february-2011

jetstar.australia.magazine

february-2011

TREES OF

ANCIENT TIMES

UNLOCKING THE

SECRETS OF

THE DAINTREE

RAINFOREST

p.52

Vows

that wow

Three couples

share their overseas

wedding wonders

p.58

SOUTH OF

THE CITY

Fun for the

family on the

Mornington

Peninsula

Alex

p.64

O’ Loughlin

AUSTRALIA’S NEWEST LEAD

MAN HEATS UP HAWAII FIVE-O

p.24

My Manila

Highlights of

the city with an

amazing racer

p.36

FEBRUARY 2011

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Photos (clockwise from far right): Maria Visconti; Cormac Hanrahan; At Maculangan

contents.

36

Check out Rovilson

Fernandez’s Manila

Cover Photo:

© Rodolfo Martinez/

CPi-Syndication.com/

Headpress

regulars

58

Get married

in paradise

2 ceo’s welcome note

4 events

9 10 minutes with...

Tim Minchin

10 style fi le to carry around

12 good taste Chinese fare

14 cheers to date night

16 the word in romance books

18 fi t to go with Melbourne

netballer Bianca Chatfi eld

21 the biz on Workout Zone

22 ensuite with Grand Balisani

69 brain teasers

in the air

with jetstar 94 your wellbeing

79 jetstar news

onboard

96 international

82 starkids

adventures

85 108 introducing our

domestic airports

88 where we fl y

111 domestic

91 have a bite

destinations focus

52

The green,

green views of

the Daintree

features

24 star struck

We say “aloha” to Hawaii’s hottest new attraction,

Alex O’Loughlin, as he rewrites TV history

30 eat beat

Eating out with the My Kitchen Rules hosts

64

Mornington

Peninsula’s

top picks

36 hot spot

Explore Manila, our newest destination, with local

heart-throb Rovilson Fernandez

40 go guide

Catch the star-studded line-up of the Australian

International Airshow when it returns to Avalon

44 adrenaline

Queenstown isn’t just for snow bunnies, as we

fi nd out during a summer spin up the mountain

50 people

Meet the lifeguards keeping Bondi Beach safe

this summer

52 hub

Discover the Daintree Rainforest’s magic and

mysteries with the locals

58 in focus

How to wed and walk the aisle in style overseas

64 fl y/drive

The best holiday fun on the Mornington Peninsula

CONTENTS

FEBRUARY 2011

FEBRUARY 2011 1


Reward yourself

Earn points at more than 4,000

Best Western hotels worldwide and

reward yourself.

Join now for free at

www.bestwesternrewards.com

Reservations: 131 779 (Aust)

0800 237 893 (NZ)

www.bestwestern.com.au

www.bestwestern.co.nz

2 FEBRUARY 2011

CEO’S WELCOME NOTE

Spreading Our Wings

Welcome

onboard. With summer drawing to a close, now is the ideal time to

take a holiday adventure to soak up the last of the sun’s rays. There

are plenty of destinations throughout the Jetstar network for sun-seekers — all of which are

easily accessible through our all-day, everyday low fares.

In addition to great-value fl ying backed by Jetstar’s Price Beat Guarantee, we’re also launching

some new routes. From 9 February, Jetstar customers can experience our new Darwin to Manila

fl ights with connections from Sydney and Melbourne. Next month, Jetstar will launch another

new route, with inaugural fl ights between Auckland and Singapore.

If you’re a sports lover, why not follow Jetstar’s partnership with the Women’s Tennis

Association to catch great tennis action. For further information on tournaments in Thailand and

Malaysia this month, visit Jetstar.com/tennis.

As always, Jetstar Magazine is jam-packed with great stories to get you in the holiday mood.

On the cover this month is Aussie actor Alex O’Loughlin, who’s now in a starring role in the revival

of the TV classic Hawaii 5-0.

Foodies will love this issue’s Good Taste page, which reveals the best places to celebrate

Chinese New Year this month in the Year of the Rabbit. Also in this issue, Filipino TV celebrity and

The Amazing Race Asia runner-up Rovilson Fernandez introduces readers to his favourite city,

Manila. In addition, romantics will swoon at our Valentine’s Day feature on overseas weddings,

the Daintree’s wonders will be revealed and the spotlight thrown on the Australian International

Airshow for its 10th anniversary at Avalon.

With so many great articles to read between here and your destination, all you need to do now

is sit back and relax.

Our hearts go out to everyone impacted by the devastating fl oods in Queensland as they

rebuild their homes, businesses and livelihoods. Qantas Group has contributed AU$500,000

towards recovery eff orts via the Premier’s Relief Fund.

Cheers,

Bruce Buchanan

Group CEO, Jetstar Airways

EDITORIAL

EDITOR

Rachel Farnay Jacques

DEPUTY EDITOR

Anne Loh

ASSISTANT EDITOR

Belinda Wan

ART DIRECTOR

Savid Gan

SENIOR PHOTO EDITOR

Jacqueline Vicaro

CONTRIBUTING PHOTO EDITORS

Lester Ledesma, Haryati Mahmood

SUB-EDITORS

Sally Wilson, Heather Millar

JAPANESE EDITORIAL CONSULTANT

Yoshino Kyoko

JETSTAR MANAGING EDITOR

Louise Laing

EXECUTIVE CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Michael Keating

EDITORIAL DIRECTOR (SINGAPORE)

Liz Weselby

DESIGN DIRECTOR (SINGAPORE)

Peter Stephens

ASSOCIATE DESIGN DIRECTOR

(SINGAPORE)

Terence Goh

FEBRUARY 2011

ADVERTISING

GROUP PUBLISHER

Michelle Kavanagh

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

Niky Sakhrani

INFLIGHT MEDIA SPECIALISTS

Kiren Gill, Jean Oldfi eld, Jenny Penas

PRODUCTION MANAGERS

Sandy Fong, Serene Wong

MANAGING DIRECTOR

Gerry Ricketts

CEO

Jeff rey O’Rourke

PUBLISHING DIRECTOR

Simon Leslie

JETSTAR MAGAZINE is published for

Jetstar Airways by Ink, 89 Neil Road #03-01

Singapore 088849, tel: +65 6324 2386,

fax: +65 6491 5261.

Australia Free Call: 1800 202 901

Advertising: jetstar.ads@ink-global.com,

Editorial: jetstar.ed@ink-global.com,

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www.jetstarmagazine.com

For reservations, call Jetstar Airways on:

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NEW ZEALAND 0800 800 995

JAPAN +800 4008 3900 (place your telephone

carrier’s access code before this number)

THAILAND +66 2267 5125

USA 1866 397 8170

VIETNAM +84 8910 5375

Web: www.jetstar.com

©Ink. All material in JETSTAR

magazine is strictly copyrighted and

all rights are reserved. Reproduction

without permission of the publisher

is strictly forbidden. Every care

has been taken in compiling the contents of this

magazine, but we assume no responsibility for the

eff ects arising therefrom. The views expressed in this

magazine are not necessarily those of the publisher

or Jetstar Airways.

All information is correct at press time.

MICA (P) 069/01/2011

Printed by Webstar Sydney: 1/83 Derby St.,

Silverwater, NSW 2128, AUSTRALIA.


Rush to the Budget counteR when you land.

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in Australia for 3 consecutive days or more and save $20. * Valid for rentals commencing

before 28 February 2011. To take advantage of this offer quote coupon number MPNZ107

at the Budget counter when you land.

*Valid for car groups B, C, D, E and P only. Subject to vehicle availability. Cannot be used in conjunction with any other coupon or promotion and is not available

on pre-booked, package tour, travel industry or government rates. BUDG902


Family Magic

Ben Russell is the co-creator/director/

associate producer of Danze Fantasy

Productions, and the son of executive

co-creator/producer/artistic director Lindy

Russell. He reveals more about his job.

As the creative director, what does your

job entail?

I’m involved in all aspects of bringing a

concept and idea to life onstage, from

developing a script, to working with

musicians, set and costume designers. It

involves a lot of travel, but when it gets

to putting it all together and seeing it

performed, it’s truly something incredible.

What are some challenges you face?

Pushing into new markets is always a

challenge. But our development in Asia is

truly a pleasure — because there’s such

variety in what is expected and enjoyed.

Th ere’s always measured risk, but having

celebrated the company’s 30th birthday, we

seem to be on the right track.

And your favourite trick?

Personally, I love close-up magic, because it

takes a massive amount of skill and years of

dedication to bring it to life. However, it’s

hard to not be amazed when you see Joe

Labero insert himself into a jet engine, or

lose his head nightly in a French guillotine.

Is it hard to work in a family business?

Th e joy is that you all strive for the same

ideal, which is to create productions that will

blow people away, and with our work there

are no creative rules.

What’s your favourite part of the job?

To bring an idea to life and watch it grow, and

to see incredibly talented performers build a

dream together every night. You also witness

a diff erent performance nightly — that’s

what keeps me captivated by theatre.

GENESIS — Th e Magic Spectacular is

on at Jupiters Hotel and Casino Th eatre at

Broadbeach Island, Gold Coast, from now

’til 8 May. Details and tickets from

www.danzefantasy.com/Genesis.html

4 FEBRUARY 2011

Innocent Arctic

Freefall By Gravity

and Other Myths

’TIL 28 FEB BANGKOK

Thai Beer Festival

Cool down with Bangkok’s annual beer

festival. Department stores and beer gardens

are setting up stalls and promotions as the

beer fl ows, along with plenty of food. So come

along, drink your fi ll and of course, celebrate

with a nation of devoted beer lovers! Tel: +66

(20) 2225 7612 4.

’TIL 7 MAR PERTH

Perth International Arts Festival

This annual arts fi esta is back with some of

the best theatre, visual arts, music, fi lm and

free events — and cool stuff like music theatre

featuring jazz maestro James Morrison, the

Apollo 13 hands-on family adventure, and

Steve Reich’s 2x5 rock band of classical music.

Tel: +61 (8) 6488 5555.

Garden of

Unearthly Delights

’TIL 20 MAR MELBOURNE

Ashes to Ashes: Cricket’s

Cracking Rivalry

Age-old cricket rivalry is remembered with

whimsical memorabilia at the National

Sports Museum, with items dating back to

1861–1862. It includes contributions from

the Melbourne Cricket Club. Brunton Ave,

Richmond, tel: +61 (3) 9657 8879.

10 FEB–13 MAR ADELAIDE

Garden of Unearthly Delights

Australia’s hugest outdoor arts festival is

swinging into Rundle Park. It features hot

acts like Cantina, Sammy J and Randy, and

Felicity Ward inside the country’s best carnival

venues, like The Umbrella Revolution, Le

Cascadeur, and more. Tickets from FringeTix.

Tel: 1300 374 643.


Julie O’Hara

(Clarence Jazz

Festival)

Fab

Stuff

February’s the month to jump off

your seat to catch these must-go

festivals, events and exhibitions

WORDS BELINDA WAN

18 FEB –13 MAR ADELAIDE

Adelaide Fringe 2011

South Australia gets even busier with

the largest arts festival in the southern

hemisphere. With programs and events

stretching from the city, to the desert and the

sea, and in random locations like laneways

and shipping containers, there’s always

something cool to see. Tel: +61 (8) 8100 2000.

22–27 FEB HOBART

Clarence Jazz Festival

Tassie’s fave fest is back to wow at spots like

the Bellerive Boardwalk. Festival Ambassador

George Washingmachine will be jamming with

the bands, while performances like Fats Waller

— Death on the Santa Fe Express and those by

jazz vocalist Julie O’Hara take place in Rosny

Barn. Tel: +61 (3) 6245 8600.

Boundary Street,

featuring trumpeter

James Morrison

(Perth International

Arts Festival)

22 FEB–6 MAR SYDNEY

Innocent Arctic

A traveller and photographer, Sydney-based

Emma Rowan-Kelly has been to the Arctic

archipelago of Svarlbard, with arresting

photographs to prove it. This vivid exhibition at

Depot II Gallery shows icescapes and glaciers,

plus polar bears, seals and walruses. Free. 2

Danks St, Waterloo, tel: +61 (0) 406 710 321.

23–26 FEB BRISBANE

Freefall By Gravity and Other Myths

This circus performance at Judith Wright

Centre of Contemporary Arts explores

everyday and irrational fear, and human

quirks. Expect hoop diving and acrobatics,

plus physical theatre from seven artistes aged

15 to 29 years old. 420 Brunswick St, Fortitude

Valley, tel: +61 (7) 3872 9000.

Zig Drag

Brilliant, hilarious, entertaining and super

glam, performer Taylor Mac is set to debunk

common myths about himself in his show

Th e Ziggy Stardust Meets Tiny Tim Songbook

or Comparison Is Violence. We stole some time

from the sequined one.

How did the show’s title come to you?

Th e media kept describing me as “Ziggy

Stardust meets Tiny Tim”, but the only thing

I have in common with either of them is that

I wear glitter (Ziggy Stardust) and sometimes

play the ukulele (Tiny Tim), and sing. Th ey

say it’s about putting you in context for

their audience, but I’m trying to encourage a

culture of using adjectives to describe what

you see.

But why “comparison is violence”?

Because whenever people say, “You’re just

like so-and-so”, sometimes what they’re

really saying is, “You’re not as special as you

think you are”.

What should the audience bear in mind?

Th ere’s no lip-synching and very few dirty

jokes, but we still have a great time.

You write plays, act, sing, write songs,

direct and produce. What’s one thing

you’d do for the rest of your life?

To me, it’s all just theatre. It’s all drag. So

this is it for me. I couldn’t ask for a better life

than throwing on some glitter and having a

party every night.

How do you always look so glam?

I don’t. Often I’m a mess. I can’t get through

a single show without at least half my drag

ending up on the fl oor or audience members.

What do you love about theatre?

Ideas, poetry, theatricality and a shared

experience — but mostly that it’s an art form

built on surprise. If you don’t allow surprise

into the theatre, you get awfully boring work.

Th e Ziggy Stardust Meets Tiny Tim

Songbook or Comparison Is Violence is on

25–26 February and 3–4 March at Sydney

Opera House’s Th e Studio, tel: +61 (2)

9250 7777.

FEBRUARY 2011 5

EVENTS


Fight Club

George Sotiropoulos is set to square off his

opponents at the latest Ultimate Fighting

Championship (UFC) — the UFC 127. He

shares details about his strategies.

What do you like most about mixed

martial arts (MMA)?

I was a hyperactive kid. I was also a good

athlete, but never really found the sport for

me. Th en I saw a tape of UFC and I knew this

was exactly what I wanted to do with my life.

I soon began travelling the world learning the

skills I would need for the UFC. I have boxed

and wrestled, and also won national jiu-jitsu

championships in Australia, but in MMA,

you have to put them all together. Th ere’s a

counter to every attack, and even a counter

to every counter. It’s human chess.

What aspect of your skills would you

like to improve?

In the UFC, if you’re not improving, you’re

losing. I’ve been doing jiu-jitsu for 13 years,

but I train very hard with coaches Leonard

Gabriel Jr (boxing), Eddie Bravo (jiu-jitsu)

and Eric Jetton (wrestling) to get better.

What is MMA’s guiding philosophy?

Th e UFC started in 1993, supposedly as a

one-off — to fi nd the “ultimate” fi ghting art.

Th ey had boxers versus wrestlers, wrestlers

versus Brazilian jiu-jitsu players, sumo guys,

whatever. What they found over the years

is that the only “ultimate” style of fi ghting

is to be profi cient in striking, grappling and

wrestling — to be good at all three. In the

UFC, you see the best fi ghters in the world

who know skills in all the martial arts, and

can mix them together.

How do you keep your strength up

during a fi ght?

It’s the will to win. When you’re gasping for

air and your arms are dead before the fi nal

round, it really helps to remember “He’s tired

too”. It’s a battle of will, as well as skill.

Watch George Sotiropoulos in action at UFC

127: Penn V Fitch, on 27 February at Sydney’s

Acer arena. Tickets from Ticketek 132 849 or

www.ticketek.com

6 FEBRUARY 2011

Carmen

Rolex Farr 40 World

Championship 2011

23–26 FEB SYDNEY

Rolex Farr 40 World

Championship 2011

To snag the coveted world champion title,

teams from Australia, Italy, Germany, New

Zealand and the US will be taking to the

Tasman Sea off Sydney Heads. Enthusiasts

should keep their eyes peeled off shore for

drama on the high seas. Tel: +61 (2) 9955 7171.

24 FEB–6 MARCH ADELAIDE

BigPond Adelaide Film Festival

The fi fth installment of this huge fi lm fest will

yield a brand-new collection of celluloid treats

for cinephiles, dreamed up by director Katrina

Sedgwick. Don’t miss the features, shorts,

videos and media screenings — including 15

awesome Aussie works. Tickets from

www.adelaidefi lmfestival.org

Madame

Butterfl y

25–26 FEB PHUKET

Phuket International

Blues Rock Festival

This hot event will be rocking the island for the

sixth time. Seven of the country’s best blues

bands will give spectators endless tunes for

two nights — a must-see for fans of blues rock.

Hilton Phuket Arcadia Resort and Spa, 333

Patak Rd, Karon Beach, tel: +66 (76) 396 433.

25–27 FEB ADELAIDE

Cellar Door Wine Festival

With access to South Australian wine regions

in one location, this is certainly an event that

wine buff s must mark down in their diaries.

Look out for food trails, tasting platters,

barbecue plates and desserts at the Regional

Farmer’s Market. Adelaide Convention Centre,

North Tce. Tickets from Ticketek 132 849.

Lion King Photo: Savid Gan; Sumo wrestlers: Getty Images


Gay Bilson

(BigPond

Adelaide

Film Festival)

25 FEB–13 MAR AUCKLAND

Auckland Fringe 2011

This is a biennial, anyone-can-join event, with

a whopping 100 comedy, dance, theatre,

music, visual arts and cabaret events jampacked

into over 40 venues from Waitakere

to Waiheke. Don’t miss Death by Cheerleader,

Gloria and Tea for Toot. Some free events.

Details on www.aucklandfringe.co.nz

25 FEB–27 APR MELBOURNE ADELAIDE SYDNEY

Madame Butterfl y

This achingly tragic tale of love and loss by the

Australian Ballet is told amid Puccini’s searing

score and an elegant Japanese setting. This

ambitious ballet rendition of a 1904 opera will

move a whole new generation with its stunning

choreography and costumes. Tickets from

1300 369 741 or www.australianballet.com.au

Cellar Door

Wine Festival

Tea for Toot

(Auckland

Fringe 2011)

26 FEB CHRISTCHURCH

International Track Meet

This world-class event features top athletes

returning to the arena for some major sporting

action. Many winners from the recently

concluded Delhi Commonwealth Games will

be present, so hotfoot it over. QEII Stadium,

171 Travis Rd, North New Brighton. Tickets

from www.internationaltrackmeet.co.nz

26 FEB–12 MAR BRISBANE

Carmen

This production of Carmen by Queensland

Ballet is set to sizzle. Choreographed by

François Klaus, the story of a free-spirited

gypsy woman who refuses to be tamed by

any man is sure to charm audiences again

with gorgeous costumes and seductive dance

moves. Tickets from qtix 136 246.

Book Now

1–26 Mar

Guitar Heaven South Pacifi c Asia Tour

Guitar genius Carlos Santana and his band

are back on stage for this world tour that

is now headed to Asia, Australia and New

Zealand. Don’t miss this fearless proponent

of love and life, as he performs his allencompassing

Guitar Heaven show.

The Lion

King

Guitar Heaven

South Pacifi c

Asia Tour

3 Mar–31 May

Th e Lion King

Th is Broadway musical debuts in Singapore at

Marina Bay Sands. Th is splendid production’s

set features the Serengeti Plains and a cast of

51. It’s one of the year’s must-sees.

6 Mar

20/twenty Challenge

Th is Sydney event raises funds for children

with cerebral palsy. It includes a 2km swim at

Shelly Beach Manly, a 3km kayak and a 20km

walk around the harbour foreshore. Th ere will

also be a shortened family course.

The March Basho

13–27 Mar

Th e March Basho

Watch sumo wrestlers slug it out at the Osaka

Prefectural Gymnasium for supremacy in the

March Tournament. Th ey’ll try to oust each

other from the circle and onto the clay fl oor.

FEBRUARY 2011 7


Tim Minchin 10

Barefooted piano

wrestler and comedy

rock royalty Tim Minchin

pits himself against

symphony orchestras in

various cities for an epic

musical showdown

INTERVIEW BELINDA WAN

How do you intend to slug it out with

a 55-piece orchestra?

One frickin’ note at a time.

How’s the relationship between you

and conductor Benjamin Northey?

So far it’s extremely pleasant, although

we haven’t actually had to work together

yet. It’s amazing how easy it is to get

along with your workmates, as long as

you’re not working.

What would you like to get across with

Tim Minchin Versus The Orchestras?

My main mission this year is to send

people away understanding that the fact

that I have no shame and no soul makes

for a lovely evening at the theatre.

You’ve won a whole bunch of awards,

which one made you the happiest?

Oh, I don’t know. Awards are complicated

because they’re nice to win, but you know

deep down that making a competition out

of art is inherently dodgy.

What are a few things you have to have

before a concert?

A lot of eye make-up, a short vocal

warm-up, a medium caff eine pick-me-up

and half a glass of wine.

Will you be adding new things to the

show as you travel to diff erent cities?

Nah, I’m too narcissistic to incorporate

geography. And anyway, the things I

talk about tend not to be very regional.

Cheese, prayer, morality and rock are

concepts sans frontiers.

If violins and oboes make you “angry”,

what else drives you crazy?

I must have been stretching for a quote

there! Umm, olives. I don’t like olives, and

I don’t think anyone else should either.

Any pianos you’ve regretted bashing?

No. They were all asking for it.

You’ve made so many people laugh.

Who or what makes you laugh?

My family. I don’t know why — they’re just

so stupid.

Any New Year resolutions?

Rock harder, sing more, eat more fruit and get

more sleep. Aren’t they everybody’s?

Tim Minchin Versus The Orchestras is on from

25 February–27 March in Melbourne (25–27

February, tel: 1300 136 166), Perth (4–5 March,

tel: 136 100), Adelaide (10–12 March,

tel: 131 246), Brisbane (18 March, tel: 132 849),

Tasmania (21 March, tel: 1300 795 257) and

Sydney (24–27 March, tel: 132 849).

FEBRUARY 2011 9

MINUTES WITH…


A Storksak bag

is just the thing

for yummy

mummies

State Your

Case

Be prepared for any style of travel

with our picks of bags that’ll take

you places — from the outback to a

swanky party

WORDS ANNE LOH

10 FEBRUARY 2011

DAY TO NIGHT

Do your sightseeing in the day with the Sarah

Connors Canvas Tote (AU$268). Take it to the

beach, the shops, or lunch. Then snap up the

Camille (AU$300) in cerise for cocktails on the

town. The autumn/winter 2011 collection has

other styles in bright gold, grey and black. From

this month on www.sarahconnors.com.au

FREE YOUR MIND

The Borne Naked Traveller (AU$35.95) is not

only see-through, but comes with empties:

a 50ml lotion pump, a 50ml atomiser spray

bottle, two 50ml screw-top bottles and two

15ml jars for your skincare. Then move it from

your weekender bag to hardcase for a holiday

— cool! Stockists on www.bornenaked.com

BABY ME

Take a cue from Angelina Jolie and grab new

Storksak bags: Sophia in tan (AU$499),

Olivia Olivia in black/moss nylon satin

(AU$229), shoulder bag Jools in black

nylon satin (AU$179, main picture)

and Aubrey in black/camel canvas

weave (AU$199). With a padded

change mat and wipe-clean

lining. From David Jones or o

on www.storksak.com.au


THEY’VE GOT YOUR BACK

The boldly coloured Explore Planet Earth Galaxy

Series bags are made of light-and-tough Polytech

600 fabric, come with a fi ve-year warranty and are

endorsed by the Chiropractic & Osteopathic College of

Australasia. The Scorpius Travel Pack with a removable

day pack in two sizes and the Carina Rucksack both

have the fully adjustable BackCare TM Air Tech Harness,

while the Pegasus Rucksack has the enhanced

BackCare TM Spinal Care Harness. RRP AU$119–199;

tel: +61 (2) 9922 3423.

