Views
5 years ago

QUANTUM METAPHYSICS - E-thesis

QUANTUM METAPHYSICS - E-thesis

QUANTUM METAPHYSICS -

Tarja Kallio-Tamminen QUANTUM METAPHYSICS The Role of Human Beings within the Paradigms of Classical and Quantum Physics

  • Page 2 and 3: ISBN 952-10-1927-1 Otamedia Oy 2004
  • Page 4 and 5: Abstract This study investigates th
  • Page 6 and 7: 4. Quantum mechanics and renewal of
  • Page 8 and 9: practically-oriented physicists. Ev
  • Page 10 and 11: me to offer new and significant mat
  • Page 12 and 13: 1. Introduction Humans have always
  • Page 14 and 15: many ontological and epistemologica
  • Page 16 and 17: existing metaphysics and took the c
  • Page 18 and 19: and significance of his thinking ha
  • Page 20 and 21: This study is an attempt to find ou
  • Page 22 and 23: mechanistic-deterministic framework
  • Page 24 and 25: such as substance, structure or pro
  • Page 26 and 27: natural causes, the pre-Socratists
  • Page 28 and 29: starting point adopted by the early
  • Page 30 and 31: permanent, since nobody could step
  • Page 32 and 33: way of not only understanding natur
  • Page 34 and 35: mistakes from the modern viewpoint.
  • Page 36 and 37: Zeno (ca. 490-430 BC) from Elea and
  • Page 38 and 39: movement of atoms in space is somet
  • Page 40 and 41: known materialist who attempted to
  • Page 42 and 43: teachings to be dangerous. 80 In hi
  • Page 44 and 45: irreconcilable opinions and explana
  • Page 46 and 47: the deeper world of ideas, even tho
  • Page 48 and 49: odies, they were no longer matter,
  • Page 50 and 51: though ideas or universals were ess
  • Page 52 and 53:

    highest part, the active intellect,

  • Page 54 and 55:

    When highlighting Galilei’s appro

  • Page 56 and 57:

    question of whether explanation onc

  • Page 58 and 59:

    accurate manner than either Plato o

  • Page 60 and 61:

    nothing more than unreal manifestat

  • Page 62 and 63:

    considered reality by modern man. 1

  • Page 64 and 65:

    were, in part, made on the basis of

  • Page 66 and 67:

    further developed by, for example,

  • Page 68 and 69:

    existence of both matter and life.

  • Page 70 and 71:

    philosophers, including Aristarchus

  • Page 72 and 73:

    inorganic world was manifested in t

  • Page 74 and 75:

    defended Copernican theory and pres

  • Page 76 and 77:

    (anima) is replaced by force (vis),

  • Page 78 and 79:

    Like Kepler, Galileo had establishe

  • Page 80 and 81:

    functions. 193 Galileo believed tha

  • Page 82 and 83:

    philosopher of science during the R

  • Page 84 and 85:

    either ancien or contemporary natur

  • Page 86 and 87:

    material dimension. 217 This world-

  • Page 88 and 89:

    Huygens (1629-1695), who continued

  • Page 90 and 91:

    influence both inside the world of

  • Page 92 and 93:

    In addition to Principia, Newton al

  • Page 94 and 95:

    the appropriate organized structure

  • Page 96 and 97:

    space. In the new way of thinking,

  • Page 98 and 99:

    view. In one broad use of the word

  • Page 100 and 101:

    In the most inclusive sense of the

  • Page 102 and 103:

    magnitudes. 269 The position and mo

  • Page 104 and 105:

    employs. 274 3.1.3. Atomism and red

  • Page 106 and 107:

    detached examination of reality, a

  • Page 108 and 109:

    from evolution on which consciousne

  • Page 110 and 111:

    The true rise of the Materialistic

  • Page 112 and 113:

    features, for example the shape and

  • Page 114 and 115:

    Classical physics is not directly a

  • Page 116 and 117:

    causal theories of action, each ind

  • Page 118 and 119:

    cognitive attribute. With their men

  • Page 120 and 121:

    actually aware. 313 In the style of

  • Page 122 and 123:

    could we even prove that they exist

  • Page 124 and 125:

    consequences would remain absolutel

  • Page 126 and 127:

    essential prerequisites of experime

  • Page 128 and 129:

    previous use of cause and effect as

  • Page 130 and 131:

    on nothing more than natural scienc

  • Page 132 and 133:

    what followed. He considered attemp

  • Page 134 and 135:

    observations. Since theory was mere

  • Page 136 and 137:

    who combined the Empiricist viewpoi

  • Page 138 and 139:

    extra trouble with the interpretati

  • Page 140 and 141:

