street lets out or simply<br />

enjoy cocktails and the impressive<br />

jukebox.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

In his 1981 memoir, John<br />

Waters suggested the city<br />

change its slogan to "Come to<br />

Baltimore and Be Shocked!"<br />

It never happened, but the<br />

Chamber of Commerce did<br />

print up bumper stickers,<br />

which you can see driving<br />

around Charm City to this day.<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 81<br />

Bermuda<br />

by glenn jones<br />

GO SHOP<br />

P-Tech<br />

5 Reid St, Hamilton; 441.295.5496;<br />

ptech.bm<br />

Forgot your favorite electronic<br />

doodad at home? P-Tech can<br />

get you what you need—digital<br />

cameras, earphones or a cell<br />

phone charger. Beyond tech,<br />

it’ll also print your digital<br />

vacation photos in a flash.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Bermuda Underwater<br />

Exploration Institute<br />

40 Crow Ln, Hamilton; 441-297-7219;<br />

buei.org<br />

Dive beneath Bermuda's<br />

seas without getting your<br />

hair wet. This museum is<br />

the authority on the island’s<br />

brilliant turquoise sea, with<br />

exhibits showing off seashells,<br />

bioluminescent creatures<br />

from the blackest depths and<br />

sunken treasure recovered<br />

from local waters. Hands-on<br />

exhibits let you try on scuba<br />

gear and experience a Great<br />

White shark attack unscathed.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Frog & Onion<br />

Royal Naval Dockyard, Mangrove Bay;<br />

441-234-7900; frogandonion.bm<br />

If you think you like Bermuda’s<br />

British flavor, then try putting<br />

it in your food. In true English<br />

pub fashion, find fish and<br />

chips, bangers and mash<br />

and locally made Dockyard<br />

Brewing Co. beer served in full<br />

English pint glasses (that’s 20<br />

oz.). There’s live music every<br />

day, so be sure to check the<br />

calendar. $$<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

GO GUIDES<br />

MEET YOUR MATCH<br />

Enjoy a two-day public<br />

holiday that turns into<br />

a four-day weekend<br />

of beaching, boating<br />

and, of course, cricket<br />

(the national sport<br />

here). Bermuda's most<br />

festive holiday marks two<br />

separate events—British<br />

colonization in 1609, and<br />

the country’s emancipation<br />

from slavery in<br />

1834. July 28-29.<br />

Cup Match Classic<br />

St. George’s;<br />

bermudacupmatch.com<br />

Waterlot<br />

At Fairmont Southampton Resort<br />

Southampton; 441.238.8000;<br />

fairmont.com/southampton<br />

On Sundays, find a delightful<br />

brunch of quality over quantity.<br />

A perfect blend of post-church<br />

locals and pre-beach visitors<br />

mix as seamlessly as the<br />

Hollandaise sauce on the eggs<br />

Benedict. Ask for Barry. $$$$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

Non-Mariners Race<br />

Mangrove Bay, Somerset<br />

This event is more of a test of<br />

what floats (care to ride a keg<br />

or picnic table?) than a true<br />

competition. The day begins<br />

with a race of makeshift boats<br />

on Mangrove Bay, and quickly<br />

devolves into a day-long party.<br />

Aug. 3.<br />

FUN FACT<br />

Gambling is legal once a<br />

year in Bermuda—during the<br />

Cup Match.<br />

Daily Scheduled Segway Safaris<br />

DC - Annapolis - Baltimore - Gettysburg<br />

1 hour $45 2 hour $70<br />

For Reservations Call<br />

1-800-734-7393<br />

www.segsinthecity.com


GO GUIDES<br />

Bloomington/<br />

Normal<br />

illinois<br />

by mary ann ford<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Third Sunday Market<br />

At the Interstate Center<br />

2301 W Market St, Bloomington; 217-<br />

202-2847; thirdsundaymarket.com<br />

Plan to spend several hours<br />

browsing through the antique<br />

furniture, sports memorabilia,<br />

folk art, jewelry, glassware<br />

and other flea market finds<br />

at this sprawling indoor/<br />

outdoor market. Every month,<br />

it attracts more than 450<br />

dealers from 17 states and, of<br />

course, hordes of shoppers.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Comlara Park<br />

13001 Recreation Area Dr, Hudson;<br />

309-434-6770;<br />

mcleancountyil.gov/parks<br />

Pitch a tent and stay the<br />

weekend or just pack a picnic<br />

for a day of communing with<br />

nature in this rural 2,200-acre<br />

park. There are 10-plus miles<br />

of wooded trails for hiking<br />

and biking, and 900-acre<br />

Evergreen Lake—home to<br />

Glasener Beach—is stocked<br />

with prize largemouth bass.<br />

Fabulation<br />

At Eaton Studio Gallery<br />

411 N Center St, Bloomington; 309-<br />

828-1575; eatonstudiogallery.com<br />

This riches-to-rags tale by<br />

Lynn Nottage is about a<br />

high-profile career woman who<br />

loses her job and returns to<br />

the projects where she grew<br />

up. Staged by local New Route<br />

Theatre company as part<br />

of a one-year run—dubbed<br />

“Corn Rose Theatre”—where<br />

it brings plays-in-the-making<br />

and established plays to the<br />

intimate setting of artist Herb<br />

Eaton’s gallery the second<br />

Wednesday of each month.<br />

July 13.<br />

Miller Park<br />

1020 S Morris Ave, Bloomington; 309-<br />

434-2260; cityblm.org/parks<br />

The kids will never be bored<br />

at this 68-acre crown jewel of<br />

Bloomington’s park system.<br />

They can perfect their putting<br />

on the greens of the 18-hole<br />

miniature golf course, cool off<br />

at the spray park or visit the<br />

tigers, bears, reindeer and sea<br />

lions at the zoo.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Joe’s Station House<br />

Pizza Pub<br />

305 N Veterans Pkwy, Normal; 309-452-<br />

5637; joesstationhousepizzapub.com<br />

Tuck into some fried pickles<br />

(dipped in ranch) before<br />

devouring into one of Joe’s<br />

Special signature-sauce pizzas<br />

topped with sausage, green<br />

peppers, mushrooms and<br />

onions. Wash it down with a<br />

craft beer, then finish your<br />

meal on a sweet note with a<br />

s’mores pizza. $<br />

GO PARTY<br />

Fat Jack’s<br />

511 N Main St, Bloomington; 309-<br />

821-9222; fatjacksinc.net<br />

Kick back with a stogie in<br />

the couch-filled cigar room,<br />

chill with a craft beer or<br />

specialty cocktail at the main<br />

bar or bust a move on the<br />

dancefloor to live DJ beats<br />

at this hotspot in downtown<br />

Bloomington.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

Renowned early-20th<br />

century trapeze troupe The<br />

Flying Wards spent their<br />

winters training in a barn<br />

in Bloomington.<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 82<br />

Boston<br />

massachusetts<br />

by diane bair & pamela wright<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Stel’s<br />

334 Newbury St; 617-262-3348;<br />

shopstels.com<br />

This comfy boutique, just steps<br />

below the buzz on Newbury<br />

Street, is a popular go-to stop<br />

for young fashionistas. This<br />

is the place to pick up a floral<br />

maxi skirt by Suno or a Wings<br />

& Horns Henley for your man.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Emerald Necklace Center<br />

125 The Fenway; 617-522-2700;<br />

emeraldnecklace.org<br />

Check out the new visitor<br />

center, housed in the historic<br />

H. H. Richardson building,<br />

where you can pick up maps<br />

and information on Boston’s<br />

Frederick Law Olmsteddesigned<br />

Emerald Necklace.<br />

Then walk the pretty string of<br />

parks, stretching from Boston<br />

Commons to Franklin Park.<br />

Shakespeare on<br />

the Common<br />

Parkman Bandstand, Boston Commons;<br />

617-426-0863; commshakes.org<br />

One of Boston’s most popular<br />

summer events draws crowds<br />

to the Commons to watch<br />

theater under the stars. Pack<br />

a picnic basket and bring a<br />

blanket to this year’s free<br />

performance of the Bard’s<br />

All’s Well That Ends Well.<br />

July 27 to Aug. 14.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Deuxave<br />

371 Commonwealth Ave; 617-517-<br />

5915; deuxave.com<br />

This new, ultra-chic bistro in<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

HAPPY TRAILS!<br />

The HarborWalk runs<br />

39 miles along the city’s<br />

historic waterfront, with<br />

parks, public art, cafés,<br />

shops, historical sites,<br />

museums, beaches and<br />

boat rentals along the<br />

way. Free audio tours<br />

and guided walks are<br />

available.<br />

Boston HarborWalk<br />

bostonharborwalk.com<br />

Back Bay features nouveau<br />

French cuisine, utilizing<br />

seasonal and local ingredients.<br />

Start with appetizers like the<br />

lobster with gnocchi or ninehour<br />

French onion soup, and<br />

follow it with a special like<br />

local flounder with fennel<br />

mussel ragout or house-made<br />

pasta. $$$$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

Trinity<br />

61 Chatham St; 617-367-6172;<br />

trinityboston.com<br />

Locals and tourists alike<br />

flock to this action-packed,<br />

three-level singles hangout<br />

located in the historic Faneuil<br />

Hall area. Catch a Sox game<br />

in the sports bar, play a<br />

game of darts or dance to<br />

DJ-mixed music.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

The oldest mounted police unit<br />

in the country was founded in<br />

Boston in 1870.<br />

Explore, Imagine, Create and Play at the Uptown Normal Children’s Discovery Museum!<br />

Children’s Discovery Museum and Discover More! Store • 101 E. Beaufort St. • Normal, IL • 309-433-3444<br />

For more information, including hours, admission, family programs, events and directions, visit: www.ChildrensDiscoveryMuseum.net


D. ZINTECK, PHOTOGRAPHICS 2<br />

Branson<br />

missouri<br />

by carol s. harris<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Lori’s Soap Market<br />

At the Grand Village Shops<br />

2800 W Hwy 76, Ste 525; 417-239-<br />

3390; lorisoapmarket.com<br />

Try hand-crafted, all-natural<br />

soaps made with olive oil and<br />

goat’s milk; they condition<br />

even the most sensitive skin.<br />

Only essential oils are used<br />

in this shop’s products—from<br />

soaps and lotions to creams<br />

and salt scrubs—to create<br />

scents like blackberry vanilla<br />

and lemongrass.<br />

GO SEE<br />

River Run Outfitters<br />

2626 State Hwy 165; 877-699-3474;<br />

riverrunoutfitters.com<br />

Record-breaking rainbow<br />

and brown trout lurk in the<br />

cold waters at the bottom<br />

of Lake Taneycomo. This allinclusive<br />

shop rents the gear<br />

and boats (and sells licenses)<br />

you need to go after ‘em.<br />

For the best chance at<br />

bringing home more than a<br />

fish story, though, you’ll want<br />

to hire the professional guides<br />

to show you their favorite<br />

fishing spots.<br />

Ralph Foster Museum<br />

At College of the Ozarks Campus,<br />

Point Lookout<br />

Opportunity Ave; 417-334-6411;<br />

rfostermuseum.com<br />

Ozarks radio pioneer Ralph<br />

Foster was one of the largest<br />

benefactors of this eclectic<br />

museum. It contains 40,000<br />

square feet of Ozarks cultural<br />

displays and natural history.<br />

Pop culture artifact The<br />

Beverly Hillbillies truck<br />

VISIT BRANSON!<br />

was donated by television<br />

producer Paul Henning.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Panda House<br />

2130 State Hwy 248; 417-335-2770<br />

Oh, the choices you’ll have at<br />

this 24-item oriental stir-fry<br />

buffet and hot bar. The sweet<br />

lemon chicken, savory bourbon<br />

chicken and overstuffed crab<br />

rangoon are local favorites.<br />

Want more? The salad and<br />

dessert bars await. Made-toorder<br />

combination meals are<br />

also available. $<br />

Sadie’s Sideboard<br />

2830 W Hwy 76; 334-3619;<br />

sadiessideboard.com<br />

“Obey the Buffet” is the slogan<br />

at this charming farmhouse<br />

eatery that’s served southernstyle<br />

comfort food—including<br />

grits, cornbread and blackberry<br />

cobbler—for more than<br />

25 years. You’ll want seconds<br />

of the mouthwatering biscuits<br />

and gravy and locally<br />

smoked meats. $<br />

GO PARTY<br />

Clear<br />

At the Hilton Branson Convention Center<br />

200 E Main St; 417-336-5400;<br />

hilton.com<br />

This sleek, urban cocktail<br />

lounge is the perfect place<br />

to spend a mild summer night.<br />

Sip the signature drink, April<br />

in Paris (St. Germain,<br />

champagne and muddled<br />

strawberries), poolside in a<br />

cabana or cozy up to a firepit<br />

with friends.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

Taney County’s Murder Rocks<br />

served as the hideout for<br />

Civil War outlaw Alf Bolin<br />

and his gang, who ambushed<br />

unsuspecting travelers on the<br />

Springfield-Harrison road.<br />

at<br />

4 Days<br />

3 Nights Terms<br />

Clarion<br />

at the<br />

Palace<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 83<br />

Buffalo/<br />

Niagara<br />

new york<br />

by jana eisenberg<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Allen Street Dress Shop<br />

89 Allen St; 716-883-0871; thedressshop.com<br />

This tastefully curated shop<br />

in the hip Allentown neighborhood<br />

features bright, flowy<br />

women’s clothing, bags and<br />

jewelry in both classic and<br />

modern styles.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Videosphere: A<br />

New Generation<br />

At Albright-Knox Art Gallery<br />

1285 Elmwood Ave; 716-882-8700;<br />

albrightknox.org<br />

The gallery’s first-ever exhibit<br />

of new media drawn from<br />

its collections reiterates its<br />

commitment to contemporary<br />

art. Included are two-dozen<br />

artists who work with<br />

computer graphics and/<br />

or animation, the internet,<br />

video and repurposed old<br />

technologies. Through Oct. 9.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Bingo's Dim Sum House<br />

3202 Sheridan Dr, Amherst; 716-<br />

833-8811<br />

This bustling new venture<br />

brings in delectable dim sum—<br />

tasty little buns, dumplings<br />

and other small dishes—fresh<br />

from owner Billy You’s family<br />

operation in New York’s<br />

Chinatown. They’re served<br />

traditionally, in stackable<br />

bamboo baskets. $<br />

Amy’s Place<br />

3234 Main St; 716-832-6666<br />

This cash-only University<br />

Heights café is known for its<br />

For For FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFo Fo FFFFo Foor<br />

rrrrrrr rrrrrr rrrrrrr rrrrrrrr rrr ONLY ONLY OO<br />

OON ONL NNLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLLL<br />

NLLYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY LLLYY LY LLLYY LLY YYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYYY<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

breakfast as well as fingerlickin’<br />

vegan/vegetarian and<br />

Mediterranean eats. Go for<br />

diner classics, or order an<br />

enormous signature dish, like<br />

the “Margie Meal”—charbroiled<br />

chicken, fajita fries, tomatoes<br />

and garlic spread, all wrapped<br />

in a pita. $<br />

GO PARTY<br />

Water Street Landing<br />

115 S Water St, Lewiston; 716-754-<br />

9200; waterstreetlanding.com<br />

Live music, a full bar and an<br />

up-close view of the mighty<br />

Niagara River are all par for the<br />

course at this riverside classic.<br />

Chill with a drink on the patio,<br />

or duck into the on-site River<br />

Sidebar for tasty bar treats like<br />

Buffalo-style chicken wings.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

GO GUIDES<br />

In the 1800s, packet boat<br />

travelers on the Erie Canal<br />

made it from Albany to Buffalo<br />

in an average of five days.<br />

SECRET GARDENS<br />

This remarkable "fiveweek-long<br />

garden party"<br />

unites 17 regional walks,<br />

celebrating gardens and<br />

the art of cultivating them<br />

throughout the area. Get<br />

inside the gates of the<br />

area’s 50 best private<br />

gardens on Thursday and<br />

Friday open gardens.<br />

Through July 31.<br />

National Garden Festival<br />

800-283-3256;<br />

nationalgardenfest.com<br />

$149 $149 855-SHO-TIME (746-8463)<br />

and restrictions apply.<br />

www.ticketbranson.com


GO GUIDES<br />

Cancun<br />

mexico<br />

by catherine gordon<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Casa Palacio<br />

At La Isla Shopping Village<br />

Blvd Kukulcan KM 12.5; +52 998-<br />

193-1490; casapalacio.com.mx<br />

Step through the doors of<br />

this luxury interiors store<br />

and you’ll enter a contemporary<br />

haven of good taste.<br />

Simple yet sleek offerings<br />

from international designers<br />

can be found here, including<br />

kitchenware from Mango Leaf<br />

that’s crafted from bamboo.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Punta Sur Sculpture<br />

Garden<br />

At Garrafon Reef Park<br />

Punta Sur, Isla Mujeres; 998-193-<br />

3360; garrafon.com<br />

Rent a golf cart to reach the<br />

rocky southern tip of Isla<br />

Mujeres, where you’ll discover<br />

an outdoor sculpture garden<br />

filled with modern creations<br />

by famed Mexican artists like<br />

Jose Luis Cuevas. Clamber<br />

up the lighthouse for stunning<br />

views of Cancun.<br />

GO EAT<br />

La Pasteleria<br />

Ave Coba, Downtown; 998-884-3420<br />

For those with a sweet tooth,<br />

indulge with breakfast at one<br />

of Cancun’s best-kept secrets.<br />

The café’s in-house bakery<br />

produces French pastries<br />

and cakes that will have you<br />

begging for more. $$<br />

Yamamoto<br />

Ave Uxmal 31, Downtown; 998-887-<br />

3366; yamamoto-cancun.com<br />

The oldest Japanese restau-<br />

rant in town still holds its own<br />

with exquisitely presented<br />

sushi made from ocean-fresh<br />

crab and shrimp. But only the<br />

brave will sample the fried ice<br />

cream with strawberry jam<br />

lurking on the dessert menu.<br />

$$$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

Mandala<br />

Blvd Kukulcan KM 9, Hotel Zone; 998-<br />

848-8380; mandalanightclub.com<br />

With its Hindu-themed interior<br />

and expertly mixed cocktails,<br />

this new club is dripping with<br />

exclusivity. Beautiful clubbers<br />

throng on the dancefloor or<br />

lounge in the various VIP sections,<br />

while DJs lay down the<br />

latest beat-filled tracks.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

The sand on the beaches of<br />

Cancun is made from crushed<br />

coral, which is cool to the<br />

touch and won’t burn your feet.<br />

REAL BIG FISH<br />

Every summer, hundreds<br />

of plankton-munching<br />

whale sharks converge<br />

in the waters around<br />

Cancun, providing adventurous<br />

types with the<br />

opportunity to swim with<br />

these gigantic creatures.<br />

Tour boats depart daily<br />

from local hotels for an<br />

unforgettable splash<br />

about with the biggest<br />

fish in the sea.<br />

Whale Shark Excursions<br />

whalesharktourscancun.com<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 84<br />