RUN AWAY

Katzi’s Stowaway collection really does make

you feel like getting away. We love the vintagestyled

Gerry with a detachable shoulder

strap (AU$249) in “whiskey tan leather” as

a weekender, and for a touch of understated

glam for sundowners, the “dusky pink” Shell

Clutch (AU$199) with glow mesh and wristlet.

Stockists on katzi.com.au

SPLASH OUT

We love beach holidays, and now

there’s no need to worry about

keeping your wet swimming

gear and towels away from

your clothes as you beachhop,

with these colourful bags

made from extra-thin, light and

waterproof nylon for your wet

swimsuit (AU$16) and towel

(AU$29.95), from Tintamar.

Available in 10 colours,

you’re sure to fi nd one that

screams: sun fun! Stockists

on www.tintamar.com.au

GET WET OR STAY DRY

When you’re out living the Billabong lifestyle, you just

want to do everything, and the Billabong Convoy Wet

& Dry Pack XL Wheelie (AU$129.99) allows you to do

just that. With tarpee-lined wet and dry compartments,

and a padded back panel, its zipaway backstraps and

telescopic handles give you two ways to carry it as well.

Available at beachculture stores at all major Australian

airports; log on to www.beachculture.com.au for details.

FUN ON WHEELS

The latest from luggage people Paklite is the Möbius Lifestyle

Luggage collection. In backpack or trolley case, prices

range from AU$99 (for the backpack) to AU$279 (for the

large trolley case). Two dual-tones are available — black/

orange and charcoal/lime. For those who are not good trolley

bag-drivers, don’t worry, the back and base scuff guards, and

hard-wearing bearing wheels, will see you through. Stockists

on www.paklite.com.au

Get Carried Away

Miranda Chance won the international

category for the 2010 GAP/Ecouterre

Recycled Denim Challenge. We ask her about

eco-design and her fi rst collection.

Tell us about your fi rst collection.

Th e CHANCE collection is designed using

upcycled denim jeans and old leather jackets.

Outdated garments are constructed into

functional, beautiful items that continue the

philosophy of “less is more” with clean lines

and simple silhouettes. I decided to make

our impact on the environment a key focus

of the collection and our business.

What’s the diff erence between

“upcycled” and “recycled”?

As the sustainability movement becomes

more mainstream, new terminology for the

processes has become more defi ned. Th e

term “recycled” is about re-using materials

and making it into something else, it also

represents sustainable practices and being

environmentally responsible. “Upcycling”

is very much apart of the sustainability and

recycling movement. It’s a more specifi c

terminology — about making something

new without downgrading the original

material or creating more pollution during

the creative process. Th e CHANCE collection

very much fi ts into this terminology.

Why denim?

I’m in love with denim jeans, I love them to

death — and I use them in an eff ort to give

them the “chance” to have another journey.

Eco-fashion is… all about sustainability.

Th ere’s a global community of sustainable

designers helping to shift the old attitudes.

Your favourite piece in your collection?

Personally, I love and use the Jeff erson

Hobo (far right) every day.

CHANCE bags are

available at NAMI

Byron Bay, tel: +61

(2) 6685 8081, www.

inhabitat.com and

www.chancebags.com

STYLE FILE

FEBRUARY 2011 11


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Taco lovers will love Streat’s

Mexican taco cart

OPPOSITE TOP/BOTTOM:

The rustic Tea Tree Café on

Waiheke Island; feast on the

huge spread of street food

at Queen Victoria Market’s

Suzuki Night Market

Chow Down

The Th Chinese Chi Year Y of f the th

Rabbit starts on 3 February

with Chinese restaurants

around the country getting

into the spirit; you can too

with our recommendations

WORDS ROBERTA MUIR

SYDNEY

Travellers passing through Sydney

International Airport can get a Chinese-food

fi x at the recently opened China Grand, which

overlooks the tarmac and the spectacular

Sydney skyline. Sister restaurant to the

popular Kam Fook restaurants, China Grand’s

seafood-focused menu off ers plenty of

“auspicious” dishes alongside house specials,

such as roasted duck laksa and Szechuanstyle

grandma’s beancurd and an all-day

yum cha menu for those wanting grab-andgo

options, or a quick bite before boarding.

Terminal 1 Shopping Precinct (after Customs),

tel: +61 (2) 8338 9622.


Sky Phoenix, in Sydney’s new central

Westfi eld complex, is celebrating the New

Year with a lion dance on 5 February, and a

special New Year banquet for tables of six

people or more. This new 500-seat fl agship of

the Phoenix Restaurant Group, the brainchild

of sisters Alice Lee and Anita Yuen, includes

traditional Chinese family-style dining, private

dining rooms and live fi sh tanks, in the heart of

the CBD. See side box for the sisters’ New Year

recommendations. Shop 6001, Westfi eld, Pitt

St, Sydney, tel: +61 (2) 9223 8822.

MELBOURNE

Max Tsang’s fi rst restaurant, the mod-

Cantonese yum cha den Mahjong (in St Kilda)

achieved cult status. Last year, he opened the

more upmarket, dark and moody Mahjong

A Memorable

Meal

Chinese food is very symbolic — most

of all on occasions such as the New Year,

when specifi c dishes are served to ensure

an auspicious start to the year. If you’re

wondering what to order (or cook) to

ensure a prosperous new year, the sisters

behind Sky Phoenix suggest:

• Braised dried oysters with black moss

and vegetables, to ensure good business

relationships in the coming year

• Rocklobsters or crabs with ginger and

shallots, as the red colour of the cooked

crustaceans symbolises good health

• Pan-fried prawns, because the sound of

the word “prawns” in Chinese is similar

to the words for “always smiling”

• Braised abalone with lettuce, to ensure

good business from all sources

• Crispy-skin chicken, because the golden

colour of the skin symbolises good luck

throughout the year

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Beijing duck; salt

and pepper squid from Mahjong Black; the

bustling Bokchoy Tang

IN BOX: Braised abalone for good business

Black overlooking Little Collins Street. The

Cantonese menu includes steamed silky egg

with scallop, sugar cane prawns, tiny duckfi

lled spring rolls, sliced sticky pork belly

and crisp fried rocklobster tail with spiced

salt. Over Chinese New Year, there’ll be the

traditional lion dancing and fi recrackers.

The New Year’s Eve à la carte menu makes it

easy for large family groups, couples or small

groups of friends to join in the celebrations.

118 Little Collins St, tel: +61 (3) 9650 8873.

Federation Square’s Bokchoy Tang is

off ering a special New Year banquet, which

includes handmade dumplings, abalone soup,

Beijing duck, and local rocklobsters wok-fried

with ginger, spring onions, Chinese rice wine

and egg noodles — as well as the Chinese

New Year speciality called “Happy Family”,

which combines fi sh fi llets, pork balls, spinach,

egg dumpling, quail eggs, ginger and spring

onions. Russell Court, Melbourne, tel: +61 (3)

9650 8666.

GOOD TASTE

And if they

had a ‘Most

Spectacular

Sunset’

category,

we definitely

would have

won that too.

Sitting over the water at

Hillarys Boat Harbour

in Perth, The Breakwater

serves great food and

drinks against a backdrop of

stunning Indian Ocean views.

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Heart

to Heart

Get in the mood for love this Valentine’s

Day at some of the country’s

most romantic bars

WORDS ROBERTA MUIR


SYDNEY

Eau de Vie, Australian Gourmet Traveller’s

2011 Bar of the Year, is a “speakeasy” at the

back of the Kirketon hotel. The music is old-

school jazz, the cocktails are classic, and the

vibe harks back to prohibition days. Moody

lighting, and the his’n’hers cocktails called

Pour Homme et Pour Femme (AU$32 for

two) — which are blends of Ketel One vodka,

various liqueurs and fruit juices — make this

the perfect place to enchant your loved one

this Valentine’s Day. 229 Darlinghurst Rd,

Darlinghurst, tel: +61 (0) 422 263 226.

Known as “the best beer garden in the

world”, Opera Bar at the Sydney Opera

House boasts a stunning view of the Sydney

Harbour Bridge, city skyline and the sparkling

harbour. Drink or dine indoors or outdoors

with live music every evening. And for a special

V-Day tipple, try the Budds & Bubbles: think

sparkling wine with Massenez peach liqueur,

lychee and rose buds. Lower Concourse Level,

Sydney Opera House, tel: +61 (2) 9247 1666.

BRISBANE

With great views over Fortitude Valley, an

open-air vibe and great bartenders, The

Roof Top Bar at the boutique Limes Hotel

ticks all the boxes for a romantic Valentine’s

drink. Relax under the stars, and sip a Rose

and Raspberry mojito at the winner of the

award for 2010’s Best Bar, as voted by MAP

Magazine. 142 Constance St, Fortitude Valley,

tel: +61 (7) 3852 9000.

GOLD COAST

With their Middle Eastern-inspired snacks

and exotic cocktails, the Mecca Bah outlets

OPPOSITE: A stunning view comes

free at Opera Bar

THIS PAGE TOP/BOTTOM: Snuggle

up for a drink with your partner at

Limes Hotel’s The Roof Top Bar;

Mecca Bah’s yummy mezze

Flower Power

CHEERS

The Giggly Rose

Whip up a romantic cocktail for two at

home — Th e Giggly Rose, a signature of

Th e Gazebo Wine Garden in Kings Cross,

Sydney. To recreate the drink, combine 8

mint leaves and 8 rose petals with 20ml

rose syrup, 15ml Gordon’s Gin and 10ml

lemon juice. Pour into two fl utes and top

with Yarraburn sparkling wine, then serve.

in Queensland, Melbourne and Canberra off er

great romancing for a Valentine’s Day date.

The Mecca Bah outlet on the Gold Coast off ers

mezze, such as lamb kofte with yoghurt and

mint sauce, and cheese-fi lled kataifi pastries.

Relax in this mini oasis and sip on a Turkish

Delight martini — Absolut vodka, crème de

cacao and rosewater — with a Turkish delight on

the side! N101 AND N106, 3 Oracle Blvd, Gold

Coast, Queensland, tel: +61 (7) 5504 7754.

MELBOURNE

Those with bohemian tastes will love Bouzy

Rouge with its eclectic collection of artifacts,

like deer antlers and shoes from Rajasthan.

There are plenty of snug corners to meet, even

a private curtained-off space (book early!),

and some of Melbourne’s best bar food.

Indeed, sangria and paella for two could be the

perfect Valentine’s Day feast. 470 Bridge Rd,

Richmond, tel: +61 (3) 9429 4348.

Tucked inside Melbourne’s historic The

George building, Mockingbird is one of the

city’s best-kept secrets. From the Art Decoinspired

trompe l’oeil walls to the beautiful

Italian marble and mosaic tiling, Mockingbird

sets the scene for an intimate Valentine’s

Day rendezvous. Step back in time to 1920s

Paris — with velvet curtains, romantic lighting,

wrought-iron detailing and a bay window

overlooking Fitzroy Street. Cosy up over

Mockingbird’s signature cocktail, Atticus

Finch (named after Gregory Peck’s character

in To Kill A Mockingbird): a heady concoction

comprising dark rum, sloe gin, peach

schnapps and lime juice. 129 Fitzroy St,

St Kilda, tel: +61 (3) 9534 0000.

FEBRUARY 2011 15


16 FEBRUARY 2011

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All You Need

is Love

Get your dose of romance this

month with these books

WORDS ANNE LOH

June Loves is a big

believer in second

chances — and

having a dog

INSET: Loves’

debut fi ction novel

June

Loves’ debut romance novel The

Shelly Beach Writers’ Group,

which is about fi nding a second chance,

making new friends despite yourself, and

bonding with a dog who knows more about life

than you do, will resonate with many.

You’ve written over 50 non-fi ction books.

What inspired you to step into the women’s

fi ction fi eld?

My husband and I made a sea change. To

avoid joining the local iceberg swimmers,

bowling and golf clubs, I enrolled for a Diploma

in Professional Writing and Editing. Novel

writing was part of this course. I wrote the fi rst

10,000 words of Shelly Beach and took up

the challenge: could I fi nish my novel? I did —

with the help of my supportive writers’ group.

Please note: my writers’ group in no way

resembles the Shelly Beach Writers’ Group!

How has writing non-fi ction books helped

you with your fi rst fi ction work?

When you write non-fi ction work, you need

a plan — a structure and an outline. I made

a plan complete with a structure — a plot

outline and character profi les — with even

an imagined calendar to write The Shelly

Beach Writers’ Group. Using these and other

writers’ tools make it easy to pick up and keep

writing a novel in the moments we grab in our

crammed-full lives today. The calendar was a

last-minute planning tool I realised I needed so

as to write Gina’s journey in a journal format.

Authors are always quick to disclaim

any characters’ resemblances to real-life

people, but that can’t be possible, surely?

Authors have to say that, otherwise family

and friends would never talk to us again! And

cashed-up colleagues and ex-partners might

even consider legal proceedings against us.

However, our seaside town, the mythical

Shelly Beach, is stacked with gorgeous,

helpful, supportive and quirky people — all

worthy of starring roles in novels.

In a world where many people do botch

up their fi rst go, what do you want

readers to take away from your book?

That it’s never too late to start over. And it’s

easier to start over if you have the support of


friends and a small community, the comfort

and solace of writing, and a penchant for the

simple life. Having a dog also helps!

What’s your favourite romantic work

that’s always a comfort to return to?

Anything by Jane Austen.

The Shelly Beach Writers’ Group is

published by Viking (Penguin), AU$29.95,

ISBN 9780670074853.

Love Lines

THE WORD

Love & Other U-Turns

Th is debut by lifestylemagazine

writer Louisa

Deasey is about the year

she fell in love with a

comedian, and decided to

follow her heart (and him)

through the backyard

of Australia in a beat-up

Mazda. What would you have done in this

case of “opposites attract”? Arena by Allen &

Unwin, AU$32.99, ISBN 9781742373416.

You Are My Future

Amanda Cole’s second book

brings you a story based

on the premise that love

could be so strong that

your future self could step

into the past to change

the course of events,

giving everyone a diff erent

future. Intense and emotional. Available from

bookstores and www.youaremyfuture.com.au.

AU$24.95, ISBN 97806465935906.

Wolfborn

Vampires are so passé.

Th is young-adult fi ction

book by Melburnian writer

Sue Bursztynski is set in

a medieval time with all

the appeal of the romantic

age — lords, castles, magic

and werewolves. A story of

self-discovery and soulmates. Woolshed Press

by Random House, AU$18.95,

ISBN 9781864718256.

Vivian Rising

If you believe in destiny

and the stars, this book by

Canberra-based New Yorker

Daniella Brodsky about

when you should believe

in your horoscope reading,

and when you should

follow your heart will prove

enlightening and heart-warming. You just

have to go with your gut feel in life. Simon &

Schuster, AU$29.99, ISBN 9780731814992.

100 Australian Poems

of Love & Loss

Edited by Jamie Grant, an

acclaimed Australian poet,

this compilation of poetry

will speak to your heart

— whether you’re feeling

euphoric or emotionally

low. Illustrated by

Australian artist Bridget Farmer, it features

high-profi le and lesser-known poets. Hardie

Grant, AU$39.95, ISBN 9781740669108 .

remote


















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FEBRUARY 2011 17


FIT TO GO

Supreme

Team

Netball sensation and

Melbourne Vixens cocaptain

Bianca Chatfi eld

reveals the secret to her

team’s success

INTERVIEW KELLY IRVING

A world-class defensive line-up and superior

skills led the Melbourne Vixens to a gripping

victory over the Adelaide Thunderbirds in

2009. As netball season rolls around this year,

co-captain Bianca Chatfi eld gets set to thrill

Australian and New Zealand spectators all

over again.

What do you love about team sports?

Having friends around you all the time. When

you’re travelling, and you’re tired and grumpy,

you’ve got 11 other girls there to perk you up.

Also, when you have a great time winning a

premiership, you’ve got 11 friends there to

celebrate with.

How do you keep one another motivated?

We’re all such diff erent personalities that

when someone is having a down time,

18 FEBRUARY 2011

someone else is having a good time. You can

feed off the other girls’ enthusiasm.

What is the team’s biggest challenge now?

We’ve got fi ve new players coming in from

diff erent teams, so our biggest challenge is to

incorporate them into our team culture.

Any competition strategies you’ll use?

We had a terrible season last year, so it’s time

for us to think outside the box, have a look

at what we can do diff erently, and try and be

creative. We’ve worked hard pre-season and

we’re ready to go!

Who are your toughest opponents?

Adelaide and Sydney always show great

strength, but I think we’re going to watch out

for more New Zealand teams this year.

Tell us how you stay on top of your game.

Keeping our strength up is very important.

That’s where a lot of our training has gone

over the last few years. You’ve got to be fi t. Yes,

you’ve got to have aerobic ability, but you also

have to be strong to take the knocks, because

our game gets more physical each time.

What about time-out fun with the team?

When we’re on the road, we have a lot of

time on our hands, so we get together and

go out for dinner a lot. Having quality time

together away from training is important. If

we just hang out as friends, then that certainly

correlates to how we get along on court.

Game On

Melbourne Vixens' Bianca

Chatfi eld (second from right)

is ready to return to form

with her team this season

What’s the team’s goal for the season?

I don’t think you can have any other goal

except to win. If we manage to stay injury-free,

we have no excuses not to.

Any advice for aspiring netballers?

I would say just have fun, train hard and enjoy

what you’re doing.

ANZ Trans-Tasman Championship

20 February: ETSA Park, Adelaide

27 February: Sydney Olympic Park Sports

Centre, Sydney

6 March: Trusts Stadium Arena, Auckland,

New Zealand

12 March: SNHC, Melbourne

21 March: Mystery Creek Events Centre,

Hamilton, New Zealand

27 March: Hisense Arena, Melbourne

31 March: SNHC, Melbourne

3 April: Hisense Arena, Melbourne

10 April: Hisense Arena, Melbourne

14 April: Brisbane Convention &

Exhibition Centre, Brisbane

17 April: Challenge Stadium, Perth

23 April: Hisense Arena, Melbourne

1 May: Hisense Arena, Melbourne


Sports afi cionados

can now do the

best for their

skin even as they

work out — with

WORKOUT|Zone

Sweat Yourself

Beautiful

What inspired

WORKOUT|Zone?

I was working out

at the gym, and my

moisturiser had yet

again dripped off

onto the handlebars. I

thought there must be

a better way to protect

and nourish my skin while

exercising. Nothing else was available then, so

WORKOUT|Zone was born.

Why is it necessary to use a specifi c

skincare product during exercise?

Traditional moisturisers literally slide off

during exercise, so the skin is not able to

retain its moisture. Changes to the skin while

exercising provide an opportunity for greater

absorption than when at rest.

How does the WORKOUT|Zone range work?

WORKOUT|Zone takes advantage of how

the skin changes during exercise. Increased

blood fl ow and skin temperature improves the

absorption of pro-vitamin A and retinol, which

can help reduce age-related changes to the

skin. Natural clays, minerals and moisturisers

WORKOUT|Zone’s founder Dr Rosy Fenwicke

(inset) talks about the fi rst-ever skincare

products (below) made just for sports people

INTERVIEW RICHARD ADAMS

also help delay dehydration. Sunscreens

protect the skin from damage.

At the moment, are there any other similar

products out there?

No, and we don’t want any!

What do you do when you’re not running

WORKOUT|Zone?

I’m a mother of three and an active runner,

having just completed my fi rst marathon in

Paris. This March, I’m running the Motatapu

off -road marathon between Wanaka and

Arrowtown, which is one of the events that we

sponsor. I also still work as a doctor, and travel

around New Zealand consulting.

In what other ways does WORKOUT|Zone

support the community?

We are the offi cial skincare sponsor of the

Coast to Coast Multisport Race, Lake Taupo

Cycle Challenge, St Kilda Cycling Club and

Vic Beach Volleyball. We also support a

shoe-recycling program, and to date have

collected over 650 pairs of shoes. Wearable

shoes are sent to Papua New Guinea. The rest

are recycled into matting, which is used for

children’s playgrounds.

What challenges have you had to overcome

in this business?

I’m a doctor rather than a business person,

and so I had to learn to think in a diff erent way.

We’ve had little start-up capital, so it has been

a steep learning curve. One of the biggest

challenges has been positioning the range

in the market place. It fi ts between a beauty

product and a sports product, which was

initially a challenge for retailers. But now, I’m

happy to say it’s been gaining acceptance with

both the sports community and retailers.

FEBRUARY 2011 21

THE BIZ


ENSUITE

Beached

in Bali

Situated in Canggu, Bali’s upcoming hotspot,

Grand Balisani Suites embraces the style of a

traditional Balinese village, while its use of local

woods, stones and fabrics creates an air of

authenticity that’s hard to fi nd these days

WORDS SAMANTHA BROWN

GET SET JETSET

Petitenget is now one of Bali’s

most happening streets, and

Potato Head brings further

fresh cachet to the area. This

beachside venue is constructed

from thousands of wooden

shutters collected from houses

on neighbouring Java island.

While it will eventually boast four

eateries — fi ne dining, seafood,

international and a bar — for now

just the latter two are operating,

along with a pool that skirts

the volcanic-sand beach out

front with of course, a swim-up

bar, making it a top sunset and

partying spot. Jl. Petitenget,

Seminyak, tel: +62 (361) 737 979.

22 FEBRUARY 2011

FINGER-LICKIN’ GOOD

Naughty Nuri’s Warung, an

Ubud institution, has opened a

second outlet on Batubelig Road,

putting its famed barbecued pork

ribs and massive martinis within

easy reach of Balisani’s guests.

The simplicity of the original

Nuri’s has been recaptured, but

the look updated, with wooden

interiors, quirky lampshades and

even a walk-through Bintang beer

bottletop curtain that hides the

bathrooms. A word of warning to

the thirsty out there: defi nitely do

not have more than two of their

New York-style martinis!

Jl. Batubelig #41, Kerobokan,

tel: +62 (361) 847 6722.

PIPE DREAMS

The new wooden complex Deus

Ex Machina, set near surfhaven

Echo Beach, peddles an

entire lifestyle: the airy store

sells motorcycles, surfboards,

bicycles, sunglasses and clothes,

while the attached restaurant

sees “food mechanics” serve up

hearty brekkies and a range of

Asian cuisine with a Thai touch.

A great spot to watch the sun

melt into distant rice paddies and

cornfi elds, sipping a cocktail.

Jl. Batu Megan No. 8, Canggu,

tel: +62 (361) 368 3395.

OM AND AWAY

The magical open-air Trimurti

Studio is the best yoga studio

in the area. It’s idyllically located

amid organic vegetable patches

and colourful tropical fl owers.

Check the changing schedule for

the times of their popular yoga

classes, which include the styles

of Anusara, Kundalini, Ashtanga

and Vinyasa fl ow. Sip on free

ginger lemongrass tea, nibble a

salad and explore the souvenir

shop. Desa Seni resort, Jl. Subak

Sari #13, Pantai Berawa, Canggu,

tel: +62 (361) 844 6392.

Grand Balisani Suites, Jl. Batubelig Beach, Seminyak, Bali,

tel: +62 (361) 730 550

Grand Balisani Suites

is right on the shores

of southwest Bali,

where an array of

funky new outlets

have opened recently


www.pastiche.com.au

p


Diving

into

History

24 FEBRUARY 2011

As Alex O’Loughlin headlines

the exciting remake of

Hawaii Five-0, he reveals the

challenges of uttering the

pop-culture catchphrase

“Book ’em, Danno”

At

WORDS DYLAN HOWARD

ADDITIONAL REPORTING GERRI MILLER

a shopping mall in the Kahala

neighbourhood of Honolulu, Hawaii,

there’s a sculpture of actor Jack Lord, who

played Detective Steve McGarrett in the

original version of the TV series Hawaii Five-0.