    “objectivity” of scientific wor

  • Page 142 and 143:

    though it, in the final analysis, w

  • Page 144 and 145:

    surrounds us. This may be a problem

  • Page 146 and 147:

    and what makes states belong to the

  • Page 148 and 149:

    machines are given. 387 It is also

  • Page 150 and 151:

    predictions of the theory perhaps d

  • Page 152 and 153:

    philosophical works he also wanted,

  • Page 154 and 155:

    In recent philosophy of science, th

  • Page 156 and 157:

    connected with a transitional phase

  • Page 158 and 159:

    historical developments, but when s

  • Page 160 and 161:

    theories, the fundamental presuppos

  • Page 162 and 163:

    Collingwood’s opinion of the revo

  • Page 164 and 165:

    of the conception of reality is als

  • Page 166 and 167:

    improved understanding of the natur

  • Page 168 and 169:

    In the new quantum framework, moder

  • Page 170 and 171:

    In the light of quantum mechanics,

  • Page 172 and 173:

    presumed features as features of th

  • Page 174 and 175:

    of reality that was formed at the t

  • Page 176 and 177:

    m hν = c = 2 h λc Strictly speaki

  • Page 178 and 179:

    particulate nature proved to be jus

  • Page 180 and 181:

    possible to study the electron thro

  • Page 182 and 183:

    with each other, and in consequence

  • Page 184 and 185:

    dependent on the chosen group of ob

  • Page 186 and 187:

    Geometrically, the components z1, z

  • Page 188 and 189:

    4.1.3. Consequences related to quan

  • Page 190 and 191:

    In spite of the mathematical accura

  • Page 192 and 193:

    quantum field theory reawakens the

  • Page 194 and 195:

    possible states of the system, and

  • Page 196 and 197:

    eigenvalues or spectral values are

  • Page 198 and 199:

    eached if measurement is carried ou

  • Page 200 and 201:

    electromagnetic interactions betwee

  • Page 202 and 203:

    The best-known example of this is H

  • Page 204 and 205:

    In contrast to what is often claime

  • Page 206 and 207:

    In addition to conjugated variables

  • Page 208 and 209:

    Einstein presented the EPR paradox

  • Page 210 and 211:

    In the 1990s, when it became possib

  • Page 212 and 213:

    instruments, has been difficult to

  • Page 214 and 215:

    This does not, however, mean that q

  • Page 216 and 217:

    By assuming that theory corresponds

  • Page 218 and 219:

    Philosophers of science have often

  • Page 220 and 221:

    Problems in interpreting quantum me

  • Page 222 and 223:

    questions which have been pondered

  • Page 224 and 225:

    observational knowledge of atomic r

  • Page 226 and 227:

    knowledge of reality, an interpreta

  • Page 228 and 229:

    of the conception of reality adopte

  • Page 230 and 231:

    philosophical matters was more diff

  • Page 232 and 233:

    Even though mathematics is a langua

  • Page 234 and 235:

    this indivisibility resulting from

  • Page 236 and 237:

    epresents essential aspects of the

  • Page 238 and 239:

    Bohr’s thinking is fittingly enli

  • Page 240 and 241:

    dependent in experience. The essent

  • Page 242 and 243:

    In his later essays, Bohr applied h

  • Page 244 and 245:

    does an electron strike the screen

  • Page 246 and 247:

    wholeness of the world. The necessa

  • Page 248 and 249:

    Bohm did not fear metaphysical re-e

  • Page 250 and 251:

    the interpretation could be supplie

  • Page 252 and 253:

    concretely understood. If someone d

  • Page 254 and 255:

    materialism or Idealism have not pr

  • Page 256 and 257:

    of experience in any situation. Mor

  • Page 258 and 259:

    connection or interaction between d

  • Page 260 and 261:

    The physicist-philosophers in Copen

  • Page 262 and 263:

    Correct understanding of Bohr’s t

  • Page 264 and 265:

    independent system. 700 For his par

  • Page 266 and 267:

    subjectivistic interpretations whic

  • Page 268 and 269:

    Supporters of the hidden-variable i

  • Page 270 and 271:

    the most common direction from whic

  • Page 272 and 273:

    an epistemological solution to the

  • Page 274 and 275:

    thus create both the different obje

  • Page 276 and 277:

    ontological and epistemological que

  • Page 278 and 279:

    influence of the observer, could be

  • Page 280 and 281:

    of a collision was not an object bu

  • Page 282 and 283:

    merges with the limits of what we c

  • Page 284 and 285:

    It simply states that creative work

  • Page 286 and 287:

    Bohr stressed the irreversibility o

  • Page 288 and 289:

    oth by our beliefs and by our theor

  • Page 290 and 291:

    existence of humans can be viewed f

  • Page 292 and 293:

    comprehensive paradigm, the ”conf

  • Page 294 and 295:

    state of a system consists of the l

  • Page 296 and 297:

    expansion of the area in which it i

  • Page 298 and 299:

    5.1.2. Re-evaluation of the positio

  • Page 300 and 301:

    while at the same time considering

  • Page 302 and 303:

    interpretation of the character of

  • Page 304 and 305:

    them. 787 Even so, mathematics is,

  • Page 306 and 307:

    which is searching for invariances.

  • Page 308 and 309:

    models they create, and contrary to

  • Page 310 and 311:

    all-embracing and universal general

  • Page 312 and 313:

    In general, attempts to avoid the p

  • Page 314 and 315:

    Socio-biology or Evolutionary psych

  • Page 316 and 317:

    laws governing electrical circuits,

  • Page 318 and 319:

    subjective states and properties be

  • Page 320 and 321:

    degree of interactivity between spi

  • Page 322 and 323:

    world of matter, different mental c

  • Page 324 and 325:

    the manner in which they are manife

  • Page 326 and 327:

    state that does not show up in the

  • Page 328 and 329:

    that remains is the nature of this

  • Page 330 and 331:

    The fundamental starting point when

  • Page 332 and 333:

    It is not difficult to reconcile fr

  • Page 334 and 335:

    specific program, but the human min

  • Page 336 and 337:

    and abstract rational theories to s

  • Page 338 and 339:

    models thus created, assume an ever

  • Page 340 and 341:

    References: AALTOILA Mika (1999) Gi

  • Page 342 and 343:

    CHEVALLEY Catherine (1994) Niels Bo

  • Page 344 and 345:

    GRANIT Ragnar (1977) The purporsive

  • Page 346 and 347:

    HOWARD Don (1994) What Makes a Clas

  • Page 348 and 349:

    LECLERK Ivor (1988) The Relation Be

  • Page 350 and 351:

    PLATON (1982) Teokset V osa, Timaio

  • Page 352 and 353:

    SINTONEN Matti (1987) Positivismi.

Metaphysics of the supernatural as illustrated by ... - Infomotions
Overview/Quantum Information
Philosophy of Quantum Probability
Quantum Mechanics for Engineers - ECS - Baylor University
Quantum Metaphysics - Postmodern Openings
A DRAMATIC EXPLORATION OF QUANTUM METAPHYSICS by ...
Philosophy and quantum mechanics/philosophy of ... - CoQuS
Discrete-continuous and classical-quantum
Imagination and diversity in the philosophy of Hobbes - E-thesis ...
THE HISTORY OF QUANTUM MECHANICS
7. An Emerging Metaphysical Macroparadigm Shift from Being to ...
Pilot wave theory, Bohmian metaphysics, and the foundations of ...
The Metaphysical Foundation of Buddhism and Modern Science
The Metaphysical Foundations of Buddhism and Modern Science: Nagarjuna and Alfred North Whitehed
Reading list for the philosophy of quantum mechanics
Christian Thomas Kohl The Metaphysical Foundations of Buddhism and Modern Science
Quantum mechanic and Particle physics
The puzzle of canonical transformations in early quantum mechanics
100 Years of the Quantum - MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and ...
Losing energy in classical, relativistic and quantum mechanics
the concept of quantum state: new views on old phenomena
Nietzsche & Nihilism Exploring a Revolutionary ... - E-thesis
what does quantum physics have to do with behavior disorders ...
On the Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics I. Introduction “I think I ...
We still do not know how to interpret quantum mechanics - Theory of ...
100 Years of Quantum Mysteries - MIT Kavli Institute for Astrophysics ...
Quantum Mechanics as Quantum Information ... - Perimeter Institute