Charleston<br />

west virginia<br />

by sheila mcentee<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Gallery Eleven<br />

1025 Quarrier St; 304-342-0083;<br />

galleryeleven.com<br />

Perhaps you fancy an<br />

exquisite, hand-blown glass<br />

vase by Ron Hinkle, a Celtic<br />

pendant by silversmith Anita<br />

Gallagher or a whimsical<br />

watercolor cat by Sonja<br />

Adkins. This creative<br />

cooperative features works<br />

by numerous local painters,<br />

potters, jewelers and<br />

stained-glass artists. Many a<br />

handsome keepsake has been<br />

found here.<br />

The Peanut Shoppe<br />

126 Capitol St; 304-342-9493<br />

The aroma of fresh-roasted<br />

peanuts, warm from Delbert<br />

Moore’s original Planters<br />

roaster, has drawn folks<br />

into this Charleston icon<br />

since 1950. A variety of<br />

nuts and nut mixes (made<br />

daily by Moore’s daughter<br />

and grandson), candies and<br />

homemade caramel corn keeps<br />

them coming back.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Ellen’s Homemade<br />

Ice Cream<br />

223-225 Capitol St; 304-343-6488<br />

West Virginia Symphony flutist<br />

Ellen Beal is also renowned<br />

for dishing out Charleston’s<br />

best ice cream. Espresso Oreo<br />

and raspberry chocolate chip<br />

are year-round favorites, but<br />

the summertime-only fresh<br />

peach is out of this world. Not<br />

an ice cream eater? Ellen also<br />

sells coffee, soups, salads<br />

and wraps. $<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

HOMECOMING<br />

Through their atmospheric,<br />

abstract and<br />

representational works,<br />

each of these prominent,<br />

West Virginia-connected<br />

artists (two of whom are<br />

natives), explores humankind’s<br />

relationship to the<br />

Appalachian landscape,<br />

which White calls “a world<br />

of ceaseless mortality<br />

and persistent fragility<br />

and regeneration.”<br />

Through July 31.<br />

Coming Home: Joseph<br />

Hughes, Tom Nakashima<br />

and Kit White<br />

At Clay Center for the Arts<br />

and Sciences of West Virginia;<br />

One Clay Sq; 304-561-3570;<br />

theclaycenter.org<br />

GO PARTY<br />

Impulse Nightclub<br />

205 Capitol St; 304-342-9614<br />

Just gotta dance? Bright<br />

lights, a state-of-the-art sound<br />

system and a hot mix of music<br />

give this popular nightclub a<br />

big-city feel. Sip a variety of<br />

specialty drinks at the bar or<br />

in the VIP area, reserved for<br />

private parties.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

West Virginia is the only state<br />

located wholly within the<br />

Appalachian Mountains. About<br />

80% of the state is forestland.<br />

RIGHT: KIT WHITE


Charlotte<br />

north carolina<br />

GO SHOP<br />

The Secret Chocolatier<br />

704-323-8178;<br />

thesecretchocolatier.com<br />

This local outfit offers solace<br />

for your sweet tooth—artisan<br />

truffles, creams, cakes and a<br />

wide array of brownies. The<br />

goods are sold at five Charlotte<br />

shops; uptown, get them at<br />

Blynk Organic, in the Bank of<br />

America Plaza (101 S Tryon St).<br />

Harry & Jeanie West Fine<br />

Musical Instruments<br />

116 E Broad St, Statesville; 704-883-<br />

0033; harryandjeaniewest.com<br />

If you’re into stringed<br />

instruments, be sure to make<br />

the trip north to this shop in<br />

neighboring Iredell County,<br />

where bluegrass legends<br />

Harry and Jeanie have stocked<br />

all variety of guitars, plus<br />

banjos, cellos, autoharps and<br />

mandolins, for years.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Carowinds<br />

14523 Carowinds Blvd;<br />

704-588-2600; carowinds.com<br />

The biggest theme park in the<br />

Carolinas will stay open until<br />

10pm this summer—great<br />

news if you want to escape the<br />

daytime heat or prefer shorter<br />

after-dusk lines at the coasters<br />

and other thrill rides.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Ben Thanh<br />

4900 Central Ave; 704-566-1088;<br />

benthanhcharlotte.com<br />

This unassuming Vietnamese<br />

restaurant serves up top-shelf<br />

food in a modest setting (and<br />

at modest prices). The beef<br />

pho is a full meal all by itself.<br />

Try the banh xeo chay (a large,<br />

meat-and-sprout filled rice<br />

pancake) dipped in sweet and<br />

sour sauce. $<br />

Brooks’ Sandwich House<br />

2710 N Brevard St; 704-375-7808<br />

The burgers here have won<br />

local awards and loyal fans for<br />

patties that lock the juices—<br />

and great taste—inside. Get a<br />

side of the legendary chili, too,<br />

but be sure to arrive early; it<br />

closes at 2pm. $<br />

Cajun Queen<br />

1800 E Seventh St; 704-377-9017;<br />

cajunqueen.net<br />

Business is brisk at the city’s<br />

top Cajun restaurant, which<br />

offers classic fare—gumbo,<br />

étouffée—in a tastefully<br />

renovated historic home. The<br />

blackened pork tenderloin with<br />

chorizo-black bean sauce,<br />

chipotle chili cream and fried<br />

plantains won't disappoint. $$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

Kickstand<br />

1101 Central Ave; 704-332-1010;<br />

kickstandcharlotte.com<br />

This Plaza-Midwood area<br />

watering hole features a long<br />

craft beer list (with 24 on tap),<br />

great drink specials and 30<br />

HD screens showing all your<br />

favorite teams. On Tuesdays,<br />

earn your own glory in the<br />

trivia contest, or ride the<br />

easy route to fame by taking<br />

the $12 Tricycle Challenge:<br />

Consume an enormous burger<br />

and a PBR tallboy and get your<br />

photo on the wall.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

Charlotte-based snack-food<br />

maker Lance started in 1913<br />

with founder Philip Lance<br />

hawking peanuts on downtown<br />

street corners.<br />

Chicago<br />

illinois<br />

by john bordsen by rod o'connor<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Hard Boiled Records<br />

and Video<br />

2010 W Roscoe St; 773-755-2619;<br />

hardboiledrecords.blogspot.com<br />

This tiny, charming survivor<br />

shows that, even in the iTunes<br />

era, there’s still a market for<br />

vinyl in all its crackly glory. The<br />

focus is on indie bands, and<br />

the staff isn’t afraid to tout its<br />

taste—which is a good thing.<br />

Lori’s Shoes<br />

824 W Armitage Ave; 773-281-5655;<br />

lorisshoes.com<br />

Footwear fanatics swear by<br />

this Lincoln Park emporium,<br />

known for stocking designer<br />

shoes up to 30% off department<br />

store prices. Whether<br />

the goal is trendy, classic or<br />

expensive Italian, this shop<br />

carries everything. (Consider<br />

yourself warned.)<br />

Paper Doll<br />

2048 W Division St; 773-227-6950;<br />

paperdollchicago.com<br />

Racks bursting with witty<br />

cards, T-shirts designed by<br />

local artists, and gift ideas<br />

ranging from journals and<br />

guidebooks to scented candles<br />

keep this Wicker Park boutique<br />

perennially popular. Don’t<br />

forget to say hello to Maude,<br />

the shop’s adorable house pug.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Chicago Yacht Club Race<br />

to Mackinac Island Boat<br />

Parade<br />

At Navy Pier<br />

600 E Grand Ave; 312-595-7437;<br />

cycracetomackinac.com<br />

Those without their own<br />

schooner can watch the boat<br />

parade that signals the start<br />

of this historic sailboat race,<br />

now in its 103rd running. Find<br />

a spot at Navy Pier and gape at<br />

the 300-plus vessels as they<br />

begin their 333-mile journey<br />

across crystal-blue Lake<br />

Michigan. July 16-19.<br />

Green City Market<br />

1750 N Clark St; 773-880-1266;<br />

greencitymarket.org<br />

New vendors at the <strong>2011</strong><br />

edition of the Windy City’s<br />

showcase farmers market,<br />

held every Wednesday and<br />

Saturday in lakefront Lincoln<br />

Park, include ready-to-eat<br />

treats from Las Manas Tamales<br />

and artisan breads from<br />

Bennison’s Bakery.<br />

Morton Arboretum<br />

4100 Lincoln Ave in Lisle, IL; 630-968-<br />

0074; mortonarb.org<br />

The more than 4,000 different<br />

trees, shrubs and other flora in<br />

this tree-hugger’s paradise is<br />

best experienced in full bloom<br />

at the peak of summer. Explore<br />

this outdoor museum on foot<br />

by hiking the 16 miles of paved<br />

or wood-chipped trails.<br />

Pierogi Fest<br />

2400 New York Ave in Whiting, IN; 219-<br />

659-0292; pierogifest.net<br />

This kitschy festival is certainly<br />

the only one with a potato<br />

dumpling mascot. Taking place<br />

in nearby northwest Indiana,<br />

it celebrates the community’s<br />

Polish heritage with a polka<br />

parade, a pierogi-eating contest<br />

and, of course, plenty of<br />

gut-busting Eastern European<br />

delicacies. July 29-31.<br />

GO EAT<br />

The Wieners Circle<br />

2622 N Clark St; 773-477-7444;<br />

wienercircle.net<br />

Most of Chicago’s legendary<br />

hot dog stands steam their<br />

Make it a night to remember at The Redhead Piano Bar!<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 85<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

GO GUIDES<br />

continued on page 86 ►<br />

16 W. Ontario St.312-640-1000


GO GUIDES<br />

◄CHICAGO cont'd<br />

links. This Lincoln Park stalwart<br />

goes the charbroiled route,<br />

resulting in a savory smokiness.<br />

Grab one with everything and a<br />

sack full of greasy yet delicious<br />

fries and dine al fresco at the<br />

Clark Street picnic tables. $<br />

Ruxbin<br />

851 N Ashland Ave; 312-624-8509;<br />

ruxbinchicago.com<br />

Fine dining is broken down<br />

to the barest essentials at<br />

this tiny BYO hotspot. The<br />

menu changes seasonally, but<br />

staples include pan-seared<br />

trout and mussels swimming<br />

in a sake tomato broth.<br />

Somehow, the dining room’s<br />

salvaged and repurposed<br />

aesthetic radiates warmth, not<br />

hipster pretentiousness. $$$<br />

Sunda<br />

110 W Illinois St; 312-644-0500;<br />

sundachicago.com<br />

Fresh modern Pan-Asian<br />

cuisine refuses to cede the<br />

spotlight at this always-packed<br />

scenester hangout. Try the<br />

crab-crusted ahi tuna or the<br />

seared Kobe beef tartare and<br />

settle in for an evening of<br />

people-watching. $$$<br />

FOR THOSE ABOUT TO ROCK<br />

Veteran musician Phil<br />

Rockrohr turned his knowledge<br />

of local music lore into<br />

a rolling business. His tour<br />

explores the sites and stories<br />

that inspired Chicago’s rock<br />

'n' roll royalty. Before getting<br />

onboard, test your knowledge<br />

of Windy City rockers:<br />

Chicago Music Tours –<br />

Chicago Rock Stars Tour ur<br />

Reservations required<br />

Bus leaves from 620 N Clark St • 773-216-3866 6<br />

Register at chicagorockstour.com<br />

GO PARTY<br />

Lux Bar<br />

18 E Bellevue Pl; 312-642-3400;<br />

luxbar.com<br />

This elegant, multi-level bar<br />

is as close as it gets for Gold<br />

Coasters seeking a neighborhood<br />

saloon where everyone<br />

knows their name. The wellheeled<br />

crowd is equally<br />

comfortable watching the<br />

Cubs or Sox game on the 16<br />

LED flat screens downstairs,<br />

or dancing to DJs spinning in<br />

the upstairs lounge.<br />

Weegee’s Lounge<br />

3659 W Armitage Ave; 773-384-9423<br />

A great bourbon list and<br />

thoughtful craft beer pours<br />

make this vintage tin-ceilinged<br />

tavern worth the trip. The cool<br />

jazz over the stereo sets a<br />

chilled-out, retro mood and the<br />

closest thing to sports action<br />

is the free shuffleboard game<br />

in the back.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

In 1930, Hostess Bakery in<br />

the Chicago suburb of Schiller<br />

Park created one of the<br />

world’s most resilient desserts:<br />

the Twinkie.<br />

1. He married the first Chicago<br />

agent to offer his band a gig.<br />

2. Her first album cover was<br />

shot in a photo booth at a<br />

Wicker Park bar.<br />

3. After seeing their first<br />

show, the drummer-to-be<br />

of this band referred to its<br />

performance ce aas<br />

“awful." awful<br />

Answers: rs: 1)<br />

Jeff Tweedy, 2) Liz Phair, 3) Smashing Pumpkins<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 86<br />

Columbus<br />

ohio<br />

by betsa marsh<br />

GO SEE<br />

Ohio State Fair<br />

At the Ohio Expo Center & State Fair<br />

717 E 17th Ave; 888-646-3976;<br />

ohiostatefair.com<br />

Where else are you going to<br />

bite into a deep-fried Mars<br />

bars? Or admire the butter<br />

cow? This legendary fair<br />

features prize farm animals,<br />

as well as exotic ones in the<br />

petting zoo, thrill rides, roving<br />

performers, horse shows and<br />

helicopter rides. July 27 to<br />

Aug. 7.<br />

Music in the Park<br />

At Friendship Park<br />

150 Oklahoma Ave, Gahanna; 614-<br />

342-4250; gahanna.gov<br />

Boogie among the begonias<br />

every Friday evening, when<br />

local acoustic (July 8, 15 and<br />

Aug. 5) oldies (July 22) and<br />

Celtic (July 29) bands rock the<br />

bandstand at Friendship Park.<br />

Through Aug. 19.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Lemongrass<br />

Fusion Cuisine<br />

641 N High St; 614-224-1414;<br />

lemongrassfusion.com<br />

This serene space is a Zen<br />

spot for sipping plum wine and<br />

savoring a lemongrass sushi<br />

roll made with tuna, salmon<br />

and smoked barbecue eel. Or<br />

try the sampler platter for a<br />

taste of three local favorites:<br />

seafood rangoon, chicken<br />

satay and spring rolls. $$$<br />

Mitchell’s M Steakhouse<br />

45 4 N Third St; 614-621-2333;<br />

mitchellssteakhouse.com<br />

Mitchell’s grills ’em all. This<br />

gourmet<br />

g<br />

& cl clas<br />

.com .com<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

bouq uquets<br />

re-imagined steakhouse tops<br />

them, too, with gorgonzola<br />

crust, cognac peppercorn or<br />

bacon. The sides are just as<br />

tempting, and have recently<br />

included jalapeño scalloped<br />

potatoes and green beans with<br />

walnut brown butter. $$$$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

Dick’s Den<br />

2417 N High St; 614-268-9573;<br />

dicksdencolumbus.com<br />

Jazz cats have been hanging<br />

in the den for decades, drawn<br />

by live music at least four<br />

nights a week. Tuesdays are<br />

for bluegrass, but it’s all jazz<br />

all the time come the weekend.<br />

The cover charge is rarely<br />

more than $5, and the drinks<br />

are dirt-cheap.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

Flying from Columbus, Geraldine<br />

“Jerrie” Mock became the<br />

first woman to fly an airplane<br />

around the globe in 1964.<br />

FACE TIME<br />

Mukha means “face” in<br />

Tagalog, and master<br />

esthetician Tim Maurer<br />

is beautifying Columbus<br />

one face at a time at<br />

this cosmetics shop and<br />

medi-spa. Stop in and<br />

remake yourself with an<br />

all-natural foundation or<br />

shadow blended just<br />

for you.<br />

Mukha<br />

980 N High St; 614-294-<br />

7546; mukhaspa.com<br />

Receive 10% off when mentioning AirTran SHIPPING AVAILABLE<br />

www.flowerstoeat.com 813.341.2328<br />

asse ses<br />

LEFT: CRAIG SMITH


JACQUELINE MIA FOSTER<br />

Dallas/<br />

Ft. Worth<br />

texas<br />

by amy anderson<br />

GO SHOP<br />

The Gypsy Wagon<br />

2928 N Henderson Ave; 214-370-<br />

8010; the-gypsy-wagon.com<br />

Stopping by this funky gift shop<br />

is like a visit to your crazy worldtraveling<br />

aunt’s house. Find<br />

Voluspa candles, 19th-century<br />

furniture, patchwork pillows, Old<br />

Gringo cowboy boots, vintage<br />

saris and handmade jewelry.<br />

Pumps<br />

103 E Virginia St, Ste 101, McKinney;<br />

972-562-4555;<br />

gottahavemypumps.com<br />

Visit quaint downtown McKinney<br />

and rest your tootsies<br />

while you treat them to the<br />

finest in footwear styles by<br />

Kelsi, Pura Lopez, Chic Mihara<br />

and more. Find hats, jewelry<br />

and handbags, to boot.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Taste of Dallas<br />

At Fair Park<br />

3809 Grand Ave; 214-421-9600;<br />

tasteofdallas.org<br />

Sample delectable specialties<br />

from Dallas’ best restaurants,<br />

all in one aromatic place. Enjoy<br />

chef demonstrations, wine and<br />

beer tastings, cookbook signings<br />

and a massive culinary<br />

marketplace with all sorts of<br />

hard-to-find buys. July 8-10.<br />

Haley Henman Gallery<br />

2335 Hardwick St; 214-749-1277;<br />

haleyhenman.com<br />

This gallery devoted to<br />

modern art by emerging and<br />

established artists exhibits<br />

diverse pieces in a variety of<br />

mediums, including drawings by<br />

Ralph Kelman and sculptures<br />

by Adriana Cobo-Frenkel.<br />

This month, check out Paper<br />

Works, which includes works by<br />

Carol Barth and Terri Thoman.<br />

Through July 18.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Railhead Smokehouse<br />

120 S Ranch House Rd, Willow Park;<br />

817-441-2523; railheadbbq.net<br />

Located near Fort Worth,<br />

this smokehouse is the real<br />

deal. Get smoked meats (even<br />

salami) fresh from the pit<br />

and smothered in homemade<br />

sauce, with beans, potato<br />

salad or coleslaw. The “biggest<br />

acts in Texas music” keep the<br />

place hopping Tuesday, Friday,<br />

Saturday and Sunday. $$<br />

Horne & Dekker's Sunday<br />

Hangover Brunch<br />

2323 N Henderson Ave; 214-821-<br />

9333; horneanddekker.com<br />

Overindulge at the hotel bar?<br />

Head to here for the Walk of<br />

Shame, a signature hangover<br />

recipe of Zwack, ginger beer,<br />

mint and a little hair of the<br />

dog. If shame’s too bitter, try a<br />

mimosa with your sea bass and<br />

scallop cakes. Sundays 11am<br />

to 3pm. $$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

Barcadia<br />

1917 N Henderson Ave; 214-821-<br />

7300; barcadiabars.com<br />

All your favorite arcade games<br />

like Ms. Pac-Man, Galaga and<br />

Space Invaders bleep and<br />

bloop here alongside oversized<br />

versions of Jenga and Connect<br />

4. Just a seventh grader’s<br />

fantasy? Not with 24 different<br />

beers on tap, happy hour until<br />

8pm and 1940s pin-up art on<br />

the walls.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

Dallas' City Hall was designed<br />

by I.M. Pei.<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 87<br />

Dayton<br />

ohio<br />

by russell florence, jr.<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Basically British<br />

