1881-10-07 - Northern New York Historical Newspapers

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1881-10-07 - Northern New York Historical Newspapers

A REPUBLICAN NEWSPAPER. LOYAL TO OUR CONVICTIONS. TERMS---|!2.00 PER ANNUM.

ESTABLISHED, A. D., 1869. BREWSTERS, N. Y., FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1881. SINGLE COPIES 5 CENTS.

Putnam County Standard

PUBLISHED FRIDAYS,

AT

BREWSTERS, N. Y.

nv

E. W. ADDIS.

•^•-•t.OO per Annum la A-V--t».

RATES OP ADVERTISING.

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7.00 8 75 18.50 80.00

H.50 10.75 17.00 84.00

i "•• 18(10 80.00 88.00

. IS.flO 15.10 88(10 38.00

15 Oil m«0 WOO 1 40 00

IK 50 a.m 87.00 00.00

W.CO 4100 68.00 100.00

UK.\'»IM1 JMT.PF.* limit. |*-r line. Knad-

*•"••••' ' •• if' • ' in USB DOLLAIt.

TOU >*.u.;.yiv.HG.

Kv.-rrli,,! ,.f .l.,|, \V..,k . ... nt.,1 IM-HMV „,,„ «t

n«-.nati.r j.n.•.-. , •.•llu • •. •:.-. rfiillr turnifh.-d.

»44f*M i.. .». ADDIS, ilttWfrtetv, x. y,

A BRAM J. MILLER,

Attorney and Counsellor

At Law and Notary Public.

Office oyer Poet Office, Brewstera, N. Y

T*T S. CLARK,

Wholesale Stationer

And

BLANK BOOK MANUFA CTURER,

AMENIA IMON, N. V.

(1EO. WM. HORTON,

ATTORNEY AND COUNSELLOR

At Law and Notary Public.

Roberts' Building, Brewatere,

and 887 Broadway, New York.

-CURST NATIONAL RANK,

BREW8TBK8, N. Y.

F. Well*, Cash. J. O. Borden, Pret.

OFFICE 11 Of Its:

O A.. M. to 3 P. M.

TJR. H. P. MILLER,

D E N T I S T ,

BBBW8TKBB, N. Y.

N1THOU8 (1X1 l)i: GAe u.liiiliilst'-i.-illii rxtruct-

lng teeth at all hours. The gua administered by

Dr. N. B. Barley, a careful and experienced phy-

aMun. All work warranted.

rJAKK A RIDE!

Best Livery Stables,

Connected with Uie Southeast House.

MILLS REYNOLDS, » - Proprietor.

The beat Livery Htablea In Putumn County.

Good accomuiodutloua mid prompt utteutlon.

lloraea ready at all hours, day or ulghL

mHE REST ROAD HORSES!

In town, and an entire new stock of H AK-

NESSES, Double and Single,

Top CABBIAOBS, SIDE-RAB BUOGIKS,

Phaetons and Coups, may be found at Uie

Park Street Livery Stable.

QAItHIE C. MEAD, Proprietor.

JOHN LITTLE,

MERCHANT TAILOR.

BBEWSTEBS, N. Y.

A fine Une of 8UITIN08 of goods. All the latest

styles can now be seen. Prices lower than ever

before. _______

xir H. RIDERT

SURGEON DENTIST,

Office in Mr. L. n Hubert's building over Mar­

cus Badt's new store.

Nitrous Oxide Uas administered lu extracting

teeth.

OREWSTER HOUSE.

8. T. Mi Malum, Proprietor.

FUI-UIMIK^ RoMt, Comfort

lla*«l l&d-VoM-il-MdU-M

TO ALL WEARY TRAVELER'S

Good __iv«ry AttatoJAQ-*.

pHILIP DIEHL,

Baker and Confectioner,

BBEWSTEBS, N. Y.

CHOICE CONFECTIONERY,

FRUITS, NUTS, TOYS, fo

ICE-CERAM.

F_inilies uud parties supplied cm abort

notice.

D

Brewster House Stables

II. E. SHOVE • CO., I'rop'n.

0

Horses Boarded by the Day or leeL

GEORGE CHARTER,

BREWSTER8, If. T.

riKAi.Eii in

TeietaWB, mil. Hrt, omen, Clin, inn, Cm-

teilojirr. Tobacco, Etc.

A LARGE STOCK OF GROCERIES.

BREWSTER

Meat Market,

FRANCIS WASHBURN,

PnOPRIETOR.

All kinds of Meat In their Season

FfiESII AND NICE.

BAIN ST., BREWSTERS, H. Y.

SOUTHEAST HOTEL.

BREWSTERS, N. Y.

Mill* Reynold.*, Prop'r.

JIowic Refitted and Refurnished.

Free Stages to and from Harlem, New York

* New England, and New York city _ Northern

Depots.

A flrst-clasH Livery in attached to the

Hotel.

L. H. ROBERTS,

Life and Fire Insurance Apcy.

*• — — O

COMBINED CAPITAL:

$100,000,000.

ASM

EEAL ESTATE AGENT

AKIl ASXXT MB TBI

Averill Chemical Paint

AMD ABEST08 PAINT. *

Fntnam Go. iiwj Bant

BREWSTERS, N. Y.

INCORPORATED, APRIL 51U. 1671.

o——

Deposits Received every day in the

week, from 9 A. M. until 3 P. M.

0

Interest allowed from the First of

each Month,

Deposits received at tbe store of LoMell & Co-

0

BON. MOKCJAN IIOBTON,

President.

FERDINAND A. Ilorr,

Secretary,

CASPAR MORF\

Iteaj.cttfully aui.ounr.i to the public tbftt lie

Use on hand at LI.

GREENHOUSES

In BREWSTERS, t complete ana varied assortment ol

>B. W. B. BOB1NSON,

DENTIST.

_kt liievvvtorM. 1M. V.,

(Over Miner's liardwure SUII. ,

Kv**ry W«*diiv-Ht!n.v.

ItoAUiitui, l't rti. i- Kit Uu*- net ot 'J'eeUi H.M-H < a

IT or 1 «,,

Waxruabwl u> give bull—_ulluu- J'un- Slirouo

Oxide ti_» _duUnli>U.'i»U In extruc—ug.

UO-D VILUXV A bhE< J A l.'JV 1

RUSTIC BASKETS,

FOLIAGE, Etc

BOQUETS HADTTO OPER

On the nhorteat notice. We would PKIMTIUIl>- call

attcntiou to hli flue collection of VEBENAH, con-

• inline of 1U0 ilill.n 1.1 »uriciU-f. A1H more tli«n 60

kind*of 1M11 LIAb, uu.uroaaaed for rure colorln|.

NEW PHOTOGRAPHER

J it Duuburv.

LoweHt MOM ,,v, ' r l"'" r , old studio.

Duubury, March 6th, lb»l.

MRS. LYD1J. IL PIRRHAM. OF LVRR. MASS,

f""/?.

LYDIA E. PINKHAM'8

VE&ETABLE COMPOP-T-).

In a Positive Cnra

far all th«MP Painful ComplnlnU and WealtBM—M

•nrnmmnn looiir beat h u l r pnpnUllon.

It will run. . ul Inly til* won't form i.f lYinalp Com

l>lalnIH, all nrarlnn ttrnit.loa, Inflammatlnu and Cleera

tlon, rniiinir anil Dlaplarpmrnta, and the cona^tiral

•nlnal Wcaknpaa, and la i.art imlarly adapted to thi

Chance of Life.

It will dlaaolre and e*r»t>l tnmora from th. utenia Ie

an early rtajrr of doTolopmrnt. The tendency lo ——•

eeroua humor* there la checked reryapeedlly by It. nae.

It rrraorp. falntneea, flatulency, deatroyaall rrarlnj

for ft: milium., and rcllerea weaknea. of tbe atomach.

It rur.'H nioatlns, (leadaehea, Nerrou. Proatratton,

Oenera,'. Debility, Bleepleaaneaa, Depi——on and Indl•

|W—03.

That frellnfr of bearinc down, rauolne pain, waifht

and backache, la always pent—nently cared br He use.

It will at all tlmea and under all drewnatal—— act la

harmony with the lawa that gorern the female ayeUm.

Forthocureof Kidney Complaint, of ulthi-r NX thai

Compound la unaurpaaaed.

LTBIA P. I'lVkllAM« VEGETABLE COM-

POITNDIa prepared at -S and W Waatern Armue,

Lynn.Maaa. Price |L BlsbottleafortS. Sent by mall

In the form of pilla, aiao In the form of loee—ree, oa

receipt of price, |1 per bos for either. Mrs. Pink—aes

freely anawera all letters of Inquiry. Bend for p—aph-

let. Addreaa as aboTe. JtfenHon (Ms Aiptr.

No family abould be without LTOLt E. I—O—IAMI

l.ivi.n PILLS. They cure constipation, tilllniieniaiL

and t.Tfi.lity of the Hear, at cents per boa.

•3- Sold by -II lirumiBia. -fe»

GLUTEN FLOUR

For 1IYSPKI'SIA, DIABETE8. LUNG

TKUUBLE8 and Nervous Debility.

The new Wuste-Hcpalrliig Ilread and Oem

Flour. Free from Hrau or starch. Scud for elr-

calar. FAHWELL _ HIIINKS, Prop's., Water-

town, N. Y. For sale by Mogle A Lylea, B7 Park

Place, New York. ^

A Turbulent and Homantlc Period ot Ameri­

can HlHtory Vividly and Dramatically Portraedy

"A ROYAL GENTLEMAN.

By JUDGE TOUROBE, author of "A FOOL'S

EHKAND,"et- My tunm hiimorouR, pathetic

und thrilling) Handaomely illustrated. Price

*_oo. Sold only HYSl'HKCHlPTioN. Men and

women wanted to take orders. Experience a

con-deration, but Industry and enterprise more

vulued. A Permiineiit sliuatlon.

FORDS, HOWARD _ HI'LHERT, Publishers.

81 Park Place, New York.

—•-*• I f_(A> ONE COIXINH' VoHtlng

C y L EtFimuc PI.AKTKK, costing

UMtu. •••innw •'' "' ll> -' >~ I'H Huperlor io," says a writer, "is a mother's

anchor." Wo havo often heard that the

first thing she does is to weigh it

When a member of Congress wanted

his picture in a heroic attitude, the

artist painted him in the act of refusing

a drink.