It’s only a bust, but it reminds Alex O’Loughlin

that he has some big bronze shoes to fi ll every

time he passes by.

O’Loughlin, the Australian actor best known

for his previous series Moonlight and Three

Rivers, and the rom-com The Back-up Plan with

Jennifer Lopez, has inherited the memorable

role of McGarrett in the modern reboot of the

action series, which premieres in Australia this

month on Network Ten.

“I’m an Aussie playing one of the most iconic

American television characters of all time.

It’s a real honour for me,” says the Canberraborn

actor, for whom any early reservations

about the show’s success or his part in it

have vanished amid stellar ratings and an

enthusiastic reception in the US, as well as

worldwide.

“Sometimes you think something is going to

do really well and it doesn’t, or vice versa. But

everywhere I go now people want to shake my

hand. We can’t shoot the show without having

security around,” he says, recalling a recent off -

the-set shopping trip where he was mobbed for

photos and autographs. “This might turn out to

be my biggest break so far,” he acknowledges.

“But I’m just taking it one day at a time.”

O’Loughlin, 34, wasn’t even born when the

original Five-0 began its 12-year run in 1968,

but anyone familiar with the original series can

expect a diff erent take — with lots of action,

humour and a modern sensibility thrown in for

pretty good measure.

The storyline goes as such: back in Hawaii

to investigate his father’s murder, Navy SEALturned-cop

McGarrett is tapped to head an

elite police task force, and recruits New Jersey

transplant Danny “Danno” Williams (Scott Caan

of Entourage), Chin Ho Kelly (Lost’s Daniel Dae

Kim), and rookie cop Kono Kalakaua (Battlestar

Galactica’s Grace Park), who is Chin’s pretty

cousin — with the latter part played in the

original by a hefty Hawaiian dude who went by

the single-name moniker of Zulu.

But producers knew better than to mess

with other touchstones of the show, including

familiar Oahu locations, Morton Stevens’

instrumental theme and the classic line, “Book

‘em, Danno!”.

“I try to fi gure out a new way to do it every

time, to change it up,” says O’Loughlin, whose

bantering relationship with Caan is central to

the show, and carried over off -screen. “We’ve

hit it off and become mates,” he says.

Military veteran McGarrett is more of the

straight man, though O’Loughlin’s portrayal is

less stoic than Lord’s. “There are a lot of areas

where he’s seen as black and white — very

clear. But there are a lot of layers to this guy. He

learned how to defend himself and his honour

very quickly and very young in life,” he says. “He

doesn’t take any crap. And if you’re in with him,

he’ll die to protect you.”

Signing on to Five-0 meant moving from

Los Angeles, his home for the past six years,

to Oahu, and although he initially felt isolated


Main photo: © Rodolfo Martinez/CPi-Syndication.com/Headpress

STAR STRUCK

ALEX O’LOUGHLIN

O’Loughlin’s

role as Detective

Steve McGarrett in

Hawaii Five-O

has sealed his

newfound heartthrob

status

FEBRUARY 2011 25


26 FEBRUARY 2011

Main photo: © Rodolfo Martinez/CPi-Syndication.com/Headpress


“I can see about fi ve

diff erent breaks from my house,

and each night I can see the sunset”

living in a hotel on the pilot episode, he now has

a mountainside house with a great Pacifi c view,

and loves island life.

“When I wake up, I make a cup of coff ee and

I look out the window — I view the surf report

from there,” says O’Loughlin, who, needless to

say, has taken up the sport. “I can see about

fi ve diff erent breaks from my house, and each

night I can see the sunset from my house.

It’s an amazing place to live. It has just totally

become my home since.”

He nevertheless plans to keep his Los

Angeles pad until he receives the offi cial

go-ahead about the series’ second season this

spring. Interestingly enough, being a graduate

of the National Institute of Dramatic Art in

Sydney from the 2002 cohort, O’Loughlin had

always planned to head to L.A. “It wasn’t about

the bright lights of Hollywood. It was about the

pool of talent,” he explains.

Of course, it was by no means an easy task

at fi rst. “I was the second-best actor for a lot of

jobs, and I lived on a friend’s couch for about

nine months,” he recalls candidly.

In fact, in one of those “almost” situations,

O’Loughlin lost the role of James Bond in

Casino Royale to Daniel Craig. “It was the

biggest audition I ever did, and also the biggest

audition I didn’t get. And it’s the one everyone

brings up,” he sighs, musing, “I think I was a

little bit young for the role.”

Nevertheless, he “got to be Bond for a day”

at the screen test, and “walked away having

learned about myself as an actor with regard to

my ambition, and about my achievement,” he

says, convinced that when the role he is right

for comes his way, he’ll be ready for it.

What he’s still coming to terms with is the

invasion of privacy that accompanies fame. He

laughs at the absurdity of a rumour that AC/

DC rocker Bon Scott was his father, calling

it “benign, not slanderous or harmful to my

family or myself, and kind of cool.”

But he’s bothered that the career he’s

chosen may impact the people in his life,

including a young son in Australia, whom

he’s tried to keep out of the press. “I’m very

protective of my family, and I don’t ever want

this stuff aff ecting them. Usually I’m okay with

it, but sometimes I want to just go home and

shut the door. I’m a very private person, and

this loss of anonymity is the hardest thing to

deal with.”

Now, living in Hawaii, just a nine-hour fl ight

away from Sydney, he’s slightly closer to

Australia. “I miss my friends. I miss going out

for the Sydney Morning Herald and a really

good breakfast,” he admits, but his job keeps

him too busy to dwell on that. “It’s a really big,

ambitious television show and I’m in a lot of it.

OPPOSITE: Despite losing out being James Bond, the boyish O’Loughlin has come into his own with

the hit remake of Hawaii Five-O THIS PAGE TOP/BOTTOM: Signing autographs is all in a day’s work;

O’Loughlin is the real-life buddy of co-star Scott Caan (far right), who plays Danny “Danno” Williams

FEBRUARY 2011 27


28 FEBRUARY 2011

O’Loughlin displays his

toned bod in a still

from the show

“There’s a lot of action, and the three Cs:

comedy, character and crime. For people who

like crime-fi ghting and cop shows, it’s got

that. The characters are really well-rounded,

and there’s a lot of really funny stuff ,” he says,

encouraging Aussie audiences to check it out.

“I really think this is going to be a show that

everyone will enjoy.”

Hawaii Five-0 airs Sundays on Network Ten.

Riding The Waves

One of Alex O’Loughlin’s top tips for Hawaii is

a skill her learned on the island: surfi ng.

“I was actually deeply humbled by God

yesterday when I went for a surf,” he says.

Although he grew up in Australia, a

country where surfi ng is renowned for being

a favourite past-time, it wasn’t until Hawaii

Five-O that he began taking to the water with

a board.

“I learned how to surf when I got here,” says

O’Loughlin. “It’s the most amazing scene here,

almost life-changing. I’m trying to transition

into a short boarder at the moment. Some

people are telling me it’s a little early for that.

So of course, yesterday, I fell.”


30 FEBRUARY 2011

EAT YOUR

HEART OUT

As My Kitchen Rules returns to our

screens this month, we fi nd out where

else the chef-hosts have been feasting

around the nation

WORDS HEATHER MILLAR


OPPOSITE AND THIS PAGE:

As chef-hosts of My Kitchen

Rules, Pete Evans and Manu

Feildel get to discover new

cooking talents, and eat

their way around the country

Pete

THIS SERIES IS GOING TO BE HUGE. THERE ARE MORE

AND BIGGER CHALLENGES, MORE TRAVEL AND

IT’S A MUCH BIGGER SHOW OVERALL

Evans and Manu Feildel — cohosts

of Channel 7’s My Kitchen

Rules — have been travelling the country in

search of Australia’s next winning team of

domestic gods and goddesses. In the second

series which starts this month, it’s a

state-versus-state scenario, as 12 teams of

two attempt to out-dine and out-wine one

other to see whose kitchen really rules.

“This series is going to be huge,” says

Feildel. “There are more and bigger

challenges, more travel and it’s a much

bigger show overall.”

It works like this: each cooking team takes

turns to transform an ordinary home into an

instant restaurant for one pressure-cooker

night. “All the contestants surprise me from

week to week,” says Evans. “They all have their

ups and downs (some more than others), but

the one thing they do have in common is their

passion for food.

“I’m constantly impressed by the

contestants’ knowledge of food, and the

dishes they produce under the most stressful

situations. I take my hat off to all the teams —

they’ve all evolved so much, and it’s a joy to

watch and be a part of.”

For the fi rst time, the teams will compete

in a variety of cooking challenges on location,

as well as at Kitchen Headquarters — a

custom-designed restaurant space. At the

end of it all, the top two teams will battle it out

for supremacy as they present their ultimate

dining menu to a full restaurant.

French-born Feildel, who was the head chef

at Livebait in the UK when it was nominated

for best seafood restaurant in 1998, moved

to Sydney in 1999. In March 2009, he opened

L’étoile in Paddington, which has achieved

recognition with the award of its fi rst chef’s

hat from Sydney Morning Herald.

“I love working on My Kitchen Rules

because it’s about real people, real food and

home cooking,” says Feildel. “I also get to

meet new people, travel through this beautiful

country and share my passion for cooking.”

After Evans opened his fi rst restaurant, The

Pantry, in Melbourne’s Brighton in 1993, he

went on to establish Hugos in Bondi, Hugos

Lounge and Hugos Bar Pizza in Kings Cross,

and Hugos Manly. His restaurants have won

numerous awards, including the coveted

Sydney Morning Herald chef’s hat, for seven

years in a row.

“You’ll get to see some amazing drama

unfolding as the series progresses,” says

Evans. “There’ll be some favourites that

people will cheer on enthusiastically from

their armchairs, but more importantly, people

will learn some great recipes, and hopefully

be inspired to try new and inventive dishes in

their own homes.”

As Pete and Manu travelled the country for

My Kitchen Rules, they kept an eye out for

great places to eat. Here are some of their

hot recommendations.

EAT BEAT

MY KITCHEN RULES

FEBRUARY 2011 31


CLOCKWISE:

Ben O’Donoghue’s South

Bank Surf Club in Brisbane

is famous for its star dish,

the jambalaya; try great

food for a good cause at

Charcoal Lane; fresh food

galore at Adelaide Central

Market; Bar Lourinha is one

of Evans’ picks

SYDNEY

Pete: We ate at Porteno in Surry Hills with the

guest judges. We tried the whole menu, but the

whole lamb cooked over the fi re pit could well

be the dish of the year. Don’t think, just go!

Manu: Apart from my restaurant L’étoile

Restaurant & Bar — obviously! — I love Le

Pelican, Surry Hills. They serve great French

Basque food. I know the chef well, and I love

the passion he puts into his cooking.

BRISBANE

Pete: I love Ben O’Donoghue’s restaurant,

South Bank Surf Club — we ate his famous

jambalaya and it was to die for — I actually

want the recipe.

Manu: Alastair McLeod’s new outfi t, Tank

Restaurant & Bar. It’s Irish with a Japanese

twist, can you believe it? I like it because it’s

diff erent, plus the food is amazing.

ADELAIDE

Pete: Ying Chow on Gouger Street does the

best aniseed duck in Australia. Also, don’t

go past the red vinegar ribs, the e-shand

eggplant, or the salt and pepper fl ounder. It’s

so cheap to eat here, but do get in early.

Manu: I love the Adelaide Central Market.

You can fi nd anything you want there. There’s

a stall where you can get great, ready-to-eat

Asian food as you shop.

HOBART

Pete: When I ate at The Red Velvet Lounge

in Cygnet, I ordered mushrooms on toast,

and they were the best I’ve ever had — the

chef, Steve Cumper, needs a medal for those

wonderful mushrooms.

Manu: Meadowbank Estate — I love their

venison tartare and potato tortellini!

MELBOURNE

Pete: The Vics (me being one) really know how

to show off food, but in a very understated

way. I love visiting the South Melbourne

Market. There are always great characters

and produce, as well as their famous dim sim

for a snack. My favourite places to eat are Bar

Lourinha, Movida and Cookie, all in the CBD.

Fitzroy has some cool, alternative restaurants

that are amazing too — I especially like

Charcoal Lane, which helps out Indigenous

and disadvantaged kids.

Manu: Coda Bar + Restaurant. I can’t go past

FEBRUARY 2011 33


The delicious

scallops at

Andaluz are a

defi nite must-try

34 FEBRUARY 2011

their black bean crab and bone marrow spring

rolls — it’s fi nger-licking good food.

PERTH

Pete: I love the marvellous Spanish-inspired

bread salad and the pâté at Andaluz tapas bar

and restaurant.

Manu: And you have to try the scallops and

pig’s trotter at Andaluz too.

DARWIN

Pete: Hanuman in Darwin is one of the

country’s fi ner restaurants. The signature

dish of oysters is great, but the trumpet

mushrooms with pork and prawn is the best.

Manu: Oh, this is a tricky one! However, the

burgers at Shenannigans were great. Why do

I like it? The burgers go so perfectly with a pint

of beer!

Take Me There

1 PORTENO

358 Cleveland St,

Surry Hills, Sydney,

tel: +61 (2) 8399 1440

1 L’ÉTOILE RESTAURANT & BAR

211 Glenmore Rd,

Paddington, Sydney,

tel: +61 (2) 9332 1577

1 LE PELICAN

411 Bourke St,

Surry Hills, Sydney,

tel: +61 (2) 9380 2622

1 SOUTH BANK SURF CLUB

30AA Stanley Plaza, South Bank

Parklands, South Brisbane,

tel: +61 (7) 3844 7301

1 TANK RESTAURANT & BAR

31 Tank St, Brisbane,

tel: +61 (7) 3003 1993

1 YING CHOW

114 Gouger St, Adelaide,

tel: +61 (8) 8211 7998

1 ADELAIDE CENTRAL MARKET

45 Grote St, Adelaide,

tel: +61 (8) 8203 7203

1 THE RED VELVET LOUNGE

24 Mary St, Cygnet, Hobart,

tel: +61 (3) 6295 0466

1 MEADOWBANK ESTATE

699 Richmond Rd, Cambridge,

tel: +61 (3) 6248 4484

1 SOUTH MELBOURNE MARKET

322 Coventry St,

Melbourne,

tel: +61 (3) 9209 6295

1 CHARCOAL LANE

136 Gertrude St,

Fitzroy, Melbourne,

tel: +61 (3) 9418 3400

1 CODA BAR + RESTAURANT

Basement, 141 Flinders Ln

(Cnr Oliver Ln), Melbourne,

tel: +61 (3) 9650 3155

1 ANDALUZ

21 Howard St, Perth,

tel: +61 (8) 9481 0092

1 HANUMAN

93 Mitchell St,

Darwin,

tel: +61 (8) 8941 3500

1 SHENANNIGANS

69 Mitchell St,

Darwin,

tel: +61 (8) 8981 2100

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Darling Harbour, Sydney


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT:

Hop on a calesa (horse-drawn

carriage); the façade of the

Casa Manila Museum; the

colourful jeepney bus is a

defi ning feature of Manila;

visit Fort Santiago for history

MANILA

SHOWING OFF

36 FEBRUARY 2011

Globe-trotting Philippines-based TV host and Amazing

Racer Rovilson Fernandez (below inset) lets us in on

why he loves coming home to Manila

WORDS MABEL DAVID-PILAR PHOTOGRAPHY AT MACULANGAN

The

way Rovilson

Fernandez

knows his way around

Manila, you’d think he

had lived here all his

life. But the TV host

grew up in San Jose,

California, and only

returned to his

parents’ native country

in 1999. That was after

he had fi nished fi lm

school and before he was

meant to head to Hong

Kong for work.

But his sharp wit,

playful sense of humour and

up-for-anything attitude landed him a

hosting job for a local travel show. More than

a decade later, Fernandez’s hosting duties

and travels in the Philippines continue. “Thus

my Manila ‘pit-stop’ has been an 11-year love

aff air,” he explains.

He started hosting for the AXN Network

in the South-East Asia region after covering

more than 50,000km around the world in the

second season of The Amazing Race Asia, and

emerging as runner-up. In the Philippines, he

currently hosts the hit news-and-variety show,

Ang Pinaka, and was recently tapped to be one

of the country’s national ambassadors for the

World Wide Fund for Nature.

Every week, Fernandez heads to a studio

or a location for shoots, voice-overs or guest

appearances. In between work and travel, he

makes time to go for a run, a drink, or attend

to any visiting friends from overseas who want

to get their feet wet exploring the Philippines.

During weekend mornings when he’s in

Manila, you might catch him heading to

Roxas Boulevard for a jog. “Nothing beats the

collective energy and mass hysteria there on

a weekend,” he says. Besides the throngs of

joggers everywhere, the scenic boulevard that

runs parallel to Manila Bay often sees cyclists

zipping in all directions.

There are dragonboat

teams churning along the

water, outdoor aerobics

classes, makeshift

badminton games,

skaters, roller bladers,

walkers, dog-walkers,

the occasional

calesa (horse-drawn

carriage), and tai chi

groups that seem

oblivious to the chaos.

“It’s motivating, it’s

surreal and needs to be

experienced when you’re

here,” says Fernandez.

When he needs to get lights or

other fi xtures for his new pad, or is craving

Chinese food at the same time, Fernandez

heads to Binondo, Manila’s Chinatown. A busy

commercial district of Manila since the 19th

century, Binondo is crammed with jewellery

shops, Chinese drugstores, hardware stores,

interesting buildings, a 17th-century church

and of course, amazing Chinese restaurants.

“I’m a huge fan of Chinese food and

there are so many wonderful restaurants to

choose from, but I occasionally fi nd myself

in mum-and-pop type of shops in Binondo,

where the ambience is suspect, the service is

nominal, but the taste more than makes up

for the shortcomings.” For a treat, he goes to

President Grand Palace Restaurant to chow

down on dim sum.

WhiteMoon Bar is Fernandez’s

recommendation for sunset drinks. Located

at the Manila Ocean Park complex, the bar

is a cosy joint with a laid-back vibe and a

fantastic view. “There are not many bars in the

city where you can catch the sunset. And at

night, you get the full moon and smooth music

playing, along with the dark, brooding ocean

waves below you.”

When Fernandez plans a romantic night

out, Manila’s fi ne-dining spots, such as

Ilustrado, The Fireplace at the Hyatt Hotel,


The Great Barrier Reef

is spectacular to dive

in, but fl ying over the

reef provides another

wonderful experience

HOT SPOT

MANILA

FEBRUARY 2011 37


and the restaurants at the newly opened

Midas Hotel and Casino are his choice

picks. “The Spanish-Filipino fare at Ilustrado

is exceptional. Dining there is like travelling

through time. The Fireplace in Hyatt Hotel

has great steaks, greater ambience and the

greatest potatoes au gratin. Midas Hotel on

Roxas Boulevard has top-notch chefs for

sushi, pastries and everything,” he says.

When he takes his friends around, the one

place he always takes them to is Dampa. While

dampa is the Filipino word for a hut or shanty,

among Manila’s residents it refers to humble

eateries within a wet market, where the

freshest seafood is cooked to your liking.

“A visit to Dampa is a must. Everyone gets

a kick out of walking around the wet market,

selecting their dinner, and ‘ooh-ing’ and ‘aaahing’

at the wide selection of seafood from our

waters. I always get a kick and a laugh out of

hearing, ‘Can we really eat that?’”

When it comes to shopping, while his

friends all want to go to the bargain paradise of

Greenhills Shopping Center in the city of San

Weekends in Manila

Rovilson Fernandez’s favourite quick

getaways from Manila

For Fernandez, the Philippines is a “healthand-wellness

country”. Th ere’s an abundance

of spas and wellness resorts, which the TV

host and health buff likes to take advantage

of when he has a free weekend. His favourites

include Th e Farm at San Benito in Batangas

and Sonya’s Garden and Spa in Cavite.

Just a two-hour drive south of Manila,

Th e Farm is a healing centre with a holistic

approach. “I love it. It makes you feel like a

better person after you get to experience the

resort and all of its amenities. I especially

enjoy the educational aspect of Th e Farm. You

get to learn something that you can apply to

your own lifestyle.”

For a relaxing day trip, Fernandez likes to

escape to Sonya’s Garden and Spa, near

the cool city of Tagaytay. “You can have a

sumptuous lunch fresh from the garden, a

leisurely walk around the compound to clear

your mind, and a therapeutic massage or foot

spa for a treat. It’s always the best three hours

of my life.”

38 FEBRUARY 2011

The Farm at

San Benito

YOU’LL WALK PAST

VARYING MILESTONES

OF PHILIPPINE

HISTORY — SPANISH

COLONIALISM,

WORLD WAR II AND

THE MARCOS ERA


Photos: Courtesy Tourism Queensland

South

China

Sea

PHILIPPINES

Manila

Sulu Sea

Juan, Fernandez also takes them to any one of

the Team Manila and Kultura Filipino stores

in the city. “Team Manila has awesome, kitschy

stuff — think new-school cool for iconic local

staples; and Kultura Filipino has locally made

items and souvenirs.” Both have outlets in the

enormous SM Mall of Asia complex, where

there are roving carts for shoppers to go from

one building to the other.

For history, Fernandez recommends a

trip to the historic walled city of Intramuros,

Manila’s oldest district built during the

Spanish times, where 19th-century homes,

an old Spanish garrison, and a 17th-century

UNESCO World Heritage-listed baroque

church still stand. The area is also home to

the Cultural Center of the Philippines,

the Manila Hotel (interesting architecture)

and the newer Manila Ocean Park. “It’s a

wonderful, charming blend of old-world charm

and modern technology,” he says.

Fernandez also gets a lot of help showing

off Manila from the good people at Walk This

Way Tour by Carlos Celdran. “His walking

tours of Manila are a must-do. You’ll walk past

varying milestones of Philippine history —

Spanish colonialism, World War II, the Marcos

era — as well as contemporary and future

Manila, all wrapped in a gritty, live, tangible

atmosphere against the backdrop of Manila

Bay.” After the tour, Fernandez suggests

taking in the sight of the speeding jeepneys,

a form of public transportation unique to the

Philippines; having a taste of the sorbetes, the

local ice cream sold in the street; or halo-halo,

a local dessert of shaved ice and diff erent

sweet toppings. “The jeepneys seem to be

shinier, the sorbetes sweeter and the halohalo

more colourful in this part of town.”

Manila can be a chaotic and gritty place,

but to Fernandez, this is part of the capital’s

appeal. “I look at it like this — when I think

about it, the best food I’ve consumed, the

best adventures I’ve encountered, the most

remarkable sights I’ve ever seen — they have

always been off the beaten path.”

OPPOSITE: A calesa ride is a treat

for the whole family

THIS PAGE, FROM TOP: Try a tasty

halo-halo; follow the street signs

to fi nd great Chinese food; cool

T-shirts await at Team Manila

lifestyle store

Take Me There

1 PRESIDENT GRAND

PALACE RESTAURANT

746 Ongpin St, Binondo,

tel: +63 (2) 242 1473

1 WHITEMOON BAR

2/F Sunset Quay, Manila Ocean Park,

tel: +63 (917) 815 4181

1 ILUSTRADO

General Luna St, Intramuros,

tel: +63 (2) 527 3674

1 THE FIREPLACE

Hyatt Hotel and Casino,

1558 Pedro Gil St, Malate,

tel: +63 (2) 245 1234

1 MIDAS HOTEL AND CASINO

2702 Roxas Blvd,

tel: +63 (2) 831 6063

1 TEAM MANILA

2/F Entertainment Mall, SM Pavillion,

SM Mall of Asia, Pasay,

tel: +63 (2) 556 4858

1 KULTURA FILIPINO

2/F Main Mall,

SM Mall of Asia, Pasay

1 SM MALL OF ASIA

SM Central Business Park 1, Island A,

Bay City, tel: +63 (2) 556 0680

1 CULTURAL CENTER OF THE PHILIPPINES

CCP Complex, Roxas Blvd,

tel: +63 (2) 832 1125

1 MANILA HOTEL

One Rizal Park,

tel: +63 (2) 527 0011

1 MANILA OCEAN PARK

Behind the Quirino Grandstand,

Rizal Park, tel: +63 (2) 567 7777

1 WALK THIS WAY TOUR BY

CARLOS CELDRAN

Tel: +63 (2) 484 4945

1 THE FARM AT SAN BENITO

119 Barangay Tipakan,

4217 Lipa City, Batangas,

tel: +63 (2) 696 3795

1 SONYA’S GARDEN AND SPA

Barangay Buck Estate, Alfonso, Cavite,

tel: +63 (917) 532 9097

Jetstar flies direct to Manila from

Darwin from 9 February, with

connections from Sydney and

Melbourne. JetSaver Light fares

from AU$169 one way. Book online

at Jetstar.com

FEBRUARY 2011 39


UP, UP

AND AWAY

For a ride into the past,

present and future of fl ight,

you can’t go past this

year’s massive Australian

International Airshow

40 FEBRUARY 2011

WORDS TIM RICHARDS

When

they nudged their fl imsy

aircraft into the air near Kitty

Hawk on 17 December 1903 to make the

fi rst-ever powered fl ight, Wilbur and Orville

Wright couldn’t have known how quickly their

invention would develop.