502 E Third St; 937-222-1488;<br />

basically-british.com<br />

This high-ceilinged<br />

Anglophile's dream specializes<br />

in imported food and<br />

merchandise from England<br />

(as well as South Africa and<br />

Australia). After enjoying high<br />

tea, browse candy, food and<br />

tea in the gift shop.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Kings Island<br />

6300 Kings Island Dr, Mason;<br />

513-754-5700; pki.com<br />

Experience Kings Island<br />

amusement park, one of<br />

Southwest Ohio’s premier<br />

attractions. Explore the kidfriendly<br />

Planet Snoopy; hop on<br />

the Beast, the world’s longest<br />

wooden rollercoaster; or<br />

swallow your stomach on the<br />

315-foot-tall Drop Tower.<br />

BACK TO THE FUTURE<br />

This nationally recognized gnized<br />

festival, which presents ents<br />

original, previously<br />

unproduced works and nd<br />

is judged by New<br />

York-based theater<br />

professionals,<br />

attracts a slew of<br />

emerging playwrights<br />

from across<br />

the world. More than n<br />

240 entries were<br />

whittled down to the e<br />

GO EAT<br />

Mr. Lee’s Fine Dining<br />

+ Sushi Bar<br />

7580 Poe Ave;<br />

937-898-3860; mrlees.com<br />

Mr. Lee’s delivers some of the<br />

best Asian cuisine in town in<br />

an elegant and opulent interior.<br />

It’s got all the favorites, from<br />

General Tso’s chicken to Hunan<br />

fried rice, as well as a full<br />

sushi menu and a monthly food<br />

and wine pairing. This month<br />

features American wines<br />

(July 6-7). $$$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

Wiley’s Comedy Nightclub<br />

101 Pine St; 937-224-5653;<br />

wileyscomedyclub.com<br />

If you’re in the mood for a good<br />

laugh, stop by Dayton’s oldest<br />

comedy club. Established and<br />

up-and-coming comedians have<br />

entertained audiences at this<br />

venue in the historic Oregon<br />

District for more than 25 years.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

Rob Lowe was raised in<br />

Oakwood, a Dayton suburb,<br />

and performed at the Dayton<br />

Playhouse in his youth.<br />

six works work that make up<br />

this year’s yea fest. Previous<br />

winners include Brooklyner<br />

Beau<br />

Willimon (pictured),<br />

whose wh political drama<br />

Farragut Fa North won<br />

the 2005 festival,<br />

op opened off-Broadway<br />

in<br />

2008 and is<br />

be being produced<br />

by Hollywood this<br />

year ye (retitled Ides of<br />

March). Ma July 29-31.<br />

At The Dayton Playhouse<br />

1301 E Siebenthaler Ave; 937-424-8477; daytonplayhouse.org<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

GO GUIDES


GO GUIDES<br />

Denver<br />

colorado<br />

by lori midson<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Eco-POLITAN<br />

437 S Wadsworth Blvd; 303-989-<br />

2229; eco-politan.com<br />

A one-stop shop for<br />

environmentally conscious<br />

parents, this shrine to earthfriendly<br />

baby essentials—cloth<br />

diapers, diaper bags, baby<br />

carriers, swaddle blankets and<br />

slings, organic cotton clothing<br />

and eco-inclined toys—also<br />

offers books and classes on<br />

making your own healthy baby<br />

food at home.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Summer Brew Fest<br />

At Mile High Station<br />

2027 W Colfax Ave; 303-596-7274;<br />

denverbrewfest.com<br />

It’s all about craft beer at<br />

this homage to suds, which<br />

features more than 100<br />

samplings from nearly 40<br />

craft breweries across the<br />

country—including Great<br />

Divide, Left Hand and New<br />

Belgium from Colorado. If you<br />

want to be one of the first<br />

hops-lovers to imbibe, there’s<br />

a VIP session at 6pm.<br />

July 22.<br />

Colorado Dragon<br />

Boat Festival<br />

At Sloan’s Lake Park<br />

4500 W 17th Ave; 303-953-7277;<br />

cdbf.org<br />

Hailed as the largest Pan-Asian<br />

festival between the Midwest<br />

and the West Coast, this<br />

summertime salute to Asian<br />

culture features arts and<br />

crafts, dancing, a marketplace,<br />

an Asian food romp and, of<br />

course, a spirited dragon boat<br />

race that draws major crowds.<br />

July 30-31.<br />

Red Rocks Amphitheater<br />

18300 W Alameda Pkwy; 303-697-<br />

4939; redrocksonline.com<br />

Catch a concert under the<br />

stars at this world-renowned<br />

venue that plays center<br />

stage to some of the best<br />

bands in the world. On tap for<br />

July: Kenny Chesney,<br />

Billy Currington and Uncle<br />

Kracker (July 6-8), Sarah<br />

McLachlan with the Colorado<br />

Symphony (July 10) and<br />

Train, Maroon 5 and Gavin<br />

DeGraw (July 28).<br />

GO EAT<br />

Bittersweet<br />

500 E Alameda Ave; 303-942-0320;<br />

bittersweetdenver.com<br />

Gastronauts are going gaga<br />

for culinary wizard Olav<br />

Peterson’s artisanal New<br />

American cuisine bolstered<br />

by fresh herbs and produce<br />

from the chef’s on-site garden.<br />

To wit: Norwegian haddock<br />

bedded with fiddlehead ferns<br />

and English pea purée, and<br />

the sweetbread reuben with<br />

pickled tomatoes. $$$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

Star Bar<br />

2137 Larimer St; 720-328-2420;<br />

starbardenver.com<br />

Colorado craft beer lovers<br />

congregate en masse at this<br />

kitschy Ballpark neighborhood<br />

watering hole that hosts live<br />

music and karaoke parties. It<br />

hosts a killer happy hour and<br />

features local brews on draft<br />

and in cans.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

Keith Richards of The<br />

Rolling Stones once tossed a<br />

television out of a window at<br />

Denver's Brown Palace Hotel.<br />

Style<br />

Stay in<br />

in Colorado<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 88<br />

Des Moines<br />

iowa<br />

by christine riccelli<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Chocolaterie Stam<br />

2814 Ingersoll Ave;<br />

515-282-9575, stamchocolate.com<br />

Exquisite European chocolate<br />

stars at this inviting shop. Run<br />

by a member of the Stam family—which<br />

started the business<br />

in the Netherlands in 1913—it<br />

features rich, finely crafted<br />

bonbons as well as truffles,<br />

cookies, coffee and gelato.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Jazz in July<br />

Various locations;<br />

515-280-3222; metroarts.org<br />

Pack a picnic and listen to<br />

regional musicians play jazz<br />

favorites at 24 free concerts<br />

throughout July. The concerts,<br />

held at parks and other outdoor<br />

sites, are accompanied<br />

by artists’ displays, children’s<br />

activities and food vendors.<br />

PAST TIME<br />

Experience Iowa’s past at this<br />

500-acre outdoor museum in<br />

suburban Des Moines. Walking<br />

trails and tractor-drawn<br />

carts connect three working ng<br />

farms—a 1700 Ioway village age<br />

and 1850 and 1900 farms— ms—<br />

where costumed interpreters ters<br />

work the land, prepare meals eals<br />

and do other chores as the e<br />

people did then. You can pitch<br />

right in; help dig out an Indian dian<br />

canoe or churn butter. Next, xt,<br />

stroll the 1875 re-created d<br />

Living History Farms arms<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

GO EAT<br />

Kirkwood Lounge<br />

400 Locust St.; 515-288-9606<br />

This high-energy restaurant<br />

is downtown’s newest hotspot.<br />

The Southern-inspired menu<br />

takes casual dining to a more<br />

creative, refined level. Try egg<br />

rolls with smoked chicken<br />

and braised greens, a salmon<br />

BLT burger or the roasted<br />

beet pizza. $$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

The House of Bricks<br />

525 E Grand Ave; 515-727-4370,<br />

thehouseofbricks.com<br />

This lively East Village bar is<br />

downtown’s live music capital,<br />

hosting rock, blues and indie<br />

music acts and presenting<br />

edgy comedy shows, poetry<br />

slams and open-mic nights.<br />

If you’re hungry, order from a<br />

menu filled with bar standards<br />

like potato skins, deli<br />

sandwiches and burgers.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

11121 Hickman Rd, Urbandale; 515-278-5286; lhf.org<br />

The 45-story, 630-foot-tall<br />

801 Grand is Des Moines’—<br />

and Iowa’s—tallest building.<br />

frontier town, which includes<br />

shops, homes and businesses,<br />

such as a milliner, plus a rural<br />

chapel and schoolhouse.<br />

Thoughtful. Contemporary.<br />

Intelligent. Stylish.<br />

CAMBRIASUITES.COM • 888.8CAMBRIA<br />

©2010 Choice Hotels International, Inc. All rights reserved.<br />

A URORA 303.576.9600 • F T. COLLINS 970.267.9000 • P UEBLO 719.546.1234


Detroit<br />

michigan<br />

by ellen piligian<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Savvy Chic<br />

2712 Riopelle St; 313-833-8769<br />

Take a little side trip to Paris<br />

in the city’s historic Eastern<br />

Market with a stop at this très<br />

chic boutique. Owner Karen<br />

Brown has constructed her<br />

own personal City of Light,<br />

filling it with a well-edited,<br />

eclectic collection that<br />

varies depending on her<br />

whimsies. Expect anything<br />

from mid-century furniture to<br />

high-fashion accessories and<br />

imported French foods. Open<br />

Thursday to Saturday.<br />

GO SEE<br />

The Heidelberg Project<br />

3600 block of Heidelberg St; 313-<br />

267-1622; heidelberg.org<br />

Summer is a great time to<br />

do a walking tour of this<br />

unique outdoor community<br />

project. Founded in 1986 by<br />

Detroit artist Tyree Guyton<br />

as a response to the blight in<br />

his neighborhood, it’s home<br />

to polka-dot houses, found<br />

objects and recycled materials<br />

reinvented as art.<br />

Nautical Mile<br />

Jefferson Ave, St. Clair Shores; 586-<br />

777-7100; nauticalmile.org<br />

This stretch of marinas, canals<br />

and boat slips—home to the<br />

largest concentration of boats<br />

in the Midwest—is brimming<br />

with family fun, from entertainment<br />

and dining to shopping<br />

and water sports. Summer<br />

events include a Car Cruise &<br />

Bike Night (July 14), Aqua Fest<br />

(July 14-17) and cruises with<br />

themes like 80s Rewind (July<br />

13) and the popular Carnival<br />

on Bourbon Street (Aug. 3).<br />

Concert of Colors<br />

Various locations; 313-624-0215;<br />

concertofcolors.com<br />

Get into the groove at this free<br />

mid-July celebration of diversity<br />

that brings together metro<br />

Detroit’s various ethnic groups<br />

and communities through live<br />

music. You’ll see local acts and<br />

performers from around the<br />

world and enjoy great chow<br />

at the outdoor street festival.<br />

July 14-17.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Detroit Seafood Market<br />

1435 Randolph St; 313-962-4180;<br />

thedetroitseafoodmarket.com<br />

Enjoy the swanky setting<br />

with exposed brick, high<br />

ceilings and floor-to-ceiling<br />

windows at one of the city’s<br />

newest restaurants. Along<br />

with fresh catches like perch<br />

and Chilean sea bass are Chef<br />

Leonardo’s famous lobster mac<br />

and cheese and blackened<br />

rib eye. $$$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

Majestic Theatre<br />

4120 Woodward Ave; 313-833-9700;<br />

majesticdetroit.com<br />

Music lovers looking for the<br />

hottest national acts should<br />

make a night of it at one of the<br />

city’s top live music venues.<br />

Located in Detroit's cultural<br />

center, the 1915 former movie<br />

theater has hosted the likes<br />

of Buddy Guy, Los Lobos and<br />

Wilco. This month, check out<br />

Rusted Root (July 10) and<br />

Steve Earle (July 30).<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

Michigan is the boating<br />

capital of the US, with more<br />

registered boats than any<br />

other state.<br />

FLINT CULTURAL<br />

CENTER<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 89<br />

Flint<br />

michigan<br />

by liz shaw<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Sullivan’s Irish Alley<br />

104 E Main St, Flushing; 810-487-<br />

2473; sullivansirishalley.com<br />

One hundred thousand<br />

welcomes await at this familyowned<br />

gift emporium. Need<br />

a Celtic knot bead for a true<br />

love’s bracelet or an Irish patchwork<br />

walking hat? If it has to<br />

do with the Emerald Isle, you’re<br />

likely to find it here, including<br />

rare pieces like Ogham (ancient<br />

script) wish plaques.<br />

GO SEE<br />

The Whiting<br />

1241 E Kearsley St; 810-237-7337;<br />

thewhiting.com<br />

A 1999 renovation returned<br />

this local institution to its<br />

original 1960s elegance. This<br />

month brings the Magnus<br />

Midwest Showcase Ballet (July<br />

16) and Great Expectations,<br />

performed by the Flint Youth<br />

Theatre (July 22 to Aug. 6).<br />

Flint Children’s Museum<br />

1602 W University Ave; 810-767-<br />

5437; flintchildrensmuseum.org<br />

Learning is fun at this museum<br />

that uses hands-on science<br />

and creative play to teach<br />

kids how the world works. This<br />

month’s theme is “Up, Up and<br />

Away”; visitors will learn about<br />

flight by conducting outdoor<br />

experiments, like sending<br />

stomp rockets into the sky.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Chutney Bazaar<br />

5454 Perry Rd, Grand Blanc; 810-603-<br />

1499; chutneybazaar.com<br />

Shop Bollywood DVDs and<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

imported goodies while munching<br />

a handmade veggie samosa<br />

at this no-frills Indian grocerturned<br />

deli. It’s perfect for a<br />

midday curry fix—especially<br />

the aloo tikki chaat (spicy peas<br />

spooned over potato cakes). $<br />

GO PARTY<br />

Fenton Winery & Brewery<br />

1545 N Leroy St, Fenton; 810-373-<br />

4194; fentonwinery.com<br />

Head to this sleek bistro-like<br />

spot for craft brews, small<br />

plates, quiet conversation<br />

and occasional music. After<br />

indulging in the decadent<br />

cherry chocolate port over<br />

cheesecake, stop by the bar to<br />

say hello to the friendly owners.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

GO GUIDES<br />

“The Rock” (located at Hammerberg<br />

Road and W 12th<br />

Street) has been the local<br />

graffiti artists’ community<br />

billboard for decades.<br />

ROAD WARRIORS<br />

For one day a year, Vehicle<br />

City becomes Bicycle<br />

City, as the region's top<br />

road bike racers risk it all<br />

in a high-speed criterium<br />

(street race) that repeatedly<br />

traverses the bumpy<br />

bricks (pavé in French)<br />

of downtown's Saginaw<br />

Street. Eat an al fresco<br />

breakfast on Saginaw and<br />

enjoy the races. July 24.<br />

Le Champion Pavé<br />

400-Block of Saginaw St;<br />

lechampionpave.com<br />

FlintCulturalCenter.org<br />

for more info<br />

Flint Institute of Arts • Flint School of Performing Arts • Flint Symphony Orchestra<br />

Flint Youth Theatre • Sloan Museum • Longway Planetarium • The Whiting


ON THE TOWN<br />

FLINT<br />

IN BRIEF BY BROOKE PORTER<br />

BY THE NUMBERS<br />

21<br />

parks in Genesee County, the largest<br />

county park system in Michigan<br />

NEWS FLASH<br />

Hotel Happening •<br />

The Fairfield Inn &<br />

Suites by Marriott<br />

opened its doors last<br />

month in Fenton in<br />

southern Genesee<br />

County. marriott<br />

.com + Time to Wine<br />

• Downtown Flint<br />

welcomed a brand-new<br />

wine bar called Cork on<br />

Saginaw in February,<br />

bringing new life to<br />

the old Dial Finance<br />

Company storefront,<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 90<br />

1<br />

length (in miles)<br />

of the oval biked<br />

during the Le<br />

Champion Pave<br />

Criterium on<br />

July 24<br />

34<br />

historic<br />

structures at<br />

Crossroads<br />

Village, a 19thcentury<br />

town<br />

that’s home to a<br />

working railroad,<br />

cider mill and<br />

Flint's oldest<br />

surviving home<br />

60<br />

height (in feet)<br />

of the Longway<br />

Planetarium’s<br />

domed theater<br />

which was vacant for<br />

more than 25 years.<br />

corkonsaginaw.com<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

JULY AVERAGES:<br />

82˚F<br />

3.2 in. 59˚F<br />

TIME ZONE:<br />

Eastern<br />

AREA CODE:<br />

810<br />

FOUNDED:<br />

1855<br />

POPULATION:<br />

436,141*<br />

GET AROUND:<br />

Mass Transportation Authority bus<br />

AIRPORT: Bishop International<br />

Airport<br />

WEBSITE: visitflint.org<br />

* in metropolitan area<br />

CULTURE CALENDAR<br />

Through Aug. 7<br />

SOMETHING WAITS BENEATH<br />

IT — EARLY WORK BY ANDREW<br />

WYETH, 1939-1969<br />

More than 30 seldom-seen<br />

paintings—plus illustrated<br />

letters and ink sketches—by<br />

the famed American watercolor<br />

artist are on view at the<br />

Flint Institute of Arts, located<br />

in the Flint Cultural Center.<br />

flintarts.org<br />

Aug. 16-20<br />

BACK TO THE BRICKS<br />

What better place than<br />

Vehicle City to host one of<br />

the largest car festivals in<br />

the US? Downtown Flint is<br />

the epicenter of this 13-mile<br />

“rolling cruise” event, which<br />

features 30,000 cars and,<br />

special this year, appearances<br />

by the legendary drag racer<br />

Don “Big Daddy” Garlits.<br />

backtothebricks.org


ON THE TOWN: FLINT, MI<br />

LOCAL FACES BY KELLY FLYNN<br />

Three Flint residents—a journalist, an urban farmer and the owner of a famed live music venue—<br />

are making their mark on the city.<br />

Melodee Mabbitt<br />

Co-Founder/Co-Editor of Broadside<br />

In 2009, The Flint Journal dropped publication<br />

to three days a week, leaving a gap in<br />

local coverage—which you filled by founding<br />

Broadside. (The Flint Journal is currently<br />

printed four days a week.) What do you hope<br />

the paper will do for Flint? “We hope people<br />

see us as a small example of the idea<br />

that you don’t need to wait for anyone to<br />

do what needs doing. We want to stoke<br />

the confi dence that we are as capable<br />

of anything as anywhere else. That has<br />

always been Flint’s identity: Billy Durant.<br />

The Sit-Down Strikers. Michael Moore.”<br />

As the editor of an indie paper, you must<br />

know where all the cool kids hang out. “Flint<br />

Local 432 is a long-time favorite. Good<br />

Beans Café in Carriage Town is great for<br />

a low-key cup of coff ee, live music and<br />

theater events. Churchill's Food & Spirits<br />

is probably the college students’ fi rst<br />

choice for burgers, brews and bands.”<br />

And Flint sure has a lot of college students.<br />

Why do you think many stay after graduating?<br />

“Flint is ripe with potential for<br />

radical rethinking and experimenting,<br />

and that is appealing to young, talented<br />

and imaginative people who want to test<br />

themselves. How awesome would it be to<br />

be able to say you helped turn Flint into<br />

the model for cities of the 21st century?”<br />

Jacky King<br />

Co-Founder of Youth Karate-Ka’s Harvesting<br />

Earth Educational Farm<br />

You and your wife Dora have started several<br />

outstanding urban gardens. What are some<br />

of your favorite outdoor spaces? “Harvesting<br />

Earth Farm, of course. I also love<br />

the Ruth Mott Foundation’s Applewood<br />

Estate, for the beauty of it all and the way<br />

they present the gardens. Everything’s all<br />

polished and clean. It’s good for the eyes.<br />

Our goal is to make Harvesting Earth<br />

similar to that.”<br />

Where can people purchase the produce<br />

grown on your farms? “You can purchase<br />

it at the Flint Farmers’ Market, at<br />

Dale’s Natural Foods, and of course,<br />

right here at the farm—you can pick it<br />

yourself, fresh.”<br />

You have two farms up and running, with<br />

nine more slated to open this summer. Will<br />

they be included in the Edible Flint Food<br />

Garden Tour? “Yes—but you can tour our<br />

farms anytime. These are educational<br />

farms—so come and see our geothermal,<br />

solar-powered greenhouses!”<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 91<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