"A man who tries to serf der public,"

says our German representative in the

Board of Aldermen, "vas got ft queer

lx>88 anyhow."

An Indian idol was recently fonnd in

Kansas. It was made of earthenware,

was brown in color, has a handle nnd

will hold two quarts.

It is n pitiful thing to hoar a young

lady say something tastes like mustache

cosmetic, and then change color and try

to look unconcerned and indifferent

"H you grasp a rattlesnake firmly

about tho neck ho cannot hurt you, ".says

a Western paper. But keeping about a

block ahead of tho snako is a better

scheme.

A woman may bo tho poorest cook in

tho world, and yet during a short trip to

tho fishing banks, when t here is a (rood

sea on, sho will be able to get up a good

dinner.

A poor young man remarks that the

only advice ho gets from capitalists is

"to live within his income," whereas the

difficulty ho experiences is to live "with­

out an income."

A precocious youngster of the boy spe­

cies insists that chickens, vegetables,

pudding and pies are "the means of

graoo," because his father never says

"Thank, God, without them."

When you say to a man, "Now, you

know, you know," you generally mean

that he don't know, and that you know

that he does not know, and that he

knows that he don't know.

"Your handwriting is very bad," said

a gentleman once to a public official.

"Yes," ho replied; "but don't you see,

if I were to write better people would

find out how I spell."

In the oil countries large quantities of

gas are use for fuel. A man who uses it

iu his cook-stove was asked the other

day why he did so, aud replied: "Be­

cause it splits BO much easier than

wood."

A bad-temperance man lost his knife,

and they asked him the usual question:

"Do you know where you lost it?"

"Yes, yes," he replied, "of course I do.

I'm merely hunting in these other places

to kill time."

When we soe a big fat man sit in a

crowded street car, with his elbows stuck

out aud his legs spread apart, wo sigh to

think that nature has spoiled a very fine

hog to make a wretched human being.

"Mary," he asked, "why am I like

butter?" He expected her to say that it

was because he was the genuine article,

but was completely crushed when she

promptly replied: "Why, 1 guess it's

because the hotter it gets the softer you

act"

"I see that J imp mis was guarded by

two detectiyoB aud throe policemen while

being saddled for the St Leger. There

will be no living in the same country

with that horrid brown thing when he

gets over hero again." This is what

"Maud 8." says.

"Isn't it heavenly?" said Miss Silly-

billy to Mr. Polo. "What ?" he asked.

"Why, the moou." "Oh, yes, just too

utterly heavenly." "Oh, 1 do just dote

ou the moon, don't you?" "Yes, it's

awfully nice, isu't it, and so splendid

conspicuous, too!"

Dean Stanley used to say that until

his marriage ho had never really lived.

A Brooklyn man says that until his

marriage he lived like a fighting cock.

His wife overheard him make this

remark one day, aud after that he lived

more like a fighting cock than ever.

"Dora" writes to ask us: "What is

the cuckoo's voice I hoar mentioned so

often?" Dora, dear, the only "oock

whoso voice" wo hear is the confounded

hired girl at G a. m., appraising us that

there is a dearth of kindling, and that

there "ain't no steuk fur breu'fus."

Said an auctioneer: "Come, now, la­

dies and gentlemen, those goods are for

sole. Will somebody give a bid ? Any­

thing, ladies uud gentleman. All I want

is an offer." "Alas!" murmured an

elderly woman iu tho crowd, "that's

what I havo boon sighing for all my

life."

A little boy who hud attended a

funeral was usked by hia mother what

the text was. He replied: "He's dead,

uud they wont up the roud." This was

the boy's version of the passage iu Ecclo-

siasters, "Mau gooth to his long homo,

and tho mourners go ubout the streets."

Thousands of women havo boon en­

tirely cured of the iuo*t stubborn cases

of female weakness by tho use of Lydia

EL Piukhum's Veget-blo Compound.

Send to Mrs. Lydia E. Pinkhum, 233

Western Avenue, Lynn, Muss, for

pamphlet >.

•#••.#- ,

CLEAR UI. \I> and voice, easy breuthing

sweet breath, perfect swell, * taste and

hearing, no cough, no distress. These

are condition brought about in catarrh

by tho use os Sanford's liudicul Cure

Complete treatment for $1.

" M> Hack Aciics fco/'

said u hardy looking man, " and 1 fool

miserable,' The doctor questioned him

and fouud that he had bocu habitually

oobtiTc for years, thut now his kidneys

were disordered, and hia whole bvatoiu

deranged. Kidney-Wort wus ruooiu-

liiouded^aud foiUifuhy taken and in a

short time mwry troubled was iviuovod

ihe d-wu-ug and tonic power of thi*

this _io_nuuo on the bo>*_is and kidnevs

is wonderful. - fHatyr*ya7UmulUt,

J


Putnam County Standard

\

State Ticket.

mn sRcnRTAnv or STATE,

JOSEPH B. CAHR,

Of ltoiiBslnor County.

FOTt (HINTROT.tiKR,

IRA DAVENPORT,

Of StaTttoD County,

FOR ATTORXRV-ORSRRATJ,

LESLIE W. RUSSELL,

Of St. Lawrence County.

FOR TRKAST^RFH,

JAMES W. HUSTED,

Of Westchester.

FOR F.NOINRRR AN1> St'KVF.YOR,

SILAS SEYMOUR,

Of Saratoga.

FOR JVDQF. OF THE rOlUT OF AITRATiS,

FRANCIS M. FINCH,

Of Tompkins Connty.

Bering AvorVn throughout the country.

For sixteen years Iio was assistant

engineer of the Eric Rail-way, and for

many years was consulting engineer of

the Union Pacific Road. He lias also

liecn indontified with the construction

and equipment of the Lexington and

Nashville, Mississippi and Ohio, Sacra­

mento Valley and other roads. Ho was

chief engineer and general superinten­

dent of the Buffalo and New York City

Railroad. He was awarded much praise

for his work in constructing the Portage

Rridge.

FRANCIS M1I.KS FINCH.

Francis Miles Finch, the nominee for

Judge of the Court of Appeals, is a

native of Ithaca, and it* about fifty-five

years old. Ho graduated at Yale College

in the class of 1849, delivering the poem

on class day. In 1888 he wrote tho

Centennial jwern on tho hundredth

anniversary of tho Linonia Society, in

A HAM' MILLION IN HORSE*.

The t-'tmhlnn SUM Fnrm, \Vhrri« C*td*mllll

l.tlntrt In Q«r*fl.

The Fashion Stnd farm, situated

about a mile and a half east of this city,

on the State street road and opposite

tho coaling station of tho Pennsylvania

railroad, it is believed has not an equal

A Tuilor's Jote.

A tailor on Fort street got hold of •

red-hot idea the other day. He heated

np his gooso to the blistering point and

plaoed it on a bench at his door with a

sign reading: •* Only twenty-five cents.'

In a few minntes along enme an ancient-

looking colored man with an eyo out for

bargains, and as ho saw tho goose and

Choice Extrnots from Dniprjrlsts.

"We know the value of malt, hops.

and iwn, composing ' Malt

lady customers highly praise

them in this

best medi-

in this conntry. It was purchased about,

ten years ago by the well-known horse- * ih f "8" *° m * •* "" min * 1b n a<

. i>_.i.i n.ili j» r«i i . « w— ho had struck it rich. He naturally

Comity Ticket.

FOR MF.MRRR OF ARSRMRMT,

SAMUEL H. EVERETT,

of Southeast.

FOR SCHOOL OOlQUBnOMBB.

JAMES A. FOSHAY,

Of Kent

FOR COFNTV CI.KRK,

EDWARD C. WEEKS,

Of Carmel.

FOR CORONER,

MARTIN V. B. STEVENS,

Of Kent

Fon JUSTICE OF SESSIONS,

PHILIP D. PENNEY,

Of Patterson.

men, Bndd Doblo and Charles H. Ker

nor, for H. N. Smith, the prominent

New York bankor, and was not visited

by tho latter till nearly a year after it

became his property. Since that time

contiguous lands have been purchased

by Mr. Smith, until his farm now eon-

tains something over 305 acres, nearly

all of which is under tho highest con­

dition of cultivation, and through which

runs a never-failing stream of water.

It was not at first Mr. Smith's purpose

to establish an extensive stock farm,

Which he paid his celebrated tribute to > bn^ o w n i n g the celebrated Goldsmith

Colonel Nathan Hale, of Revolutionary | M a i d a n d otber fine-blooded: horses, ho

Tlic State Convention.

The Republican State Convention,

held at the Academy of Music on

Wednesday, was the most harmonious

gathering for many years. The Garfield

Republicans had a majority of 108 over

the Couklingitcs. The candidates placed

in nomination are as follows:

OENERAIJ JOSEFIl R. CARR.

General Joseph B. Carr, the nominee

for Secretary of State, was born at Alba­

ny, August 10, 1028, and was educated

at Troy. When tho war broke out he

commissioned as lieutenant-colonel of 1M>rcGlai)1.iinea piping; and that parti-

the 2d New York Begiment, and a month culftr fttu?nt|on i H t o h o pnid to tho ^m-

ditiou of the bath-rooms, and their

fame. He has since, written a largo

number of successful poems, including

popular: college songs, "The Last Cigar"

and others, and tho well-known poem,

entitled "The Blno aud tho Gray."

His first reputation as a lawyer was

won about thirty years ago by securing

the acquittal of Edward H. KulolT, who

was charged with the murder of his

wife. When General Grant was elected,

in 1868, the Internal Revenue Collector-

ship of the Ithaca District fell to him,

but ho held tho offleo for only a short

time. Ho had charge of the Cornell

estate for a long time, and has been prill*

cipal counsel for Cornell University since

its foundation. Mr. Finch is n pain­

staking lawyer and an able advocate,

besides a literary man of extensive

culture. He was appointed in 1880

Judge of the Court of Appeals and was

reappointed at the beginning of this

year.