Over a century later, commemorations

of milestones in aviation history have been

coming thick and fast. This year sees both

the 90th anniversary of the foundation of the

Royal Australian Air Force (RAAF), and the

centenary of Australia’s fi rst-ever, landmark

passenger fl ight.

Even the upcoming Australian International

Airshow is celebrating a signifi cant

anniversary, according to Peter Meehan, the

head announcer at the biennial event.

“This will be the tenth air show at Avalon,”

he says. “And the air displays have certainly

come a long way since — with far more diverse

aerospace, military and civilian displays. The

exposition on the ground that started out

modestly is now one of the biggest in the

world. The other aspect is the development

on the ground,” he adds. “In the early days, if it

rained it was a quagmire. These days, there are


Main photo: Alamy

CLOCKWISE FROM MAIN:

This year’s Airshow pays

tribute to the aircraft of

yesteryear, including the

World War II Mustang; the

overhead action always

enthralls crowds; this is

one event that will thrill

big and little kids

a lot more stone pathways and bitumen hard

stands that make it far more comfortable for

people attending. And road traffi c has vastly

improved — the four-hour ordeal of getting in

and out of the air show from Melbourne is now

reduced to less than two hours.”

Considering the anniversaries being

commemorated at this year’s show, it’s no

surprise that two major aviation institutions,

the Temora Aviation Museum and the

Historical Aircraft Restoration Society (HARS),

are playing a big part in the proceedings.

“There will be a number of historic aircraft

THE RAAF MUSEUM INTENDS TO FLY

ITS COLLECTION OF AIRCRAFT, INCLUDING

A WORLD WAR I SOPWITH PUP

on display,” says Meehan. “HARS operates a

Super Constellation, a DC3 and a Catalina, the

World War II fl ying boat. The Temora Aviation

Museum fl ies a lot of iconic RAAF aircraft from

yesteryear, such as the Meteor, the Vampire

and the Sabre jet.” Other historic aircraft

that will be coming to the show include the

Spitfi re, Gloster, Lockheed Hudson, Kittyhawk,

Mustang, Boomerang and DC4.

It’s not all about the past, of course. As the

Airshow coincides with the 90th anniversary

of the RAAF, the latter is playing a major role in

this year’s events.

“It’s a big deal,” says Air Commodore

David Pietsch, the head of the planning

team for the Air Force’s contribution. “We’re

commemorating 90 years of faithful and

impressive service. We’re one of the oldest air

forces in the world, so it gives us something to

be quite proud about.”

That pride will be front and centre at

Avalon. “We will have signifi cant displays, both

on the ground and in the air. It’s a modest

demonstration of our tradition, innovation and

evolution so far. For the air display itself, which

will be on the Saturday and Sunday of the

show, we’re planning to have most of the Air

Force’s aircraft involved,” continues Pietsch.

“Not all may be there because of operational

reasons — that applies mostly to the Orions

and C17s. But we’ll have the Hawk, which is

the jet trainer, we’ll also have both the classic

Hornets and the Super Hornets, as well as

the Roulettes. They’ll put on their standard

aerobatic team display each day.”

Despite this impressive array of modern

hardware, history will never be far away. “The

RAAF Museum intends to fl y its collection of

aeroplanes,” says Pietsch. “These include the

World War II Mustang, the Winjeel, the CT-4A

(one of our more recent trainers), the Tiger

Moth and a Sopwith Pup that dates back to

World War I.”

And there’s even more military hardware to

add to the list, according to Meehan. “Other

highlights will include the Wedgetail early

warning aircraft, the midair-refuelling aircraft

by Airbus and the Heron unmanned vehicle.”

There’s also much to do at ground level.

A new addition this year is a demonstration

facility for aerial unmanned vehicles. There’ll

also be a mobility display track, on which

GO GUIDE

AUSTRALIAN

INTERNATIONAL AIRSHOW

FEBRUARY 2011 41


42 FEBRUARY 2011

The Roulettes’ impressive

aerial formations will keep

your eyes glued to the sky

motorcycle stunt teams and monster truck

drivers will be performing. Other airborne

highlights include the spectacular night show,

which comprises a simulated air-ground

attack involving military aircraft and vehicles,

plus pyrotechnics and fi reworks.

Stunt pilots are also joining in. American

Kent Pietsch (no relation to Air Commodore

Pietsch) will stage his comedic aerobatic act,

and Australia’s own “top gun” and former Red

Bull Air Race pilot Matt Hall will be fl ying. It’s a

program that Meehan feels will excite anyone

interested in aviation. “Any attendee will be

overcome by the air displays, the exposition’s

size and the layout of aircraft across the vast

hectares of the Avalon fi eld,” he says. “Overall,

it’s an awesome and all-consuming sight.”

The Australian International Airshow is

open to the public from 4 to 6 March. For

more details, visit www.airshow.net.au.

Tickets from Ticketmaster via 136 100 or

www.ticketmaster.com.au.

Jetstar flies direct to Avalon from Brisbane

and Sydney, and to Melbourne from across

Australia. JetSaver Light fares from AU$39

one way. Book online at Jetstar.com


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The Great Barrier Reef

is spectacular to dive

in, but fl ying over the

reef provides another

wonderful experience

HEAD IN THE

CLOUDS

44 FEBRUARY 2011

If you want to rest and relax,

don’t go to Queenstown —

the snowy mountain town

that has built its rep on fun

and games

WORDS WENDY DUNLOP

Main photo: Photolibrary; Queenstown Rafting: Destination Queenstown


Main photo: Alamy

CLOCKWISE: “Fly”

across Skippers Canyon

on the Swing; go on a

heartpumping ride with

Queenstown Rafting;

dine out in Queenstown’s

best restaurants

OPPOSITE: The

excitement doesn’t stop

when night falls

They

say New York never sleeps, and

the same could be said for

Queenstown. As New Zealand’s ultimate yearround

resort, it dishes up a sizzling adventure

menu by day and plenty of party buzz at night.

Against a jaw-dropping backdrop of lakes,

rivers and mountains, Queenstown off ers

wacky activities and views from every angle,

including upside-down. Ever since AJ Hackett

bungy-ed off the Kawarau Bridge in the 1980s,

the town has become a “try anything once”

adrenaline playground.

Upon my arrival, I am whisked away by The

Helicopter Line to champagne bubbles and

spectacular views of Lake Wakatipu enroute

to “Bob’s Peak”. This prime vantage point

rises almost 800m and is also accessed by

Queenstown’s gondola. At the top, with the

best view in the world, Skyline Restaurant has

delighted diners for decades, while the treeclad

slopes sport the family-friendly luge and

Ziptrek Ecotours.

A purpose-built, fl ying-fox franchise, Ziptrek

off ers four zip lines linked between specially

constructed landing platforms. I’m fi rst geared

up with helmet, harness (and hope) and

invited to swing forward, backwards, upside

down or “hands free”, with a special request

by guides Mike, Morgan and Liam to land in a

“guide-friendly package” — which is Ziptrek

speak for “don’t kick me in the face”!

If adventure gives you an appetite,

Botswana Butchery is one of Queenstown’s

trendiest restaurants, and is located in a

refurbished early settler’s cottage on the

foreshore. With an emphasis on premier meat

dishes and fresh produce, it’s popular every

night of the week.

Next morning I’m on the water.

Queenstown Rafting is one of New Zealand’s

largest whitewater rafting companies

with trips on the Kawarau, Shotover and

Landsborough Rivers. Following an inelegant

wriggle into bootees, and a wet suit, helmet

and life vest, there’s a serious set of safety

drills before I get to whoop along to conquer

my fi rst rapids successfully. Good thing too,

because “there’s no stop button on Mother

Nature’s rollercoaster,” laugh guides Tom,

Craig and Gabby. Indeed.

Later, an afternoon of quaffi ng awaits me

at Central Otago’s best wineries. Grapes were

introduced to the arid province as early as

1857, but took more than 100 years to gain

recognition. Today, Central Otago wines win

national and international awards, and are a

THERE’S NO

STOP BUTTON ON

MOTHER NATURE’S

ROLLERCOASTER

mainstay of New Zealand’s wine reputation.

At the southernmost latitude in the world

for growing grapes, Gibbston Valley Wines

produced its fi rst commercial crop in 1987,

and now hosts 30,000 visitors a year to its

vineyard, cellar tastings, shop, café, cheesery

and the largest wine cave in New Zealand.

Using French oak barrels for its renowned

pinot noir, the winery’s cave provides perfect

barrel conditions with a natural temperature

of 14°C.

Nearby, The Wine House and Kitchen

operates from the Glenroy Homestead (1911),

and is home to Van Asch Wines. Owner

Henry Van Asch, co-founder of the iconic

Queenstown Bungy, describes his Freefall

label as “an adventure in wine and best

enjoyed after conquering a challenge.”

Brennan Wines produces just 800 cases

ADRENALINE

QUEENSTOWN

FEBRUARY 2011 45


Photos: Destination Queenstown

CLOCKWISE: Cruise Lake

Wakatipu on The TSS

Earnslaw; on two wheels at

Jacks Point; barrel-tasting in

Gibbston Valley Cave

each vintage and considers itself a “minnow”

among its neighbours. But its Italian-style

pinot grigio, experimental muscat grapes,

and delightful pétanque and picnic area bring

visitors to its “low-key charm, small status and

super soul,” says Noel Brennan.

Amisfi eld has been a consistent awardwinner

for its 100% estate-grown wines.

Teamed with impressive good food and “trust

the chef” wine matches, I’m in tastebud

heaven, savouring zucchini truffl ati, salmon

panna cotta and chicken with garden pesto.

Fortifi ed for another day of adventure,

I begin with a death-defying descent into

historic Skippers Canyon. Once the world’s

largest gold-bearing river, it squeezes through

a narrow gorge that’s now the venue for a wild

9km ride by Skippers Jetboat.

High above the canyon, Winky’s Museum

traces Skippers’ gold history from boom to

bust. Owned by fi fth-generation descendents

of a gold mining family, the original cottage is

crammed with memorabilia, implements and

relics, including a rare chain measure (exactly

22 feet long) and a stack of gold pans for you

to try your luck!

But it’s lunacy more than luck that delivers

me to Skippers’ latest attraction. Canyon

Swing operates from a platform 60m above

the river, where you’re harnessed and

humorously heckled into choosing from a

“menu of terror”. Ten diff erent jump styles

off ering 10 kinds of fear eventually result in a

freefall plummet and 200m pendulum swing

reaching 150k/h. “But the only thing for you

to really worry about is bringing a change of

underwear,” say the witty inventors of this

award-winning scream machine.

A hand-steadying drink is mandatory

A HAND-

STEADYING DRINK

IS MANDATORY

ON RETURN TO

TOWN... AT BED

BAR “IN RECLINE”

on return to town. Perhaps cocktails at my

favourite, Queenstown Crowne Plaza’s

Bed Bar, where you can enjoy your drink “in

recline”, before dining in style at the hotel’s

Threesixty restaurant.

The lakefront dazzles at night and is also

home to Queenstown’s most nostalgic

attractions: The TSS Earnslaw, which has

been cruising Lake Wakatipu since 1912,

while Eichardt’s Private Hotel is the town’s

oldest hotel, with an atmosphere all its own.

This year, you’ll be able to explore the area

with Walter Peak Cycling Excursion. Their

45-minute Earnslaw cruise to Walter Peak

Sheep Station to ride the western shores of

Lake Wakatipu to Mount Nicholas Station can

be done guided or independently.

For a gastronomic must-try, I join the queue

at Fergburgers; a “Queenstown institution,

late-night hangout and massive munch!”

The nearby Arrowtown off ers a heritage

adventure among restored pioneer cottages

and picturesque shops, dating from the 1860s

when the town’s population reached 7,000

FEBRUARY 2011 47


The heritage

Arrowtown

48 FEBRUARY 2011

at the peak of the gold rush. There’s still gold

in the Arrow River, and beside it, the Chinese

miners’ village is an authentic reconstruction

of life as they knew it. Surrounded by selfguided

walking and biking trails, and three

superb golf courses, Arrowtown is a treasure

in its own right, retaining an ambience sought

after by visitors and residents alike.

Whether it’s adventure, heritage, indulgence

or all three, Queenstown is the resort for all

seasons and reasons. In summer, it’s light until

late, and when all other adventures are

over for the day, the scenery and sunsets

become star attractions. As former US

President Bill Clinton once said, “Queenstown

is just breathtaking”.

Take Me There

1 THE HELICOPTER LINE

Lucas Plc, Queenstown Airport,

tel: +64 (3) 442 3034

1 SKYLINE RESTAURANT

Brecon St, Queenstown,

tel: +64 (3) 441 0101,

1 ZIPTREK ECOTOURS

45 Camp St, Queenstown,

tel: +64 (3) 441 2102

1 BOTSWANA BUTCHERY

17 Queens Pde, Queenstown,

tel: +64 (3) 442 6994

1 QUEENSTOWN RAFTING

35 Shotover St, Queenstown,

tel: +64 (3) 442 9792

1 GIBBSTON VALLEY WINES

Gibbston RD1, 1820 State Hwy 6,

tel: +64 (3) 442 6910

1 THE WINE HOUSE

AND KITCHEN

1693 Gibbston Hwy,

tel: +64 (3) 442 7310

1 BRENNAN WINES

86 Gibbston Back Rd,

tel: +64 (3) 442 4315

1 AMISFIELD

10 Lake Hayes Rd,

tel: +64 (3) 442 0556

1 SKIPPERS JETBOAT

Tel: +64 (3) 442 9434

1 CANYON SWING

37 Shotover St,

Queenstown

tel: +64 (3) 442 6990

1 QUEENSTOWN CROWNE

PLAZA

Beach St,

Queenstown

tel: +64 (3) 441 0095

1 THE TSS EARNSLAW

Tel: +64 (3) 249 7416

1 EICHARDT’S PRIVATE HOTEL

Marine Pde, Queenstown,

tel: +64 (3) 441 0450

1 WALTER PEAK

CYCLING EXCURSION

www.queenstown-nz.co.nz

1 FERGBURGERS

42 Shotover St, Queenstown,

tel: +64 (3) 441 1232

Jetstar flies direct to Queenstown from Melbourne and the

Gold Coast, and from across New Zealand. JetSaver Light

fares from AU$199 one way. Book online at Jetstar.com

Photo: Photolibrary


Indulge your senses with the colours of Autumn

Experience the delights of Autumn in New Zealand with a unique Peppers holiday. From Christchurch to Queenstown the

changing colours will excite your senses. While different in nature, each Peppers shares a dedication to beautifully appointed

accommodation, fresh seasonal menus and friendly local staff, with plentiful ways to indulge all the senses especially at this

time of the year.

Peppers Clearwater Resort, Christchurch is surrounded by beautiful and inviting scenery, including an 18-hole championship

golfcourse. It offers something for everyone - from cycling to fly-fishing and tramping the extensive trails of nearby terrain.

Peppers Bluewater Resort, Lake Tekapo is set amongst the mountains and glacial lakes of the rugged Mackenzie Country region

on Lake Tekapo. Choose from numerous walks with magnificent scenery, relax in the hot springs or enjoy star gazing at night.

Peppers Beacon, Queenstown sits on the pristine shores of Lake Wakatipu, overlooking the stunning Remarkables Mountains.

Just a 5-minute stroll from Queenstown with adrenalin fuelled activities including rafting, bungy jumping and jet boat rides.

Experience Peppers. Australia: Call 1300 987 600

New Zealand: Call 0800 275 373

visit peppers.com.au

or contact your preferred travel agent


A regular on Bondi Rescue,

Terry McDermott has had

more than 20 years of

experience being a lifeguard

OPPOSITE TOP/BOTTOM:

Some of the brave men

behind Bondi Rescue; a

Bondi Lifeguard signals to a

swimmer at sea

BOYS IN

BLUE,

TO THE

RESCUE

For the lifeguards of Bondi Rescue, it’s

non-stop action at this beautiful workplace

WORDS CLARE BRUNDLE

50 FEBRUARY 2011


Everyone

loves a man in

uniform, but there’s

one uniform that’s been getting more

recognition than ever before, thanks to Channel

Ten’s Bondi Rescue. Having made a splash since

its debut in 2006 and back on our screens since

30 January, the fl y-on-the-wall documentary

series follows the day-to-day working lives of

the blue-clad Bondi Lifeguards. It records the

highs and lows of the team that is responsible

for protecting visitors who fl ock to Australia’s (if

not the world’s) most famous beach.

The fact is, Bondi Rescue has been a ripper

of a success both at home and all around the

world, amassing more than 2.5 million viewers

per year and an ever-growing legion of fans.

Terry McDermott, one of the regulars on the

show since the start and a veteran lifeguard

with more than 20 years’ experience under his

(life) belt, was pretty confi dent it would be a

hit right from the start.

“I knew it was going to be a success. The

show is character-based and viewers love to

connect with people’s real lives. They can see

what we do is an honourable thing at the end

of the day, and we do it in the best place in the

world — Bondi Beach in Australia.”

The beautiful beach backdrop is obviously

one of the keys to the show’s popularity.

However, it’s more than just good looks that

makes Bondi Beach so special.

“There’s a city of 4.5 million people living

behind us, and their main beach centre

is Bondi. The vast majority visit with the

intention of having a wonderful day at

the beach, which creates a very special

atmosphere. This interaction of the beach with

such a mix of people is unique in the world,”

says McDermott proudly.

So what sort of “interaction” can fans

expect in the new series? Think human

“squirrels”, weird alien-like jellyfi sh, surfers

with dislocated shoulders, bad reactions to

bluebottle stings, swimmers caught in rips,

lost kids and even an appearance by one

of the world’s most famous lifeguards —

former-Baywatch star David Hasselhoff .

Amusingly, it sounds like The Hoff had to

fi ght off the attention of the real-life lifeguards

just as much as the beach babes during his

visit to Bondi.

“Baywatch started at the same time as I

started lifeguarding, so it has a special place

in my heart,” says a smiling McDermott. “I was

a bit star struck about meeting my celluloid

hero, but all the younger lads were quick to

jump in and ask him about Pammie Anderson.

He’s a crack-up.”

With no two days on the beach the same,

the sixth series is packed full with all sorts of

surprises and unpredictable scenarios that

test the limits of the lifeguards.

“The fi rst weekend of fi lming this season

was crazy — we pulled up a dead shark

from the net, buried it in the sand, then the

Fisheries came along to do an autopsy… all

this, while multiple other things and rescues

were going on at the same time.”

So should swimmers be nervous about

sharks on the beach and do the lifeguards

worry about what lurks in the ocean?

“After 40 years of surfi ng, I’ve rarely seen

a shark. They’re in the back of my mind and

they’re real, but our beach has nets and a lot

of surveillance. Riding my bike home is more

risky,” says McDermott matter-of-factly.

Along with shark sightings, quirky

characters and exciting saves, the next season

also promises a heightened viewer experience.

“The production company has really

taken the show to a whole new level with the

number, types and positioning of cameras

used. The cameras are everywhere — on

helmets, boards, underwater and more —

capturing all the action from every angle,”

explains McDermott excitedly.

However, while Bondi Rescue is good

entertainment, and even humorous in parts,

it’s important to remember that the show is

a documentary, and the challenges that the

lifeguards face are very real.

McDermott describes how each member of

the team has trained hard to gain their place

in the Bondi Lifeguard Tower, and thinks that

the level of commitment required to make it

in the profession might surprise viewers. He

admits that it can be diffi cult to stay focused

on a busy summer’s day with more than

40,000 people on the beach, and even harder

not to get aff ected when scenarios don’t have

positive outcomes or someone drowns.

But it’s also clear that McDermott loves

his job and the “very talented group of guys”

he works with, on top of also feeling proud of

how Bondi Rescue is “helping the world take

lifeguarding seriously, and to see it as a real

possible career”.

So what would his advice be to any teenage

wannabe lifeguards?

“Get involved with the ocean recreationally

in as many ways as possible. If you surf

or swim, and are in or around the ocean

the whole time, you get a diff erent level of

understanding and appreciation. You’ve got to

start with a love of the ocean. Lifeguarding will

come later on.”

Bondi Rescue is on Network Ten on Sundays

at 8pm.

Beach Safety Tips

PEOPLE

BONDI RESCUE

FEBRUARY 2011 51


FARAWAY FOREST

To walk within the Daintree Rainforest is to take a walk back to the beginning of time

52 FEBRUARY 2011

WORDS MARIA VISCONTI


Main photo: Photolibrary; Cassowary photo: Alamy; Ginger plant and waterfall photos: Maria Visconti

“This

place is so laid back that you

could have your shower lying

down,” my friend exaggerates on our all-girls’

trip to the Daintree Rainforest for nature and

some pampering.

Just then, our guide Juan Walker stops on

a narrow track in the middle of the rainforest.

“Because the leaves of this tree are covered

in tiny gripping hairs, they were used by our

people to wrap the soft-shelled eggs of turtles

for safe transport,” he explains, passing the

elongated leaves around for us to examine.

CLOCKWISE: A bird’s eye

view of the gorgeous Daintree

Rainforest; a wild ginger plant in

the rainforest; keep an eye out

for the fl ightless cassowary bird;

this waterfall in the Daintree is

traditionally for women only

This dense and intensely green rainforest is

home to more tree species than the whole of

North America and Europe, and at 110 million

years old, is older than the Amazon. Our walk is

a relatively cool one, cosseted as we are in this

emerald-green refuge.

“And now ladies, I’ll leave you to enjoy

the waterfall which has traditionally been

a women’s gathering place,” says Walker,

disappearing down the track. We’re soon under

a cool stream of clear water, and guide Linda

Burchill from Walkabout Cultural Adventures

takes over the Kuku Yalanji story. Overhead,

ancient cycad palms, king ferns and the

ubiquitous ylang ylang tree bow their heads

over this idyllic spot. Juan and Linda’s people,

the Kuku Yalanji, knew how to fi nd food and

medicine among the rainforest trees, although

most of the fruits are highly toxic and require

laborious processing. For millennia, they lived

undisturbed in temporary camps by the creeks

and rivers of this vast track of lowland forest —

hunting, gathering and fi shing off the reef on

the nearby coast.

HUB

THE DAINTREE RAINFOREST

FEBRUARY 2011 53


Main photo: Photolibrary; Juan Walker and tea photo: Maria Visconti

“My grandfather and his mates used to build

semi-circular dams at Wonga Beach using

the rocks available. When the tide receded, it

would leave many fi sh trapped in the artifi cially

created pools,” reminisces Walker. But

traditional tribal life was disrupted permanently

after the fi rst Europeans arrived, lured by gold

and red cedar wood. Today, the Kuku Yalanji

people are keen to keep their traditions alive

— while guiding half- and full-day interpretive

nature walks in the Daintree, and maintaining a

presence in all aspects of hospitality.