Joel Rash<br />

Founder, Flint Local 432<br />

Your live music venue—a.k.a. “the Local”—is<br />

moving into another spot downtown. Tell us<br />

about the new location. “Within one block<br />

there is an art gallery, a pizza joint, an<br />

ATM, a yoga studio, a hair salon, a deli, an<br />

ice cream stand, a coff ee shop and more.”<br />

Are there any other changes on the horizon?<br />

“One big diff erence is that we’ll be able to<br />

have a variety of performing arts. We’ve<br />

already spoken with theater companies,<br />

dance troupes, spoken word collectives,<br />

DJs, visual artists; even a burlesque<br />

troupe is interested in using the space.<br />

We’ll still do concerts every weekend, but<br />

we plan on having as many other off erings<br />

as possible.”<br />

What are some other spots in town to hear<br />

good music? “Local acts are regularly<br />

onstage at The Loft and Churchill’s<br />

Food & Spirits. Touring rock and outlaw<br />

country acts have made The Machine<br />

Shop on Dort Highway a must. They<br />

are gaining a national reputation with<br />

shows from some real heavyweights like<br />

Drowning Pool, Whitey Morgan, Clutch<br />

and even Kid Rock.”


ON THE TOWN: FLINT, MI<br />

STREET SCENE: SAGINAW STREET BY ELIZABETH SHAW<br />

Saginaw Street in downtown—a.k.a. "the bricks”—has reinvented itself in recent years, opening<br />

everything from restaurants and a wine bar to a yoga studio and day spa. Here are some top<br />

spots, from Court Street north to the river.<br />

1. The Lunch Studio<br />

444 S Saginaw St<br />

Now 10 years old, this popular<br />

midday eatery was one of the<br />

fi rst to bring good eats back<br />

downtown. It serves the best<br />

chicken salad sandwich on<br />

the bricks. 810-424-9868;<br />

flintlunchstudio.com<br />

TO FLINT RIVER<br />

5. The Yoga Loft & Sharp Fitness<br />

555 S Saginaw St, Ste 104<br />

If you want to work in a<br />

workout, head to this studio,<br />

where drop-ins can take<br />

everything from yoga and<br />

Tai Chi to cardio kickboxing<br />

and Zumba. 810-232-2210;<br />

yogaloftflint.com<br />

1<br />

E 1ST ST<br />

2<br />

2. 501 Bar and Grill<br />

500 S Saginaw St<br />

Flint’s own Manhattan-style<br />

martini bar is the perfect<br />

place for sipping cocktails<br />

paired with tasty plates like<br />

tenderloin tips with balsamic<br />

syrup and remoulade. Arrive<br />

early to avoid the crowds. 810-<br />

410-4406; 501barandgrill.com<br />

3<br />

4<br />

5<br />

E E 2ND 2 ST<br />

6. Cork on Saginaw<br />

635 S Saginaw St<br />

This wine bar featuring 28<br />

wines by the glass is decorated<br />

with leather chairs, marble<br />

counters and polished cement<br />

fl oors. There’s a lengthy<br />

small-plates menu, but local<br />

caterer-chef Marge Murphy’s<br />

best surprise is the bacon<br />

cashew caramel corn. 810-<br />

422-9625; corkonsaginaw.com<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 92<br />

6<br />

3. Blackstone’s Pub & Grill<br />

531 S Saginaw St<br />

This big noisy pub is named<br />

for the men’s clothing shop<br />

that resided here before.<br />

Locals love the “blarney<br />

stones” (a.k.a. pizzas); the<br />

“Flintstone” is topped with<br />

ground beef, cheddar jack<br />

cheese, homegrown Koegels<br />

hot dog slices, onions and<br />

tangy mustard. 810-234-<br />

9011; 1 blackstonesgrill.com<br />

bla blacks ckst<br />

E 3RD ST<br />

7. Bil Bill Thomas’<br />

as Ha Halo Burger<br />

800 S<br />

Saginaw St<br />

The original 1923 Kewpee<br />

Hotel Hamburgs joint became<br />

Halo in 1967, and it’s still a<br />

Flint tradition (though the<br />

Thomas family said goodbye<br />

in 2010). Where else can you<br />

eat an olive burger (a Flint<br />

staple, it just means “topped<br />

with olives”) beneath authentic<br />

Art Deco chandeliers and<br />

mosaic tiles? 810-238-4607;<br />

haloburger.com<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

E 4TH ST<br />

4. Garibella Salon<br />

555 S Saginaw St, Ste 103<br />

Shear the shag or opt for<br />

some posh pampering with<br />

a facial or pedicure at this<br />

full-service day salon and<br />

spa decorated with vintage<br />

photos of Flint. 810-238-<br />

9000; garibellasalon.com<br />

7<br />

8<br />

E COURT ST<br />

8. Greater Flint Arts Council<br />

816 S Saginaw St<br />

The granddaddy of Flint’s<br />

art revival, GFAC coordinates<br />

the Second Friday<br />

Artwalk, when the city turns<br />

out in style for art, food and<br />

music at various spots down<br />

Saginaw Street. July 8, 6pm<br />

to 9pm; 810-238-2787;<br />

greaterflintartscouncil.org


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(Seasonal)<br />

Tickets on sale NOW at<br />

AirTran.com<br />

• Lowest average airfares in Michigan<br />

• Easy-in, easy-out terminal & parking<br />

• Closest airport to most of Mid-Michigan<br />

• Free Wi-Fi throughout the terminal<br />

G-3425 W. Bristol Road • Flint, MI 48507 • 810-235-6560<br />

bishopairport.org<br />

Free Wi-Fi<br />

TERMINAL WIDE


ON THE TOWN: FLINT, MI<br />

GUIDING LIGHTS BY KELLY FLYNN<br />

What better place to take a road trip than the region where car culture was<br />

born? Just make sure not to speed through this lighthouse-filled shoreline<br />

drive of the Blue Water Area (a.k.a. the “Thumb”).<br />

Fort Gratiot Lighthouse<br />

1 Before skipping town, enjoy a Coney Omelet at Tom Z Flint<br />

Original Coney Island, then hop onto I-69 and head east into<br />

the sunrise.<br />

2 Drive 67 miles to Port Huron, “the<br />

maritime capital of the Great Lakes.”<br />

Soak up the Blue Water Area’s nautical<br />

culture with a visit to the Port Huron<br />

Museum and the Huron Lightship<br />

Museum, a fl oating lighthouse. End<br />

the tour with a stop at Lighthouse Park,<br />

where Fort Gratiot Lighthouse marks<br />

the entrance to the St. Clair River. (The<br />

lighthouse itself is closed for renovations<br />

until the fall.)<br />

3 Take M-25 22 miles north to Lexington, a charming harbor<br />

village with a downtown shopping area. Browse the handmade<br />

furniture at Barn Basics and pick up a vase by Michigan artist<br />

Michael Bladow at Weekends before feasting on a juicy olive<br />

burger at the historic Cadillac House.<br />

4 Continue 11 miles north to the Port Sanilac Lighthouse, located<br />

on the corner of Cherry and Lake streets. Although it’s now a<br />

private residence, it’s still an active aid in navigation. View its<br />

octagonal shape and hourglass silhouette from the public access<br />

pier that stretches out into the lake next to the tower.<br />

5 A 29-mile drive north on M-25 will bring you to the 126-yearold<br />

Harbor Beach Lighthouse, located one mile off shore. Tours of<br />

this completely restored beauty are available on weekends during<br />

the summer.<br />

8<br />

9<br />

75<br />

1<br />

25<br />

69<br />

7 6<br />

25<br />

5<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 94<br />

6 Follow M-25 north 15<br />

miles and stop by Lighthouse<br />

County Park to view<br />

the jewel of Huron County,<br />

the 154-year-old Pointe aux<br />

Barques Lighthouse, where<br />

you can learn about the<br />

shipwrecks of Lake Huron<br />

at the on-site Thumb Underwater<br />

Preserve museum.<br />

7 Ten miles farther, you'll<br />

fi nd yourself in Port Austin.<br />

Because of its unique position<br />

at the tip of the Thumb,<br />

this is a beautiful spot to<br />

enjoy both the sunrise and<br />

the sunset over the water.<br />

From the breakwall, you<br />

can check on the restoration<br />

progress of the Port Austin<br />

Reef Light. Feast on lake<br />

perch at The Bank 1884<br />

Food & Spirits, a National<br />

Historic Site restaurant<br />

downtown, before bedding<br />

down for the night<br />

at The Little Yellow<br />

Cottages. Come<br />

morning, fuel up<br />

for the day at the<br />

Lighthouse Café.<br />

The Lighthouse<br />

4<br />

Special comes with<br />

3<br />

a heaping portion<br />

of eggs, bacon, sausage,<br />

ham, potatoes,<br />

2<br />

toast—and all the<br />

local gossip.<br />

8 Heading southwest,<br />

it’s 66 miles along the east<br />

shore of Saginaw Bay to<br />

Bay City, a bustling riverfront<br />

community<br />

that’s home to the Bay<br />

Antique Center, Michigan’s<br />

largest antique mart.<br />

9 After picking up a few<br />

tchotchkes to take home, hit<br />

the open road of I-75 South,<br />

and 50 miles later you’ll be<br />

right back in the heart of<br />

Vehicle City.<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

On Auto<br />

If you prefer staying in town,<br />

Flint has enough car culture<br />

to keep visitors in overdrive.<br />

Ogle more than 25 classic<br />

and concept Buicks, Chevrolets<br />

and other locally built automobiles<br />

at the Sloan Museum’s<br />

Buick Automotive Gallery and<br />

Research Center. 303 Walnut<br />

St; 810.237.3440;<br />

sloanlongway.org<br />

Delve into Flint’s automotive<br />

past in the Scharchburg<br />

Archives at Kettering University.<br />

The largest collection of<br />

automotive papers, it includes<br />

more than 8,000 documents<br />

from William C. Durant, the<br />

founder of General Motors.<br />

1700 W Third Ave; 810-762-<br />

9500; kettering.edu/archives<br />

For stock car racing at its<br />

finest, speed over to Auto<br />

City Speedway. After the<br />

race (check the website for<br />

the calendar), take a free trip<br />

to the pits for photo ops with<br />

the drivers. 10205 N Saginaw<br />

Rd, Clio; 810-687-7384;<br />

autocityspeedway.com<br />

spee


GO GUIDES<br />

Ft. Lauderdale<br />

florida<br />

by jan norris<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Competition Tackle<br />

5011 S State Rte 7; 954-581-4476;<br />

competitiontackle.com<br />

Come armed with pro gear for<br />

your next fresh or saltwater<br />

tourney with rods, reels and<br />

tackle from this chock-full<br />

store. Big names like Shimano,<br />

Penn, Electromate and Star<br />

are among the brands sold to<br />

record-holders—and fish-tale<br />

tellers, too.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Chef Jean Pierre<br />

Cooking School<br />

1436 N Federal Hwy; 954-563-2700;<br />

chefjeanpierre.com<br />

From “best bouillabaisse” to<br />

Cajun to basic lessons in knife<br />

work, polish your culinary<br />

techniques in classes given<br />

by a top-rated chef. Geared<br />

for adults and older children,<br />

there are demos and hands-on<br />

instruction—and, best of all,<br />

you get to eat your classwork.<br />

USHA Hydrofoil Nationals<br />

At Mills Pond Park<br />

2201 NW Ninth Ave; usawaterski.org<br />

It’s tough to describe this<br />

cousin of water-skiing that<br />

involves a hydrofoil wing<br />

attached by a pole to the<br />

bottom of the ski. This contest<br />

brings out agile athletes who<br />

do airborne tricks. July 14-17.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Food Truck Rally<br />

At Seminole Hard Rock Casino<br />

1 Seminole Way, Hollywood; 866-502-<br />

7529; seminolehardrockhollywood.com<br />

Every Thursday night this<br />

13051 Bell Tower Drive<br />

239-482-2900 • 1-877-2CROWNE<br />

cpfortmyers.com<br />

summer, 20-plus gourmet<br />

food trucks roll in at 6pm from<br />

Broward and Dade counties,<br />

bearing haute street food.<br />

Trendy tastes like Korean<br />

barbecue, sushi, artisan pizza<br />

and cupcakes are served for<br />

hand-friendly eating. $<br />

JB’s on the Beach<br />

300 N Ocean Blvd, Deerfield Beach;<br />

954-571-5220; jbsonthebeach.com<br />

Wood-grilled seafood (mahi’s<br />

a favorite) and tropical drinks<br />

like mojitos satisfy diners,<br />

and daily live music gets the<br />

dancers going. It’s oceanfront,<br />

with indoor and outdoor seats<br />

overlooking the beach—a<br />

perfect setting for weekend<br />

(only) breakfasts. $$$<br />

Big City Tavern<br />

609 E Las Olas Blvd; 954-727-0307;<br />

bigtimerestaurants.com<br />

Recently redecorated with<br />

sports memorabilia, vintage<br />

beauty queen photos and<br />

lanterns, this American-fare<br />

favorite also kicked up its<br />

menu, with dishes such as<br />

agnolotti and braised pork<br />

shoulder, pizza bianca and<br />

chicken Milanese. Eat outside<br />

on the greened-up patio. $$$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

McSorley’s Beach Pub<br />

837 N Ft Lauderdale Beach Blvd; 954-<br />

565-4446; mcsorleysbeachpub.com<br />

Sit on the outside sundeck<br />

here with a cold mug and get<br />

your Irish on while watching<br />

the beach scene. Play beer<br />

pong in the more casual game<br />

room; or go for cocktails in the<br />

lounge, where there’s a cigar<br />

and spirits night.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

Ft. Lauderdale’s beach starred<br />

in two movies: Where the Boys<br />

Are (1960) and Elvis’ Girl<br />

Happy (1965).<br />

Ft. Myers<br />

florida<br />

by libby mcmillan<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Babs Bead Warehouse<br />

16205 S Tamiami Tr #4; 239-432-<br />

1778<br />

Trollbeads are a draw, but this<br />

better-than-average bead<br />

shop also carries Swarovski<br />

crystal, gemstones and<br />

sterling silver components.<br />

Wannabe jewelry makers can<br />

sign up for one-day classes.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Centennial Park<br />

2000 W First St; 239-321-7530;<br />

cityftmyers.com<br />

Sited along the downtown<br />

riverfront, this event-centric<br />

park is home to the beloved<br />

life-size sculpture Uncommon<br />

Friends, featuring famous former<br />

winter residents Thomas<br />

Edison, Henry Ford and Harvey<br />

Firestone, as well as Dr. Alexis<br />

Carrel and frequent visitor<br />

Charles Lindbergh.<br />

Sanibel Lighthouse<br />

Eastern end of Periwinkle Way;<br />

This iconic lighthouse has<br />

crowned Sanibel’s east end<br />

since 1884, and it’s still operational<br />

(a 1972 Coast Guard<br />

effort to decommission it was<br />

stamped out by outraged<br />

locals). The beachgoers lounge<br />

beneath its tower, and seashell<br />

fanatics scour the sand for the<br />

coveted “miniatures” that are<br />

often found here.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Sweet Melissa’s Cafe<br />

1625 Periwinkle Way, Sanibel Island;<br />

239-472-1956; sweetmelissacafe.net<br />

Chef Melissa Talmage lures<br />

Cooper Hotels. Your Upscale Choice in Fort Myers, Florida.<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 96<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

LOCAL LEGEND<br />

Step into Old<br />

Florida at this lowbrow<br />

family-owned legend near<br />

Sanibel Island, which has<br />

been around for more than<br />

three decades. Locals<br />

wash down fried seafood<br />

with cold brews while Jim<br />

and the Cracker Box Band<br />

jam every Friday and<br />

Saturday.<br />

The Cracker Box<br />

16910 McGregor Blvd; 239-<br />

466-4344; facebook.com/<br />

thecrackerboxrestaurant<br />

devoted foodies to her Sanibel<br />

haven with small plates like<br />

crispy soft-shelled crab and<br />

bourbon-glazed pork belly and<br />

entrees like oven-roasted cobia<br />

and pan-seared duck breast.<br />

Soothing live acoustic jazz sets<br />

the mood Tuesday, Thursday<br />

and Friday nights. $$$$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

Gator Lanes<br />

7050 Crystal Dr; 239-939-0048;<br />

gatorlanes.net<br />

This popular bowling alley gets<br />

packed on weekend nights;<br />

crowds start arriving around<br />

10pm and keep on coming. It’s<br />

a fun venue, with a full bar and<br />

music. Be sure you arrive early<br />

enough to snag a lane!<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

Many beachfront<br />

accommodations offer steep<br />

last-minute discounts until<br />

November or December, when<br />

occupancy rises again.<br />

Fort Myers Airport/FGCU<br />

Bell Tower Shops Airport/FGCU<br />

5255 Big Pine Way<br />

239-275-6000 • 1-800-CALL-HOME<br />

homewoodsuitesftmyers.com<br />

16410 Corporate Commerce Way<br />

239-210-7200 • 1-877-STAY-HGI<br />

fortmyersairportfgcu.hgi.com<br />

16450 Corporate Commerce Way<br />

239-210-7300 • 1-800-CALL-HOME<br />

fortmyersairportfgcu.homewoodsuites.com


In the heart of Sanibel’s<br />

Favorite Shopping Plaza<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

YOUR FIRST STOP<br />

Be sure to stop by the Visitor Center at the Sanibel &<br />

Captiva Islands Chamber of Commerce when you arrive.<br />

You will find us in a colorful island-style building on your<br />

right-hand side, the 2nd driveway immediately aer you<br />

drive onto the island. Open 365 days a year, our staff is<br />

here to answer your questions from 9am – 5pm every<br />

day of the week. You will also find that islanders are very<br />

knowledgeable and helpful outside these hours.<br />

NATURE AND WILDLIFE<br />

Our islands provide a nature vacation for the entire<br />

family like no other - from the avid nature lover to the<br />

budding naturalist, there’s something for everyone. More<br />

than half the islands are devoted to wildlife and are<br />

protected for wildlife and nature.<br />

Our J.N. “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge<br />

covers more than 5,000-acres of wildlife, home to<br />

numerous exotic birds, raccoons, oer, alligators and<br />

other wildlife. The refuge features delightful footpaths,<br />

winding canoe trails and a five-mile scenic drive, all of<br />

which are lush with seagrape, wax and salt myrtles, red<br />

mangrove, cabbage or Sabal palms and other native plant<br />

varieties. You can take a wildlife tour, either by car or by<br />

bike, which is a five mile, one-way scenic road which runs<br />

along the bay side of Sanibel. Alternatively, you can take<br />

an informational tram tour through the refuge.<br />

ADVERTISEMENT<br />

<br />

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Premiering<br />

now at<br />

Sanibel’s<br />

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Since 1978<br />

239-472-3128<br />

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COME VISIT SANIBEL & CAPTIVA ISLANDS IN<br />