• •«»-»«»-- -

Tho public will 1JC gratified to learn

that the work of repairing and renova­

ting tho White House is going on

briskly; that plumbers are specially busy

there; that the gas aud sewer pipes are

to IK* taken out and replaced with

bought the farm on whioh to keep and

breed them. Boooming more and more

infatuated with stock-rahingand breed­

ing, Mr. Smith has increased his stables

and improved the establishment nntil

they now represent a moneyod value of

about 8500.000, his horses alone being

valued at $300,000. With the single ex­

ception of Robert Bonner, Mr. Smith

has probably spent more money for

horses than any man in the United

States.

With a view of laying before our

readers a description of this interesting

stock-farm, a reporter of the State Ga-

tette recently made a visit thereto. The

first thing to which tho reporter's atten­

tion was directed was tho speeding of

Ebony, a handsome Knox colt, and

Dutch Girl, on the mile track. Then

tho large squaro building used fox

offices, harness and carriage-rooms, etc.,

adjoining tho grand stand, was visited.

On the ground floor, facing the track,

is the reception room, whose fineness of

finish almost beggars description.

later (May, 1800) became colonel of tho

regiment The 2d Regiment was tho

first volunteer regiment to leave tho

State. In 1862 General Carr was made

a Brigadier-General. He was at Big

Bethel, l>ore a conspicuous part in all the

battles of the Army of the Potomac, up

to the final surrender of Lee in April,

1805. Ho became a Brevet-Major-Geu-

eral in March, 18(55, and was mustered

out in September. He was for several

years Major-Geueral of the Third Di­

vision of tho State Militia. His resi­

dence is at Troy, where he is engaged in

tho manufacture of chaiu coble.

IRA DAVENPORT.

Senator Davenport, the nominee for

Controller, was born in Steuben County

in 1841. His father was a noted philan­

thropist. He was elected to tho Senate

in 1877 and was re-elected in 1871). Ho

supported the Garfield Administration

in tho Senatorial contest.

LESLIE W. RF88ELL.

Leslie W. Russell, the candidate for

Attorney-General, was born in Canton,

St Lawrence County, in 1840. At the

age of eighteen he euterod tho law office

Hill, Cagger A- Porter, in Albany, where

he studied law for some years. He then

removed to Milwaukee, Wis., and com­

pleted his law studies in that city. He

was :ilM .ut to be admitted to tho bar

when the war broke out and he enlisted

in the first 1st Wisconsin regiment, of

which ho was adjutant. His father dy­

ing at this time, he returned to his na­

tive place mid cared for his father's fam­

ily. At the nge of twenty-seven he was

elected to the Constitutional Convention

of 1807, being the youngest member of

that body. When twenty-nine years of

age, or in I8Gi>, he was elected District-

Attorney of St. Lawrence County. In

1877 he was elected county judge, his

term not expiring until 1083. In 1878

Mr. Russell was elected a Regent of tho

University.

JAMLH W. 11C6TKD.

James W. limited, of Peekskill, the

nominee for State Treasurer, was lx>ru

iu Bedford, Westchester County, on Oc­

tober 31, 1833. He was prepured for

college at Bedford academy, and Mas

graduated from Yale College in 1851.

He studied law with Edward Wells, of

Peekskill, and was admitted to the bar

in 1857. He has been Superintendent of

Schools, School Commissioner, Deputy

Superintendent of lusuran( iiLej withou:

«'ji]n..MtJ'>n iu the Republican ufllflUa

Mr. JJustod was speukcr ol the AshcinhJ;

m \$Ji, J*:«;, and in l£7& Ui IHTT h.

was defeated u» u candidate Cut" Sj» •;;].«j

l'.v (ieojge B. Sloan ujtej j MJV ,-].„.,

vote in the J',, publican caucus.

I I J. A.-. ,-,| .\M"ia.

(ielieiaJ SJJU.-. SeymOUXj the eiu.didu i

1. -i Sate J'Jigii. v il *, \, ara old

He lieltl the oilier of State Engineer Uli<

Surveyor in 1855 and Lfififi, J J. i.-

kuowi, jjoin l.i- e.nun-etioi, witJi engin

sanitary improvement. There are to be

new carpets also, with new furniture,

altogether costing gl 0,(MM). The public

received an impression during the illness

of President Garfield that the White

House was not a safe edifice to live iu.

Possibly tho feeling against the structure

was somewhat exaggerated, but thero

was doubtless some truth in the criticism

of the house which was no freely uttered.

No possible amount of money is of the

least consemieneo wheu weighed against

the health and life of the Chief Executive

of the Republic.

The Keller in Witchcraft.

The belief in witchcraft, which in

years gone by was so extensively entei

tained, has not yet died out, and in

many English country village*, it is re­

garded as one of thoue secret dangers

to which every homo is more or loss ex­

posed. Hence various devices are still

resorted to for the purpose of counter­

acting tho supposed hurtful influences

of this baneful power. One of the best

preservatives is a horseshoe nailed over

the door. In Lancashire the good

housewife puts a hot iron into the

cream during tho process of churning

to expel the witch from the churn.

Witches are supposed to have the powei

of changing their shape und resuming

it again at will, a notion which wosverv

popular in past years, tho cat's and the

toad's being the forms they were thought

to assume. Hence the appearance of a

toad on tho doorstep is taken as a cer­

tain sign that the house is under evil in­

fluence and the poor roptile is often

subjected to some cruel death. Cats,

also, were formerly exjiosed to rough

usage,' one method being to inclose

them with a quantity of soot iu wooden

bottles suspended on a line. The per-

on who succeeded in beating out the

bottom of the bottle as he run under it

and yet escaping the contents was the

hero of tho sport, a practice to which

Shakespeare alludes in "Much Ado

About Nothing," where Benedick says:

"Haug uic iu M buttlo like a est aud glioot at

1110."

A species of superstition that may be

said to reign supreme in almost every

home is the belief in ghosts. Indeed,

there is scarcely a village in England

that does not boast of the proud dis­

tinction of having its haunted house or

spot. There is an extensive folk-lore

associated with dreams. To dream of

death denotes happiness, but to dream

of gathering a nosegay is unlucky,

signifying that our best and fairest

hopes shall wither away like flowers in

a nosegay, Dreaming about hulls,

dances, etc., indicates coming good for­

tune, and thus we ure told that those

V> In- dim in of being ut a ball

Nuauni' lutve tiiiv for tear ;

For bimij tin v will unite1 bc-

To tkose they hold must dear.

A I'uradlse ol I'isli Mori».

If any otie wants leal choice, reason­

able fish stories, he i hould go to

Minnesota Polkb have no fancy for

the incredible up there; the btttbt ure

BO plenty thut exaggeration is hi tuple

folly. A part* of unglers were seated

around in a Minnesota depot, with a

tine btriug of lish, a few days ago, wait­

ing for u train, and killed time by re

latiug their exj>erieiue-, S.veiul prettj

stout yarns were naiiatnl, when u long-

armed Mijinesotian, who appeared tt

be u resident of the town, and had up

patently taken a great interest in tht

stories, interrupted the meeiing by

saying that he was possessed of fuctt

that would discount any that had been

cited. What he was about to tell wat

true, because it had been his own ex­

perience. Alluding to some remarkh

that had hi cu made ubout the rapid

growth of lish in Mmm sotu waters, hi

said that four year* ago he caught u

three pound IMSS. AS he did not want

small lish lie tluvw the body back intt

the Water, hut belole doing bo tied |

little toy tin whiotle to its tail. Thiei

years later he caught the same hh,

which weighed ban pounds, ai.d the Un

whistle hail grown to be an euoruiom

fog horn. The stuteimait was not dis­

puted. I.'ku-ijo /-/

productive, the crops would find s

ready market among the mining popu­

lation

AM it in for all dlaasaea or the KIDNEYS,

LIVER AND BOWELS.

Zt oleansM Uio nyitcm or llio acrid potion

tlint oiuaca tho n:rsf-ii: HTOCK OF

CROCKERY AND

DREW LADIES' SEMINARY,

( A1 {311: L, N. Y.

Begin* i/n Fait Term, Sept. 7th, 1881.

Those Beeldng brood home care and tliomujrb

Insi ruction tor their daughters should send for

circular or visit IU

UEO. C. SMITH, A. M.

THE

STANDAEB

SILK

or TUB

W0BLD.

CUPPINUS r Olt THE CURI0U8.

Ftuoigation of brimstone is of Roman

origin.

The Gauls love to deoorate tbeu

helmets, swords and bnokles with coral.

A crown of red-hot iron was ao

ancient punishment for rebels and regi­

cides.

The Emperor Augustus in his lettei

writing dated even the divisions of the

hours.

Coleridge and Goldsmith wrote " Tht

House that Jack Built" and "Goody

two-shoes."

By the Saxon laws twelve y

Fair WVi^lits,

Full Mrasurr.

T II K Ii A 1> I £ H

ARE ESPECIALLY INVITED TO CALL AND INSPECT

KIIOi: OKJMHV]H£]| T T,

it bavlug been repleulsbed with a full line of Prosit Oooda.

Ladlt'a% Misses' aud Children*' French and American Kid hoei*

t&T Tho rtcout lurge purehuuoH of litXi'J'S & BHOES direct from the Manu­

facturer ejuil .1. .•- 11.-- t • > i.il 1 at lloduood Price*, and wo take pleauure in being

Clin I -led to sell to OUT J»ut lolls

Die BEST GOOD at the LOWEST PRICES!

MAX STABLER & C-^.,

ONE PRICE CLOTHIERS.

+~m~*~

Full and Complete Stock in all the Latest Styles

Men's and Boys' Clothing.

A STOCK OF 1>KY GOODS

M:\j:n j:x(i:i-iJ:i> I

A STOCK OF O It OC Fit IKS

Jju: iJ:KV BH0<

A STOCK OF CLOTHING

Kcj-lciiislicil with cvt-rv cliuiij^c ul tin- M-USOU !

A STOCK OF HOOTS AM) SHOES

I NKVlAJ.LKO JN VAJilET) . OJ0 ifmjT laf ftMAll «'

F. i:. rosTKirs.

We Still Maintain Our Popular Low Prices,

ME.N'b iJl'lTS SMIW to |ttWi

MEN'S oVKKUMTb AN1> ILUlJUtU 0 Oil to a* 00

MKN'h YASTAUtOS* t W to b IV

Hois Ml l> 4 OU 10 10 OU

lions' 1'W.ltl ll.Vl.s U Ul to U(s)

rllll.UltEN'S MMK * 00 tO 1000

« nn Did.N > o.NKio CA is y 6o to is oo

s\iMI'I.N OF t.OOD SKST » Hlr: OF ( HAKOF.