On this walk, we learn about the various

uses of the native trees and the habits of native

animals, such as the fl ightless cassowary,

crocodiles, kangaroos, and many birds and

bugs. Burchill also introduces us to Aboriginal

painting methods and we try our hand at dot,

crosshatch and x-ray painting techniques.

Though it’s summer, I never feel the need to

turn on the air-conditioning in my tree house

within Daintree Eco Lodge and Spa. All 15

houses are built high up from the ground,

smack in the middle of the canopy, within

two hectares of virgin rainforest. Evenings

spent in the rainforest are truly magical, and

sealing myself off in an air-conditioned room

would mean missing out on the intense aroma

released at night by nearby fl owers (among

them the ylang ylang — an integral component

of the Chanel No. 5 perfume).

Relaxing in the jacuzzi in the privacy of my

fully insect-screened balcony allows me to

integrate with the natural surrounds, and tune

in to the sounds made by frogs and cicadas.

But the Daintree, a 90-minute drive from

Cairns, has another side to its wilderness: one

that refl ects the fl ourishing of the Australian

RELAXING IN

THE JACUZZI ON

MY BALCONY

ALLOWS ME TO

INTEGRATE WITH

THE NATURAL

SURROUNDS

CLOCKWISE FROM MAIN: A tour led by

Walkabout Cultural Adventures is always

an eye-opening experience; the traditional

jam and infusion are best enjoyed

together; Aboriginal guide Juan Walker

sugar and beef industry. For a taste of rural

life after settlement, we’re told we should try

a wild ride through cattle country in an Argo,

from Daintree Argo 8x8 Rainforest Tours.“A

what?” we ask in unison. An Argo, it turns out,

is a low-impact 8x8 vehicle that climbs virtually

any terrain, so for an hour we careen up and

down disused forestry tracks led by Rusty the

kelpie, who takes his role as lead dog seriously.

Sally, who owns a few hectares of land and

runs cattle, drives us to the top of the hill. From

high ground, the views are spectacular: the

corrugations of the mountain range across the

river are densely forested, but the base has

been cleared to create pasture. The hilly terrain

looks like the folds of a heavy duvet gently

falling towards the river.

The property’s cattle are led to high ground

before seasonal rains bring in the fl oods.

Once there, the clearings off er shelter for the

FEBRUARY 2011 55


one of the top ten dream hotels in the world

on one of the six most luxurious beaches in the world

Furama Resort Danang

68 Ho Xuan Huong Street, Da Nang City, Vietnam

T: (84-511) 3847 333 / 3847 888 F: (84-511) 3847 666

E: reservation@furamavietnam.com W: www.furamavietnam.com


Deon and Jim’s

wedding ceremony on

a beach in Thailand’s

Koh Samui

58 FEBRUARY 2011


ON A

RING

AND A

PRAYER

If you’ve always dreamt

of an exotic wedding

overseas, read on for how

three couples planned their

perfect day in paradise

WORDS UTE JUNKER

IN FOCUS

OVERSEAS WEDDINGS

MARRIED IN: KOH SAMUI

When Deon Nickell-Davies and Jim Morris

got married, some decisions were easy. For

instance, when Deon couldn’t make up her

mind about what colour the bridesmaid

dresses should be, they decided to have a truly

white wedding — with all the wedding party

and all the guests in white.

Similarly, when they realised how expensive

venue hire was in Australia, they decided an

overseas wedding would be much cheaper

— and Koh Samui in Thailand was their fi rst

choice. “The people are gorgeous, the scenery

is beautiful — we both have a bit of a crush on

Thailand,” says Deon.

Choosing a date for their wedding was also

simple. “We wanted our friends to have the

best possible experience, so we planned our

wedding around the full-moon party on Koh

Phangan. We also had our hens and bucks’

nights festivities at the same party, which was

great,” says Deon.

Deon and Jim chose to have their ceremony

at the Nora Beach Resort, where they’d stayed

before. “We had to do the paperwork at the

embassy in Bangkok, but the resort organised

all of that for us too. When we arrived in

Bangkok, there was a driver to meet us

who drove us around and helped us get

everything done.”

Any worries Deon and Jim had about the

organisation of the wedding were allayed as

soon as they arrived at the resort. “Our wedding

coordinator had a PowerPoint presentation

that covered absolutely everything — more

than I’d ever hoped or asked for,” explains Deon.

“I’d provided a lot of ideas — for instance, I

had sent through a picture of the type of cake

I had in mind — and they mirrored everything

I suggested. And they gave us a personal

assistant to call on for anything we needed.”

The wedding coordinator also suggested

some unique touches for the day. “After we

had gotten married, we planted a frangipani

tree in the hotel grounds, which is what they call

a ‘love tree’. That was their idea, and it was really

nice,” says Deon.

Not everything went according to plan,

however. For her hens’ day, Deon and her

girlfriends went out on a catamaran, and

Deon lost her iPod — with all the music she’d

downloaded for the wedding. Jim and his mates

didn’t fare so well on their scooter excursion.

FEBRUARY 2011 59


Your very own wedding Paradise

Nestled on the shoulder of a pristine white sandy beach

and sheltered lagoon, Plantation Island Resort is a

picturesque island located just 15 km offshore from

Fiji’s main island of Viti Levu.

Plantation specializes in romantic beach weddings,

and can cater to small or large groups. There is a wide

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and a variety of activity options to keep your guests

entertained.

Romantic Lailai Wedding packages start

from just AUD550

Create memories for a lifetime with a wedding in paradise!

www.plantationisland.com Phone: (679) 6669 333


“The boys got carried away, and every

single one of them came back with skin off

their elbows and other injuries — except

Jim, who somehow came back unscathed.

One of our groomsmen needed 28 stitches,”

remembers Deon.

For Deon and Jim, getting married in Samui

not only gave them a holiday as a wedding, it

also let them enjoy a very special day. “We had

a set budget, and it bought us so much more

in Thailand,” says Jim. “We had all these little

add-ons, like fi reworks and fi re twirlers, and

the amount of fl owers and the amount of food

was amazing.”

It also gave them a chance to introduce

friends and family to a place they love. “My

mum had initially been against us getting

married in Thailand, because she hadn’t ever

travelled to an Asian country, but she loved

it so much, she’s booked to go back this

year. Hearing how much she enjoyed it was a

highlight for me,” says Deon.

Jennifer and Brian

could get the best

of both worlds

in Fiji — a chapel

wedding in a

resort location

DEON’S WEDDING TIPS

“Trust your planner. I didn’t want to put all my

eggs in one basket, so I booked my own DJ,

not the one the resort recommended, and

he was a bit of a disappointment. I wish I’d

listened to them. Also, have some idea of what

you want. Nothing’s impossible in Thailand —

just tell them what you want and they’ll fi nd a

way to do it.”

MARRIED IN: FIJI

Jennifer and Brian Grimes were determined

that their wedding would be a relaxed, laidback

aff air. They were so laid back in their

approach, in fact, that they got married in a

country they’d never even been to before.

“My parents had been on holiday in Fiji a

few years before, seen some weddings while

they were there, and said we should consider

it,” Jennifer says. “We wanted to have a

wedding that was fun, that didn’t involve a lot

of headaches and dramas like some weddings

Fly in Style

Fly StarClass, Jetstar’s International Business

Class. You’ll start your holiday by enjoying

priority check-in, extra baggage allowance

(up to 30kg) and exclusive use of the Qantas

Club. During your fl ight, you’ll be able to relax

in wide leather seats with lots of leg room,

and enjoy meals, drinks and entertainment,

which are all included in the fare. You’ll also

earn Qantas Frequent Flyer points and Status

Credits at Business Class Levels*.

So next time you fl y international on one of

our Airbus A330s, try StarClass. Aren’t you

entitled to a little star treatment?

StarClass fares to Phuket and Bangkok from

AU$1,059 one-way. *T&Cs apply. See Jetstar.com

we’d been to, and Fiji sounded like it might be

nice and easy. Plus, we liked the idea of having a

holiday at the same time.”

Jennifer and Brian visited travel agents,

and looked through bridal magazines and the

internet to put together a shortlist of resorts.

They made the unusual choice of having the

ceremony at one resort, and the reception

at another.

“We got married at Shangri-La’s Fijian

Resort and Spa, and what sold us on that was

this big white chapel they had overlooking the

ocean. We had originally thought about getting

married on the beach, but it was a time of year

when the weather can turn a bit drizzly, so the

chapel was very appealing.”

They held their reception at the Naviti

Resort, where Jennifer’s parents had stayed.

“They off ered very good packages for our

guests that included not only the fl ights and

accommodation, but all you could eat and

drink: the prices were irresistible.”

Jennifer admits that she found planning

a wedding by remote control a trifl e nerveracking.

“I’m a bit of a control freak, so I kept

emailing to check things. They were so relaxed:

they’d say, ‘Bula, don’t stress.’ They were doing

90 weddings that month — three a day! — so

they have it all down to a fi ne art.”

Jennifer and Brian wanted to keep their

wedding simple, but were thrilled by some of

the touches that made their day memorable.

“At the chapel, there was a choir that sang as

we walked in, and at the reception, they had

candles fl oating in the water and a big archway

to walk through. And nothing was too hard. At

the last minute, we wanted a microphone for

the speeches, and they found us one.”

For Jennifer and Brian, a wedding in Fiji

proved to be not only simple, but also great

value. “The entire wedding cost us AU$13,000,

and that included a 10-day holiday. And the

whole day was fun, and not stressful. One of

our friends who came to the wedding has just

gotten engaged, and she’s planning on doing

the same thing, because she thought our

wedding was terrifi c.”

FEBRUARY 2011 61


MAIN AND

INSET: Rebecca

and Malcolm’s

fabulous Phuket

seafront wedding

JENNIFER’S WEDDING TIPS

“Do your research — getting married overseas

can be much cheaper than getting married

in Australia. Trust your wedding planners —

they know what they’re doing.”

MARRIED IN: PHUKET

There were plenty of memorable moments

at Rebecca O’Grady and Malcolm Smith’s

wedding. For instance, they made the guests

recite their own vows, promising (among other

things) to have fun on the day. The fi reworks

were a hit, as was the fi re dancer. But the real

highlight was the arrival of the baby elephant.

Rebecca and Mal got married at the Paresa

Resort in Phuket, a venue they chose while

on holiday. “The resort is beautiful, and their

wedding planner was great,” says Rebecca.

“Organising it was a lot easier than it would

have been at home, because of the wedding

planner,” agrees Mal. “Once we gave her input

into what we liked and what we wanted, she

looked after everything.”

Having done their research, the couple knew

that for the marriage to be legally recognised,

they would either have to get married in a

registry offi ce in Australia, or go through the

Australian consulate in Bangkok. They then

decided to get married in Australia, but have a

big ceremony in Thailand.

“We sent out a ‘save the date’ six months

early, and invited around 100 people,” says

Mal. “We knew many of them wouldn’t be able

to make it, and were thrilled when around 50

people attended.”

Rebecca and Mal made it easy for their

62 FEBRUARY 2011

guests by including useful information about

Phuket along with the wedding invitations:

information about visas, the climate, currency,

and useful sites.

“We had extensive information on

accommodation options — we were going

to spend two full weeks there, and wanted

as many people as possible to share the

experience with us — and most people did stay

on after the wedding,” he says.

For Rebecca, the most challenging element

was the weather. “The day before, we had

torrential rain. On the day itself, however, the

weather was perfect — and the next day, it

poured down again.”

On the upside, Rebecca says, the wedding

was “way cheaper” than it would have been

in Australia. “We had so many inclusions that

would have been out of our price range at home

— we had a live band, and both a cocktail party

and a full sit-down meal.”

“For me, the most special thing was the

number of friends and family who made the

eff ort to be part of our big day,” adds Mal. “Once

we made the decision, we accepted that we

might miss out on close friends and family

being there, and it was wonderful that so many

of them did come.”

REBECCA AND MAL’S WEDDING TIPS

“Having your wedding in a holiday destination

means you’re already relaxing. Provide your

guests with as much information as possible.

We sent out email alerts about great airline

deals — so do take away as much stress as you

can for them.”

Take Me There

1 NORA BEACH RESORT

Koh Samui,

tel: +66 (77) 42 9400

1 SHANGRI-LA’S FIJIAN RESORT AND SPA

Yanuca Island,

tel: +679 652 0155

1 NAVITI RESORT

Viti Levu,

tel: +679 653 0444

1 PARESA RESORT

Phuket,

tel: +66 (76) 302 000

Jetstar flies direct to Phuket and Fiji

from Sydney, and to Bangkok from

Melbourne, with connecting flights

from around Australia. JetSaver Light

fares from AU$219 one way.

Book online at Jetstar.com


OPPOSITE: From strawberry picking

at Sunny Ridge Strawberry Farm;

swimming with dolphins; wildlife

feeding at Moonlit Sanctuary Wildlife

Conservation Park; exploring Point

Nepean National Park; to dips at

Peninsula Hot Springs — there’s heaps

to do on the Mornington Peninsula

The

Gather the family for a

fun-fi lled holiday on the

Mornington Peninsula,

one of Victoria’s top

summer destinations

WORDS AND PHOTOGRAPHY CORMAC HANRAHAN

Mornington Peninsula, just an hour

from Melbourne, is ideal for

families who love summer. From strawberry

fi elds to sand sculptures, wildlife parks and

dolphins, the peninsula off ers diverse ways for

young and old to bask in one another’s

company and the Aussie outdoors.

I’m there now, the sun is shining, and I’m

surrounded by a multicultural array of smiling

families crouched among rows of strawberry

plants, eagerly fi lling punnets with berries.

While Sunny Ridge Strawberry Farm at

64 FEBRUARY 2011

PICK OF

THE CROP

Main Ridge is Australia’s biggest commercial

strawberry producer, it also off ers an

ever-popular, “pick-your-own” experience from

November to April.

“There’s something really special about

picking fruit as a family, and then enjoying

them together afterwards. The kids get to

experience the fruit in its natural state and

understand the connection to nature, while

adults are reminded of their childhood when

they used to pick berries,” says Joanne Petrillo

of Sunny Ridge.

Indeed, out in the fi eld, toddlers, parents

and grandparents are busy among the plants,

carefully choosing only the ripest of berries,

for unlike other fruits, strawberries don’t

continue to ripen once picked, so recognising

a ready-to-be-picked berry is essential.

Afterwards, relax at Sunny Ridge dessert café,

open on weekends.

After working up a mild sweat among the

strawberries, it’s time to trade the bushy

surrounds of Main Ridge for the dunes of Rye,

and the restorative powers of the Peninsula

Hot Springs, towards the tip of the peninsula.

Situated in the hollows of surrounding dunes,

mineral-infused water heated by the earth

rises into a series of pools, dotted throughout

native coastal vegetation.

With its Turkish Hamam steam room,

shiatsu stone walk, sleep-inducing bean

bag-fi lled chill-out zone, and pools of varying

dimensions, depths and temperatures,

Peninsula Hot Springs is a utopia of

family-friendly rest and relaxation.

“I really wanted to bring home this idea of

the spa as a social hub — a place where people

talk, relax and share ideas, just like they have

for centuries in Japan, Turkey and of course,

ancient Rome,” says owner Charles Davidson,

who spends much of his time visiting the

world’s spas for inspiration and ideas.

Although the baths are open well into

the evening, as dusk falls, I fi nd myself at

another of the Peninsula’s family-friendly

attractions, the Moonlit Sanctuary Wildlife


The Great Barrier Reef

is spectacular to dive

in, but fl ying over the

reef provides another

wonderful experience

FLY/DRIVE

MORNINGTON PENINSULA

FEBRUARY 2011 65


Conservation Park, home to more than 400

native animals.

“Australian animals are most active in the

night, so this is a great way to see them being

themselves in their own environment,” says

the park’s creator, Michael Johnson, of the

park’s night tour.

The park plays an important role in the

conservation of some of Australia’s most

endangered species — it’s home to the only

giant fl uff y gliders in Victoria and the only

southern bettongs on mainland Australia —

both of which come out to say hello on the

lantern-lit night tours.

A sudden rummaging nearby in the bushes

stops our party in its tracks. As we hold out

our lanterns and peer into the darkness, two

of the cutest little wallabies hop playfully into

our pools of light, and are soon feeding from

our hands.

“People get so much more out of seeing

animals in their natural habitats — and

nothing beats coming out a night with a torch

and a guide, and talking about them in their

own homes,” says Michael.

Another place to interact with animals in

their own home from October until the end of

April is at Sorrento pier, onboard a tour with

Polperro Dolphin Swims.

The family-run company has decades of

experience in getting people of all ages and

abilities into the water with Port Phillip Bay’s

66 FEBRUARY 2011

resident dolphins,

and when captain

Troy spots a pod

off the bow shortly

after motoring away

from the moorings,

it’s certainly an exciting

time to be in the water.

Soon, families are hanging

onto the tow lines from the

back of the boat, singing through

their snorkels to encourage the dolphins to

come play. And come they do — ducking and

weaving around the delighted swimmers,

some of whom have never snorkelled before,

let alone been eyeballed by wild dolphins.

Back on shore, I head for the spectacular

narrow neck of land that forms the western

extreme of the peninsula, Point Nepean

National Park, where I meet another family

enjoying the great outdoors. Gavin Gourley

and his kids have been holidaying in the area

for more than a decade, and take their bikes

into the park every year.

“The kids love it — they run around the

old forts, hide in the tunnels, ride in and out

on their bikes, and explore the beaches”,

says Gourley. The old forts and tunnels are

remnants of World War II, when the point’s

position at the entrance to Port Phillip Bay

made it a critical defence post — a fact that

adds a great historical element to an already-


Photos: Courtesy Tourism Queensland

IT’S A VERY ACCESSIBLE

ART FORM BECAUSE

EVERYONE HAS HAD SOME

EXPERIENCE BUILDING A

SANDCASTLE, AND IT ALSO

HAS THIS MAGICAL FEEL

unique slice of natural coastal bushland.

Just when I think there couldn’t possibly

be any more things for the family to do on

the peninsula in summer, I fi nd myself in

the bayside town of Frankston, staring at a

three-metre dog with a fl ea circus teetering on

its back, all expertly carved from sand.

In actual fact, Sandstorm events have been

delighting holidaymakers for nearly a decade

with their annual summer exhibitions on the

Mornington Peninsula from Boxing Day until

26 April. This year’s event, themed “creepy

crawlies”, presents an awesome display of

other-worldy creatures from the recesses of

our collective imaginations.

“Everyone loves it: families, seniors and

couples come after dark when it’s all lit up

with lanterns, with music playing. It’s a very

accessible art form because everyone has had

some experience building a sandcastle, and it

has this magical feel because it’s all created

from an ordinary material that simply signifi es

summer at the beach in Australia,” says

Sharon Home of Sandstorm.

The best thing is: the fun, family-friendly

things to do on the Mornington Peninsula are

not limited to those mentioned above and

there’s plenty more to explore for a day trip,

weekend or week-long holiday.

Take Me There

1 SUNNY RIDGE

STRAWBERRY FARM

244 Shands Rd, Main Ridge,

tel: +61 (3) 5989 4500

Tip: Fruit is ripest in February.

1 PENINSULA HOT SPRINGS

Springs Ln, Fingal,

tel: +61 (3) 5950 8777

Tip: Adult entry fee is reduced

by AU$10 after 7pm.

1 MOONLIT SANCTUARY

WILDLIFE CONSERVATION

PARK

550 Tyabb Tooradin Rd,

Pearcedale,

CLOCKWISE

FROM MAIN:

Take a trip through

history at Point

Nepean National

Park; go dolphin

spotting with a

tour by Polperro

Dolphin Swims;

check out amazing

sand sculptures

at Frankston’s

Sandstorm event

tel: +61 (3) 5978 7935

Tip: Two-hour private tours

can be arranged for AU$150

per couple.

1 POLPERRO DOLPHIN SWIMS

Tel: +61 (3) 5988 8437

Tip: The mornings in February

and March are best for

dolphin spotting.

1 POINT NEPEAN

NATIONAL PARK

End of Point Nepean Road,

www.parkweb.vic.gov.au

Tip: Take your own bike and a

cut lunch.

Jetstar flies direct to Melbourne from Singapore and

Bangkok, and from across Australia and New Zealand.

JetSaver Light fares from AU$49 one way. Book online

at Jetstar.com

FEBRUARY 2011 67


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Sudoku.

Grab a pen, put on your thinking

cap and join the craze!

The objective of Sudoku is to fi ll in the missing

squares so that each row, column and 3x3 box

contains the numbers 1 through to 9. To get you

started, here are a few tactics...

Scan each horizontal and vertical band

consisting of three 3x3 boxes. It’s often easiest

to start in a spot with the most numbers already

given. If you can fi nd the same number in two

rows, you know that number must be in the third

(the same goes for columns). Now see which

intersecting rows and columns can be eliminated

because they also contain that number. (This

method is called slicing and dicing.)

Some Sudoku fans like to pencil in possible

answers in the corners of individual squares. Once

you have a few numbers fi lled in, you may also fi nd

it handy to jot down a list of missing numbers for

each row, column and box.

Good luck! See page 72 for answers.

SUDOKU EASY SUDOKU MODERATE

9 6 1 7 4

7 6 9 3

7 2 8

1 9 4 2

9 7 4

2 1 6 8

3 4 1 2 9

6 4

4 1

9 2

4

5 1 8 9 2

2 3 9 7 1

8 1 7 5 6

2 4 3

5 9 2

BRAIN TEASERS

TRIVIA SUDOKU

QUIZ

FEBRUARY 2011 69


BRAIN TEASERS

CROSSWORD TRIVIA QUIZ & ANSWERS

1. Who plays Hermione Granger in the

Harry Potter fi lms?

2. Gail Kelly is the CEO of which major

fi nancial corporation?

3. What type of tree is a Banyan?

4. Who has been the MP for the Division of

Warringah since 1994?

5. The bright-red dye carmine is obtained

from the bodies of which beetles?

6. Flying Jetstar, which city would you travel

to for access to the Great Barrier Reef?

7. Tony Hawk is a famous fi gure in which

sporting fi eld?

8. Whose new album is called Get ’Em Girls?

9. Which car company’s logo is based on

the Pleiades star cluster?

10. Aung San Suu Kyi is associated with the

democracy movement in which country?

11. Who wrote the classic American novel

To Kill a Mockingbird?

12. Which style of Chinese cuisine is

renowned for being hot and spicy?

13. To whom is Kate Middleton engaged?

14. Stuart Sutcliff e was an early member of

which famous group?

15. Where in the human body is

the pharynx?

70 FEBRUARY 2011

16. Who is the actor who plays the lead role in

the ABC drama Rake?

17. On which continent are the Atlas

mountains located?

18. Which famous treaty signed in 1840 gave

Britain sovereignty over New Zealand?

19. Who wrote the famous and well-loved

comic opera The Mikado?

20. Which English artist is famous for his

works featuring animals preserved

in formaldehyde?

21. Who played the character of Melissa,

who was killed off in the last series of

Packed to the Rafters?

22. What name is given to a hybrid of a

grapefruit, orange and tangerine?

23. Which band did the late drummer

Keith Moon play in?

24. How is the United Nations Children’s Fund

better known?

25. The halogen family comprises fl uorine,

bromine, iodine, astatine and which

other element?

26. Who plays the lead role in the Hitler

assassination fi lm Valkyrie?

27. What are the three colours on

Thailand’s fl ag?

40-question

quiz.

28. Which by-product of sugar refi ning is

called blackstrap in its darkest form?

29. In which Saudi Arabian city can the

burial place of the prophet Muhammad

be found?

30. Which movie did the late Frank Sinatra

win an Oscar for?

31. Which instrument is played by the

leader of an orchestra?

32. “Under the Milky Way” was the biggest hit

for which Aussie band?

33. Sarah Palin was the governor of which

US state?

34. Flying Jetstar, which island would you be

landing on if you were visiting Indonesia’s

capital city?

35. Montevideo is the capital of which

South American country?

36. What was the stage name of the famous

exotic dancer executed for spying for

Germany in World War I?