FLORIDA TO DISCOVER PARADISE FOR YOURSELF.<br />

Sanibel and Captiva Islands in Southwest Florida are the perfect choice for your getaway vacation, whether you<br />

are looking for a romantic stay, a family trip or a nature retreat. The lush and tropical islands are located south of<br />

Tampa and just north of Naples. Our nearest airport is Southwest Florida International Airport (RSW), located in<br />

Fort Myers,which is 23 miles from Sanibel Island and 33 miles from Captiva Island. Our islands are the perfect home<br />

for your getaway. Enjoy 15 miles of unspoiled beaches, 22 miles of bike paths, 50 species of fish, 230 types of birds,<br />

250 types of shells and 0 stop lights. We have many different attractions, such as the Ding Darling Wildlife Refuge<br />

and the nature preserve. Outdoor activities include fishing, shelling, biking, and bird watching, boating, golfing, and<br />

snorkeling… to name just a few. Sanibel Island measures roughly 12 miles long and three miles across at its widest.<br />

Little sister Captiva Island has more compact measurements of approximately four miles long and half a mile wide.<br />

<br />

<br />

Open 7 Days<br />

www.sanibel-captiva.org


SHELLING<br />

The best shelling in the world is<br />

found on the beaches of Sanibel and<br />

Captiva Island. There is a geographic<br />

reason for this, the Islands do a<br />

twist and turn along the coastline to<br />

form the Sanibel and Captiva ‘shelf’,<br />

among a string of other more orderly,<br />

straight-and-narrow islands. The<br />

east-west torque of Sanibel’s south<br />

end acts like a shovel scooping up all<br />

the seashells that the Gulf imports<br />

from The Caribbean and other<br />

southern seas.<br />

The abundance and variety<br />

of shells have made Sanibel and<br />

Captiva Islands shell-obsessed.<br />

Known as the ‘Shell Capital of the<br />

World’ people come to our islands<br />

from all over the world, drawn by<br />

the song of the seashell. They parade<br />

along the sands doubled over in<br />

a stance that’s been dubbed the<br />

Sanibel Stoop or the Captiva Crawl<br />

- come try it out for yourself and<br />

see which suits you best. Be sure to<br />

stop into the Bailey-Mahew’s Shell<br />

Museum to learn everything you<br />

need to know on shelling.<br />

FISHING<br />

The pristine waters surrounding<br />

Sanibel Island and Captiva Island<br />

provide excellent opportunities for<br />

fishermen of all skill levels; from the<br />

novice to the World Record seeker.<br />

The warm waters of the gulf provide<br />

great breeding and living grounds<br />

for many species of fish, including<br />

redfish, speckled trout, snook, tarpon<br />

and more. Whether offshore, inshore,<br />

back bay, pier, beach or wade fishing,<br />

fish can be found here year round.<br />

DINING<br />

Restaurateurs and chefs from all over<br />

the globe have come to Sanibel and<br />

Captiva Islands to add their creative<br />

influences to our island melting pot of<br />

restaurants. The result? Some of the<br />

most delightfully inventive cuisine<br />

you’ll discover anywhere.<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

Island Vacations<br />

of Sanibel & Captiva, Inc.<br />

No maer your taste, you’ll find<br />

culinary delights to match every<br />

appetite, each reflecting the savory<br />

spirit of our tropical paradise.<br />

Does golfing, shelling, fishing, diving, island<br />

cruising and simply relaxing on one of the last<br />

tropical islands in the US pique your interest?<br />

Come play in the sun ~ Sanibel Island Style<br />

MENTION THIS AD<br />

AND RECEIVE 10% OFF<br />

ON YOUR NEXT VISIT<br />

800.533.4486<br />

www.seashellsofsanibel.com<br />

SHOPPING<br />

Our islands offer quaint & friendly<br />

shopping. With a broad array of<br />

locally owned retail businesses on the<br />

islands, we are sure to have what you<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

need. Looking for a pharmacy, book<br />

store, new swim suit or sunglasses?<br />

Check out our online directory at<br />

sanibel-captiva.org to find the retailer<br />

just for you.<br />

WHAT TO BRING?<br />

Our easy-going, outdoor lifestyle<br />

translates to casual, informal aire,<br />

both day and night. Shorts and<br />

sandals are the norm. Restaurants<br />

range from simple outdoor cafes<br />

to elegant candlelit dining rooms;<br />

none requires jackets or ties. Retail<br />

establishments generally request<br />

shirts and shoes.<br />

PLAN FOR SUNSHINE<br />

Our winters are mild (average<br />

daytime temperatures in the 70s<br />

and 80s) and dry (it rains just enough<br />

to keep our islands lush). Summer<br />

temperatures, ranging from the<br />

high 80s to low 90s, are tempered<br />

by cooling sea breezes and brief<br />

aernoon showers, followed by more<br />

sunshine and glorious sunsets.<br />

THE ISLANDS OF SANIBEL AND<br />

CAPTIVA - NATURALLY<br />

YOU’LL LOVE US


ADVERTISEMENT<br />

Walk-In Rentals Available<br />

Vacation Rentals | Seasonal Rentals<br />

For Sanibel and Captiva rentals: 800.656.9111 | RoyalShell.com<br />

For Bonita, Estero and Naples rentals: 855.213.3311 | RoyalShellRentals.com<br />

For SW Florida real estate sales: 800.805.0168 | RoyalShellRealEstate.com<br />

Island Vacations<br />

sanibelislandvacations.com<br />

(888) 451-7277<br />

Royal Shell Vacations<br />

royalshell.com<br />

(800) 656-9111<br />

VIP Vacation Rentals<br />

viprental.com<br />

(877) 273-3992<br />

Lazy Flamingo<br />

lazyflamingo.com<br />

(239) 472-5353<br />

(239) 472-6939<br />

Greenhouse Grill<br />

greenhousegrill.tumblr.com<br />

(239) 472-6882<br />

Over Easy Café<br />

overeasycafesanibel.com<br />

(239) 472-2625<br />

Bailey’s General Store<br />

baileys-sanibel.com<br />

(239) 472-1516<br />

Shop on Sanibel<br />

shoponsanibel.com<br />

(239) 472-2783<br />

Congress Jewelers<br />

congressjewelers.com<br />

(239) 472-4177<br />

WHERE TO SHOP<br />

Pink Shell Resort<br />

pinkshell.com<br />

(866) 976-8493<br />

Holiday Inn<br />

sanibelbeachresort.com<br />

(800) 443-0909<br />

Reservation Central<br />

rescen.com<br />

(800) 290-6920<br />

Blue Giraffe<br />

mybluegiraffe.com<br />

(239) 472-2525<br />

Courtney’s<br />

courtneyssanibel.com<br />

(239) 472-4646<br />

Doc Ford’s<br />

docfordssanibel.com<br />

(239) 472-8311<br />

Jerry’s Foods of Sanibel<br />

jerrysfoods.com<br />

(239) 472-2525<br />

Shiny Objects<br />

shinyobjectsonline.com<br />

(239) 472-1660<br />

Captiva General Store<br />

captivaislandstore.com<br />

(239) 472-2374<br />

WHERE TO STAY<br />

WHERE TO DINE<br />

Tween Waters Inn<br />

tween-waters.com<br />

(800) 223-5865<br />

Captiva Island Inn<br />

captivaislandinn.com<br />

(800) 454-9898<br />

American Realty of Captiva<br />

captiva-island.com<br />

(800) 547-0127<br />

Pinocchio’s Ice Cream<br />

pinocchiosicecream.com<br />

(239) 472-6566<br />

CIP’s Place<br />

cipsplace.com<br />

(239) 472-0223<br />

Sweet Melissa’s<br />

sweetmelissascafe.net<br />

(239) 472-1956<br />

Adventures in Paradise<br />

adventureinparadise.com<br />

(239) 472-8443<br />

YOLO Watersports<br />

yolo-jims.com<br />

(239) 472-9656<br />

Captiva Cruises<br />

captivacruises.com<br />

(239) 472-5300<br />

WHERE TO PLAY<br />

West Wind Inn<br />

westwindinn.com<br />

866-318-8466<br />

Select Vacation Properties<br />

selectvacationproperties.com<br />

(866) 455-0028<br />

The Colony Resort<br />

colonyresortsanibel.com<br />

(800) 342-1704<br />

Traditions on the Beach<br />

traditionsonthebeach.com<br />

(239) 472-4559<br />

Sanibel Café<br />

sanibelcafe.com<br />

(239) 472-5323<br />

The Lighthouse Café<br />

lighthousecafe.com<br />

(239) 472-0303<br />

Sanibel Recreation Center<br />

mysanibel.com<br />

(239) 472-0345<br />

L3 Beach Photo<br />

L3BeachPhoto.com<br />

(817) 903-8889<br />

The Sanibel Thriller<br />

sanibelthriller.com<br />

(239) 472-2328<br />

A Sanibel Tradition for more than 30 Years<br />

<br />

<br />

www.sanibel-captiva.org


GO GUIDES<br />

Grand Rapids<br />

michigan<br />

by amy eckert<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Martha’s Vineyard<br />

200 Union Ave NE; 616-459-0911;<br />

marthasvineyardgr.com<br />

More than 3,000 wine<br />

labels fill the shelves of this<br />

two-story Heritage Hill shop,<br />

making it one of Michigan’s<br />

largest. Shop from varietals<br />

produced in Michigan and<br />

around the world, including<br />

the largest selection of<br />

Bordeaux wines in the state.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Picnic Pops<br />

At Cannonsburg Ski Area<br />

6800 Cannonsburg Rd NE,<br />

Cannonsburg; 616-454-9451;<br />

grsymphony.org<br />

Grab a blanket and a picnic<br />

dinner—and maybe a bottle<br />

of wine from Martha’s<br />

Vineyard—and head to Grand<br />

Rapids’ favorite ski resort<br />

for one of these outdoor<br />

summer concerts, which<br />

take place Thursday and<br />

Friday evenings. Music<br />

ranges from classical to<br />

Michael Jackson hits, all<br />

played by the versatile Grand<br />

Rapids Symphony. July 14<br />

to Aug 5.<br />

Holland State Park<br />

2215 Ottawa Beach Rd, Holland;<br />

616-399-9390; michigan.gov/holland<br />

Golden sand dunes and<br />

pristine beaches stretch as<br />

far as the eye can see at this<br />

Lake Michigan park. But don't<br />

just sit around and soak up<br />

the sun: You can climb the<br />

dunes, play in the surf and<br />

shoot photographs of Big<br />

Red lighthouse.<br />

GO EAT<br />

One Stop Coney Shop<br />

154 Fulton St E; 616-233-9700;<br />

onestopconeyshop.com<br />

Order ’em deep-fried and<br />

smothered with barbecue<br />

sauce, topped with bacon<br />

and ranch or Grand Rapids<br />

style, with chili and dill<br />

shreds. There are more than<br />

15 hot dogs from which to<br />

choose at this downtown stop,<br />

including vegetarian—and a<br />

cone of Belgian frites makes a<br />

great side. $<br />

Bistro Bella Vita<br />

44 Grandville Ave SW; 616-222-4600;<br />

bistrobellavita.com<br />

Tasty dishes packed with<br />

local ingredients keep<br />

people coming to this exposedbrick-walled<br />

restaurant<br />

located downtown. Try the<br />

prosciutto-and-fresh fruit<br />

salad with local berries or<br />

the house-made gnocchi with<br />

veggies. $$$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

The Viceroy<br />

53 Commerce Ave; 616-774-8423;<br />

viceroygr.com<br />

Track down the address and<br />

type the key code “1-9-3-0” to<br />

gain entry to this downtown<br />

speakeasy done up inside<br />

with fire engine red and<br />

black. Cocktails rule here,<br />

from classics like Sazeracs<br />

and Sidecars to inventive<br />

concoctions like the Cherry<br />

Rumble (rum, Michigan tart<br />

cherry shrub, dried cherry<br />

tincture and sparkling wine).<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

Twenty-four public golf<br />

courses—many only 15<br />

minutes from downtown—<br />

give Grand Rapids one of<br />

the nation’s highest ratios<br />

of public golf courses<br />

to population.<br />

If you’re looking at this<br />

banner so are your clients<br />

To advertise in call our<br />

sales team at 888.864.1732<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 100<br />

Harrisburg<br />

pennsylvania<br />

by christine conard schultz<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Bogey’s Corner<br />

Unique Pup-tique<br />

413 Walnut St; 717-233-0487<br />

This boutique offers classy<br />

duds and fancy toys for pups<br />

and the people who love them.<br />

Choose from jewelry, accessories<br />

and pet-themed gifts.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Animals in the Ranks<br />

of the Civil War<br />

At The National Civil War Museum<br />

One Lincoln Cir at Reservoir Park; 717-<br />

260-1861; nationalcivilwarmuseum.org<br />

This new exhibit focuses on<br />

the dogs, camels, eagles<br />

and other animals that were<br />

adopted by troops in the Civil<br />

War to serve as mascots and<br />

companions. It’s a fascinating<br />

study of the relationships<br />

between animals and their<br />

owners. Through Sept. 4.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Miso Sushi and Grill<br />

4620 Jonestown Rd; 717-526-4088;<br />

misosushibar.com<br />

This quaint spot is quickly<br />

becoming a local favorite for<br />

its larger-than-average sushi<br />

rolls. Going raw? Try an orange<br />

flamingo roll (spicy salmon<br />

with homemade wasabi). Want<br />

grilled? Go for a dish with<br />

homemade teriyaki sauce. The<br />

chef is known for surprising<br />

guests with creations (on the<br />

house). $$<br />

Accomac Inn<br />

6330 River Dr, York; 717-252-1521;<br />

accomacinn.com<br />

This award-winning spot<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

serves French-American<br />

cuisine in a building that’s as<br />

old as the nation itself. Enjoy<br />

gourmet presentations like a<br />

half duck flambéed tableside<br />

with breast and leg confit,<br />

parsley potatoes, veggies and<br />

rhubarb-sage jus—inside or on<br />

the porch that overlooks the<br />

Susquehanna River. $$$$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

Dockside Willies<br />

449 S Front St, Wormleysburg; 717-<br />

730-4443; docksidewillies.com<br />

Recent renovations bring this<br />

local hotspot new life overlooking<br />

the Susquehanna River<br />

from the west bank. There’s<br />

top-notch pub grub, awesome<br />

deck seating and a great beer<br />

list, including local micros.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

The highest recorded temperature<br />

in Harrisburg was 107ºF,<br />

in July 1966.<br />

COLOR-FULL<br />

Seen now by more than<br />

600,000 people, this<br />

original Sight & Sound<br />

production unfolds in<br />

front of, beside and above<br />

you in a lavish theatrical<br />

production, alive with<br />

colorful characters, live<br />

animals and memorable<br />

lyrics. Through Oct. 22.<br />

Joseph<br />

At Sight & Sound Theatre<br />

Rt 896, 300 Hartman Bridge<br />

Rd, Ronks; 800.377.1277;<br />

sight-sound.com


POINT MALLARD PARK<br />

Houston<br />

texas<br />

by joann takasaki<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Chick & Chica<br />

3710 Main St; 281-888-4676;<br />

chickandchica.com<br />

Find the clothing, jewelry and<br />

home accessories that express<br />

your inner Tex-Mex—the<br />

one filled with color, fun and<br />

playfulness. The beautifully<br />

crafted art and accessories<br />

make wonderful gifts for the<br />

women in your life.<br />

Gentlemen’s Tonic<br />

1180 Uptown Park Blvd;<br />

713-892-8383; gentlemenstonic.com<br />

This is the place for men who<br />

want a little pampering. Head<br />

here for a classic, straightrazor<br />

shave—then take home<br />

all of the grooming products to<br />

recreate the moment at home.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Saint Arnold’s Brewery<br />

2000 Lyons Ave; 713-686-9494;<br />

saintarnold.com<br />

Nothing takes the edge<br />

off Houston’s summer<br />

heat like a frosty, cold beer.<br />

And there are few better<br />

places to have one than<br />

right from the source at the<br />

city's oldest microbrewery.<br />

Take an afternoon tour,<br />

followed by a tasting in the<br />

bier hall; you even get a<br />

souvenir glass.<br />

Reliant Park World<br />

Series of Dog Shows<br />

One Reliant Park; 713-824-4968;<br />

reliantdogshows.com<br />

Spend a dog day afternoon<br />

watching world-class pooches<br />

be put through their paces.<br />

If the competitions aren’t<br />

enough to satisfy, attend<br />

classes, check out exhibitor<br />

booths and attend seminars<br />

and demonstrations.<br />

July 20-24.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Kasra Persian Grill<br />

9741 Westheimer Rd;<br />

713-975-1810; kasrahouston.com<br />

Can’t make it to Tehran this<br />

summer? Let your taste buds<br />

take a trip that won’t cost<br />

a bundle, starting with the<br />

light, bright cucumber yogurt<br />

scooped up with flatbread.<br />

Follow it up with the Cornish<br />

hen kabob or the beef-y<br />

sultani. $$<br />

Reef<br />

2600 Travis St; 713-526-8282;<br />

reefhouston.com<br />

On muggy days, there’s<br />

nothing like a cold ceviche<br />

with a crisp wine or limey<br />

margarita to cool you off.<br />

And Chef Bryan Caswell’s<br />

ceviche is always delightful<br />

and oh-so-fresh. The seasonal<br />

citrus brightens rather than<br />

overpowers. $$$$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

Notsuoh<br />

314 Main St; 713-409-4750;<br />

notsuoh.com<br />

At this laidback bar, enjoy<br />

intense, serious conversation<br />

about the meaning of life, the<br />

quadratics of chess or the<br />

a-rhythmic syncopations of<br />

the drummer on stage. Or<br />

simply eavesdrop while sipping<br />

your drink of choice, be it<br />

beer or the hard stuff. Wednesdays<br />

feature open-mic<br />

night at 9:30.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

There is such a thing as a state<br />

pastry—and Texas has the<br />

sopapilla (honey cake).<br />

Huntsville/<br />

Decatur<br />

alabama<br />

by karen beasley<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Ayers Farm Family Market<br />