HmilpV MenUitiir t.iM-n with Each suit. Scud for ear New lilustratt^

Catalogue, with Rules for Keif-Measurement,

••*•-•

HAX STADLUtt & CO.,

Mio A W7 iJUOAl'WAV.

| .-KM K fillMt SiUKK-r.

,iw A «iti Kiuu'j'u Avanun;

» UKNKK K(.1(11 KlU WTMICI^

VOJili.


T

Putnam County Standard.

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1881.

First Baptist Church.

Rev. R. B. .Tomw, Piurtor. Sorvlccs: rrpnchlnfr

11 n. m., and 7:»o p. m. KnliUntti School, ».8o n. in.

Hnbbntli School Tcnclicrs'mcoilnB, Tumdny 7:80

? . m. Prayer meeting, Thursday 7:80 p. m.

ou arc invited to to attend nil these services,

And are assured ot n hearty welcome-

M. E. Church.

StmnAV.—rrenchlnp nt n a. m., and 7:80 p. m.

Sunday School nnd pastor's Hlble class, »:Bo a. m

Younp people's l'rnycr meeting, 8:W> p. m., and

general church meeting, 6:>MI p. m. Teacher's

meeting every Monday evi-nlnp. Young People's

cottage Prayer mooting every Tuesday evening.

Oeneral Prayer meeting on Wednesday evening.

Young People's ("lass meeting, Tuesday evening,

children's Class meeting every Friday evening.

Presbyterian 8crriccs.

Regular Service at the Central Presbyterian

Church Sunday at 11 a. in. Sunday School at 9

a. m. Prayer meeting on Tuesday evening at 7.8».

Regular service at the itnptlst Chun h, Brews-

tern, on Sunday evening at 7.B0 o'clock. Sunday

School at 8.B0 p. m. Prayer meeting on Wodnes-

d ly evening at 7.80.

Episcopal Church.

Sunday school at P:Sna.m. Divine Service nt

n ii. in. nnd 7:80 p. m.

BREWSTER LODGE, I. 0. O. F.

Meets on Monday Evening at 7.80 p. m.

Tittt.O Tnblca.

IIA If I.I M BAll.ROAl).

Trains I^enve Brewslers for New York at 0:88

A. VL; 8:B1 A. M.; 8:18 P. M.; 0:ft5 P. M.

IiCave llrewsters for Pawling at 10:85 A. M. 0:58

P M.

"Leave Brewslers for Chatham and Albnny at

lt:1BP.M.;K:4BP. M.

Leave i.i;.inl central Depot for Brewsters at

8:M A. M.;-10:80 A. M.: 8:50 p. M.; 4:55 P. M.

NKW YORK CITY A NORTHERN RAILROAD.

Ijeave Brewsters for New York, 5:45 A. M.; T:i«0

A. M.; 8:80 P. M.: 7:85 P. M. ,

UMTC Beet r Street, New York, 8:48 A. M.; 8:84

P. M.; 4.00 P. M.

NEW YORK A NEW KNOLAND HA1LBOAD.

Leave Brewsters for Boston at 5:18 A. M.; 4:88

P.M.

Leave Brewsters for Danbury at 18:03 P. M.;

0:18 P. M.

Leave Banbury for Brewsters at 7:18 A. M.;

8:8* P. M.

The trains to and from Banbury make Blow

ooane.tlon at Brewsters with trains arriving

fro n nnd going to New ork via N.Y.C. A s.U.K.

Train Leaves Boston tor BratrBten at ltM p. M.

SI NBAY TRAINS.

On the Harlem road the milk train reaches

Brewsters going north at 10tM a. in. The pas­

senger train arrives at 11:88. Going south the

passenger train leaves Brewsters at 5:85 p. in.:

milk, 8:45.

On Uie Northern roan" the passenger train

leaves 63rd SL at V:(ifl a. m. nnd arrives in Brews­

ters nt ISron in. The train returns at 4:80 p. m.

on the New England road a train Is run In

connection with tlie above which reaches Dan-

bury at 18:38 and leaves on the return trip at 4

o'clock.

Special Announcement.

A new seamless Kid Glovo, in three

and four buttons. Something very elo-

S mt. Every pair warranted, at Marcus

Belt's great Dry Goods Bazaar, cor.

Main St. and Park Ave., Brewsters, N.

HAPPENINGS.

President Arthur was fifty-one years

of age on Wednesday last.

Mr. Garrie C. Mead's Baker Boy car-

red off third money in the 2:40 race at

New Milford, Conu.

The school meeting for the election of

a Trustee, Collector and Clerk, takes

plaee at the town hall on Wednesday

next. Polls open from 12 to 4.

Walker Blaine is said to lw a chip of

the old block. And he is being

industriously pushed for n sent in Con­

gress by his father's Maine supporters.

G. B. Bunnell, Broadway curiosities

and variety entertainment, hail fair aud­

iences at the town hall on Monday and

Tuesday. Two performances were given

each day, afternoon and evening.

A post-office has been established nt

Tilly Foster Iron Mines, and Mr.

Andrew Cosgriff has been appointed

postmaster. The post-office will bo lo­

cated at the store building.

The sociable of tho Ladies Aid Society

of tho M. E. Church is postponed on ac-

account of the Danbury Foir. It will

be held at the house of Mrs. John S.

Eno, on Tuesday evening of next week,

Oct, 11.

Through carelessness an error occurred

in the school report last week. Master

Frank Hino was entitled to mention as

excelling in tho first arithmetic, while

James Glecson, whose name was omit­

ted entirely, excelled in the second

arithmetic

To accommodate correspondents and

facilitate the transaction of business

relating to the coming celebration at

Yorktown, Va», tho Western Union Tele­

graph Company has just established an

office there, connected by wire with

Hampton, twenty-six miles distant, a

convenience the historic plncc never has

enjoyed before.

A feud has existed for some time be-

tween John Leonard and Patrick Mc-

Cormick, farm lal>orer8, employed by

Mr. William F. Fowler. McCormick

had some wordB with Leonard's wife on

Saturday evening, and finally Leonard

himself took a hand in tho discussion,

and aimed a blow at McCormick with n

bush-hook, which cut a gash six or

eight inches long directly along nnd be­

neath McCormick's shoulder blade.

Dr. Bayloy dressed the wound, and the

patient Mill HOOU be able to continue 11is

discussion with Mrs. Leonard, so abrupt­

ly terminated. Leonard has not been

arrested.

A sermom to young men will be de­

livered in the M. E, Church next Sun­

day night. Subject: " Lessons from tho

Life and Character of Garfield."

The new dwellings, just now neariug

completion at tho Tilly Foster Iron

Minos, will acooinuioduto ubout forty

families. Messrs. Armstrong and Dale

have tho contract for completing, before

Nov. 15th, tho work begun by Peter

Boo.

• ^ _

Uncalled for letters remaining iu post

' office, at Brewsters, Putnam County, N.

Y., week ending Out. 7th, 1881: Miss

Mary Cary, Mrs. Elizalieth Goodhue,

Miss Mary E. Huren, Miss Mary Kier-

neu, Mr. James Prideaus, Miss Flora E.

Pugsley, Mr. Geo. Williams.

A. F. LOBDELL, P. M.

- '4*«i>

The sudden change iu the weather has

" set a good many people a thinking,"

and most of them have made up their

minds to go to Barnum's Great Chatham

Square Clothing House and procure.

suitable clothing for winter wear. This

old established house lius became so cel­

ebrated for fair dealing uud perfect fit­

ting that it is with difficulty they are en­

abled to fill their orders. Recently

largo additions huve been made to the

tailoring department, and, with the

added help of twenty-six tailors just ar­

rived from Puris, Buruum A Sou foel

confident that their largely increasing

trade cuu be uccommoduted with com­

plete outfits without delay.

•>•»»

The Fifth Avenue Combinatiou has

just fiuishedd an eugugemeut of one

week at the Danbury Opera House, and

before returning to the city, will perforn

for one night only, at the town hall,

Brewsters. This celebruted company,

numbering 28 per.vm.-, will produce

" The Two Orphans," ou Monday even­

ing, Oct. loth. Reserved seats can be

lyecured ut the store of Dixon, Smith k

Co. The following reference to this

play is from an editoriul in tho Daily

Graphic;

Were aome of the olergymeu who de­

nounce the theatre to witness such a

play as that of the Two Orphans, the}'

could not avoid modifying their opinions.

Though French iu its origin, the play is

HO purely wholesome in its tone, and

preaches sib j>owerl'ul u sermon uguinst

vice, that its iuflueuee must be altogeth­

er good.

•••••»•

Mr. Mills, the apostle of ensilage, or the

preservation of crops iu u green state for

fodder, the possibilities of which he is

illustrating ut Arruheck farm, Peiuptou,

. J., lays down the followiugjeouditionn

tiul to success: Air must be per-

•xcludud from the pit or silo by

ui and continuous pressure of

da to the square foot; the crop

have flowered before being cut,

e knives should be sharp enough

tear the saccharine sacks. Last

Mr. Mills fed fur seven months 140

uniuiuls, cows and horses, from ten acres

of corn fodder. The lust summer he fed

for six weeks 140 milch cows, from live

acres of outs sown iu the spring, and he

believes that during the coming winter

and until his corn crop for 1882 is ready

he can, in spite of un inferior yield oc-

l.v the drouth, keep 100 cattle

on the corn (udder cut lrom twenty-live

teres. ^Ir. Mills stutt-s thut one ton of

trass preserved K'ecn in a ado possesses

,i great feeding capacity as twenty tons

the beat buy. These are startling

*uro*, but if anyone feels disposed to

Among the "accidents of history" tho

Chicogo Intcr-Occan placed the throw­

ing of a train from the track by a cow,

which delayed a friend of both Sherman

and Garfield at a country statiou, which

caused him to meet and talk over the

coming Chicago conventiou with another

friend of Sherman's, which lead the first

to impress upon the second the necessity

of Garfield's heading the Sherman

delegation from Ohio, which resulted in

the second's persuading Sherman to per­

sonally request that favor of Garfield,

which was the causo of GarfieM's attend­

ing the Chicago convention, of his

being nominated for tho presidency and

thus of his tragic death. That cow will

take its place in history with Mrs.