37. What activity would you be doing if

you were krumping?

38. The companies Electronic Arts and

Activision are known for producing which

form of entertainment?

39. What type of fi sh is used to make fugu,

the Japanese dish that can be deadly

if not prepared properly?

40. Which famous company is known to

be the largest motor-manufacturing

corporation in the world?

Photo: Warner Bros


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BRAIN TEASERS

CROSSWORD & ANSWERS

ARROW CROSSWORD

US

high-school

TV series

Disorderly

Resound

Reveal,

divulge information

(3,2)

Writing

implement

Singer Ms

Minnelli

__ M

Banks,

sci-fi author

Person

taking part

in a play

Small

canine (3,3)

In a dormant

or hidden

stage

Relative or

interrogative

pronoun

Fuses

together

G P U

LAWLESS

ECHO EEL

LETON M E

O KN I TS

B I R O I H

A PUGDOG

L I Z A H I R E

N LATENT

72 FEBRUARY 2011

Gemstone

mined at

Coober Pedy

Charter

Inexpensive

wine

Snake-like

fish

Twelfth __,

Shakespeare

play

Large truck Consume

To __ For,

Nicole

Kidman film

Prickle on

a plant

2 6 3 9 8 5 1 7 4

4 1 8 7 6 3 5 2 9

7 5 9 1 4 2 6 3 8

1 9 5 2 7 8 4 6 3

6 3 7 4 5 1 8 9 2

8 4 2 6 3 9 7 1 5

3 2 4 8 1 7 9 5 6

9 7 6 5 2 4 3 8 1

5 8 1 3 9 6 2 4 7

Sudoku Moderate Arrow Crossword

__ Hill,

Aussie

TV star

__ Back,

Beatles song

1. Emma Watson 2. Westpac

3. Fig 4. Tony Abbott

5. Cochineal 6. Cairns

7. Skateboarding

8. Jessica Mauboy 9. Subaru

10. Myanmar 11. Harper Lee

12. Szechuan 13. Prince

William 14. The Beatles

15. Throat 16. Richard

Roxburgh 17. Africa 18. Treaty

of Waitangi 19. Gilbert and

Sullivan 20. Damien Hirst

21. Zoe Ventoura 22. Ugli

fruit 23. The Who 24. UNICEF

25. Chlorine 26. Tom Cruise

27. Red, white and blue

28. Molasses 29. Medina

30. From Here to Eternity

31. Violin 32. The Church

33. Alaska 34. Java

35. Uruguay 36. Mata Hari

37. Dancing (it’s a style of

street dance) 38. Video

games 39. Puff er fi sh

40. Toyota

Trivia Answers

5 1 4 7 3 9 6 2 8

9 3 6 1 2 8 5 7 4

8 7 2 4 5 6 9 1 3

4 5 7 2 1 3 8 9 6

1 8 3 9 6 4 7 5 2

6 2 9 5 8 7 4 3 1

2 9 1 6 4 5 3 8 7

3 4 5 8 7 1 2 6 9

7 6 8 3 9 2 1 4 5

Sudoku Easy

ANSWERS


BRAIN TEASERS

AUSTRALIA ZOO

Wildlife

Warriors!

74 FEBRUARY 2011

Join us in helping to

save our wildlife!

Help the Australia Zoo Rescue Unit get

this turtle back into the ocean!

Here are some tips on how you can be a wildlife warrior at home!

Install a bird bath or frog pond

in your backyard for wildlife to

drink from on hot days

Put a possum box on a tree

or around logs in your garden

to give animals a home

Prevent your pets from harming

wildlife by keeping them secure

at night

Take a tour of the Australia Zoo Wildlife

Hospital, one of the world’s biggest and

most environmentally friendly wildlife

facilities situated at Australia Zoo.

Visit www.australiazoo.com.au

for tour details and bookings.

Buy your entry tickets to Australia

Zoo from your Jetstar Cabin Crew

during your domestic flight.

Just ask for details.

Australia Zoo is the major

sponsor of the Australia Zoo

Wildlife Warriors, who support

conservation around the world.

Find out all about Australia Zoo’s

conservation projects at:

www.australiazoo.com.au

If you see injured or sick wildlife

that needs care, call a local

wildlife carer for help


City of Perth Opera in the Park:

Die Fledermaus

5 Feb, Supreme Court Gardens, 8pm

As the opening event of the Perth International Arts Festival,

this famous comedic operetta offers a magical and enchanting

night of entertainment in the lush outdoor setting of the

Supreme Court Gardens. Eisenstein is sentenced to eight

days in prison, but instead attends Prince Orlovsky’s ball at

a friend’s invitation. The characters are colourful and the plot

abounds with great confusion, comedy and disguise.

Transportations and Transmissions

of Nathan Stevens

Until 12 Feb, Gallery Central, 10am

Transforming the gallery into his own deserted island, North

American inter-media artists Nathan Stevens leaves you

stranded in this landscape of lost dimensions.

Lotterywest Festival Celebration: Les Girafes

25 Feb, Perth Cultural Centre, Northbridge, 7.30pm

This hilarious street performance by Compagnie Off (France)

includes nine naughty giraffes, one distracted opera singer,

an inept ringmaster and a contingent of clowns and acrobats

as they wind their way through Northbridge, mischievously

disrupting street life. Everyone’s invited to follow as inquisitive

giraffes poke their noses into shopfronts and the action

unfolds in a circus-like atmosphere of confetti explosions,

fiery hoops and fantastic song.

Summer Love at the Piazza

Presented by the City of Perth

Every Wed in summer, Northbridge Piazza, 6.30pm

Throughout summer, short films and animations on the theme

of Love will screen for free every Wednesday. On 9 Feb is Paris

Je-Taime, 16 Feb screens Across the Universe, and 23 Feb

hosts Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind.

Eat Drink Perth

Presented by the City of Perth

25 Feb - 31 Mar, various locations

Eat Drink Perth is a month-long festival celebrating the city’s

food and drink culture with a program of events that includes

wine tasting, coffee classes, cooking demonstrations,

degustations, progressive dinners, cocktail evenings and

much more. See www.eatdrinkperth.com.au

Shops open every day except Good Friday,

ANZAC Day, Christmas Day and New Year’s Day.

SEA

MORE

Cnr King and Flinders Streets, Melbourne,

Victoria, Australia Ph 03 9923 5999

www.melbourneaquarium.com.au


market place.

GOLD COAST

CALL TALLSHIP CRUISES

+61 7 5532 2444

Located on the Gold Coast www.tallship.com.au

76 FEBRUARY 2011






















The Veronica George Gallery represents a large

number of leading Australian glass artists and

showcases many of their complex glass techniques.

In addition to the wide selection of tasteful gifts and

special pieces for the interior, we have unique works of

art for the collector.

As well as the magnificent variety of original handblown

glass, there is a fine collection of contemporary

jewellery by well-known Australian artists.

1082 High St, Armadale,

Melbourne, 3143

Ph: 03 9500 9930

Fax: 03 9500 9125

veronica@veronicageorge.com.au

www.veronicageorge.com.au

To advertise your business in market place, please contact the Jetstar Magazine sales team:

OPEN 7 DAYS

Mon to Sat

10am to 5.30pm

and Sun

11am to 5.30pm


Jetstar Magazine.

Ph: 1800 202 901 (within Australia) I +65 6324 2386 (outside of Australia) I email: jetstar.ads@ink-global.com

FEBRUARY 2011 77


market place.

To advertise your business in market place, please contact the Jetstar Magazine sales team:

Ph: 1800 202 901 (within Australia) I +65 6324 2386 (outside of Australia) I email: jetstar.ads@ink-global.com

78 FEBRUARY 2011


TOP TO BOTTOM: Aussie tennis

champs Samantha Stosur

and Jelena Dokic graced the

announcement of Jetstar’s

partnership with the Women’s

Tennis Assocation (WTA)

IN THE AIR

WITH

79 Jetstar news

81 Jetstar kids’ competition

82 StarKids

85


88 where we fl y

91 menu

94 your wellbeing onboard

96 international adventures

108 domestic airports

111 domestic destinations focus

SMASH HIT

Jetstar

is the fi rst-ever offi cial

airline partner of the

Women’s Tennis Association (WTA) and its

tournaments across the Asia Pacifi c region —

until 2013.

As Asia Pacifi c’s largest low-fare airline, Jetstar

has a growing Pan-Asian network, including new

routes to China, and is further developing its

fl ying hubs in Singapore, Vietnam and Australia.

Under the three-year, multi-million dollar

deal, Jetstar team members and customers

will have the chance to travel with elite

women tennis players onboard, win tickets

to attend tournaments and take part in

events through social-media websites.

See Jetstar.com for more details.

FEBRUARY 2011 79


is there a pilot on board?

you be the pilot...

and fly this incredible

a320 flight simulator today

gift

cert.

avail

$88

purchase

online or

telephone

07 5533 5000

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airport

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I have just come back from four days in Noosa.

I fl ew Jetstar and loved the fl ight. I went with

my family and we stayed at Sheraton, which we

liked; we swam in the pool and played cricket. On

Saturday we went to the beach and I loved diving

into the surf; it was great fun. We didn’t see any

sharks luckily. In the evenings, we went to local

restaurants to eat. Coming home, our fl ight was

delayed by showers but I still like Jetstar.

By Matthew, Vaucluse, New South Wales

Jetstar Readers’ Competition

I loved going on the plane. We went

to Dreamworld, I loved going on the

rocketship ride. I went snorkelling in

the pool and saw the fi sh. My favourite

thing was the Nickelodeon bucket at

Whitewater World. I loved the man at the

restaurant cooking at our bench — he

threw food into mum and dad’s mouth.

By Laura, Balmain, New South Wales

I live in Sydney, and me, my mum and dad

fl ew to Adelaide to spend Christmas with my

grandparents, aunty, uncle and cousins. Santa

found me in Adelaide — mum said he would. I

had heaps of fun with my cousins. We went to

Waterworld and to the movies to see Gulliver’s

Travels. As a special treat, Nanny and Pa took us

to see Dinosaurs Alive, which was so awesome.

By Michael, Sydney, New South Wales

FAN

TALES

Tell us about your

Jetstar holiday for your

chance to win a AU$100

travel voucher!

kids! Simply write

Hey, us a letter about

your holiday, and each month,

the three best letters we

receive from our Jetstar

passengers will win a AU$100

fl ight voucher*.

It’s easy to win! To enter:

— eligible entrants must

(during the promotion

period) fl y Jetstar on a

holiday,

— write a letter to us telling

us all about your holiday in 100 words or

less. Include where you went, what you did,

what you liked, what you saw,

— send us a photo of you on holiday or a

drawing of everything that you enjoyed!

— submit with all your contact details.

Entries must be sent via post (at the

expense of the entrant) labelled Jetstar

Magazine My Holiday Competition to PO

BOX 4713, Melbourne, Victoria, 3001.

* Terms and conditions apply. See Jetstar.

com/magazine for more details.

To enter: Write a 100-word story about your

holiday and post your entry, along with your

Jetstar boarding pass, to Jetstar Magazine, My

Holiday Competition, PO BOX 4713, Melbourne

Victoria, 3001. The promotion commences

at 12.01 am (AEDT) on 1 November, 2010 and

closes at midnight 12.00 pm (AEST) on 30

April, 2011. The winners will be the most colourful

and creative entries submitted each month

during the Promotion Period, as selected by

a panel of judges appointed by the Promotor.

Winners will be notifi ed by email within two

days of the judging taking place at the beginning

of each new month. There are 18 individual

prizes. Each prize is the same and consists of 1

x AU$100 Jetstar voucher. Three prizes are issued

per month for the duration of the promotion

(6 months). The total value of the prizes is

AU$1,800. The promoter is Jetstar Airways Pty

Limited (ABN 33 069 720 243) of Level 4, 222

Bourke Street, Melbourne, VIC 3000. Full terms

and conditions can be found at www.jetstar.

com/magazine.

FEBRUARY 2011 81


starkids

MAIN: Riski and her friends at the

child forum want to educate people

about the dangers of the Gang Dolly,

and the threat of HIV and AIDS in

their community

BOTTOM: Riski is not afraid of

leading candid discussions on HIV

and AIDS to discourage her peers

from working in the Gang Dolly

A LEADER

FOR CHANGE

Riski bravely speaks out on HIV and AIDS

WORDS WORLD VISION

Surabaya,

Almost half of the

the second largest

population in Vietnam city in Indonesia,

can live be without a tough, access unforgiving to place for children to

clean water

grow OPPOSITE: up. Living A StarKids- near the dangerous Gang Dolly

district, supported a centre project of will prostitution and drug use,

teenager build hygienic Riski latrines is determined to educate her

peers and waste about facilities the dangers for of HIV and AIDS.

people In her like third the year Thi of family high school, Riski is

a chairperson of the child forum of World

82 FEBRUARY 2011

Vision’s Safe Environment for Children Project

in Surabaya, supported by StarKids. Riski’s

involvement with World Vision began when she

was sponsored as a child, which helped with her

tuition fees and school supplies, as well as the

quality of her local primary school. As a result,

Riski fl ourished as a student.

In many countries around the world, HIV is

still a taboo subject that people fi nd diffi cult

to talk about. In Surabaya, the number of new

HIV infections is on the rise. However, in Riski’s

community, there's both a lack of knowledge

about how the disease is transmitted, as well as

severe social discrimination facing people

living with HIV.

Riski has gained leadership skills from her

involvement with the Safe Environment for

Children Project. She's passionate about leading

discussions with her peers and adults about

HIV transmission and prevention, though the

discussions are sometimes uncomfortable.

Initially, Riski had reservations about devoting

her time to the child forum. “Will it disturb my

studies? Can I still play with my friends? Can

I still help my parents?” she wondered. “But

what I worried about did not happen... I have

learnt a lot of lessons about sex education,

reproductive health, HIV and AIDS, and

how to be a good facilitator to spread such

knowledge to my peers,” she says proudly.

Riski dreams of becoming a teacher, and the

skills and confi dence she is gaining through her

involvement in the child forum are moving her

closer to achieving this goal.


The child forum also teaches participants

and their families about child rights and

child protection, so they can grow in a safe

environment and know how to protect

themselves. Through interactive role play and

literature, participants are made aware of

their rights and how to negotiate potentially

dangerous situations in Gang Dolly.

The Safe Environment for Children Project’s

child forum provides an ideal space for children

and young adults to engage with one other.

Riski and her friends have also taken classes in

journalism, computer training, photography and

English — gaining skills that will help them in the

future. “Besides that, we’ve also received training

on basic leadership. It makes me [feel] capable

and self-confi dent as the chairperson of the

children’s forum,” Riski adds.

In her role as a chairperson, Riski involves her

friends in child-forum activities, so that they too

can teach others about sexually transmitted

diseases, and HIV and AIDS. Attending National

Children’s Day, peer-educator training, basic

leadership for children, and HIV and AIDS

seminars, Riski and her friends are determined

to change their community, and the Gang Dolly

district, for the better. “We want to share the

dangers of HIV and AIDS, and [unprotected]

sex in the Gang Dolly. We also want to make

commercial sex workers aware, so that they’ll get

out of the Dolly and seek a good job,” says Riski.

However, Riski and her peers face formidable

obstacles. Commercial sex in the Gang Dolly

district is a profi table enterprise, and many

young people are trapped, tricked or forced by

poverty to become involved in the sex industry.

Many face violence if they try to leave, or must

pay their “employers” a very large sum of money.

But Riski is determined. “We are brave,” she

says with conviction. “We have training on basic

leadership, child rights and motivation. In terms

of strategy, we will collaborate with other local

NGOs [non-government organisations].”

The children’s forum has not only provided

an outlet for Riski and her peers to grow and

learn —it's also training them to become

social activists for their generation by creating

partnerships with NGOs and the government.

Riski’s fi ght to reduce the spread of HIV and AIDS

in her community has given her the confi dence

and skills to help fulfi l her dreams.

Help support this and other projects by

donating to Jetstar’s StarKids program. Visit

worldvision.com.au/ourwork/solutions/

JetstarStarkids.aspx to fi nd out more.

YOU CAN HELP

Vulnerable children and communities

need our help. The StarKids

partnership between Jetstar and

World Vision was formed to help

children enjoy a brighter future.

You can support StarKids by

donating loose change in the

donation envelope located in your

seat pocket.

Let your small change

create change!

About StarKids

Tim Costello, CEO, World Vision

How did StarKids come about?

StarKids is a humanitarian partnership

between World Vision Australia and Jetstar.

Th e partnership supports community-based

development projects in Australia and across

Asia, and aims to improve the lives of families

living in poverty. It’s about giving children a

brighter future.

What does StarKids aim to achieve?

Th e support given to World Vision through

StarKids will go towards transforming the

lives of vulnerable children.

How can Jetstar passengers help?

Your donations would be most welcome!

Please place your small change (all currencies)

in the StarKids envelope located in your seat

pocket. Th e money collected from Jetstar

passengers will be given to World Vision

Australia for community development

projects in Australia and Asia. You can also

donate online at www.jetstar.com/starkids.

Where can I get more information about

World Vision projects?

Visit www.worldvision.com.au

or www.jetstar.com/starkids for

more information.

FEBRUARY 2011 83


TimeOutSingapore.com

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Time Out Singapore is published by Ink Publishing Pte Ltd, 89 Neil Road, #03-01, Singapore 088849.

www.ink-global.com Tel: +65 6324 2386 Fax: +65 6491 5261


100ml

FEBRUARY 2011 85


A

86 FEBRUARY 2011

Sydney photo: Hamilton Lund/Tourism NSW; Gold Coast and Cairns photos: Tourism Queensland


FEBRUARY 2011 87


INDIA

SRI LANKA

88 FEBRUARY 2011

MYANMAR

CHINA








TAIWAN


THAILAND VIETNAM




CAMBODIA

PHILIPPINES





MALAYSIA

MALAYSIA


JETSTAR VIETNAM DOMESTIC









SINGAPORE

INDONESIA

JAVA

(Denpasar)




AUSTRALIA

JAPAN

Direct

Darwin-

Manila from 9

February 2011*



(Tullamarine)

JETSTAR INTERNATIONAL SERVICES OPERATED BY

JETSTAR

JETSTAR INTERNATIONAL SERVICES OPERATED BY

JETSTAR ASIA OR VALUAIR

JETSTAR OPERATES FLIGHTS THROUGHOUT VIETNAM WITH

JETSTAR PACIFIC (LEFT INSET)

JETSTAR OPERATES FLIGHTS THROUGHOUT

NEW ZEALAND (RIGHT INSET)

QANTAS CONNECTIONS TO LONDON

QANTAS CONNECTIONS TO LONDON AND FRANKFURT

JETSTAR VIETNAM DOMESTIC CONNECTIONS TO

SINGAPORE AND DARWIN





30% more

flights to

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JetSaver Light

fares from

$119

New direct

flights

Auckland –

Singapore

from 17 March*


NEW ZEALAND



JETSTAR SERVICES FROM SINGAPORE TO AUCKLAND

COMMENCE 17 MARCH 2011*

JETSTAR FLIES FROM AUCKLAND TO CAIRNS FROM 12

APRIL 2011*

JETSTAR FLIES FROM PERTH TO THE GOLD COAST FROM

4 APRIL 2011*

JETSTAR FLIES FROM DARWIN TO MANILA FROM

9 FEBRUARY 2011*

*SUBJECT TO REGULATORY APPROVAL


(Avalon)

where we fly

Fly Jetstar to more than 50 holiday destinations throughout

Australia, New Zealand, Asia and the South Pacific

JETSTAR AUSTRALIA DOMESTIC

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FEBRUARY 2011 89


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snacks

While’s Nibbles Assorted Nuts $3.50

Dry Roasted Almonds, Cashews & Macadamias

Mainland “On the Go” Tasty Cheese & Crackers $4.00

Pringles $4.00

Sour Cream & Onion or Original

Authentic Nissin Cup Noodles $5.00

Hot Chicken Soup filled with yummy noodles

Miso soup $3.00

(Japan flights only)

Savory Spicy Broad Beans $4.00

(Japan flights only)

sweets

Oven Baked Gourmet Muffin

Blueberry

$4.00

Byron Bay Cookie Bar

White Choc Chunk and Macadamia Nut (Gluten Free)

$3.00

M&M’s — Milk Chocolate $3.00

Mars Bar $3.00

DOMESTIC NEW ZEALAND

Snacks Choices NZ$

While’s Nibbles Assorted Nuts $3.50

Pringles $4.00

Authentic Nissin Cup Noodles

Sweet Choices

$5.00

Oven-baked Gourmet Muffin $4.00

Cookie Time Chocolate Fix $3.00

M&M’s - Milk Chocolate $3.00

Mars Bar $3.00

Cafe NZ$

Republica Coffee (Fairtrade and Organic)

100% Colombian, Arabica

$3.00

Nature’s Cuppa Tea (Fairtrade and Organic) $3.00

New Zealand Domestic menu items are in NZD.

meals

Classic Fresh Sandwiches $7.00

Shaved Leg Ham & Tasty Cheese with a mild mustard

mayonnaise or Egg, Mayo & Cos Lettuce

Gourmet Chicken Wrap $8.00

Chicken mixed with basil pesto,

mayonnaise & sundried tomatoes with lettuce

in a soft tortilla (Served cold)

Light Meal $10.00

(International Only - not available on all flights)

Hot Meal of the Day $12.00

(Only on flights to/from New Zealand & International)

English Breakfast Tea

Nestlé Hot Chocolate $4.00

Beverages (Non Alcoholic)

Lemonade $3.00

Coke or Diet Coke $3.00

Orange Juice $3.00

Nu Pure Spring Water

Beverages (Alcoholic)

$3.50

Heineken $7.00

Victoria Bitter $6.00

Amstel Light Beer $5.50

Pooles Rock Firestick Shiraz $7.00

Pooles Rock Semillon Sauvignon Blanc $7.00

Smirnoff Vodka Ice Red $8.00

Bundaberg Rum & Cola $8.00

Jim Beam Bourbon & Cola $8.00

FEBRUARY 2011 91


Cullen Bay

Best Barramundi in Darwin!

Tel: (08) 8941 1141

Arrangements Ar A rangement and

ha hhampers mpers with wit

chocolates, ch c ocolates, candy, c



to ttoys ys s or helium hheliu

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Phone: 08 8948 0504

yaw



(07) 5538 9291

Open 7 days breakfast, lunch, dinner and take away

sierra grand building, corner of margaret avenue

and gold coast highway, broadbeach, qld, 4218


your wellbeing onboard

SAFETY, SECURITY & COMFORT

Jetstar is a wholly owned subsidiary of Qantas Airways Limited and places the

same emphasis on achieving standards of excellence in safety and security.

QANTAS GROUP SECURITY

The risk-management challenges facing

today’s airline industry remain complex. We

are continually addressing assessed security

threats and risks to minimise vulnerability. The

application of risk-management principles,

innovation and a commitment to excellence

all contribute to creating an effective security

environment. A dedicated Qantas Group

Security Operations Centre monitors global

security 24 hours a day.

Many of our security measures are not

apparent to the public. However, during

check-in and boarding you may have noticed

security measures such as:

• Random explosive trace detection of

passengers and their carry-on luggage.

• Laptops and aerosols being subjected to

enhanced inspection at screening points.

• Increased vigilance at passenger screening

points and increased guarding of our

aircraft and terminals.

Further measures apply to flights to the

United States:

• Additional carry-on baggage searches just

prior to boarding.

• Random baggage searches at check-in

and boarding.

• Passengers selected at random for patdown

inspections, including the removal and

checking of shoes.

CARRY-ON BAGGAGE

Rules are needed to protect you from the

threat of liquid explosives. Liquids, aerosols

or gels in your carry-on baggage must be 100

millilitres/grams or less and must be sealed

in a transparent independently resealable,

one-litre plastic bag. You are only allowed

one plastic bag. You may still carry on board

prescription medicines. Baby products and

non-prescription medicines that you need for

the flight are also allowed. Proof of need may

be required. Please Note: These restrictions do

not apply to checked-in baggage.