2015 Memorial Pkwy, Huntsville; 256-<br />

533-5667; ayersfarmersmarket.com<br />

This family-owned farm stand<br />

has supplied locals with homegrown<br />

goods for more than 30<br />

years, including fresh organic<br />

produce from the nearby Amish<br />

community. Summer months<br />

feature some of the best figs,<br />

peaches, cantaloupe, apples,<br />

tomatoes and watermelon<br />

available for miles.<br />

GO SEE<br />

EarlyWorks Museums<br />

Downtown Huntsville; 256-564-8100;<br />

earlyworks.com<br />

This hands-on history museum<br />

complex—the largest in the<br />

South—is made up of three<br />

attractions: a children’s<br />

museum (404 Madison St<br />

SE), the Alabama Constitution<br />

Village (109 Gates Ave SE) and<br />

the Historic Huntsville Depot<br />

(320 Church St NW). All three<br />

bring Alabama history to life<br />

through exhibits like a 16-foot<br />

talking tree and a 46-foot<br />

river keelboat.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Let’s Do Lunch<br />

435 Holly St NE, Decatur;<br />

256-340-2637<br />

This popular lunch spot is<br />

known for its thick chicken<br />

salad sandwiches, served on<br />

fresh, homemade sourdough<br />

bread. The pasta salads are<br />

delicious, and the fruit tea has<br />

just the right touch of sweetness<br />

and is a nice complement<br />

to the hearty sandwich. $<br />

OutrageousCabins.com<br />

865 366 7012<br />

1426 Upper Middle Creek Rd, Sevierville, TN 37876<br />

Enjoy your Tennessee dream rental in Pigeon Forge, Gatlinburg, Smoky Mountains,<br />

atop of the mountain splendor for an unforgettable view. What are you waiting for?<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 101<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

City Cafe<br />

101 First Ave SE, Decatur;<br />

256-353-9719<br />

At this blue-plate diner, rub<br />

elbows with local businesspeople<br />

and politicians over<br />

breakfast or lunch while<br />

getting caught up on the news<br />

of the day. $<br />

GO PARTY<br />

The Station<br />

340 The Bridge Street Town Centre,<br />

Huntsville; 256-327-8880;<br />

thestation.net<br />

This family entertainment<br />

center has it all: an arcade, 12<br />

bowling lanes, billiards, live<br />

music, a restaurant, lounge<br />

area with a bar, an outdoor<br />

patio and VIP areas.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

GO GUIDES<br />

Weighing in at 111 pounds,<br />

the second-largest blue catfish<br />

in the world was reeled in from<br />

Wheeler Lake in 1996.<br />

KEEP IT COOL<br />

Offering an escape from<br />

humid summer days,<br />

this water haven has<br />

everything a kid needs to<br />

keep cool including water<br />

slides, a wave pool and<br />

a beach area. Monday<br />

through Thursday offer<br />

half-price admission.<br />

Point Mallard Park<br />

Waterpark<br />

2901 Point Mallard Rd,<br />

Decatur; 256-341-4900;<br />

pointmallardpark.com


GO GUIDES<br />

Indianapolis<br />

indiana<br />

by susan j. guyett<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Bundy Decoy<br />

16506 Strawtown Ave, Noblesville;<br />

765-734-1198; bundyducks.com<br />

Come discover unique<br />

American folk art in the form of<br />

beautiful, hand-crafted wooden<br />

ducks (decoys, really) at this<br />

30-year-old family business in<br />

Noblesville. The Bundys also<br />

create custom hunting knives<br />

and walking sticks—memorable<br />

keepsakes, indeed.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Art for the Nation<br />

At Indiana State Museum<br />

650 W Washington St;<br />

317-232-1637; indianamuseum.org<br />

Learn how patriotism and<br />

propaganda joined forces<br />

to bring the nation together<br />

during World Wars I and II at<br />

this exhibit of iconic artistillustrated<br />

war-time posters.<br />

Through July 24.<br />

Indiana Black Expo’s<br />

Summer Celebration<br />

Various locations; 317-925-2702;<br />

ibeonline.com<br />

This 41st-annual summer<br />

celebration has something<br />

for everyone: Seminars to<br />

educate, speakers to inspire,<br />

art to ponder and, of course,<br />

music to bring the roof down.<br />

This year’s 40-plus acts<br />

include Bobby Brown,<br />

Bell Biv Devoe and Biz<br />

Markie. July 7-17.<br />

The Lawn at White River<br />

State Park<br />

801 W Washington St; 317-233-<br />

2434; in.gov/whiteriver<br />

Concerts al fresco are<br />

scheduled all summer long<br />

at this state park in the heart<br />

of downtown. The schedule<br />

includes Florence and the<br />

Machine (July 4), O.A.R. (July<br />

22), Wiz Khalifa (Aug. 2) and<br />

The Decemberists (Aug. 5).<br />

GO EAT<br />

Matteo’s Italian Ristorante<br />

40 N Ninth St, Noblesville; 317-774-<br />

9771; matteosindy.com<br />

Watch out that you don’t fill up<br />

on the hot, crusty bread that’s<br />

served with herb-infused olive<br />

oil. Save room for never-fail<br />

fresh pastas and specials like<br />

osso buco in this homey Italian<br />

joint where every meal is a<br />

memorable feast. $$$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

The Red Room<br />

6335 Guilford Ave; 317-257-1344;<br />

theredroomindy.com<br />

This upscale club is located<br />

upstairs overlooking a busy corner<br />

in Broad Ripple, and offers<br />

fancy cocktails, munchies<br />

and a chance to meet friendly<br />

strangers. Get your groove on<br />

Wednesday nights, when salsa<br />

dance lessons are offered.<br />

Slippery Noodle Inn<br />

372 South Meridian St; 317-631-<br />

6974; slipperynoodleinn.com<br />

The owners here swear it’s<br />

Indiana’s oldest bar, open since<br />

1850 when it served as a way<br />

station on the Underground<br />

Railroad. These days the focus<br />

is on serving live blues seven<br />

nights a week alongside good<br />

drinks (and there’s a full menu in<br />

case you get peckish).<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

One of the highest points<br />

in Indianapolis (842 feet) is<br />

located in Crown Hill Cemetery<br />

at the grave of Hoosier poet<br />

James Whitcomb Riley.<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 102<br />

Jacksonville<br />

florida<br />

by lilla ross<br />

GO SHOP<br />

The Green Alligator<br />

3581 St Johns Ave; 904-389-3099;<br />

thegreenalligator.com<br />

This specialty toy store has<br />

treats for all kids, from toddlers<br />

on up to teens, including<br />

puzzles, trains, cranes, dolls,<br />

flying saucers and even a<br />

little bling for the princess in<br />

your life.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Savage Ancient Seas<br />

At Museum of Science & History<br />

1025 Museum Cir; 904-396-6674;<br />

themosh.org<br />

Get a glimpse of the fearsome<br />

creatures that roamed<br />

the seas millions of years<br />

ago. Think 10-foot-long sea<br />

turtles, Pteranodons with<br />

33-foot wingspans and<br />

50-foot-long shark ancestors<br />

called Megalodons. They’re all<br />

from the private collection of<br />

paleontologist Mike Triebold.<br />

Through Oct. 30.<br />

The Riverwalk<br />

Downtown on the St. Johns River;<br />

downtownjacksonville.org<br />

Take a stroll through the<br />

heart of downtown along<br />

the St. Johns River. The<br />

well-lit boardwalk is lined with<br />

restaurants, businesses and<br />

high-rise residences, as well as<br />

a shopping center and marina.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Casa Marina<br />

At Casa Marina Hotel<br />

691 N First St, Jacksonville Beach;<br />

904-270-0025; casamarinahotel.com<br />

Dine on Chef Aaron Webb’s<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

THE CITY WILD<br />

This 122-acre gem of a<br />

preserve, located in the<br />

heart of the city, has miles<br />

of trails that wind through<br />

13 different ecosystems.<br />

Admission is free during<br />

daylight hours, and<br />

occasional events include<br />

yoga under the oaks and<br />

plein air painting.<br />

Jacksonville Arboretum<br />

& Gardens<br />

1445 Millcoe Rd;<br />

jacksonvillearboretum.org<br />

“new beach” cuisine, which<br />

features local seafood, while<br />

watching the waves on the<br />

Atlantic. Grab a lunch of<br />

crabcakes, goat cheese salad<br />

and mahi calypso—then burn<br />

it off with a stroll along the<br />

surf line. $$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

Plush<br />

845 University Blvd N; 904-743-<br />

1845; plushjax.com<br />

This 12,000-square-foot,<br />

multilevel super club is<br />

so big that there are five<br />

fully-stocked bars to serve its<br />

thirsty revelers. The dancefloor<br />

is packed nightly and live DJs<br />

crank out the hottest beats.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

Buried in the mud of the St.<br />

Johns River is the wreckage<br />

of a Civil War steamboat,<br />

the Maple Leaf, sunk by a<br />

Confederate torpedo in 1864.<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

FLICKR: WILB


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ON THE TOWN<br />

KANSAS CITY<br />

IN BRIEF BY BROOKE PORTER<br />

BY THE NUMBERS<br />

64<br />

30+<br />

paintings by Jules<br />

Olitski on view at<br />

the Kemper<br />

Museum of<br />

Contemporary Art<br />

8<br />

length (in<br />

minutes) of the<br />

Kansas City Zoo’s<br />

new African Sky<br />

Safari Tram ride<br />

10.8 MILLION<br />

weight (in<br />

pounds) of<br />

structural steel<br />

carved horses on the M.C. Illions-<br />

used to build the<br />

new Kauffman<br />

designed carousel that was installed<br />

at Worlds of Fun in May. A real beauty,<br />

it dates back to 1926.<br />

NEWS FLASH<br />

Get Your Kicks •<br />

The $200 million<br />

LIVESTRONG Sport-<br />

ing Park k opened on<br />

June 9, with some<br />

insiders hailing it as the<br />

most tech-savvy sports<br />

venue in the world. The<br />

stadium will host more<br />

than 300 events a year,<br />

including Major League<br />

Soccer games and<br />

concerts. sporting<br />

kc.com + All Aboard<br />

• This year marks the<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 104<br />

Center for the<br />

Performing Arts,<br />

opening Sept. 16<br />

20th anniversary of<br />

the Arabia Steamboat<br />

Museum, home to the<br />

largest collection of<br />

pre-Civil War artifacts<br />

in the world, including<br />

those recovered from<br />

the 1856 steamboat<br />

Arabia. 1856.com<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

JULY AVERAGES:<br />

90˚F<br />

3.6 in. 72˚F<br />

TIME ZONE:<br />

Central<br />

AREA CODES:<br />

816 (MO);<br />

913 (KS)<br />

FOUNDED:<br />

1853<br />

POPULATION:<br />

2.2 million*<br />

GET AROUND:<br />

Metro Area Express (The MAX) bus<br />

AIRPORT: Kansas City<br />

International Airport<br />

WEBSITE: visitkc.com<br />

* in metropolitan area<br />

CULTURE CALENDAR<br />

July 7, 14, 21, 28<br />

JAZZ ON THE SQUARE<br />

For some free al fresco tunes,<br />

head to the mixed-use development<br />

of Zona Rosa and<br />

get cozy on the town square<br />

or listen from the patios of<br />

nearby restaurants. The<br />

two-hour concerts begin at<br />

7pm and take place Thursdays<br />

through Sept. 1. zonarosa.com<br />

July 21-31<br />

KC FRINGE FESTIVAL<br />

Venues throughout the city<br />

will be overfl owing with live<br />

theater, dance, visual arts,<br />

puppetry, fi lm and fashion—some<br />

of it wacky, all of<br />

it uncensored—during this<br />

annual alternative cultural<br />

festival. kcfringe.org<br />

KC FRINGE FESTIVAL: KANSAS CITY CVA


ON THE TOWN: KANSAS CITY<br />

AT A CROSSROADS BY MARY BLOCH<br />

The warehouse-filled Crossroads District has been brought back to<br />

life, with funky shops and art galleries occupying storefronts. Here’s<br />

a look at what the area’s local designers are creating.<br />

1. Hammerpress<br />

110 Southwest Blvd<br />

Whimsical greeting cards and coasters with<br />

colorful graphics are just a few of the paper<br />

wonders that Kansas City Art Institute alum<br />

Brady Vest produces on antique printing<br />

presses, for sale at his transformed industrial<br />

space. $5.50/card; $8/set of 12 coasters<br />

816-421-1929; hammerpress.net<br />

2. Scarlett Garnet<br />

504 E 18th St, Studio 101<br />

Unconventional, sure. But these<br />

mismatched bow-and-arrow earrings will<br />

get people talking—and that’s the point of<br />

statement-making accessories, after all.<br />

Local Garnet Griebel and St. Louis-based<br />

Katie Miller handcraft and sell them at<br />

their studio/gallery/event space (open by<br />

appointment). $38<br />

816-914-5739; scarlettgarnet.com<br />

3. Method.<br />

1529 Grand Blvd<br />

Designed by the local brand Sozni, this<br />

plaid pocket square made with 100%<br />

pashmina wool was handcrafted by<br />

select artisans in Kashmir, India, using<br />

a 500-year-old process. It’s available at<br />

Method., which was started by three<br />

lawyers who wanted to give local designers<br />

a venue to display forward-thinking men’s<br />

clothing and accessories. $125<br />

816-221-5888; methodkc.com<br />

4. Spool<br />

122 W 18th St<br />

Give your baby girl some love by dressing<br />

her with as much style as you do yourself.<br />

Pick up this vibrant African-print cotton<br />

dress with a removable satin bow at Spool, ol,<br />

a tiny boutique where local designers<br />

showcase their creations. (Don’t worry, there<br />

are some goodies for moms, too). $44<br />

816-842-0228<br />

5. Tomboy Design Studio<br />

1817 McGee St<br />

The “Michelle” trench coat made with h<br />

orange cut velvet and linen paired with ith<br />

the “Hepburn” pant in wheat linen is s just<br />

one of the off -the-rack outfi ts owner r and<br />

Kansas City Art Institute alum Laura ra<br />

McGrew creates in her shop. Don’t<br />

like what you see? She also creates<br />

made-to-order designs. $494/coat; ;<br />

$250/pants<br />

816-472-6200; tomboydesign.net<br />

2<br />

4<br />

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45th & Oak<br />

Kansas City, Missouri<br />

nelson-atkins.org<br />

816.751.1ART<br />

April 9–August 7, <strong>2011</strong><br />

Together again.<br />

For the fi rst time in more than 30 years,<br />

the three paintings that form this masterpiece.<br />

Claude Monet, French (1840–1926). Water Lilies (detail), c. 1915–1926. Oil on canvas. Purchase: William Rockhill Nelson Trust, 57-26.


ON THE TOWN: KANSAS CITY<br />

MAIN COURSES BY MARY BLOCH<br />

This three-block area of Main Street just south of the Country Club Plaza is a bustling row of<br />

eateries, from make-your-own salad spots to artisan ice cream parlors.<br />

1. BO LING’S<br />

4800 Main St<br />

This ornately decorated Chinese restaurant in<br />

the Kansas City Board of Trade building has<br />

developed a cult following for its weekend dim<br />

sum. The plates pile up as diners savor succulent roasted<br />

duck, pork buns and all manner of dumplings. 816-753-<br />

1718; bolings.com<br />

2.THE MIXX<br />

4855 Main St<br />

The hardest part about eating at this small<br />

fast-casual spot is picking which of the more<br />

than 50 “Mixx-ins” to put in your madeto-order<br />

salad, wrap or sandwich. Can’t decide? Menu<br />

off erings include a Thai salmon salad and vegan curry<br />

sweet potato wrap. 816-756-2300; mixxingitup.com<br />

3. SPIN! NEAPOLITAN PIZZA<br />

4950 Main St<br />

At this much-loved local chain, diners can<br />

create their own gourmet pizza or pick one of<br />

the specialties, including the cipolla e chevre<br />

with fi g mmarmalade,<br />

caramelized onions and goat cheese.<br />

The eatery also<br />

hosts weekly bike rides; after working up<br />

an appetite, satisfy it<br />

with 10% off a post-workout meal.<br />

816-561-7746; spinpizza.com<br />

4. GLACÉ ARTISAN ICE CREAM<br />

4960 Main St<br />

Chocolatier Christopher Elbow has augmentedented<br />

his candy-making company by<br />

creating decadent cadent ice cream, made with<br />

seasonal and fresh fl avors such as goat cheese with honey,<br />

Venezuelan spiced chocolate, salted pretzel and pineapplecilantro<br />

sorbet. 816-561-1117; glaceicecream.com<br />

5. ACCURSO’S ITALIAN RESTAURANT<br />

4980 Main St<br />

This popular family eatery tops sandwiches,<br />

pasta and pizza with meatballs as big as<br />

baseballs and spicy homemade sausage.<br />

Come early for happy hour on the patio. 816-753-0810;<br />

accursos.com<br />

6.THE PEANUT<br />

5000 Main St<br />

The bar is always bustling at this hole-in-thewall,<br />

but it’s the food that will make you a fan.<br />

The Triple BLT is anything but peanut-sized;<br />

triple-layered with shredded cheese, it’s the best in town.<br />

816-753-9499; peanutkc.com<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 107<br />

7. ANDRÉ’S CONFISERIE SUISSE<br />

5018 Main St<br />

This Swiss gem resplendent with<br />

national fl ags hanging from the ceiling ng<br />

is one of the block’s oldies. Ladies<br />

who lunch ostensibly fl ock to the tea room for the e<br />

quiche, but they’re really in it for the pastries like<br />

the chocolate-stuff ed macaroons and a superb<br />

Linzer torte. 816-561-6484; andreschocolates.comm<br />

8. JACK GAGE AMERICAN TAVERNN<br />

5031 Main St<br />

Pub grub gets a facelift at this casual<br />

pub, where the sliders (Angus s burger,<br />

Maryland crabcake and buttermilk ttermilk<br />

chicken) and the tobacco onion straws are standouts.<br />

Happy hour is a big draw, and late ate nights<br />

you’ll fi nd twentysomethings congregating egating at the<br />

bar. 816-531-4243; jackgagekc.com m<br />

9. OSTERIA IL L CENTRO<br />

5101 Main n St<br />

Many hearts have been won over<br />

the<br />

spiedini piedini di pollo (chicken breas breast in<br />

Italian breadcrumbs drizzle drizzled with<br />

amogia ogia sauce) and veal piccata (with butter, b lemon<br />

and parsley) at this cozy and intimate intima date-night<br />

spot. 816-561-2369; osteria-ilcentro.com<br />

osteria-ilcen<br />

10. MINSKY’S MI<br />

PIZZA CAFE & BAR<br />

5105 Main St<br />

Part of a local chain, this casual<br />

pizza joint off ers a list of speciality<br />

pies (lamb sausage, pesto, sun-dried<br />

tomato and spinach, anyone?) and hot sandwiches.<br />

Specials are off ered daily, including a slice of pizza,<br />

side salad and drink for less than $6. 816-561-<br />

5100; minskys.com<br />

11. EGGTC.<br />

5107 Main St<br />

When Gregg Johnson opened<br />

this hopping breakfast- and lunchonly<br />

spot, he completed a trifecta<br />

of restaurants on this small block (along with #9<br />

and #10). If you can get in, you won’t leave<br />

hungry. Go for something unconventional,<br />

like a frittata with apples, goat cheese, walnuts<br />

and red onion chutney or a crepe with guava<br />

cream cheese, strawberries, mango sauce,<br />

whipped cream and candied pecans. 816-561-<br />

0116; eggtc-kc.com<br />

GO MAGAZINE


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ON THE TOWN: KANSAS CITY<br />