O'Leary's, which kicked over the lamp

that burned Chicago.

resident Arthur was married iu 1850

to Ellen Louis Herndon, Fredricksburg,

Va, She was a daughter of Cuptaiu

William Dewis Herudou, U. S. N., who

in 1851-2 gained world wide fume na

commander of the naval expedition sent

by the United States to explore the

River Amazon. Tho herioc death of

Captain Herndon, while in coniuiuud of

tho United States mail steamship Cen­

tral America, some twenty years ago, is

still fresh in the memory of many, aud

was one of the noble deeds of which the

American navy will alwuys lie proud.

Mrs. Arthur died suddenly iu the early

port of January, 1880, leuviug two

children—Chester Allen Arthur, now

aged 15, and Ellen Herndon Arthur, now

aged 8.

Notice!

The annual election of a Trustee,

Collector, and Clerk, in School District

No. 13, will be held at town hall,

Wednesday, October 12th. Polls will

be oj>en from 12 m. to 4 p. m.

HOWARD E. FosTRit, Dirt, Cleric

Brewsters, Sept 28th, 1881.

The County Ticket.

Tho Republicans of Putnam County

have placed a remarkably strong ticket

in the field. Mr. Everett's record nt

Albnny will help him immensely in the

present fight, nnd tho excellent nomina­

tion for School Commissioner nnd Coun­

ty Clerk gives us grent confidence of 800* j '"8 waB co °l. ft "d when plenRiirc-soekerB

cess. Of their merits we shall hnvo

won 1 to snV in the future.

The Daiihury Fair.

Once more Old Prob. has favored Out

ngrieulturnl friends with fine weather,

and the fair of 1881 is passing down into

history, leaving a more famous name

than nny of its predecessors. Wednes­

day was a cold, blustering day, but the

show of cnttlc, etc,, was Inrgcr than over

befOTB, On Thursdry, notwithstanding

the facilities for reaching the fair grounds

by roil, tenuis begnn passing through

Brewsters bound enstwnrd ns enrly as

6.80 a. m. Conductor Trowbridge's

train from Pawling, due here at (1.32 a.

m., brought down about 50 persons who

desired to get an early start. The morn-

Tho Tilly Foster Stores.

Tho opening of the Mntnmoth Stores,

nt the Tilly Foster lrom Mines, took

place on Monday. A better appointed

building for carrying on the business

could not be planned. It is complete

from cellar to nttic. A railroad track

branching off from the New York city

and Northern 11." B. delivers tho cor

loads of goods directly in rear of tho

building, and the work of unloading is

comparatively easy. The barrels and

boxes are allowed to roll or slide down

into tho cellar, and from there by means

of an easy working elevator, upon which

one man can raise a ton, tho goods arc

hoisted to any of tho floors above. Upon

the basement floor wo find the salt fish

of all kinds, pork, lard, butter, cheese,

flour, etc. There is nlso a furnace for,

the purpose of heating the building.

Tho first floor is tho the main business

found out that no trains left for tho fair

until 8.58 a. m., a dozen of them started

out on foot, saving, provided they made

the return trip on foot, 35 cents, and ap­

parently enjoying the exhileroting exer­

cise. Conductor Micklo's train from

Chatham, due at 8.51, landed nearly 200

passengers here, and they were immedi­

ately transferred, by wagon and on foot,

to the New England depot, in time for

the 8.50 train.

Teams rolled into town from every di­

rection from nine o'clock until noon.

Tl e country was favored with a fine rain

on Saturday ond Sunday last, but tho

dust was just as intolerable as ever.

The special train on tho New York City

A- Northern road, due here at 10.50, was

so crowded that it did not arrive until

nearly noon. About 1000 passengers

were upou the train. All the standing

room, both inside and outside tho cars,

wan occupied. At many stations on tho

Northern road tho supply of excursion

tickets gave out, and passengers were

room. The long shelves arc loaded j obliged to pay regular fare. Carmcl

down with every conceivable article of , turned out the largest delegation. Those

general merchandise. Few families will j who had huckleberry money left from

need supplies which cannot bo found the Coney Island excursions swarmed

there. Tho second floor will be filled down from the surrounding hillsides,

with ready-made clothing, gents' furnish- j covered tho platform, and made largo

ing gwxls, overalls, jackets, carpets, oil footprints on tho frosty lsiards. Tho

cloths, window shades, paper hangiugs, ] merchant from his business, tho dentist

etc. On the second floor is nlso a sleep- from his cosy homo, the politieians from

iug-room for employees of the store. On

the first floor there is a fire proof vault,

book-keeper's office, and Supt. Cos*

griff's private office. Tho attic will bo

ueed for storing purposes. On Monday

morniug Messrs. Mnttison aud Green

and their assistants were busy putting

up orders aud packing away goods. A

larRe delivery wagon, drawn by a couple

of sturdy-looking bay colts, of Cnpt.

CosgrifTs raising, is constantly on the

road. Extensive coal sheds arc about to

be constructed. An advertisement will

b-j fouud elsewhere.

The body of the notorious young

scouudrel who occasionally uuswered to

other names but wus universally known

as Billy the Kid, and who was happily

killed last July, was buried iu u long

neglected cemetery near Fort Sumner.

Five days afterward the body was snatch­

ed from the ground, conveyed to Las

Vegas, New Mexico, uud slipped into the

private office of a physician iu that place.

There the head wus removed, uud ufter

sufficient manipulation the skull assum­

ed the polished and cleuuly uppeuruuue

appropriate to such u relic. The body

was buried again iu a secret pluce to

avoid discovery and allow excitement to

to subside, and in due time the complete

skeleton of Billy the Kid will dangle

before the delighted eyes of the studetits

iu some medical college. This is the

story told by Tin Lu« Vegas QpUct

but that organ may have been too much

dilated to discern the facts in the case

clearly.

«.»•»

Neil Gilinour, Superintendent of Pub­

lic Instruction, writes to Miss Susan B.

Anthony that under the law pusscd lubt

whiter women who are legal voters ut

school meetings may .be divided into

three classes: First, any womuu who is

a resident of the district, of the uge of

21 years, entitled to hold lauds in this

State, and who dcies own or hue real

estate in the district liable to tuxutiou

for school purposes; second, uuy woman

who is a citj/.'-n of the United State.-.,

above the age of 21 years, u resident of

the district, uud who has permanently

residing with her a child of school uge,

who hus ut tended the school of tho

district for u i>eriod of ut least eight

weeks withiu the yeur preceding the

time at which the vote is otter* d; third,

uuy woman who is a citizen of the

United States ul*»ve the uge of 21 year.-.,

u resident oi the district, uud whose

uunio is actually on the lust precediug

town usseusment roll for ]H-rsouul prop­

erty exceeding $50 in value, exclusive

of such us is exempt from execution.

Km oilment is not necessary ut school

meetings. It is only uoocssury thut the

A Kenmrknble Career Ended.

Henry F. Durant died in Boston last

Monday night, in his sixtieth year* Ho

was for years a successful nnd distinguish­

ed lawyer, and was intimately associated

with KMfus Choate, who called him "tho

velvet-footed Durant," and named his

inner office "Durant's sweet-box." Ho

wus remarkably keen, wily, quick of

comprehension, rich in resources, full of

expedients and surprises, An iudcfatigablo

worker, and not over-scrupulous us to

the means he employed to win success.

He built up a lucrative practice, aud

became very rich. In 1803 his son, u

young man of rare promise, died sudden­

ly, after a brief illness. This bereave­

ment chnuged tho whole tenor of Mr.

Durant's life. Ho gave up his profitable

practice, studied religion, prayed, exhort­

ed others to sock peace of mind and lay

up riches in heaven, nnd becamo a lay

evangelist. His gifted wife, a Southern

lady.of strong character, seconded his

new efforts. But he was not content

with merely exhorting others to he and

do good. Iu 1873 he planned a college

for young women at Wellesley, about

fifteen miles west of Boston, which was

finished and opened iu 1K75, the coin-

pletest aud most elegant institution of

its kind iu the world. It cost him

$1,000,(100, uud in addition to its erect ion

uud endowment he has given $50,000 a

year since it wus opened to iucreuso its

usefulluess und attractions. One of his

later efforts wus to form u society for the

aid of young, gifted women who ure too

lioor to secure uu education. In these

philanthropic efforts he had the coiistunt

sympathy uud aid of his wife, aud he

showed his thorough disinterestedness

by refusing to uttich his imine to the

institution ho founded uud so liberally

equipped. In these duys u greut deal of

odium hus been oust upon the religious

profession, and with good reason; for in

many cuses it hus been used us u musk

to hide selfish uud even criminal designs.'

A greut deul of religious exhortution is

mere cunt. But there ure notable

example.-, of sincerity which eoniptl

uduiirutiuu, and Mr. Duruiit showed his

faith by his works, which will be un

enduring monument to his memory. It

would be well if other rich luwyers and

professing Christians would follow his

noble example.

their wires, tho gentleman of leisure

from the absorbing game of "tups"—all

scrambled together nnd most of them

succeeded iu gettiug on bonrd. No pas­

sengers were allowed to get ou bonrd at

Brewsters. The regular 12.03 p. m.

train followed close on the heels of the

special, and picked up such passengers

as had liecu unable to get on board tho

preceding train. The 12.80 p. in. spec­

ial from Brewsters to the fair grounds

curried a largo numlier of people who

had come up the Harlem on the noon

express. At Brewsters 8IG tickets for

the fair grounds were sold on Thursday

morning. Over 100 regular tickets for

Danbury were also Bold, a great many

people calling for a ticket for Daubury

who simply wanted to go to the fmr

grouuds. In the hurry nnd rush thero

wus but little time for the ticket ngent to

offer explanations. All the livery teams

in BrewBters were engaged for the fair,

and although it in our impression that

the number of teams at the fair on

Thursday was not as great as last year,

we do not believe there was any percep­

tible decrease in tho number from this

vicinity. Tho crowd of people on Thurs­

day was undoubtedly larger than on any

previous day.

The show iu tho tents and hi the

building is about tho same as usual; the

only noticeable addition is a chicken-

hatching machine and a hose-curt. Mo.

lasses candy, pancakes aud peurlinu di­

vided the attention of a great number of

people, who were only waiting for the

trot to begin ; then the tents liccomo

suddeuly deserted, and the small boy

Creeps cautiously up to the apples and

pcucheH and breaks up the prize dozens.