SAFETY FIRST

Seatbelts must be fastened during take-off,

landing and when you are seated in case your

aircraft encounters turbulence. Luggage

must be stored in the overhead locker or

under the seat in front of you. The back of

your seat must be upright and the tray table

fastened when the aircraft is taking off and

landing. Please remain seated after landing

until you are invited to leave the aircraft.

Sleeping on the aircraft floor is not permitted.

Please read the safety instruction card in

your seat pocket, noting emergency exits

and location of life jackets. Please watch

the safety demonstration prior to take-off.

94 FEBRUARY 2011

In an emergency, the crew will give specific

instructions. They may speak assertively and

will require your cooperation.

SMOKING

Government regulations prohibit smoking on

all flights operated by Australian-registered

aircraft. There are smoke detectors in all

toilets and penalties for regulation breaches.

THE IMPORTANCE OF BLOOD

CIRCULATION AND MUSCLE

RELAXATION DURING FLIGHTS

If you have concerns about your health and

flying, Jetstar recommends you seek

medical advice before flying. When you’re

sitting upright and are inactive for a long

period, several things can happen:

• The central blood vessels in your legs can

be compressed, making it harder for the

blood to get back to your heart.

• Muscles can become tense, resulting

in backaches and a feeling of excessive

fatigue during and even after the flight.

• The normal body mechanism for returning

fluid to the heart can be inhibited and

gravity can cause fluid to collect in your feet,

resulting in swollen feet after a long flight.

• Some studies have concluded that

prolonged immobility may be a risk factor

in the formation of blood clots in the legs

– Deep Vein Thrombosis (DVT). Particular

medical conditions may increase the risk

of formation of blood clots if associated

with prolonged immobility. Medical

research indicates that factors which may

give you an increased risk of DVT include:

• Personal or family history of DVT

• Recent surgery or injury, especially to the

lower limbs or abdomen

• Blood disorders leading to increased

clotting tendency

• If you are older than 40

• Oestrogen hormone therapy, including

oral contraceptives

• Pregnancy

• Tobacco smoking

• Former or current malignant disease

• Obesity

• Dehydration

• Heart problems

• Varicose veins

Compression stockings can assist in

preventing swelling of the ankles and feet

and they may improve the blood return

to the body from the lower legs. These

stockings can be purchased from medical

and surgical supply companies and

need to be individually fitted to your leg

measurements. During your flight, move

your legs and feet three or four minutes per

hour while seated and move about the cabin

occasionally.

CABIN PRESSURE

If you are suffering nasal congestion, an ear

infection or allergies, Jetstar recommends

seeking medical advice before flying.

A cold, flu or hay fever can impair your

sinuses. Swollen membranes in your nose

could block the Eustachian tubes between

your nasal passages and your middle ear

chamber. This can cause discomfort during

changes in cabin pressure, particularly

during the aircraft’s descent.

• To “clear” your ears, try swallowing and/or

yawning. This helps open your Eustachian

tubes, equalising the pressure between

your middle ear chamber and your throat.

• When you are flying with an infant, give

them a dummy or feed them during the

aircraft’s descent. Sucking and swallowing

will help the infant equalise the pressure in

their ears.

CABIN HUMIDITY / DEHYDRATION

Humidity levels of less than 25% are

common in the aircraft cabin. This is due

to the low humidity levels of the outside

air supplied to the cabin. Low humidity can

cause drying of the nose, throat and eyes

and it can irritate wearers of contact lenses.

We recommend that you:

• Drink water frequently during flight.

• Drink coffee, tea and alcohol only in

moderation – these drinks act as diuretics,

increasing dehydration.

• Remove contact lenses and wear glasses if

your eyes are irritated.

• Use a skin moisturiser to refresh the skin.

MOTION SICKNESS

This ailment is caused by a conflict between

the body’s senses of vision and equilibrium.

Air turbulence increases its likelihood

because it can cause movement of fluid in

the vestibular apparatus of the inner ear.

If you have good visual cues (keeping your

eyes fixed on a non-moving object), motion

sickness is less likely to occur.

JETSTAR SECURITY POLICY

Jetstar has a strict policy on denying

boarding to any passengers who are

inappropriate in flight or on ground in

comments or behaviour. Jetstar does not

accept any inappropriate comments as

“jokes”. All matters are referred to relevant

authorities for prosecution. Jetstar will seek

to recover all costs incurred as a result of

inflight incidents from those involved.

MORE INFORMATION ON IN-FLIGHT

HEALTH ISSUES CAN BE FOUND AT:

www.qantas.com.au/info/flying/InTheAir/

yourHealthInflight


international adventures

A traditional

Fijian music

performance

FIJI

This South Pacifi c nation

is a dream with white,

sandy beaches, crystalclear

lagoons and lush,

tropical gardens — and

warm, friendly people only

too happy to share their

fascinating culture.












FROM THE AIRPORT

Nadi Town 8km from Nadi

International Airport

Travel time Nadi Town is 10–15

mins by car

Taxi FJ$7–$10 (AU$3.82–$5.46)

Airport Shuttle US$10.18

(AU$10.25) per person one way to

Nadi Town

ON THE GO

1. Car hire Cars can be hired at

the airport and you drive on the left

side of the road as in Australia.

2. Taxi Plentiful but you need

to make sure they switch on

the meters.

3. Motorcycle Bright yellow bikes

to rent from Westside Motorcycles.

4. Light plane Getting to

Suva from Nadi could cost you

FJ$86–$103 (AU$46.93–$56.21).

96 FEBRUARY 2011

SCOTT WILLIAMS

General manager,

InterContinental Fiji

Golf Resort & Spa

Must-eat: I am completely

addicted to kokoda, which is

a traditional Fijian appetiser

comprising raw fi sh cooked in

lime, chilli and coconut juice. It’s

an exquisite dish that seems to

encapsulate everything I’ve come

to love about Fiji.

Local delicacy: Fiji has a vibrant

Indian culture that stretches back

many, many generations. The

curries in Fiji are sensational — a

combination of traditional Indian

cooking with Fijian fl avours. A tip: if

you like hot curries, you’ll need to

ask for extra spice.

Local recreational activity

to watch: Go to a local rugby

game. The locals play some of

the best-quality rugby I’ve ever

seen, with phenomenal skill and

sportsmanship. It’s not unusual

to get ten thousand passionate

Fijians in a local club rugby match

— which is something you have to

experience personally in order to

fully appreciate it.

Most unusual thing to do:

Something that’s unusual

elsewhere but part of the fabric of

Fijian life is the kava ceremony —

kava being a potent drink made

from the ground-up root of the

kava plant. A kava ceremony is

relevant for any type of celebration,

a welcome or thank you, and can

last for anything from an hour to

several days. If you’re lucky enough

to take part in a kava ceremony,

learn the sayings before you go in

— for example, when you’re being

handed the cup, “high tide” means

a full measure and “low tide”

means a half measure.

I love Fiji because: Of its infallible

power to slow people down. Fiji’s

locale, climate, people and food all

combine to relax stressed visitors.

The way Fijians live and treat

others sets a powerful example.

VISA REQUIREMENTS: Passengers are advised to make themselves

familiar with the relevant visa requirements for international travel.

Visa requirements may diff er between countries.

A traditional Hawaiian

dance performance

HONOLULU

HAWAII

Honolulu, on the island of

Oahu, is one of the world’s

most exotic capital cities.

Encapsulating a modern

vitality with the delightful

charm of old Hawaiiana, it

reverberates with aloha —

the spirit of welcome.







FROM THE AIRPORT

CBD 14km from Honolulu

International Airport

Travel time CBD is around

15 mins by car


Taxi Approx US$40 (AU$40.26)

VIP stretch limo From US$70

(AU$70.46) for two people


Airport shuttle US$9 (AU$9.06)

and taking around 20 mins

Bus Every 30 mins at US$2

(AU$2.01) for bus number 19 and

taking around 1hr 10 mins

ON THE GO

Bus There are many hotel

shuttle buses, public buses and

quaint open-air trolley buses —

Oahu has an excellent bus network.

For a fl at fee of US$2 (AU$2.01)

you can easily travel any distance,

including bus changes, to any

attraction you’d like to visit.

NOELANI

SCHILLING-

WHEELER

Senior director of

sales & marketing,

Oahu Visitors Bureau

Local delicacy: I have so many —

how do I choose?! But poke, which

is cubed, fresh raw fi sh (usually

tuna), mixed with onion, limu

(seaweed) and Hawaiian spices,

is not only extremely addictive,

but goes very well with beer. After

trying it at a restaurant, look for

one of many poke shops around

the island and buy a few varieties —

there are shoyu ones, onion ones,

limu ones and spicy ones. Enjoy it

on your hotel lanai overlooking the

ocean as the sun sets.

Local recreational activity

to watch: Surfi ng. Whether it’s

regular surfi ng, stand-up paddling,

tandem surfi ng or outrigger canoe

surfi ng for leisure or a surfi ng

competition, Oahu is the birthplace

of surfi ng. The coolest thing is to

take lessons and try to ride the

waves yourself.

Best place to hang out with

the locals: Oahu has something

happening every weekend —

whether it be a cultural event, an

art festival or a sports event, the

list goes on. We also have great

farmers markets around the island

— most notably the KCC Farmers

Market below Diamond Head and

the North Shore Farmers Market.

This is where you can meet, mingle

and chat with locals.

Favourite local festivals:

I love the Prince Lot Hula Festival.

It’s a one-day, non-competitive

hula celebration where some of

the best hula halau (schools) and

kumu hula (teachers) come out to

share their culture in the form of a

hula celebration with one another,

the community and visitors. It’s

a window into Hawaiian culture

at beautiful Moanalua Gardens.

Another festival I love is the

Made In Hawaii Festival — a great

weekend of shopping for unique

products (food, jewellery, crafts)

from around the islands.

Fiji photo: Tourism Fiji; Hawaii photo: Hawaii Tourism Authority (HTA)/Tor Johnso


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Speak to the dentist (0361-7449911)

OPEN ON SUNDAY

JAKARTA OFFICE

Dharmawangsa Square

Ground Floor Unit 65, Jakarta

Phone: (021) 727 88284, Hp. 081 113 7241

E-mail: mguzt@mac.com


international adventures

Traditional wood carving

BALI

INDONESIA

One of Asia’s best holiday

islands, Indonesia’s Bali

has the irresistible allure

of sun, sea, surf and

mountains, along with

a rich cultural heritage.

Top it all off with excellent

eating and shopping.

Java

Borneo

INDONESIA

Bali

(Denpasar)

FROM THE AIRPORT

CBD 15km from Denpasar’s Ngurah

Rai Airport

Travel time Kuta Beach is around

10 mins by car

Taxi About IDR30,000 (AU$3.36)

Shuttle bus Most hotels off er

complimentary pick-up

DAMRI Bus IDR15,000 (AU$1.68)

to any city bus station

ON THE GO

1. Taxi Get your hotel to order one

for you and always try to arrange for

a return trip.

2. Hired car The only way to go

beyond the city and into the villages.

Hiring a driver only costs a little bit

more, but is worth the price.

3. Motorcycle To reach those hardto-reach

remote beaches, secret

surfi ng sites and little lanes.

98 FEBRUARY 2011

CHUN Y. GEE

Principal/managing

director,

Bule|Fusion

Worldwide

Best breakfast: This isn’t for

anyone on a diet, but I’d go for

almond croissants and macaroons

at Bali Catering Company.

Great place for dinner: MÉTIS

restaurant, for simply delicious

food, amazing ambience and

people-watching.

Best place to party with the

gang: HOME, when it’s open.

Best buy for under AU$50: A

little slice of heaven — the carrot

cake at Biku Restaurant and Tea

House. Can you tell I have a really

sweet tooth?

Must-buy (money no object!):

A penthouse beachfront villa

at Echo Beach. Sunsets are a

diff erent canvas of vibrant colours

each day — simply breathtaking.

Insider’s tip: Try to fi nd an

Indonesian healer in Canggu. If

you can fi nd him, and he’s there,

whatever aches and pains in your

body will be gone.

Survival tip for tourists: Don’t

drive crazily on motorbikes if

you’re not a local. The Indonesians

have been driving motorbikes

all their lives, so they know what

they’re doing.

Local delicacy: For all the pork

lovers of the world: I really have to

recommend babi guling (suckling

pig). I just love the delicious,

mouth-watering and crispy skin.

Best idea for a family outing:

An afternoon at the Geger Beach

in Nusa Dua. The best part is that

there’s no need to bring food,

because there’s a waterside

restaurant there.

I love Bali because: On this

beautiful island, almost anything

and everything can happen!

JAKARTA

INDONESIA

Indonesia’s capital is the

11th biggest city in the

world, with the hustle

and bustle to match. This

exciting hub combines a

fascinating history with

a vibrant energy, and a

unique island culture.

Jakarta

VISA REQUIREMENTS: Passengers are advised to make themselves

familiar with the relevant visa requirements for international travel.

Visa requirements may diff er between countries.

INDONESIA

Java

Borneo

FROM THE AIRPORT

CBD 20km from Soekarno-Hatta

International Airport

Travel time Allow at least 40 mins

by car (depending on the conditions

of the traffi c)

Taxi IDR120,000 (AU$13.44) to the

CBD, including charges

DAMRI Bus IDR15,000 (AU$1.68)

to a city bus station

ON THE GO

1. Taxi The most reliable taxi

company is Blue Bird. You can call

+62 (21) 7917 1234 and book one in

advance. Remember to ignore any

informal taxi “agents” who approach

you on the street.

2. Hired car If driving around the

busy city is daunting, ask for a driver

with your car.

3. PATAS These can be described

as air-conditioned modern buses.

The city skyline

DR TOGU

MANURUNG

CEO,

Borneo Orangutan

Survival (BOS)

Foundation

Best idea for a family outing:

If you’re looking for an adventure,

stepping out of Jakarta’s crazybusy

environment is probably

the best way to go. Indonesia is

famous for its panoramic views and

outdoor attractions — a great way

to enjoy some serenity while being

outdoors with your loved ones.

Survival tips for tourists: If

you’re staying in Jakarta, always

bring a book to keep you busy

during rush-hour traffi c. If you

venture out of the city, bring water,

mosquito repellent and suntan

lotion, and you’re good to go.

Must-eat: Black pepper crab is

a famous speciality and available

in most seafood restaurants in

Jakarta, but is best enjoyed in its

hometown of Balikpapan, which is

in east Kalimantan.

Best buys for under AU$50:

An orangutan plush toy for the little

ones, or best-selling T-shirts from

the Borneo Orangutan Survival

(BOS) Foundation. Exclusively sold

by the BOS Foundation, all the

profi ts go towards eff orts to release

orangutans back to the wild.

Must-buy gifts: If you’re into

meaningful gifts that make a

person’s day and also help the

environment in some way, I

would recommend buying an

orangutan adoption package from

BOS Foundation that lets your

loved ones be a part of Bornean

orangutan conservation eff orts, or

maybe a Plant-A-Tree package that

helps keep the earth green.

Unusual fact: Did you know that

the orangutan shares 97.4% of its

DNA with humans?

I love Jakarta because: It has

great access to other parts of the

country, where you can marvel at

the true beauty of Indonesia.


international adventures

TOKYO

JAPAN

Japan’s hippest, most

fascinating and largest city

is nothing short of stunning.

When not discovering

ultra-futuristic sights, you’ll

fi nd many hidden nooks of

history among the narrow

winding streets.

SOUTH

KOREA

Sea of Japan

(East Sea)

JAPAN

100 FEBRUARY 2011

Tokyo

Pacifi c

Ocean

FROM THE AIRPORT

CBD 66km from Narita Airport

Travel time 60–90 mins by car

Taxi Approx ¥20,000 (AU$242.47)

Limousine bus ¥3,000 (AU$36.37),

takes 60–90 mins

JR Narita Express Every 30–60

mins at ¥3,000 (AU$36.37); takes

60 mins

ON THE GO

1. The subway Effi cient and clean,

this transport mode will take you

to anywhere you want to go.

2. Shinkansen (bullet train)

Depending on where you want to

go, this super-fast train is clean and

effi cient. It can takes anything from

minutes to hours to get to another

prefecture. Be sure to remember

to keep quiet in the mornings —

as offi ce workers often sleep

during their daily commute to

their workplace.

Cherry

blossom

season

DAVE ENRIGHT

Owner/director,

Evergreen

Outdoor Center

Best breakfast: The buff et

breakfast at the Garden Hotel

Narita. It’s a tidy hotel with a tasty

buff et close to the Narita Airport,

with aff ordable rates and a free

shuttle to and from the airport.

Great place for dinner:

Piadina Cafe in Aoyama (near the

Canadian Embassy) is a hidden

secret for those who love real

Italian cuisine and great coff ee.

Best place to party with the

gang: Unit, close to Daikanyama

station. It’s huge! So huge you’d

get lost going from stage to stage.

Or maybe that’s just due to the

copious amounts of drinks you’d

consume there. There’s a great

line-up on the weekend, too.

Best buy for under AU$50: A

full-day lift ticket at Happo One ski

resort in Hakuba, Nagano. It off ers

the best skiing most people will

ever experience, and is cheaper

than many other resorts.

Survival tip for tourists: Even

though Tokyo is an amazing

metropolis with more things to see

and do than one lifetime allows, do

remember to get out and see the

countryside as well.

Unusual fact: The Japanese

large intestine is genetically longer

than Europeans due to the highfi

bre, low-meat diet that has been

the norm in Japan for the last

1,000 years or more.

Local delicacy: Soba (buckwheat

noodles), a delicious meal of hot or

cold handmade noodles.

Favourite local festival:

Hands down the most amazing

(if insane) festival you’ll ever

experience anywhere is the

Nozawa Fire Festival, in Nozawa,

Nagano, on 15 January every year.

You have to see it to believe it.

OSAKA

JAPAN

VISA REQUIREMENTS: Passengers are advised to make themselves

familiar with the relevant visa requirements for international travel.

Visa requirements may diff er between countries.

Known widely as “the

kitchen of Japan”, Osaka

is also home to modern

architectural wonders,

wild fashion and a prolifi c

creative scene. From here,

discover the breathtaking,

ancient city of Kyoto.

SOUTH

KOREA

Sea of Japan

(East Sea)

Osaka

JAPAN

FROM THE AIRPORT

CBD 38km from Kansai

International Airport

Travel time 50 mins by car

Pacifi c

Ocean

Taxi Approx ¥17,000 (AU$205.41)

Limousine bus Every 45 mins at

¥880 (AU$10.63), takes 50 mins

Nankai Express Train Every 30

mins from ¥1,390 (AU$16.79), takes

30 mins

ON THE GO

1. The subway Easy to use, effi cient

and clean, this mode of transport

will take you everywhere you want to

go in Osaka.

2. Bicycle Many of the hotels in the

Kansai region (of which Osaka is a

part) off er their guests the option

of hiring a bicycle. It’s a good way

to get around the city because of

Osaka’s easy-to-navigate, relatively

safe terrain.

Children attend

shichi-go-san

festivities at temples

JUNYA ONO

Director of sales

and marketing,

The Ritz-Carlton,

Osaka

Best night out: The Tempozan

area. It’s a bay area where you

can ride on a Ferris wheel (one of

the largest in the world) and take

a night cruise, while enjoying the

gorgeous night views.

Must-buys: Fake food or menus.

Some restaurants display

their menus outside using

non-perishable ingredients — as

in, fake food that’s made using a

wax-like material. These works of

art look so real, and can even be a

cute pop artwork for your home.

Must-eats: Takoyaki (fried

octopus ball) and okonomiyaki

(vegetable, meat and seafood

pancakes). They’re typical Osaka

foods, which both restaurants and

stalls sell. In some restaurants, you

can even cook your own.

Great places for dinner: French

restaurant La Baie and Chinese

restaurant Xiang Tao at The Ritz-

Carlton, Osaka. They both received

one star in last year’s edition of

the Michelin Guide for Kyoto and

Osaka. La Baie was the only one

awarded the fi ve spoon-and-fork

marks, which is the highest rating

for its interior and service; while

Xiang Tao was one of only two

Chinese restaurants that was

awarded with a star.

Favourite local festival: My

favourite festival is defi nitely the

spring’s cherry blossom festival

at the former Mint. Many cherry

blossoms form a beautiful tunnel,

and going through this is an

extraordinary experience. The

concentration of elegant pink

cherry blossoms opening is such a

special and lovely sight.

I love Osaka because: The food

is delightful and people are friendly,

making you feel at home. Osaka

has the charm of both old and

modern Japan.

Tokyo: PictureNet/Corbis; Osaka photo: JNTO


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international adventures

Explore

Auckland by

sailing boat

AUCKLAND

NEW ZEALAND

Auckland is New Zealand’s

most cosmopolitan

city, and has the largest

Polynesian population.

The “City of Sails” is also

one of the few cities to

have harbours on two

separate bodies of water.

Tasman

Sea

South Island

Queenstown

North Island

Cook

Strait

FROM THE AIRPORT

CBD 20km from Auckland

International Airport

Travel time CBD is around

45 mins by car

102 FEBRUARY 2011

Great Barrier I.

Auckland

Wellington

NEW ZEALAND

Taxi From NZ$60 (AU$45.82)

Pacific

Ocean

Shuttle bus NZ$30 (AU$22.91),

taking 45–60 mins

ON THE GO

1. Jafa cabs This is a bicycle with

bench seats for two. It is free if you

board it within the Auckland central

business district.

2. Ferry Interislander is the main

ferry operator between Wellington,

in the North Island, and Picton, in

the South Island.

3. The city circuit bus Two bus

circuits that will take you safely and

easily to the city’s attractions.

4. The train A good one is KiwiRail.

FLEUR POSTILL

New Zealand

general manager,

Haystac

Best breakfast: At Takapuna

Beach Café on The Promenade,

Takapuna. This gorgeous café

is situated on the beach, which

is ideal for a leisurely stroll after

breakfast. At the adjacent deli,

you can purchase all manner of

handmade treats to take away.

Great place for dinner: Coco’s

Cantina on Karangahape Road.

You can’t reserve a table at this

lively, rustic Italian eatery, but

you can enjoy a drink down the

road at D.O.C. bar (Department

of Conversation), as you wait for

tables to free up.

Must-buy gift: A soft, stuff ed

native bird toy from Pauanesia.

This great gift shop is just opposite

Freyberg Square on High Street

in the city, and these trendy

keepsakes are made locally using

salvaged fabrics.

Local recreational activity to

watch: Auckland is the City of

Sails, and the Auckland waterfront

is just bustling with sailboats. On a

calm day, the harbour is fi lled, and

the scene is beautiful to see.

Best place to hang out with

the locals: Piha Beach is a

40-minute drive from Auckland

city and a popular surf spot.

Best idea for a family

outing: The Auckland Museum

of Transport and Technology

(MOTAT), is well worth a visit.

Pick up helium balloons for the

kids that have been fashioned

into little hot-air balloons with

hanging baskets, and take a picnic

basket to Western Springs Park

afterwards, which is next door.

I love Auckland because: It’s a

sprawling city, but feels more like

a collection of unique little villages.

You’re truly missing out if you limit

yourself to just one.

Tasman

Sea

South Island

Queenstown

VISA REQUIREMENTS: Passengers are advised to make themselves

familiar with the relevant visa requirements for international travel.

Visa requirements may diff er between countries.

CHRISTCHURCH

NEW ZEALAND

Billed as New Zealand’s

“most English” city with

its fabulous gardens,

Christchurch is the oldest

established city in the

country. It’s also the

gateway to the fantastic

skiing of Queenstown.

North Island

Cook

Strait

FROM THE AIRPORT

CBD 11km from Christchurch

International Airport

Travel time CBD is around

20 mins by car

Great Barrier I.

Wellington

NEW ZEALAND

Christchurch

Taxi Approx NZ$32 (AU$24.44)

Shuttle bus NZ$12 (AU$9.17),

taking 20–30 mins

Pacific

Ocean

ON THE GO

1. The shuttle Free seven-day

central Christchurch bus.