THE LATE SHOW STORY AND PHOTOS BY SAM POLCER<br />

For a taste of what KC jazz is all about, head to the Mutual Musicians Foundation—where,<br />

every Friday and Saturday night, the party doesn’t start until midnight.<br />

It’s 4am and folks are still making<br />

their way up to the dimly lit second<br />

fl oor—most of them clearly still<br />

buzzing from some previous engagement—where<br />

a lovely chanteuse<br />

has just stepped off the stage after a<br />

few songs with the resident guitar/bass/<br />

drums trio. The band, after three hours<br />

of playing with only a few short breaks,<br />

is showing no signs of slowing down<br />

as more local musicians join in. It’s<br />

Saturday night at the Mutual Musicians<br />

Foundation—which is as rich in cultural<br />

history as it is in fi rst-rate musicianship.<br />

You see, few places in the US can<br />

claim to have birthed their own<br />

signature styles of jazz; cities like New<br />

Orleans, St. Louis, Chicago and New<br />

York immediately come to mind. And<br />

then there’s Kansas City, which, with<br />

its swinging, bluesy, riff -based tunes<br />

usually featuring 4/4 time signatures,<br />

is fi rmly imprinted in the annals of jazz<br />

history. Charlie “Bird” Parker was the<br />

city’s most famous musical export,<br />

and Bennie Moten and Count Basie<br />

helped shape the sound during the<br />

scene’s heyday.<br />

But the biggest infl uencer of the KC<br />

sound wasn’t so much a who as a what:<br />

The local jazz clubs known for hosting<br />

all-night jam sessions, allowing for<br />

extended solos and requiring solid riff s<br />

to keep them going. That’s why, when I<br />

asked a friend where to get a real taste<br />

of jazz in Kansas City, he pointed me to<br />

the Mutual Musicians Foundation.<br />

The Foundation has hosted jazz since<br />

1930, back when it was still the home<br />

of Local 627—one of the African-American<br />

musicians’ unions affi liated with<br />

the American Federation of Musicians.<br />

Today, the performances stay true to<br />

the raucous all-night jam sessions of the<br />

past. (What’s more, it’s the only spot in<br />

Missouri to get a drink after 3am.)<br />

It’s the way jazz was meant to be<br />

played, and the way KC jazz came into<br />

its own. I think the Bird would be<br />

pleased. I know I was.<br />

Mutual Musicians Foundation<br />

1823 Highland Ave, 816-471-5212<br />

thefoundationjamson.org<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 109<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

PRIMETIME PERFORMANCES<br />

Don’t want to stay up all night?<br />

Not to worry. Here are some<br />

spots where the music gets<br />

started long before midnight.<br />

The Blue Room<br />

Part of the American Jazz<br />

Museum by day and a jazz club<br />

by night, this place books top<br />

acts and was included in<br />

DownBeat magazine’s Top 100<br />

Jazz Clubs in the world. 1616<br />

E 18th St; 816-474-2929;<br />

americanjazzmuseum.com<br />

The Majestic Restaurant<br />

Formerly a saloon, bordello<br />

and speakeasy, this spot is<br />

known these days for its dryaged<br />

steaks and live jazz<br />

all week long. 931 Broadway;<br />

816-221-1888;<br />

majestickc.com<br />

Jardine’s Restaurant<br />

and Jazz Club<br />

Many local musicians cite this<br />

small, elegant eatery/club as<br />

one of their favorite places to<br />

play in town, so last year’s Best<br />

Intimate Live Music Venue<br />

award from KC Magazine should<br />

come as no surprise.<br />

4536 Main St; 816-561-6480;<br />

jardines4jazz.com


GO GUIDES<br />

Kansas City<br />

missouri<br />

by mary bloch<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Churchill in Fairway<br />

5240 Belinder Ave; 913-262-5240;<br />

shopatchurchill.com<br />

Browse an eclectic mix of fine<br />

jewelry and high fashion clothing<br />

at this shop, which peddles<br />

everything from ancient<br />

coin cuff links and turquoise<br />

necklaces to python clutches<br />

and couture gowns.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Bruce Watkins Cultural<br />

Heritage Center<br />

3700 Blue Pkwy; 816-513-0700<br />

This educational facility is<br />

a tribute to Kansas City’s<br />

early African-American<br />

pioneers, while also serving<br />

ALL TOGETHER NOW<br />

For the first time in 30<br />

years, panels from the St.<br />

Louis Art Museum, the<br />

Cleveland Museum of Art<br />

and Kansas City’s own<br />

art museum are reunited<br />

to display the complete<br />

Water Lilies triptych.<br />

Archival photographs and<br />

notes further enhance the<br />

exhibit. Through Aug. 7<br />

Monet's Water Lilies<br />

At Nelson-Atkins Museum of<br />

Art; 4525 Oak St; 816-751-<br />

1278; nelson-atkins.org<br />

as a showcase for local and<br />

regional performing artists.<br />

The permanent exhibits<br />

portray African-American art<br />

and cultural history.<br />

The Money Museum<br />

1 Memorial Dr; 816-881-2683;<br />

kansascityfed.org/moneymuseum<br />

Where but at the Federal<br />

Reserve can you watch millions<br />

of dollars being processed<br />

or hold a gold bar worth<br />

$400,000? Visitors can gawk<br />

at a 450-plus-piece collection<br />

of coins minted under every<br />

US president since George<br />

Washington.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Carmen's Park Place<br />

11526 Ash St; 913-327-7115;<br />

carmenscafekc.com<br />

The Italian and festive tapas<br />

menu is a hit at this upscale<br />

neighborhood trattoria.<br />

Diners favor the mouthwatering<br />

variety of spiedini, pastas<br />

and the special bread dipping<br />

sauce, made at the table<br />

with olive oil, basil, garlic,<br />

red and black peppers and<br />

grated Parmesan. $$$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

The Indie Bar<br />

1228 Main St; 816-283-9900;<br />

midlandkc.com/indieonmain.php<br />

This music-centric bar on the<br />

ground floor of the Midland<br />

Theatre is the perfect place to<br />

stop by either before or after<br />

a live show. What’s more,<br />

ticket holders will have a<br />

chance to enter the venue<br />

before the doors are opened<br />

to the public.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

Missouri is the only state in the<br />

US to have two Federal Reserve<br />

headquarters, one in Kansas<br />

City and one in St. Louis.<br />

<br />

<br />

<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 110<br />

Key West<br />

florida<br />

by josie gulliksen<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Key West Aloe<br />

419 Duval St; 305-293-1885;<br />

keywestaloe.com<br />

Your skin will love you for paying<br />

a visit to this shop, founded<br />

by two enterprising—and<br />

sunburned—New Yorkers on<br />

vacation here. Besides skincare<br />

products, it sells hair care<br />

products and body splashes,<br />

all made from nature’s soothing<br />

plant, aloe vera.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Nancy Forrester’s<br />

Secret Garden<br />

1 Free School Ln; 305-294-0015;<br />

nsfgarden.com<br />

This off-the-beaten-path spot<br />

is like a mini rainforest in the<br />

middle of rocky Key West. It’s<br />

home to swaying palm trees in<br />

every shade of green, colorful<br />

bouganvilleas, spice trees and<br />

delicate orchids.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Conch Republic<br />

Seafood Company<br />

631 Greene St; 305-294-4403;<br />

conchrepublicseafood.com<br />

This open-air and environmentally<br />

conscious restaurant<br />

on the waterfront comes<br />

complete with an on-site conch<br />

farm. Appetizers liked smoked<br />

fish dip and coconut shrimp<br />

make great starters before the<br />

fresh local catch (seared or<br />

blackened). $$<br />

Pisces<br />

1007 Simonton St; 305-294-7100;<br />

pisceskeywest.com<br />

You can’t miss this lemon<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

GO FISH!<br />

The tranquil backcountry<br />

of Key West awaits—and<br />

Captain Mitch Pazara<br />

knows all of the best<br />

locales. Let him take you<br />

to shallow, calm waters<br />

chock-full of tarpon,<br />

barracuda, yellow jacks,<br />

bone-fish and, yes,<br />

even sharks.<br />

South Pole Charters<br />

5130 US Hwy 1, Stock<br />

Island; 305-304-3470;<br />

southpolecharters.com<br />

yellow eatery, famous for<br />

its signature lobster “tango<br />

mango”: lobster flambéed in<br />

cognac with shrimp in saffron<br />

butter, mango and basil. Filet<br />

mignon, prawns and the freshest<br />

fish possible round out<br />

the menu. $$$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

d’vine Wine Gallery<br />

At The Gardens Hotel<br />

526 Angela St; 305-294-2661;<br />

gardenshotel.com<br />

If the Duval Crawl is not your<br />

scene, this wine gallery might<br />

be the perfect alternative. Sit<br />

in the lovely garden and help<br />

yourself to a taste, half-glass<br />

or glass of any of 36 vintages,<br />

using a high-tech Enomatic<br />

dispensing system. Wednesday<br />

through Sunday, 5-10pm.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

From 1828 to 1850, Key<br />

West was the richest city per<br />

capita in the US.


TOP RIGHT: FLICKR: FURLINED<br />

Knoxville<br />

tennessee<br />

by rose kennedy<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Hanson Gallery<br />

5607 Kingston Pike; 865-584-6097;<br />

hansongallery.com<br />

Fine crafts from regionally and<br />

nationally acclaimed artists<br />

at this shop include East<br />

Tennessee landscapes from<br />

Robert Batey, horse sculptures<br />

from Jeri Hollister and even<br />

kaleidoscopes.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Big South Fork<br />

Scenic Railway<br />

100 Henderson St, Stearns;<br />

606-376-5330; bsfsry.com<br />

Scope out lush fall foliage on a<br />

16-mile roundtrip rail journey<br />

that descends 600 feet into<br />

the gorge at Big South Fork<br />

National River and Recreation<br />

Area before stopping at Blue<br />

Heron Coal Mining Camp.<br />

Big Mama's Karaoke Café<br />

10605 Chapman Hwy, Seymour;<br />

865-609-0208; karaokecafe.com<br />

Get up the courage to sing<br />

onstage or just take in the<br />

zany antics at this familyfriendly<br />

karaoke spot. (It opens<br />

at noon on Saturdays.) The<br />

vast song selection covers<br />

country hits, Sinatra, show<br />

tunes and heavy metal.<br />

GO EAT<br />

The Grill at Highlands Row<br />

4705 Old Kingston Pike; 865-851-<br />

7722; thegrillathighlandsrow.com<br />

This restaurant serves<br />

sophisticated Southern cuisine<br />

in an architecturally Old World<br />

space. The shrimp and grits<br />

is the showstopper, along<br />

with the 8-oz. petite tender<br />

(which combines the qualities<br />

of sirloin and filet mignon).<br />

Top it all off with a moonshine<br />

cocktail. $$$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

Cotton Eyed Joe<br />

11220 Outlet Dr;<br />

865-675-4563; cottoneyedjoe.com<br />

Put on your dancin' boots to<br />

mingle with urban cowboys<br />

at this real country club,<br />

named after a classic line<br />

dancing song. There's even a<br />

mechanical bull.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

Knoxville native James E.<br />

“Buck” Karnes helped rally<br />

the 117th Infantry in a<br />

charge that broke the<br />

Hindenburg Line and forced<br />

the Germans into a retreat<br />

in WWI. He received the<br />

Congressional Medal of Honor<br />

for his actions.<br />

CAFFEINE OVERDOSE<br />

This tiny café has<br />

a sublime selection<br />

of exotic premium<br />

chocolates, along with<br />

some toothsome baked<br />

goods (bacon-chocolate<br />

chip cookies are a<br />

recent example) and darn<br />

good cups of java and<br />

sweet lattes. $$<br />

Coffee and Chocolate<br />

327 Union Ave; 865-688-<br />

9244; coffeeandchocolate<br />

knoxville.com<br />

Las Vegas<br />

nevada<br />

by lisa plummer<br />

GO SHOP<br />

The Guinness Store<br />

At The Shoppes at Mandalay Place<br />

3950 Las Vegas Blvd S;<br />

702-632-9333; mandalaybay.com<br />

Fans of the famed Irish<br />

stout will go bananas in this<br />

1,500-square-foot gift shop<br />

chock-full off all things Guinness,<br />

including beer cozies,<br />

hats, T-shirts, ties, Christmas<br />

ornaments, authentic pouring<br />

spoons and coffee mugs for<br />

the morning after.<br />

GO SEE<br />

The Improv at Harrah’s<br />

At Harrah’s Las Vegas<br />

3475 Las Vegas Blvd S;<br />

702-369-5223; harrahslasvegas.com<br />

Need a good belly laugh? Look<br />

no further than this intimate,<br />

informal comedy club, featuring<br />

a weekly rotating roster of<br />

new and established comedic<br />

talent. There’s a reason it was<br />

voted the city’s best comedy<br />

club four years in a row by the<br />

Las Vegas Review-Journal.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Blue Ribbon Sushi<br />

Bar & Grill<br />

The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas<br />

3708 Las Vegas Blvd S; 877-893-<br />

2001; cosmopolitanlasvegas.com<br />

NYC chefs and restaurateurs<br />

Eric and Bruce Bromberg<br />

have delivered a winner to the<br />

Strip with their flavorful fusion<br />

of American and Japanese<br />

cuisine. Must-haves include<br />

the salmon tartare with quail<br />

egg, baked clams in miso<br />

butter, octopus sashimi, misomarinated<br />

black cod and the<br />

OutrageousCabins.com<br />

865 366 7012<br />

1426 Upper Middle Creek Rd, Sevierville, TN 37876<br />

Enjoy your Tennessee dream rental in Pigeon Forge, Gatlinburg, Smoky Mountains,<br />

atop of the mountain splendor for an unforgettable view. What are you waiting for?<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 111<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

scrumptious gingerbread pudding.<br />

The menu also features<br />

steakhouse favorites. $$$$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

View Bar<br />

Aria Resort & Casino<br />

3730 Las Vegas Blvd S;<br />

702-590-7111; arialasvegas.com<br />

The perfect place to kick off or<br />

end an evening, this chic bar<br />

and lounge features plenty of<br />

comfortable seating, expert<br />

mixologists and friendly<br />

waitresses serving up delicious<br />

signature libations, including<br />

the lip-smacking ginger cosmopolitan<br />

and cucumber collins.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

GO GUIDES<br />

DREAM MACHINES<br />

Check out Nevada’s<br />

only factory-authorized<br />

Ferrari and Maserati dealership,<br />

displaying more<br />

than a dozen vehicles<br />

exceeding $700,000.<br />

Extremely rare and<br />

sought after, these highperformance<br />

dream cars<br />

draw thousands of people<br />

to the showroom daily.<br />

Penske-Wynn<br />

Ferrari Maserati<br />

At Wynn Las Vegas<br />

3131 Las Vegas Blvd<br />

S; 702-770-3580;<br />

penskewynnferrari.com<br />

The Mirage, considered Vegas'<br />

first “mega resort” hotel and<br />

casino, opened in 1989 boasting<br />

a price tag of $630 million<br />

(equal to $1.09 billion today).