Tho tent shows uro more numerous

than ever, and of a better grade. Bun­

nell's museum uud variety entertainment

wiui full all day long, the receipts of the

concern uuiouutiug to more than $000.

Dr. Kuox got 10 cents euch for 2120 ad­

missions to his side show. Boasted sau­

sages and oyster soup form the chief

ui tides of diet, and sweet cider the prin­

cipal beveruge. Connecticut's severe

pedlar law, which exacts $25 from every

liou-resideut pedlur, has somewhut cur-

tuiled that branch of industry.

Before the races begun u lot of carrier

pigeons were let go from the judges

stand, uud they sailed oil' into the woods

ou the north, evidently looking for olive

brunches.

.1. O. Smith's Lady Kcudd hud uu easy

victory in the 2.50 race, the fastest time

being 2.45. She wus sold to W. C. Duly

of Hurtiord, before the nice was finished.

Lady Scudd is the most promising horse

entered iu the Westeru Connecticut cir­

cuit this year. After live heats the 2.:J">

ruee wus won by Low Tullmuu, a Turry-

town horse. The best time was 2.84 J. A

running race and u '•tournament" con­

cluded the sport of the ufteruoon.

The urrungemeuts for running sjieciul

truiua were not of ihe best. The uum-

l>er of curs wus entirely inudequute, uud

(Juiteau will Uu tried before the no person was uble to tell, until the

Supreme Court of the District of Colum- j train sturted, lor whut point it wus

bia. The District Attorney, in bringing liound. People who wiuited to go to

bun before this court, is uwure thut the

court hus no jurisdiction in cuses where

the offence wus begun here uud death

followed elsewhere. This deciniou, how­

ever, wus given very many years ugo uud

the recent uuthorities ure till in fuvor of

the jurisdiction of u court over un

offender in the place where the offence

wus begun. ll(initean hus counsel, it

is not unlikely thut the question muy be

cullied Up before final sentence be plo-

uouueod upon him. The District At­

torney hus hut little doubt that (Juiteuu's

defence will bu iusuuity and if he should

Danbury, Hiiwleyville and New Milford

came to Brewsters. A person once in­

side u cur could not get out until the

train wus unlouded. 'ihe (»..">."> traius on

tiie Harlem loud wuitcd for the 0,10 liaiii

from the fuir grounds, which did not ar­

rive here until 7.'25 p. m. But tlii.s is

the first yeur of running speoul truius,

uud allowance.-, must be mude for all

short-comings.

Besides the perils of broken roils,

obstructions on the truck, misplaced

switches, and multitudinous other sources

desire to plead guilty he will not be ! of danger iu railwuy truvcl, trains now

allowed, us the Court -eiieially ivhiscs sccui to he exposed to danger of deruil-

|0 uooept such u plea in u cupitul ease, UUittl b» their own unruly occupuuts.

Guiteuu hus hud several offers from 'I'm other day a stock train caluc to

luwyers in different ports of the country grief on the Mi^ouri I'uchic iiuilroud.

to defend him, some of them men of lair li junqn-d the truck, tore up the ruils

icputution. Tne great queMiou, how- for u long distance, uud deluyed ull tmwJ

ewr, is whether Ouitcuu cuu he token

from the jail to court and 1 uick uguiu

without being mobbed. ThieuU. Uuve

been mude to lynch him, and wry ellort

will be mode to protect him from vio-

lel.e. •. TheallllN, hiWeVel', CUllUot Lj)

lUed tor such u purpose, idlhoii^h the

woman comply with oue of the three

^•ute them Mr. Mills will gladly furu- \ divisions mentioned, in order to oom.Li-' District militia might he culled out in

^^'MJ proof, and triumphantly point to ! lute her legal u voter at seho.J liioctiugM, | case ol riot. The mihtiu have been

his k ek and huppy cows, whose rich and, the SupcriuU-nhuut su\s, her \ote

" *^^ ^ings wUt-cent a quai't more thou ought not to be refused ot such nu . t

tbe usu.i prux.

lugs.

instructed iu cose of u sigiiol of six lire

bells thi.e times to report to their

uruioiics instantly.

se\eii hours. The accident was cuusod

by u steer, which contrived to jump out

ol the car through u narrow door in

trout. The animal lell under the cars,

which were riumiug ut full speed, and

cuu&od the train to jump the tuvck,

dauiagiug the ears ond killing a

number ol the cattle. The steer which

caused the trouble was iound some

distance beyond the wieck, rolled Up in

a bloody lump no u,s to U- hardly dis­

tinguishable.

Republican County Convention.

The largest nnmlier of politicians ever

seen in Cnrmcl were in attendance nt the

Republican County • Convention on

Tuesday. The Convention did not as­

semble until 3 o'clock p. m., when Hon.

Hamilton Fish, Jr., Chairman of the

County Committee, ascended the court­

house stairs, stepped behind tho long

green-covered judges liench, nnd nipped

for order. E. W. Addis, of Southeast,

wns called to the chair, and Messrs. A.

J. Miller, of Southeast, and Eugene

Barton, of Philipstown, were chosen

Secretaries.

The following resolutions, offered by

Mr. J. G. Miller, were adopted:

Jtrsntvrd:—That the Republicans in

Putnam County, in common with the

whole nation and the whole civilized

world, profoundly deplore tho death of

.President Oarfield. They remember his

humble origin, his struggles for an cdn-

cntion, his heroism in the field, his long

and brilliant service in Congress, his

splendid administration of tho govon-

ment, his great abilities, his unerring

judgment, his pure life, his Christnin

spirit, his patience and fortitudo in the

shadow of death, and they loved him.

They believe that hat! ho lived, politics

would hnvo reached a higher plane,

party spirit would have lioen checked,

and the last vestiges of sectional feeling

would have become extinguished.

Botolvcdi—That we place implicit

confidence in tho integrity, ability and

sound Republicanism of President

Arthur, whose unsullied record gives as­

surance that under his administration

the interests of the nation will bo in snfe

hands.

Retotuodt—That tho courso pursued

by our member of Assembly, Hon.

Samuel II. Everett, iu tho election of

United States Senators to fill tho vacan­

cies produced by tho unjustifiable and

treacherous abnndonment of their posts

by Senators Conkling aud Piatt, meets

our hearty approbation.

ttenolvoAs—That tho delegates np-

pointed by this Convention to represent

tho Republicans of Putnam County in

Republican State Convention, to bo held

in tho City of New York, on the 5th day

of October instant, arc hereby instructed

and directed to vote with tho Garfield

Republicans iu the organization of said

Convention, aud also to vote with the

Garfield Republicans in electing a mem­

ber of tho State Committee for this dis­

trict.

Dated, Oct. 4th, 1881.

Following is the list of delegates pres­

ent at the Convention:

< \\ KM n,, No. 1.—Thadcus R. Ganug,

Alonzo YV. Hodden, James C. Gulick,

Hart Curry. DISTRICT, NO. 2.—William

W. Everett, John G. Miller, Nathaniel

D. Shaw, Stephen Chamberlain, George

W. Gay.

KENT.—James J. Dakin, Joshua

Griffith, Jeremiah W. Hnzon, Uriah

Terry, Nathaniel Parker, Arthur Town-

send.

PATTERSON. — Charles H. Towner,

James H. Thompson, Jr., Johu R. Yale,

Philip D. Penny, Abuer L. Crosby,

William S. Robinsou.

PI'TNAM VALIJEY.—John Dakin, Goo.

Sherwood, James O. Cole, James Sher­

wood.

Pinmr-sTowN, No. 1.—Hamilton Fish,

Jr., Hiram Van Tassell, Merritt E.

Pindar, DISTRICT NO. 2.—Thomas \V.

Jay cox. DISTRICT NO. 3.—David Rob­

inson, George McCabe, Edward Huestia,

Eugene Barton, Seth Socor, Jumes E.

Builey, Jacob G. Southard. *

SOUTHEAST.—Johu S. Euo, Theodora

Kclley, Seth O. Crosby, Ahaz S. Mygatf,

A brain J. Miller, Emersou YV. Addis,

John Day, Jemes K. Smith.

Tho first business iu order wus the

election of two delegutes to tho State

Convention, John S. Euo, of Southeast,

Ambrose Ryder, of Ciirmel, uud George

McCubc, of Philipstown, were pluccd in

iiomination. The result of tho first bal­

lot was us follows, two names being on

each ballot:

Whole number of ballots 44

Necessary for a choice 23

Johu S. Euo received

George McCabo "

Ambrose Ryder "

Blank

Mr. Euo wus duclurcd elected. The

balloting for choice of the second dele­

gate resulted us follows:

Whole number of votes cast 44

Necessary for a choice 23

Ambrose Ryder received 2:1

George McCuho " 21

Mr. Ambrose Ryder was declared elect­

ed.

The election of delegates to attend the

Senatorial Convention was next in order

uud the following gentlemen wcromuned

by their respective delegutious:

CARMEI., NO. 1.—Hurt Currry. DIS­

TRICT No. 2.—Willium W. Hart.

KENT.—James J. Dukin, Uriuh

Terry.

PATTERSON.—Jumes E. Towner, Henry

Maine.

• 1'iTNAN VAEI.EV.—Juvis W. Baxter,

Ebenemr Eickey.

PniLii'STows, No. 1.—Hamilton Fihh,

Jr. DISTRICT NO. 2.— Willium J.

Hucstis. DisiRirr No. 3.—Jacob G.

Southard,

Soi-riiEAhT.—Theodore Kelley, George

F. Bailey.

Philip D. Penney, of Patter»>on, moved

that the uominutiou of County oHic-crs

be j.o.-t polled Ulilil Oct. 25tll.

Mr. Fish spoke against the motion.

He believed thut the dcluy wus unwise

ami would bring defeat hi NOVCUIIHT.

He wuiitcd to uuil the ticket to the must

now uud let the Duuiocrucy fire at it fur

four week**. Tin" Convention hud as­

sembled lor the purpose of nominating

County officer* and he would udvise no

steps backward.

A vote being taken upon the motion

to adjourn, it wus lost us follow:

N.ws. Messrs. Guuung, Huddcn,

(iuliek, Curry, Everett, J. i>. Miller,

ed of by unction.