2. The tram A 25-minute tourist

circuit with 11 stops that passes

through the central city and the

main cultural precinct.

3. The Orbiter Bus service running

every 15 minutes to six suburban

shopping malls.

4. The city circuit bus There are

two bus circuits covering major

Christchurch attractions.

ROBERTS EJUBS

General manager,

Novotel Christchurch

Cathedral Square

Great place for dinner: “The

Strip” on Oxford Terrace. Many

popular restaurants and eateries

are available, with a stunning

array of choice. The restaurants

also have the added benefi t of

overlooking the Avon River.

Best night out: SOL Square and

Poplar Lane. They’re full of relaxed

bars, nightclubs, coff ee lounges,

cocktail bars and restaurants.

Best place to party with the

gang: Pop Lane and SOL Square

— in particular, the Russian vodka

bar and the German beer bar,

along with Below Zero Ice Bar in

Cathedral Square.

Best breakfast: I confess I’m

a fan of Square Restaurant’s

full-buff et breakfast at the Novotel

Christchurch. It features New

Zealand sparkling wine, a selection

of seasonal fruits, yoghurt, breads,

pastries, your favourite hot dishes

and eggs cooked how you like

them. More importantly, The

Square also off ers service with a

genuine smile.

Best buy for under AU$50: An

experience in the Below Zero Ice

Bar, which is nicely located within

the Novotel Christchurch complex.

Must-buy (money no object!):

Try to get a case of Ata Rangi

pinot noir — it’s delicate, with

a slight fl oral aroma and silky

texture. I cannot get enough of this

sensational wine.

Must-buy gift: Green jade.

Insider’s tip: When buying jade,

you must buy it for others and not

yourself — otherwise it’s deemed

bad luck.

Survival tip for tourists: If

you’re Australian, wear your

Wallabies jersey discreetly.

The Arts

Centre

New Zealand: Tourism New Zealand


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See Auckland’s beautiful harbour with full commentary


international adventures

Traditional

shophouses

SINGAPORE

A tropical island nation

with a multicultural

society, Singapore is a

sophisticated microcosm

of Asia. The Lion City

buzzes 24 hours a day

with varied dining, nightlife

and shopping options.


FROM THE AIRPORT

CBD 20km





Travel time 20–30 mins by car

Taxi Approx S$20 (AU$15.54)

with a surcharge of S$3–$5

(AU$2.33–$3.88)

Airport shuttle services Most

hotels S$9 (AU$6.99) one way

MRT train Every 10–15 mins from

Terminal 2 and 3 from 5.30am–

11.18pm, takes 27 mins to reach the

city for S$1.70 (AU$1.32)

ON THE GO

1. The Hippo An open-top

double-decker bus that allows you

to hop on and off whenever you like.

S$23 (AU$17.87) for a one-day pass.

2. MRT Air-conditioned

subway throughout the island.

3. Trishaw An old-school threewheeled

bicycle with a carriage.

104 FEBRUARY 2011

JERRY DE SOUZA

Creative director,

Spa Esprit Group

Survival tip for tourists:

Be prepared for the hot, humid

weather. Carry sunblock and

packets of tissues that will double

up as seat “chope-per” (chope

means to reserve) at food centres.

Unusual fact: We are a groomed

nation. There are 12 Strips (Spa

Esprit’s dedicated waxing salon)

here for 4.5 million people, but

only four similar dedicated salons

in New York City, which has nine

million people.

Must-eat: The squid ink pizza at

Skinny Pizza.

Local delicacy: Defi nitely the

black pepper crab at Long Beach.

Try the outlet at Dempsey.

Local recreational activity to

watch: Dragon boating during the

Mid-Autumn Festival.

Best place to hang out with

the locals: Check out Test

Kitchen at House. This creative

space experiments and off ers

two diff erent types of interesting

desserts each day. It’s also a

platform for budding bakers to

showcase their works.

Favourite local festival: The

Mid-Autumn Festival.

Best idea for a family outing:

Kite fl ying, which is getting more

popular nowadays.

For history: Drop by The Fullerton

Hotel for its beautiful architecture

and history. It’s structurally

stunning, and I love the fact that it

used to be an old post offi ce before

being converted into a plush hotel.

I love Singapore because: It’s

convenient and accessible to other

parts of the world. Things are done

very effi ciently and I like the fast

pace of life here.

HO CHI MINH CITY

VIETNAM

Vietnam’s largest city

and its economic capital,

this vibrant cultural

hotspot has a population

of high-energy people,

who eff ortlessly meld the

traditional with the new

and contemporary.





VISA REQUIREMENTS: Passengers are advised to make themselves

familiar with the relevant visa requirements for international travel.

Visa requirements may diff er between countries.











FROM THE AIRPORT

CBD 7km from Tan Son Nhat

International Airport

Travel time CBD is around

20 mins by car

Taxi A taxi voucher from Visitor

Information for US$12 (AU$12.08)

Shuttle bus Most hotels off er

complimentary pick-up

ON THE GO

1. Taxi Ask the drivers to turn

the meters on; there are

taxi-motorbikes as well.

2. Walking This is the best way to

dash up alleys and down one-way

streets, but we only recommend

this for District One.

3. Cyclos This is a one-person

seat that is powered by a cyclist

— prepare yourself for being noselevel

with the exhaust fumes and

frenetic action on the streets.

The People’s Committee building,

also called Hotel de Ville

NATHAN RAYNER

MBA student,

RMIT University,

Vietnam campus

Best breakfast: You can’t

beat a bowl of pho from a street

vendor. For a few dollars you can

get a steaming bowl of traditional

Vietnamese beef noodle soup.

Great place for dinner: Pho

2000 at the Ben Thanh Market,

where former US president Bill

Clinton once enjoyed a bowl of pho

when he visited the city in 2000.

Best night out: Join the

backpackers, English teachers

and locals at the bars on Bui Vien

Street. Go2 Bar gets popular later

in the night.

Best place to party with the

gang: If you want to visit Ho

Chi Minh City’s most notorious

nightclub, then you can’t go past

Apocalypse Now. It’s a guaranteed

party every night of the week.

Must-buy gifts: Vietnam is

famous for its lacquerware.

Lacquerware photo albums and

boxes also make ideal souvenirs

and gifts.

Insider’s tip: The travel agents

around Pham Ngu Lao Street off er

great day trips around and outside

Ho Chi Minh City. Visit a few of

them and fi nd the best deal.

Survival tip for tourists:

Haggle, haggle, haggle. When

buying souvenirs, you have to

bargain hard to get a good deal.

Unusual fact: There are a

whopping 20 million motorbikes on

the roads in Vietnam.

Must-eats: Ho Chi Minh is famous

for its street food. Find somewhere

that looks clean and enjoy

traditional food with the locals.

Local recreational activity to

watch: Take a xe om (motorcycle

taxi) and cruise around the city.

Singapore photo: Savid Gan; Ho Chi Minh photo: Travel Ink/Getty Images


international adventures

Manila’s

night scene

PHILIPPINES

MANILA

This capital city on the

western side of Luzon

island showcases

skyscrapers mixed with

historic Spanish colonial

architecture. This is also

evident in the country’s

intriguing food.

South

China

Sea

PHILIPPINES

Manila

Sulu Sea

FROM THE AIRPORT

CBD 7km from Ninoy Aquino

International Airport

Travel time CBD is around

30 mins by car

Taxi Approx PHP450 (AU$10.28).

Prepaid taxis are available inside the

airport terminal and save you the

hassle of haggling

ON THE GO

1. Taxi You can usually fl ag one

down at most malls. Be sure to

always insist on using the meter.

If the driver refuses, just say no

politely and get down from the cab.

Do not react aggressively.

2. Jeepney These interesting

lorries ply most major city roads,

and can take you anywhere along

their route.

3. Train The Light Rail Transit goes

east-west across the city, while the

Metro Rail Transit goes north-south.

106 FEBRUARY 2011

ELOISA SERGIO

Blogger and founder,

Pinoyblogosphere.

com

Best breakfast: Tapsilog — it’s a

typical and pretty requisite Filipino

breakfast platter of dried or cured

beef or venison (tapa), garlic rice

(sinangag), a fried egg (itlog) and

lastly, pickled papaya strips.

Great place for dinner: One of

my favourites for any occasion is

Café Illustrado, because it off ers

beautiful Spanish era-inspired

fi ne dining coupled with a historic,

old-Manila setting, located in the

walled city of Intramuros. It’s a

good bet for family or friends.

Best night out: I would

recommend going to Malate, which

is perfect for a nightlife adventure.

What’s great about it is that it has

clusters of restaurants and bars

with live music seven days a week.

Best buys for under AU$50:

You can take your pick from a

huge variety of Indigenous and

well-crafted products from all over

the Philippines, which are housed

in Kultura Filipino shop — the

largest Filipino lifestyle retail store

located at SM Malls.

Insider’s tip: The cheapest form

of transportation is by the jeepney,

the king of the road. You may fi nd

it interesting to know that it was

originally an American G.I. surplus

jeep converted into a public-utility

vehicle to address the problem of

vehicle scarcity after the war.

Must-eat: I love eating halo halo

— an iced treat served with grated

ice, milk, ice cream, fruits and

sweet beans. It’s a unique Filipino

dessert and a must-eat.

Most romantic spot: It’s

defi nitely got to be an evening at

Manila Bay. For an unforgettable

evening, do experience a dinner

cruise — while admiring the Manila

skyline and a view of the famous

Manila Bay sunset.

Khao Lak

beach

PHUKET

THAILAND

VISA REQUIREMENTS: Passengers are advised to make themselves

familiar with the relevant visa requirements for international travel.

Visa requirements may diff er between countries.

Providing a nice contrast

to the capital Bangkok,

Phuket is a beach-lover’s

paradise, and defi nitely a

great place to slow down

and lap up the island life of

the locals — with stunning

scenery to boot.

MYANMAR

Andaman

Sea

Phuket

MALAYSIA

LAOS

THAILAND

Gulf

of

Thailand

CAMBODIA

FROM THE AIRPORT

Patong Beach 32km from Phuket

International Airport

Travel time Patong Beach is

around 45 mins by car

Taxi Approx THB400 (AU$13.31)

Shuttle bus Every 30 mins at

THB52 (AU$1.73); takes about

60mins

Gulf

of

Tonkin

VIETNAM

ON THE GO

1. Motorbike A cheap and

convenient way to explore all the

tiny lanes around the beach — but

drive with care!

2. Tuk-tuk This method of transport

off ers an exhilarating ride, but is

best for short distances only.

3. Car hire Really the only way to go

beyond the city. If you want to enjoy

the scenery while on the move,

hiring a driver as well only costs a

little more.

KASIDEJ

PREECHANOND

Resident manager,

La Flora Resort

& Spa

For history: To me, nothing quite

beats the rare experience of visiting

a rubber tree farm. Rubber trees

cover 33% of Phuket’s land area.

The fi rst tree was planted in 1889

in Trang. The method of tapping

the rubber trees, where an incision

is made on the tree’s trunk and a

small cup is used to collect the sap,

has remained unchanged to this

day. That’s quite an interesting fact,

when you think about how much

has changed in the world, and is

still changing.

Must-eat: Before you leave

Phuket, make sure you try the

original fried noodles, called pad

mee phuket thaley, which are

yellow noodles stir-fried with

prawns, calamari, egg, beans and

roasted chilli paste.

Best idea for a family outing:

Head out to Khao Lak Elephant

Camp, near the Khao Lak

National Park, for trekking trips on

elephants through the rainforest.

Your whole family will love it, and

probably remember it long after

they’ve reached home.

Insider’s tip: If you’re not really

big on crowds and want some

peace, get away from the west

beaches to Poseidon Beach — a

wonderful and secluded beach

in southern Khao Lak. Great

swimming, intriguing rocky

outcrops and stunning sunsets

make this a special treat in the

area. A couple of local restaurants

are on the beach to provide you

with a chair, umbrella and of

course, refreshments.

Most unusual thing to do: Try

hiring a local guide to take you to

Moken Village, located at the north

of Khao Lak, which is where sea

gypsies live from June to October

when they’re land-bound. They

have their very own culture and

spoken language.


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INTRODUCING OUR AIRPORTS

Let us give you a head-start

ADELAIDE

CBD 6km

Travel time CBD is around

15 mins by car

Taxi Approx AU$18

Skylink Bus Every 30 mins–1hr:

AU$8.50 adult, $3.50 child. Takes

around 35 mins

Airport parking AU$4–$90

(30 mins–72 hrs)

AVALON

Geelong CBD 20km

Melbourne CBD 55km

Travel time 15 mins (Geelong);

40 mins (Melbourne) by car

Taxi Approx AU$45 Geelong;

approx AU$80 Melbourne

Avalon Airport Shuttle Meets

all fl ights. From AU$17 adult, $14

child (Geelong); AU$20 adult,

$10 child (Melbourne)

Airport parking From AU$3 for the

fi rst 20 mins; weekly rate AU$53

BALLINA-BYRON

CBD Byron Bay is 23km;

Ballina is 5km

Travel time Byron Bay is

20 mins by car; Ballina is

7 mins by car

Taxi Approx AU$10–$15

to Ballina; approx $65 to

Byron Bay

Airlink bus Meets most fl ights:

AU$20 adult ($35 return); $12

children under 13 years (oneway).

Takes around 35 mins

Airport parking AU$2–$12

(1 hr–24 hrs)

BRISBANE

CBD 16km

Travel time CBD is around

25 mins by car

Taxi Approx AU$33

Bus Every 15–30 mins: AU$14

adult; $8 child; under 4 years

free. Takes about 30 mins

AirTrain Every 20 mins to CBD:

one-way adult fare AU$14.50;

return $27. Takes about 22 mins

Airport parking AU$5–$30

(30 mins–24 hrs)

CAIRNS

CBD 8km

Travel time CBD takes 10 mins

by car

Taxi Approx AU$15

Australia Coach Shuttle Every

hour: AU$10 adult; $15 couple;

AU$5 child. Takes around

20 mins

108 FEBRUARY 2011

Airport parking AU$3–$16

(2–24 hrs)

DARWIN

CBD 13km

Travel time CBD is 15 mins

by car

Taxi Approx AU$27

Darwin Airport Shuttle

Meets all fl ights: AU$10 (adult).

Takes around 20 mins

Airport parking AU$3–$12

(up to 24 hrs)

GOLD COAST

Surfers Paradise 20km

Travel time Surfers Paradise is

around 30 mins by car

Taxi Approx AU$40

Con-X-ion Shuttle bus Booking

required: +61 (7) 5556 9888:

AU$22 adult; $13 child (4–13

years); children under 4 years

travel free. Takes around

45 mins

Airport parking AU$3–$36

(30 mins–24 hrs)

Gold Coast Airport Lounge

For a small entrance fee, check

in for movies, comfy lounges,

newspapers, snacks and drinks.

HAMILTON ISLAND

Travel time From the airport to

your accommodation takes only

a few minutes

Shuttle bus Complimentary for

hotel guests

HOBART

CBD 17km

Travel time CBD is around

20 mins by car

Taxi Approx AU$36–$42

Airporter shuttle bus Meets all

fl ights: AU$15 adult; $8 children

aged 4–15; children under 4

travel free. Journey takes around

30 mins

Airport parking AU$2–$13

(24 hrs)

LAUNCESTON

CBD 16km

Travel time CBD is around

10 mins by car

Taxi Approx AU$30

Airporter Shuttle bus Meets

all fl ights: AU$14 adult; $5 child;

children under 4 free. Takes

around 15 mins

Airport parking AU$2–$15

(25 mins–24 hrs)

MACKAY

CBD 6km

Travel time CBD 15 mins by car

Taxi Approx AU$18

To Airlie Beach Take a taxi to

the bus terminal in Wellington

Street and then a bus service by

Greyhound or Premier; approx

AU$22 one-way adult fare

Airport parking AU$2–$20

(24 hrs)

MELBOURNE

CBD 23km

Travel time 35 mins by car

Taxi Approx AU$55

SkyBus Every 10 mins: AU$16

adult; $6 child (4–14 years). Takes

20 mins

Airport parking Short-term

from AU$3; long-term from

AU$29

NEWCASTLE

CBD 20km

Travel time CBD is around

25 mins by car

Taxi Approx AU$60

Shuttle Bus Door-to-door

service (from AU$35) through

Newcastle Information Services

at +61 (2) 4928 9822. Port

Stephens Coaches (public bus)

every hour: AU$6.50 adult; $3.50

concession. Takes 35 mins

Airport parking AU$2–$25

(1 hr–24 hrs)

PERTH

CBD 12km (domestic terminal)

and 17km (international terminal)

Travel time 30 mins by car

Taxi Approx AU$26 (domestic)

and $33 (international)

Perth Airport City Shuttle Every

30 mins (domestic) and

45 mins (international):

AU$15 adult (domestic),

$20 (international). Journey

takes 15–35 mins

Fremantle Airporter AU$35

(booking required)

Transperth Bus 37 From

domestic terminal to Kings Park

via the city AU$3.20

Airport parking Short-term

carpark from AU$3.70; long-term

carpark from AU$17

SYDNEY

CBD 8km

Travel time CBD around

15 mins by car

Taxi Approx AU$50

Bus Every 20–30 mins: AU$14

adult; AU$7 child. Journey takes

around 30 mins

Trains Every 10 mins

(weekdays) AU$15 adult. Takes

around 13 mins into the centre of

the city

Airport parking AU$7–$52

(30 mins–24 hrs)

SUNSHINE COAST

Travel time Noosa is

30 mins, Maroochydore

is 10–15 mins by car

Taxi Approx AU$56 to travel

to Noosa; approx AU$28 to

Maroochydore

Henry’s Bus Service Meets all

fl ights: AU$20 adult; $10 child;

children under 4 years free.

Journey to Noosa takes around

45 mins

Airport parking AU$4–$18

(2–24 hrs). New hourly 622

TransLink bus service connects

the airport to the suburbs. Starts

5.54am weekdays, 6.54am

weekends. www.translink.com.au

TOWNSVILLE

CBD 5km

Travel time CBD around 10 mins;

taxi approx AU$16

Airport shuttle Booking required

+61 (7) 4775 5544 to the Strand

and city, Sunferries, the Transit

Centre and Coral Princess:

AU$8 (adult); takes 10–15 mins

Airport parking Short-term

carpark, AU$4–$24

(2 hrs–12 hrs). Long-term

carpark, AU$12–$72 (1–6 days);

thereafter AU$10 per 24-hour

period or part thereof

WHITSUNDAY COAST

CBD 30km from

PROSERPINE AIRPORT

Travel time CBD takes around

35 mins

Taxi Approx AU$80

Whitsunday Transit AU$15 adult

share-ride (one-way; $28 return);

$9 child (one-way; $16 return),

children under 4 years travel

free. The Whitsunday Transit

service meets all fl ights. For

details, call +61 (7) 4946 1800

Airport parking For customers,

airport parking is free (24hrs)


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Sunshine Coast photos: Tourism Queensland

YOUR

INSIDER’S

GUIDE

Australians share their

favourite domestic

destinations

SUNSHINE COAST

GRAEME SAIT

Founder/managing director,

NTS Health

Great place for dinner: Spice Bar Mooloolaba

— great atmosphere and an amazing modern

Australian- and Asian-infl uenced menu. It’s a

world-class dining experience.

Local delicacies: It’s got to be the homemade

cheeses, sourdough breads, marinated olives

and the mind-boggling range of organic ham at

the famous Eumundi Markets.

Local recreational activity to watch: Hang

gliders working the currents off the seaside cliff s

of Rainbow Beach, near Fraser Island. This beach

features dolphins playing in azure waters, and in

some places, the forest comes right down to the

foreshore itself.

Favourite local festival: The Woodford Folk

Festival from December to January is the biggest

annual cultural event of its kind, featuring more

than 2,000 performers and 580 events. The

program comprises concerts, dances, a fi lm

festival, comedy sessions, acoustic jams, an

entire children’s festival, art-and-craft workshops

and a world of foods to experience. It’s a defi nite

must-do, and must be attended to be believed!

Best idea for a family outing: Hiring a pontoon

and travelling up the Noosa River to Boreen Point

for lunch. National parks, birdlife and surreal

refl ections mark the journey to the lake — where

you can chill on the beach or hire a windsurfer

after lunch.

australian focus

The gorgeous

Sunshine Coast

off ers numerous

great adventures

BELOW: Find your own

private patch of beach

along the stunning

Sunshine Coast

Most romantic spot: Strolling the Noosa beach

boardwalk at sunset, before stopping for some

cocktails at a beachside eatery.

I love the Sunshine Coast because: The

spectacular coastline and breathtaking

hinterland host a rare collection of passionate

people. I travel the world for my business, but I

kiss the ground on my return to this lovely region.

FEBRUARY 2011 111


australian focus

Best nights out: Going to concerts at Kings

Park, Sandalford Winery and Leeuwin Estate. You

get to enjoy the world’s greatest performers, as

you sip great Western Australian wines in relaxed

outdoor settings.

Best place to party with the gang: The

Breakwater at Hillarys Boat Harbour is the most

stylish pub in Perth, with great food and views.

Must-buy (money no object!): A gold simulated

diamond all-rounder necklet from Secrets looks

like a AU$100,000 heirloom, but actually only

costs a fraction of the price (about AU$1,760

to AU$2,750).

Must-buy gift: Every girl should have a

simulated diamond tennis bracelet from Secrets

(or perhaps even three! — in white gold, yellow

gold and rose gold).

Insider’s tip: The Perth Mint in eastern Perth

has the world’s biggest gold-bar collection and

hourly gold-pouring demonstrations every day.

Most romantic spot: The Indiana Tea House on

Cottesloe Beach.

I love Perth because: Of its blue skies,

magnifi cent beaches, fabulous wild fl owers and

wide, open spaces.

TOP: Perth’s city malls

off er alfresco cafés and

top shopping spots

BOTTOM: Water activities

are a popular pastime

in Adelaide

112 FEBRUARY 2011

PERTH

ALISON PUCHY

Owner,

SECRETS Shhh…

ADELAIDE

JAKE GREENROD

Owner,

GoodLife Modern

Organic Pizza

Must-eats: Laksa at Asian Gourmet in the

Central Markets. It’s been consistently good for

20 years, and even the famous Cheong Liew is a

regular there. But you also shouldn’t miss having

an organic pizza at GoodLife!

Favourite local festival: It has to be the Garden

of Unearthly Delights, during Adelaide’s fantastic

Fringe Festival. There’s nothing like enjoying

some food and a Coopers with carny folk on a hot

summer’s night. But get in early to avoid a line!

Best idea for a family outing: Swimming with

the dolphins with Temptation Sailing at Glenelg.

It’s an early start, but it’s worth seeing the sun

rising over the hills as you dive into the beautiful

waters of the bay.

Most romantic spot: The view from Samuels

Gorge Winery in McLaren Vale. Aside from great

wine, they do a mean coff ee and may even share

a Peroni with you if you need a palate cleanser.

Local recreational activity to watch: Pick a hot

summer’s night, and head to Jetty Road, Glenelg,

to people-watch and cruise the strip.

Must-buy gift: Haigh’s chocolates are

addictive, and a defi nite must-buy. I love their

chocolate-dipped orange slices.

Perth photo: Tourism Western Australia; Adelaide photo: SATC


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GREAT RATES

Rent a Group B (e.g. Hyundai Getz 5 door automatic), Group C (e.g. Hyundai Elantra), Group D (e.g. Mitsubishi Lancer) or

Group E (e.g. Ford Falcon), with Avis in Australia for three or more consecutive days and receive a one car group upgrade*

up to a maximum Group P (e.g. Ford Falcon XR6). This offer is available until 31 March, 2011 and be sure to quote coupon

number UPPA039 when making your reservation at the Avis counter. This special offer cannot be used in conjunction

with any other offer or coupon and is not available on pre-booked, package tour, travel industry or government rates.

Go to the Avis counter on arrival

*Offer is subject to vehicle availability at time of rental. Other conditions may apply.

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