GO GUIDES<br />

Lexington<br />

kentucky<br />

by patti nickell<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Bluetique<br />

235 Woodland Ave; 859-309-1310<br />

This shop offers trendy yet<br />

affordable styles. Despite<br />

its decidedly youngish vibe,<br />

you are likely to find both<br />

sorority girls and their mothers<br />

shopping for everything from<br />

leggings to little black dresses.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Raven Run<br />

Nature Sanctuary<br />

5888 Jack’s Creek Pike; 859-272-<br />

6105; lexingtonky.gov<br />

This lovely, 734-acre nature<br />

preserve is just a 30-minute<br />

drive southeast of downtown,<br />

bordering the palisades of the<br />

Kentucky River. There’s a bounty<br />

for the weekend naturalist to<br />

explore, with 10 miles of hiking<br />

trails, 200 species of birds and<br />

600 plant species.<br />

Victorian Square<br />

W Main St and N Broadway; victoriansquareshoppes.com<br />

This colorful collection of<br />

1880s Victorian buildings is<br />

home to shops, restaurants<br />

and bars facing a central<br />

atrium. De Vassa Bar & Café<br />

is known for its Brazilian foods<br />

and live entertainment, and the<br />

Artists Attic lets visitors watch<br />

artists at work.<br />

Latrobe’s Pope Villa<br />

326 Grosvenor Ave; 859-253-0362;<br />

popevilla.org<br />

This is one of three remaining<br />

residential buildings in<br />

the country designed by US<br />

Capitol architect Benjamin<br />

Latrobe. Visitors can admire<br />

the geometrically perfect<br />

square building with a domed<br />

circular rotunda. As the<br />

building’s in the midst of a long<br />

renovation, (free) tours are by<br />

appointment only.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Rossi’s<br />

1060 Chinoe Rd; 859-335-8788;<br />

rossis-restaurant.com<br />

Pop in here for a snack at the<br />

bar. Go for the blue cheese<br />

chips: thin potato slices fried<br />

and sprinkled with blue cheese<br />

crumbles, bacon and scallions.<br />

If you’d rather linger over a<br />

meal, grab a table on the<br />

patio. $$<br />

The Merrick Inn<br />

1074 Merrick Dr; 859-269-5417;<br />

thermerrickinn.com<br />

This elegant eatery's leafy<br />

urban setting gives it a country<br />

inn feel, with a menu described<br />

as “signature Southern.” Make<br />

sure to try the fried banana<br />

peppers, a Lexington tradition.<br />

Dine inside or on the beautiful,<br />

flower-filled patio. $$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

The Beer Trappe<br />

811 Euclid Ave; 859-309-0911;<br />

thebeertrappe.com<br />

Draft Magazine calls this one<br />

of America’s Top 100 beer<br />

bars. With eight rotating taps<br />

for tastings, flights or full<br />

pours, it offers accessible<br />

crafts like Magic Hat #9 or<br />

rare brews such as North<br />

Coast Old Rasputin. Oh, and<br />

there are more than 400<br />

bottles. Thirsty yet?<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

The Lexington Cemetery, the<br />

burial place of Henry Clay<br />

and Confederate Gen. John<br />

Hunt Morgan, is a national<br />

arboretum.<br />

Concours -Saturday, July 16th, <strong>2011</strong><br />

Other events - July 14-17th<br />

Lexington, Kentucky<br />

www.keenelandconcours.com<br />

859-422-3329<br />

Proceeds oceeds benefit<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 112<br />

Los Angeles<br />

california<br />

by scott huver<br />

GO SHOP<br />

PAR-LA<br />

8250 Santa Monica Blvd;<br />

323-450-9748<br />

Once an ice cream parlor,<br />

designer Patrick DiLascia’s<br />

menswear boutique serves<br />

scoops of trendy style: vegan<br />

leather jackets, cargo shorts<br />

and sweaters by Twice; tees<br />

and hoodies by Rolland Berry;<br />

and DiLascia’s Bakery line of<br />

casual-chic shirts, pants, vests<br />

and jackets.<br />

Planet Blue Malibu<br />

3835 Cross Creek Rd; 310-317-9975;<br />

shopplanetblue.com<br />

Planet Blue’s original flagship<br />

outpost in the Malibu<br />

Country Mart remains young<br />

Hollywood’s hippest source<br />

of the easiest, breeziest and<br />

beachiest couture, where<br />

Vanessa Hudgens, Ashley<br />

Tisdale and Kim Kardashian<br />

snare SoCal styles suitable<br />

COVER WORTHY<br />

The iconic music magazine<br />

wines and dines its guests<br />

like rock stars in its first-ever<br />

restaurant and lounge: in the<br />

upstairs dining room, American<br />

fare from chef Christopher<br />

Ennis is served up amid an eyepopping<br />

display of memorable<br />

musicians’ cover shots and a<br />

patio; downstairs, DJ beats<br />

thump as divas-in-training<br />

order bottle service alongside<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

for either clubhopping or just<br />

hangin’ out surfside.<br />

Creature Features<br />

280 W Sierra Madre Blvd; 626-355-<br />

9100; creaturefeatures.com<br />

This house of horrors offers<br />

fans of sci-fi, fantasy and<br />

spine-tingling cinema a<br />

comprehensive selection of<br />

merchandise, music, memoirs<br />

and memorabilia. Geek gods<br />

like FX master Ray Harryhausen<br />

occasionally stop by for<br />

coveted signings.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Cuban Film Posters: From<br />

Havana to the World<br />

At The Academy of Motion Picture Arts<br />

& Sciences Grand Lobby Gallery<br />

8949 Wilshire Blvd; 310-247-3000;<br />

oscars.org<br />

More than 100 visually<br />

dynamic handmade silkscreen<br />

prints of movie posters<br />

created by the Cuban Film<br />

Institute fill the Oscar<br />

headquarters’ sweeping lobby,<br />

from international releases<br />

like A Clockwork Orange and<br />

Schindler’s List to homegrown<br />

films like Strawberry and<br />

Chocolate. Through Aug. 28.<br />

the dancefloor; and the cozy<br />

offshoot VIP bar B-Side<br />

features high-end cocktails<br />

crafted by Tricia Alley. $$$<br />

Rolling Stone LA<br />

At Hollywood & Highland<br />

6801 Hollywood Blvd; 323-464-4000; rollingstonela.com


The Groundlings Theater<br />

7307 Melrose Ave; 323-934-4747;<br />

groundlings.com<br />

The improv training ground<br />

that taught the likes of Will<br />

Ferrell, Kristen Wiig and Kathy<br />

Griffin how to mine for laughs<br />

offers an ongoing assortment<br />

of hilarious stage shows<br />

(like Thursday’s long-running<br />

“Cookin’ With Gas”) featuring a<br />

troupe of tomorrow’s comedy<br />

superstars.<br />

Shrek the Musical<br />

At the Pantages Theatre<br />

6233 Hollywood Blvd; 323-468-1770;<br />

broadwayla.org<br />

Hollywood’s most famous<br />

ogre—of the green variety, at<br />

least—takes this historic stage<br />

for a live musical interpretation<br />

of the beloved DreamWorks<br />

animated film, complete with a<br />

sassy donkey, a feisty princess<br />

and a nervous gingerbread<br />

man. July 12-31.<br />

Gabor-i-vision!<br />

At the Paley Center for Media<br />

465 N Beverly Dr; 310-786-1091;<br />

paleycenter.org<br />

This two-day television<br />

celebration of Eva and Zsa<br />

Zsa features screenings<br />

of classic guest spots by<br />

those Hungarian sisters<br />

who demonstrate their gift<br />

of Gab-or with Milton Berle,<br />

Steve Allen, Johnny Carson,<br />

David Letterman and more.<br />

July 30 (Eva) and 31 (Zsa Zsa).<br />

GO EAT<br />

Pink’s<br />

709 N La Brea Ave; 323-931-4223;<br />

pinkshollywood.com<br />

There’s only one Pink’s,<br />

serving up wondrous wieners<br />

from the same nondescript<br />

shack at the corner of<br />

Melrose and La Brea since<br />

1939—and that’s why the<br />

lines (where you might stand<br />

behind Jimmy Kimmel) extend<br />

even longer than their “Stretch<br />

Chili Dog.” $<br />

John O’Groats<br />

10516 Pico Blvd; 310-204-0692;<br />

ogroatsrestaurant.com<br />

For LA power-breakfasting—in<br />

jeans instead of Armani—nothing<br />

beats this Westside spot.<br />

Go for the Huevos O’Groats (a<br />

biscuit-dough tortilla stuffed<br />

with eggs, cheese, black<br />

beans, onions, peppers, salsa<br />

and sour cream) with a sweet<br />

stack of pumpkin pancakes on<br />

the side. $$$<br />

Dan Tana’s<br />

9071 Santa Monica Blvd; 310-275-<br />

9444; dantanasrestaurant.com<br />

For nearly 50 years, the<br />

deceptively modest-looking<br />

Italian bistro has been a<br />

freewheeling epicenter of<br />

elbow-rubbing (literally—it’s<br />

cozy) for generations of<br />

Hollywood’s elite. (Regular<br />

George Clooney has a<br />

veal cutlet named after him).<br />

The menu’s hidden gem:<br />

the oh-so-garlicky Chicken<br />

Vesuvius. $$$$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

La Descarga<br />

1159 N Western Ave; 323-466-1324;<br />

ladescargala.com<br />

To spoil the surprise of the<br />

entrance would be a crime,<br />

but once guests are escorted<br />

from the deceptively dumpy<br />

stairwell through the secret<br />

passageway, they’re transported<br />

into a pre-Castro<br />

Havana-style drinking den<br />

filled with rich rums, curling<br />

cigar smoke and Cuban music.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

Once pulp writer Edgar<br />

Rice Burroughs’ ranch, LA’s<br />

Valley neighborhood Tarzana<br />

is named after his famed<br />

creation: Tarzan of the Apes.<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 113<br />

Memphis<br />

tennessee<br />

by bianca phillips<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Hoot + Louise<br />

109 G.E. Patterson Ave;<br />

901-746-8683<br />

Don’t waste the day scouring<br />

clothing racks at thrift<br />

stores. This whimsical South<br />

Main Arts District boutique<br />

has already done the work<br />

for you. The shop carries<br />

vintage ladies’ clothing and<br />

accessories, as well as hardto-find<br />

modern-day pieces by<br />

designers Snoozer Loser and<br />

Little Ocean.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Shelby Farms Greenline<br />

Starts at Tillman St near Walnut Grove<br />

Rd; shelbyfarmsgreenline.org<br />

This paved 7-mile path runs<br />

the length of an abandoned rail<br />

track from Midtown to Shelby<br />

Farms Park. It's packed with<br />

cyclists, rollerbladers, joggers<br />

and walkers. Note: There are<br />

various access points along<br />

the route.<br />

Footloose<br />

At Playhouse on the Square<br />

66 S Cooper St; 901-726-4656;<br />

playhouseonthesquare.org<br />

In the immortal words of Lady<br />

Gaga: “It’ll be okay. Just dance.”<br />

That’s the same philosophy<br />

that guides the lead in this<br />

classic show. Chicago-native<br />

Ren helps residents in his new<br />

rural town overcome their<br />

rigidity with a little fancy foot<br />

action. Local actors show off<br />

their moves to classic 1980s<br />

tunes, like “Holding Out for a<br />

Hero,” “Almost Paradise” and,<br />

of course, “Footloose.” Through<br />

July 24.<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

GO EAT<br />

Flying Fish<br />

105 S Second St; 901-522-8228;<br />

flyingfishinthe.net<br />

Fried catfish is the star menu<br />

item at this no-frills, counterservice<br />

seafood joint, where<br />

hundreds of singing Billy Bass<br />

plaques decorate the walls.<br />

The fried catfish po’boy may<br />

seem like the obvious choice,<br />

but other popular selections<br />

include crawfish (“mud bugs”),<br />

snow crab legs and grilled<br />

barbecue shrimp. $<br />

R.P. Tracks<br />

3547 Walker Ave; 901-327-1471;<br />

rptracks.com<br />

Memphis is known for<br />

barbecue, but what do the<br />

vegetarians eat? Barbecue<br />

tofu nachos from this joint,<br />

that’s what. This University<br />

of Memphis-area bar and grill<br />

also serves its popular fried<br />

tofu ‘cue on sandwiches and<br />

in burritos. But omnivores<br />

will also find plenty to eat,<br />

like chicken patty melts and<br />

grilled-cheese sandwiches<br />

loaded with bacon. $<br />

GO PARTY<br />

Dublin House<br />

2021 Madison Ave; 901-278-0048<br />

Guinness, Harp and Smithwick's<br />

flow like water at this<br />

Midtown pub. Pool tables,<br />

darts and flat-screen TVs<br />

will entertain you should the<br />

conversation lull.<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

GO GUIDES<br />

Soul man Rev. Al Green<br />

presides over the Full Gospel<br />

Tabernacle Church (787<br />

Hale Rd) in Whitehaven.<br />

Respectful visitors are<br />

welcome for Sunday services.<br />

Green likely won’t be singing<br />

“Let’s Stay Together,” but<br />

you may hear him bust out<br />

some gospel tunes.


GO GUIDES<br />

Miami<br />

florida<br />

by jessica sick<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Item<br />

1673 Meridian Ave, Miami Beach; 305-<br />

673-1600; myfavoriteitem.com<br />

While you won’t find whale<br />

watching or clambakes here,<br />

this new boutique just off<br />

Lincoln Road will inspire a jaunt<br />

to The Vineyard (its other locale<br />

is in Provincetown). Beachperfect<br />

dresses, swim trunks<br />

and accessories are all in stock.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Florida Marlins<br />

Sun Life Stadium, 2269 NW199th<br />

St, Miami Gardens; 305-623-6100;<br />

florida.marlins.mlb.com<br />

A cold beer, a bag of peanuts<br />

and an afternoon with nothing<br />

to do but relax. Ah, baseball<br />

season. Catch the summer<br />

sluggers at home, where they’ll<br />

step up to the plate against<br />

teams including Houston<br />

(July 7-10) and the New York<br />

Mets (July 22-24).<br />

Venetian Pool<br />

2701 De Soto Blvd, Coral Gables; 305-<br />

460-5306; coralgablesvenetianpool.com<br />

Low on the vacation to-do list<br />

while: Visit a former quarry<br />

pit—unless it’s this picturesque<br />

lagoon that was built out of<br />

a limestone reserve. Fed by<br />

artesian wells, the pool is decorated<br />

with waterfalls, coral rock<br />

caves and shaded porticos.<br />

Open through Labor Day.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Cevichery Restobar<br />

448 Espanola Way, Miami Beach;<br />

305-532-6620<br />

Newsflash: Miami’s hot in the<br />

STRIPPED PPED<br />

DOWNN<br />

New York ork<br />

and LA may<br />

have more ore<br />

famous s<br />

fashion n<br />

shows, but<br />

for the show<br />

involving ng<br />

tiny bits s of<br />

Spandex, ex,<br />

head to othe the<br />

white tents on the sand,<br />

where designers like Red<br />

Carter and Trina Turk<br />

show off their suits.<br />

July 15-19.<br />

Mercedes-Benz Fashion<br />

Week Swim<br />

Various locations, Miami<br />

Beach; 646-871-2400;<br />

miami.mbfashionweek.com<br />

summer. Like sauna in the<br />

middle of a rain forest hot. Do<br />

as the Peruvians do and dig<br />

into some refreshing ceviche—<br />

there's lots of it here. Wash it<br />

all down with the two-for-one<br />

sangria or a pisco sour. $$<br />

GO PARTY<br />

Kill Your Idol<br />

222 Espanola Way, Miami Beach;<br />

305-672-1852<br />

If a group of hipsters opened<br />

a college bar, it would look<br />

like this spot tucked off busy<br />

Washington Avenue. Funky<br />

décor—pinball machine, board<br />

games, Bruce Lee statue—compliment<br />

reasonable drink prices<br />

(by SoBe standards, of course).<br />

FUN FACT!<br />

Miami Beach’s Art Deco<br />

District contains the world’s<br />

largest collection of Art Deco<br />

architecture, with more<br />

than 800 buildings representative<br />

of the style.<br />

JULY <strong>2011</strong> 114<br />

Milwaukee<br />

wisconsin<br />

by jeanette hurt<br />

GO SHOP<br />

Elite Repeat<br />

2205 N Calhoun Rd, Brookfield; 262-<br />

789-9359; eliterepeatclothing.com<br />

Looking for some Jimmy<br />

Choos on a Payless budget?<br />

Pay a visit to this amazing<br />

consignment shop, where you'll<br />

find everything from Armani to<br />

St. John.<br />

Mars Cheese Castle<br />

2800 120th Ave, Kenosha;<br />

800-655-6147; marscheese.com<br />

One of the biggest cheese<br />

stores in Wisconsin got even<br />

larger. The new digs are<br />

truly palatial, and there are<br />

even more cheeses, sausages<br />

and Badger state gifts to<br />

be found.<br />

bigfoot bike and skate<br />

2481 S Kinnickinnic Ave; 414-332-<br />

3479; bigfootbikeandskate.com<br />

Looking to outfit your BMX<br />

bike, find a new pair of<br />

rollerblades or get some<br />

skateboarding safety gear?<br />

This funky sports shop<br />

boasts a knowledgeable<br />

staff and great selection for<br />

active bikers, skateboarders,<br />

rollerbladers and even roller<br />

derby enthusiasts. Plus, they<br />

do repairs.<br />

GO SEE<br />

Palermo’s Pizza<br />

Factory Tours<br />

3301 W Canal St; 414-455-0383;<br />

palermospizza.com/tours.aspx<br />

Ever wonder how they make<br />

those tasty frozen pies?<br />

Ponder no further after taking<br />

the Palermo’s Pizza factory<br />

tour, available on Fridays at<br />

GO MAGAZINE<br />

1:30pm (call ahead to reserve<br />

a spot). Tours includes a slice<br />

of cheesy, pan-style goodness.<br />

Chill on the Hill<br />

Humboldt Park Bandshell<br />

Oklahoma and Howell aves;<br />

bayviewneighborhood.com<br />

Pack a picnic or grab some<br />

food to go and set yourself up<br />

for some great music at the<br />

free concerts, offered every<br />

Tuesday night through the end<br />

of August. The music starts<br />

at 6:30pm, but people start<br />

picnicking after 5pm.<br />

Festa Italiana<br />

At Henry Maier Festival Park<br />

200 N Harbor Dr; 414-223-2808;<br />

festaitaliana.com<br />

Get your mambo Italiano fix<br />

at the country’s largest Italian<br />

festival. Besides amazing<br />

food and music, check out<br />

the Leaning Tower of Pisa<br />

that MSOE students will build<br />

out of Legos, take a bite out<br />

of the attempt to make the<br />

world’s largest canoli and enjoy<br />

gondola rides. July 21-24.<br />

German Fest<br />

At Henry Maier Festival Park<br />

200 N Harbor Dr; 414-464-9444;<br />

germanfest.com<br />

Like brats, Oompah bands<br />

and beer? Then find your<br />

personal nirvana at the<br />

country’s largest German<br />

festival. New this year is a giant<br />

Eat-a-thon contest (contestants<br />

must eat everything<br />

placed in front of them over a<br />

two-day period), a homemade<br />

beer contest and soccer<br />

tournament. July 28-31.<br />

GO EAT<br />

Sobelman’s Pub and Grill<br />

1900 W St Paul Ave; 414-931-1919;<br />

milwaukeesbestburgers.com<br />

The web site says it all—Milwaukee’s<br />

best burgers. With<br />

12 different varieties of fresh<br />

Play.


lack Angus beef burgers to<br />

choose from, this joint is a<br />

meat lover’s paradise. Be sure<br />

to check out the seasonal<br />

patio. $<br />

Pizzeria Picola<br />

7606 W State St, Wauwatosa;<br />

414-443-0800; pizzeriapiccola.com<br />

Don’t expect large pies, but<br />

do expect some of the best<br />

Neopolitan-style pizzas in<br />

town. These delicate, thincrusted<br />

beauties are topped<br />

with fresh mozzarella, woodroasted<br />

vegetables and more,<br />

and even cater to gluten-free<br />

diets. Try the “Four Seasons,”<br />

with prosciutto, artichokes,<br />

olives and provolone. On<br />

sunny days, enjoy the pleasant<br />

sidewalk patio. $$<br />

Attebury’s Pub and Eatery<br />

3807 S Packard Ave, St. Francis;<br />

414-294-3800; atteburyspub.com<br />

Expect good things at this<br />

new restaurant, located in<br />

the former space of Carlton<br />

Grange. The owners of the<br />

Palms Bistro bring a bit of<br />

Third Ward sophistication<br />

further south, with great fish<br />

and chips, amazing salads and<br />

stellar pastas and pizzas. $$<br />

VIVE LE FRANCE!<br />

For one weekend a year, the<br />

city says “Bonjour” to everything<br />

French when Bastille<br />

Days, the largest French<br />

festival in North America,<br />

takes over Cathedral Square<br />

Park July 14-17. Here's what<br />

you won’t want to miss:<br />

• Beignets: The Alliance<br />

Française de Milwaukee whips<br />

up hot, fresh French donuts<br />

that you can dip in chicory-<br />

GO PARTY<br />

Gumby’s Pub<br />

2151 S Kinnickinnic Ave; 414-763-<br />

4935; facebook.com/GumbysPub<br />

Named after Brewers former<br />

second baseman Jim Gantner,<br />

this casual bar is more sportsthemed<br />

than sports bar. It’s a<br />

great place to watch a game,<br />

but it’s also a lively, welcoming<br />

place to sip some suds and<br />

enjoy good conversation with<br />

its many regulars.<br />

Trocadero<br />

1758 N Water St; 414-272-0205;<br />

ztrocadero.com<br />

When this East Side French<br />

enclave reopened last year, it<br />