With a new Administration iu jxiwer,

an extra session of tho Senate close ut

huud, upprouchhig elect ions of im­

portance in scvcrul States, a Yorktown

celebrutiou ready to blossom, mid an

biteruutiouul Cotton E.vj>o»itiou just

o|H-niug its doors to the world, it would

seem to be uu unfuvorable moment for

starting a sou serpent upou its rounds

thiouuh the press. And yet such a

monster hus been simultaneously dis­

covered in the neiehborho:--i Uuui uny

I .!• r.,,|i-h,

CUt*. I ' "lit little uiul'tt

i.ni.v puukuip- Utw tue

uirl i .I'M ili'Wl

ullior.


A Porter-Hems© Steak.

At the restaurant:

"This is the portcr-honse steak, is it?"

naked the sail passenger, sitting nt the

corner table.

"Yes, sir," said the waiter, with the

air of n man who was tired telling tho

same lie a thonsand times a day, "porter-

honse steak, sir; same as yon ordered,

sir."

"Do yon cut porter-house steak from

tahtari the horns, this year ?" asked tho

sad passenger, with the intonation of a

man who wanted to know.

"8ir ? said the waiter.

"It seemed to bo a trifle tenderer last

year," tho sad passenger went on with

the air of a tired man indulging in

pleasant reminiscences of the past; "but

I remember now it was cut a trifle lower

down then. Last year you cut your

porter-honso steaks from tho curl in the

forehead, and the sirloins from the shin;

but I thing this comes from between tin­

horns. I used to live in a boarding-

house where they cut tho porter­

house from between the horns, and this

one reminds mo of them. Animal dead

this steak came from ?"

"Dead 1" echoed the astonished waiter,

"course, sir. He was butchered, sir."

"Butchered to mako a Roman holi­

day," sighed the sad passenger. "He

would 1 to more likely to make a Roman

swear. Well it was time he was killed.

He hadn't many mom years to live on

this earth. Ah, here's the brass tip

from one of his horns. Dropped into

tho steak, no doubt, while you were

slicing it off. What do you do with

those steaks when tin- guests are through

with them ?"

The waiter looked puezled. "Why,

sir." he said, "they ain't nothing left of

'em when customers get through with

'em, sir."

"Possible?" said the sad passenger,

"what becomes of them ?"

The waiter looked nervous.

"What?" he said; tho "customers oat

them up."

The sad passenger looked up with an

air of interest.

"Incredible!" he exclaimed; "I can­

not accept your statement without proof.

They may hide them under tin- chairs,

or secrete them away in their pocketa to

throw at burglars, but I cannot believe

they eat them. Here, let me see ono of

them eat this, and I will believe you.

Trust me, good waiter, I—"

But the waiter pointed to a placard in­

scribed "Positively no Trust," and went

to the cashier's desk to tell the boss to

look out for man at the corner table, as

he didn't seem to be satisfied with his

steak and he had asked for trust. -

Burlington Hawkeyr.

ports and lins a keen eye for hints about

improved modes of culture. Tho

younger members of tho family come in

for tho amusing anecdotes and scraps of

fnn. All look forward to the day that

shall bring the paper with the liveliest

interest, and if by some unlucky chance

it fails to come it is a bitter disappoint­

ment One can hardly estimate the

amount of information which a paper

that is not only read but studied con

carry into a family. They have, week

by week, spread before their mental

vision a panorama of the busy world, its

fluctuations, and its concerns. It is tho

poor man's library, and furnishes as

much mental food as he has time to con­

sume and digest No one who has

observed how much those who are far

away from the places where men most

oongregate value their weekly paper can

fail to join in invoking a blessing on tho

inventor of this means of intellectual en­

joyment— Cedar Kapidn Kc.puWo.an.

(uticiira

THE GREAT SKIN CURE.

INFALLIBLY CURK8

rrCItTNO AND SOAliT DISEASES, SCItOF-

WOVR HUMORS, UIJCRRS, OI.P

SORES AND MF.ltcrui \I. AFPRO-

TTONS WHEN AT.lj OTHER

HUMAN AGENCIES

FAtti.

T HBCTTICrRA TREATMENT, for tho cure

of skin a nil blood iiNriiscs, consist s In the

Internal UBC of crvicriu RNOI.VFNT, tho new

Blood Purifier, nnd tho external use of crocuiu

nnd cmcriu SoAr.tliP (Wat Skin cures.

For Sunburn, Tnn nnd orroisy Skin, use Ccn-

CTBA Soxr, nil exquisite toilet, bath nnd nursery

sanative, fragrant with delicious flower odors

nnd healing balsams.

An Outlaw's Wife*

The Omaha Itcpuhlican says: The

wife of the noted train robber, Jesse

James, waa formerly on Omaha girl.

The Ralston family came to Omaha after

or near the close of the war. Annie was

then a mere child. After residing there

a number of years Mr. Ralston's busi­

ness dwindled away and he returned to

Independence, Mo., and they are living

there yet

In 1874, Annie Ralston, having grown

up to 1 >e U bright and handsome young

Lady, came bock to Omaha on a visit and

was the guest of her cousin, who was

the wife of a well known busiuess man

here. Among her young gentlemen

friends was one who fell deeply in love

with her, and Bhe received his devoted

attention until he proposed marriage to

her, and then she coolly refused him.

This was entirely unexpected on his

part, and, to use a very forcible., expres­

sion, it broke him all up. He took to

drink, and soon became a moral and

nearly a physical wreck. His downfull

and ruin were due to Annie Ralstou's

refusal Up to this time he had been a

modest young man, had excellent pros­

pects and was highly resected by all

who knew him, but since that event he

became entirely changed, and his course

from that time was downward, lie is

the son of a well known professional

gentleman residing in Omaha. He is

now a wanderer in the new towns of the

rough West, and is probably leading a

wreckless life of dissipation.

Annie Ralston returned to Indepen­

dence, and one night, about a moutli

afterward, she ran away from home and

married the noted Jesse James, who it

teems, hod met the girl by chance and

courted her clandestinely until he won

her affections. Bhe was full of romance,

and no doubt become infatuated with

the bold desperado, with whose exciting

career she had become acquainted.

boon after the marriage the younger

brothers made then* famous and fatal

raid on the Northfield bank of Minne­

sota, and it was generally suspected that

the two James brothers were members

of the gang, and thut in making t heir

escape they followed the Missouri river

down to the vicinity of Kansas City. It

was thought that Jesse James would

oome to Omaha and here meet his wife.

A detective was detailed to keep a sharp

lookout for her, but she never came here

after her uiurriage. Huch is a chupter

from the history oi Annie Ralston, the

outluw's wife.

Keep Your Health.

I will give yon a few extracts that

may be of use to all. I know they are

tome:

Thousand of persons starved them­

selves into thinness, paleness and ner­

vousness by living on white bread and

sweet things and sleeping too little.

Oatmeal, cracked whoat, graham bread

and beef, with plenty of sleep would

make them plump and ruddy.

Catarrh, bronchitis and consumption

often originate in damp feet Mud,

water and snow will soon make the feet

damp, if yon wear only leather boots.

The artio overshoe is a perfect preven­

tion. If the leather boot be light, and

the arctic bo worn only when walking in

in mud or snow it is a perfect foot-rig.

The sick-room should be kept clean

and dry; no curtains, no valances, no

soiled clothes hanging about, no dusty,

carpet. Neither vessels of water nor

bottles of medicine should be left stand­

ing about An open fire is number one

among the blessings of a sick-room.

For those who aro troubled with in­

digestion, be in the sun as much as

possible, and try to to lie in the sun at

least an hour; expose the body to sun­

shine, especially the back. Those who

take plenty of exercise, eat good,

healthy food, and live in the sunshine,

will seldom have indigestion or dyspep­

sia. Tea is a most fruitful souroo of

dyspepsia, because it is usually drank to

excess.

A very noted health physician says if

you want to be healthy and live to a

good old age you must climb up stairs

and live at the top. The stairs consist

of but seven steps, and you must make

a pause on each step and follow his

directions:

First Step—Eat wheat, oats, corn,

fruits, beef and mutton, plainly cooked,

in moderate quantity, and but two meals

a day.

Second Step—Breathe good air day

and night

Third Step—Exercise freely in the

open air.

Fourth Step—Retire early and rise

early.

Fifth Step—Wear flannel next your

skin every day in the year, and so dis­

pose your dress that your limbs shall be

kept warm. Bathe frequently.

Sixth Step—Live in the sunshine.

Let your bedroom be one which receives

a flood of light, and spend your day

either out in the sunlight or in a room

which is well lighted.

Seventh Step—Cultivate a cheerful

temper. Seek the society of jolly folks.

Don't be afraid to laugh.

Oo up this this flight of stairs. Live

above. Catarrh cannot crawl up there.

Catarrh and other maladies are prowl­

ing about the basement and oonnot

reach tho floor above.—M. D.

SALT RHEUM.

Will Mclxmnld, «M8 Dearborn St., Chicago,

K ntefnlly acknowledges a cure of Salt Rheum on

ad, face, neck, arms nnd legs for seventeen

years; not able to walk except on hnnds and

knees for one year; not able to help himself for

eight years; tried hundreds of remedies; doctors

pronounced his case hopeless; permanently

cured by the cuUcura Remedies.

Get the Prices

or

WATCHES,

CLOCKS,

Jewelry AND

Silverware,

AT

PSORIASIS.

n. E. Carpenter, Esq., Henderson, N. Y., cured

of Psoriasis or Leprosy, of twenty years' stand­

ing, by the crncrHA RRSOI.VKNT Internally and

CimeniA and cmerBA HoAr externally. The

most wonderful case on record, cure certified to

before a justice of Hie peace and prominent

citizens. Allnffllcted with Itching nnd Scaly

Diseases should send to us for this testimonial In

MIL

SKIN DISEASE.

suffered

F. n. Drake, Esq., Detroit, Michigan

beyond nil description from a skin disease which

appeared on his hands, head and face, and near­

ly destroyed his eyes. The most careful doctor­

ing failed to help him, and after all had failed he

used cunci'HA HKSOI.VBNT Internally, CUTIOUOA

and CrntT'RA SOAP externally, nnd was cured,

and has remained perfectly well to this day.

R. Hampton & Co's.

Before making your purchases.

______ •

YOU WILL FIND OCR

Prices as Low

As thR Lowest,

BENSdS

CAPCINE

PLASTERS

HAVE BEEN IMITATED,

And their excellent reputation in­

jured by worthless imitations. The

Public are cautioned against buy-

tag Plasters having similar sound-

tag names. Boo that the word

CAPCINE is correctly spelled

I1WT ATS TAIN K O U 8

1IOTOGRAPH8

ARE NOW TAKKX BY

voils o m

IN HIS NEW STUDIO,

101 THaln St., llannnry.

i No more cold Iron Jammed agalnst^our head.

.T. M. F O L S O M .

FIELD GANUN,

Main Street, Rrewster*.

Announces the

O P K M I Jf

Of the

«

NEW STORE

In ni KII i.'s BLOCK, nnd that he naa stocked

the same with

Dry Goods & Groceries.

BOOTS AND SHOES.

AND THE

QUALITY in EVERY CASE

An RepreNented!

SCROFULA.

Hon. Wm. Taylor, Boston, says: " After three

months'use of the CCTICTRA HKMKDIRR, nnd n

years of as constant Buffering from humor of the

face, neck nnd scalp as was ever endured, I can

say that I am cured, and pronounce my case the

most remarkable on record. I have been so elat­

ed with my success that I have stopped men on

the street who were afflicted nnd told them to

get the < ui uii rn Kemedlcs and they would cure

them.

SKIN HUMORS.

Mrs. s, E. Whipple, Decatur, Mich., writes that

her face, head and some parts of her body were

almost raw. Head covered with senbs and sores.

Suffered fearfully nnd tried everything. Perma­

nently cured by cutlcura Hemedlea,

CUTICURA

Remedies are for sale by all druggist*. Price of

CrncrHA, a Medical .lelley, small boxes, 60c.;

large boxes, |1; C'LTICCKA HBSOI.VRKT, the new

BlOM Purifier, ft per bottle. CCTtcuRA MKIII-

CINAI. T0II.RT Sou', 85c,; CrriCl'HA SHAVINII

sow, iv.: In bars for barbers and large consum­

ers, BOC. Principal depot,

WEEKS & POTTER, Boston, Mass.

W*AH mailed free on receipt of price.

R. Hampton & Co.,

Watchmakers & Jewelers,

MAIN STREET, RREWSTER8.

Benson's Capcine

Porous Plasters

Aro tho only improvement ever

made in Plasters.

One is worth more then a dozen

of any other kind.

Will positively cure where othor

remedies will not oven relievo.

Price 25 cents.

Beware of cheap Plasters made

with lead poisons.

SEABURYA JOHNSON.

_ M nntil ncturinj; C'IIIIIIIHIH, New York.

A KIIKK KKMKOY AT I.AHT. Prln-Mct*.

MEAD'S Medicated CORN and BUNION PLASTER,

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ALE AND PORTER,

I6T" Mineral Water put up in siphon

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DAMintV. OONN., AND BREWBTER8, N. T.

PHARMACY,

M. Daragan & Co.

WILL GUARANTEE

A SAVING OF 25 PER CENT,

OH MOHK IN KVKHY 1'AIU OF

BOOTS, SHOES,

and RUBBERS

Hold now or at any otlter 11 inc.

Every Article Warranted

To be as Uood as Represented.

Tbc following figures, and a few will answer,

show bow you can save money In buying of us:

Mens'Good Rubber Hoots IS.B0

Mens' PureUutn Hoots 8.00

Mens' Solid Cult Hoots, f 1.T6 to *.00

Mens' Chicago Kip Hoots, It soles and tap.. I.M

Mens'8. Kip Hoots, it soles and tap 8.00

A NEW THIN8!

The Exteitftlou Heel

RUBBER SHOE,

The Ne wspaper in a 1 arm house

People who live ueux the great

thoroughfares, where they have access to

two or throe dailies, and a half dozen

weeklies, do uo fully appreciate the

value of u newspaper. They come,

indeed, to look upon thexu as necessities,

and they would as cheerfully do with­

out their inoruiug meal as their morning

mail. But one must be far off in the

country, remote from "the maddening

crowd," to realize the full luxury of a

newspaper. The farmer who receives

but one paper a week does not glance

over its colums hurriedly, with an air of

impatieuce, as dous your merchant or

lawyer. He begins with the beguming

aud reads to the close, not permitting

u new item or an advertisement to escape

his eye. Then it has to be thumbed by

every member of the family, each one

looking for things in which he or she is

most interested. The grown-up daughter

looks for the marriage notices, and is

delighted if the editor has treated them

to a love btory. Tht son who is just

about to engage in farming, with an

enthusiasm that will carrv bim im hj ml.

vui.ee of his father, reads all the crop re*

At the Stamp Window.

Mueller, who presides at the post-

office stamp window, dispensing minia­

ture portraits of Washington, Jackson,

Franklin and other, in lots to suit pur­

chasers, was at his post the other day,

when a queer siiecimeu of humanity

presented himself, and the following

dialogue ensued:

" Any discount on three-cent stamps

where a man buys more than one ?"

"No."

Can't ymi sell a bunch of 'em at a

reduction, same's they do street-car

ticket* ?"

•* No."

" I buy a good many in the course of

a year, and you can huve my hull custom

jes' well's not, ef you'll do the fair

thiug."

" The law don't allow any discount."

" Haven't you got some where you

hain't put the sticken on yet, that you

you could sell for less ? I can put on the

gum myself."

" Haven't any that way."

" Mebbe you've got *em without the

picture. My gal, Susan Jane, cau paint

Washington's portrait so uu'tral that

Martha herself would be fooled by it."

*' 11 you don't want to buy any stumps,

moke wuy for others who do.

" But I do want some. Ought to

knock off a little when a feller takes u

big quantity. I could get 'em up to our

village, but thought I could get them

cheaper down here where they're

made."

" You liud you can't."

"Jesso. No stamp scalpers in the

city ?"

" None that 1 know of."

" You might know of some one who

is stuck with a lot on hand that would

go cheap—sell out below cost to make

room for a new stock of fall stamps—

muu going out of business, terrific sacri-

lice of stamps, or something like that,

eh?"

"No."

" Well, then," (with u sigh), "here's

three cents ; gimme one stump and I'll

see how it goes. It it suits me 1 may

buy all my stamps of you."

"Thank you. lioekou they'll give

sutisfaction. We aim to please."

"(iood duy."

" Good day." < '>!ii«ii>ii,

>l. i .i- Li,., .ii..1 VV ...i.l Twin,

In.iH.l i - ..;.. unit llluUi Topa,

: . .nil -. ^uani'itcr, i'•.., nit*

Soot Rests,

Writing Desks,

Blooking Boxes.

.NO A (.::M.K\L ASSOUTMKNT OF

FuairiTiraB.

China, Crockery,

and Glass Ware.

TEA SETS.

I'LAIN AND DBCOHATKD IN

I CHINA.

Kfll.tll.

KUKUMII.

American,

TBTt-ATKI'K MTU IN rlllNK.SU AND

J.WAM.&K WAKK.

Vennor's Predictions!

Fur i I.I.- Ali niMi.- \\. .ii in•!, iii • 11;>i • u . s in roal v fur

MoOUAJiT'S UEVIKVV.

Suuiplf cup) mulli'd fur Hi-, ttiuiuji, J. M. biou-

VAUT, 1'uu., New York, I'Mla., ur ( Mcugo.

btA I To uidwiTi

U*. Addrca

U.Wutddiigluii, N. J.

17 Mouh, 6

uiKui ltc-oOMjiiuly

. ! i..l.ii I F. licit

I l( 1 / I l(

AXLE GREASE.

I.I ,i in tn«- world. LiiMit, lunger tium uuy

other. Alttujn lu good condition. Cured buren,

(•ui*, bruibct und ourua. CUHU l>ui little more

thuli tUe Uultutiului. t:\ery jmikuge nun lite

irnUe umri'. full fur >iie genuine, and lake no

OUl'T.

Kauiy 1'iicl.era.

• T.u I ..I-.

'• V>>Um uud h»uccr»,

" NllL-.

" V« fr.

" Tollul !». In.

" buiuke bent.

In all

MAKKS OV WA1IK,

French, (ieriuau,

EnjjIiKli, AuicricAU,

('nil.fM , Ju|i»i.i*e,

Mujw.ii ii,

Kit.. JUtC

A '.' " >l) ASSUUTMKNT OF

DECORATED CHAMBER SETS

PLATED WARE.

Tabic CMler*. Cak. UaakeU. liutler UUhM,

Fkklc Jura. Mu^.. Upoou Holder*.

\ui«-«. *JHMIII», Furaa,

CnUdJUi'k KuU.

O . >rr»

CUTLERY.

Iniiu aud Furka. pocket Knitu, Mot

I'll ka. N ut Cracker*, «lc

And no «ud tu our tart**/ wr of (umg*

USEFUL AND ORNAMENTAL.

DANlttJItY, CT.

W.T.GANUNG

The Pioneer Druggist,

HUH ut hi- Drutf s • In HrcwhlcrH tltu l.i i•;.• ••.-1 uud UCHI aauurted

-I' H h Of

I M U ^ S n i h i i i M s ,

And

Pharmaceutical Preparations

er in 111iv offered to tin.- nubile lu t hi.-- vlclulty, und In churge of und Kufeli- dlKia-nbcd by

MIt. JOHN SLOANK, u drugglM of niuny yeura exiHTlenue lu different

( n if:-, ni the United HluteH.

l > liy»ii«iHiiM' PrewerlptionM n .^i>«'«-i:ilii y :

AUiO A LAHOE AND UKAUTIFCL HTOCK OF

Fancy Goods Perfumery, Stationery, Pocket-Books,

I'llMX DIAKIEH, COMltH, IIAIK 111(1 MILS. I1AIK OILS, 1'OMAHEH, I'OCKET-

EMVE8. KA/OHH und STKOl'K, soAI'H In eodlflM vurlety, Twenty different

I. iiui.i »f TOHACCO, chewing uud Kmoklng, u greut variety of

PIPES, from one eent to |B.oo eueh, und the only

hoiibe lu town lmvlng their

CJlfgUVM M li

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