Teacher Awareness Kit - Journey Beyond Road Trauma

journeybeyondroadtrauma.org

Teacher Awareness Kit - Journey Beyond Road Trauma

journey beyond

road trauma

A Classroom Resource for Teachers and Students

JOURNEY BEYOND ROAD TRAUMA

Teacher Awareness Kit


Teacher Awareness Kit

JBRT Classroom Resources

• JBRT Curriculum Relevance

• Unit 1 - Consequences of High Risk Driving Behaviours

• Unit 2 - Driving and Prescription Drugs (Pharmaceuticals)

• Unit 3 - Dealing with Grief

• Unit 4 - Tragic Consequences of Driver Fatigue

• Unit 5 - Developing Cognitive Reasoning Skills for Personal Behaviour Assessment

Teacher Awareness Kit

• Student Awareness Kit

Teacher Multimedia Kit

• Student Multimedia Kit

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Teacher Awareness Kit

Facts & Statistics

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Approximately 1,600 fatalities and 50,000 injuries

occur on Australian roads every year. These

are staggering numbers, but it is difficult to

comprehend the enormity of these figures until

you put a face and a story to each statistic.

Road trauma is a difficult and complex issue.

It causes a ripple effect of loss and grief which

extends throughout communities. For every road

death it has been estimated that an average of

13 people are significantly affected.

A definition of the term trauma by the Australian Academy of Science*

The word ‘trauma’ is especially appropriate to describe the injuries inflicted by road crashes. The medical

profession uses it for any bodily injury or wound, but more literally it means ‘a powerful shock that may

have long-lasting effects’ – an apt description for the sudden violence of a road crash.

Various thesaurus definitions of trauma include disturbance, shock, suffering, upset, pain, strain and distress

and while road trauma is mostly associated with motor vehicle crashes, the term road trauma can also refers

to crashes involving rail, tram, motorbikes, bicycles, scooters and pedestrians.

Those affected by road trauma include those involved in the

crash, their family, their close friends, those first on the scene

and the attending emergency service workers.

Road trauma not only describes the impact of physical injuries

sustained by those involved in a road crash but the emotional

suffering suffered by people left to grieve the loss or care for

those seriously injured in crashes.

Risk driving behaviours include speeding, drink driving,

driving under the influence of licit and illicit drugs, fatigue

and not using seat belts and restraints. Licit substances

include prescription medications and inhalant misuse and

illicit substances include illegal drugs. Substance abuse can

be defined as the use of any substance for mood-altering

purposes.

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Teacher Awareness Kit

Facts & Statistics (continued)

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The NSW Government Motor Accidents Authority

claims cognitive, attitudinal, behavioural and

cultural and social factors make young people

more susceptible to being involved in road

crashes.

Young people aged 17 to 25 years are at a higher

risk of crashing than older drivers because of

inexperience and a tendency to take part in risk

taking behaviour.

State Governments and Automobile Organisations

monitor road fatalities and actively support driver education in an effort to eradicate road trauma. (see links

further on for further information)

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Teacher Awareness Kit

Background - Journey Beyond Road Trauma

The Journey Beyond Road Trauma website was conceived and created by South Australian filmmaker Sandra

Cook and New South Wales online media producer Kerry Sunderland.

When Sandra’s father died after a collision in 2004, Sandra realised that families and friends of those affected

by road crashes needed an outlet for their grief and pain.

“When you think about all the people affected by all these crashes the numbers are mind boggling,” she

says, “I’ve spoken to a lot of people affected by road trauma for both serious injuries and for fatalities and

from that I’ve understood that people affected by road trauma often feel quite voiceless when they have

so much to say. They also quite often want to do something positive or proactive so this doesn’t happen to

someone else.”

The project launched in 2010 with sponsorship from organisations including Screen Australia, the Royal

Automobile Association of South Australia, the Alcohol and Rehabilitation Foundation (which promotes

community education to prevent alcohol and other licit substance abuse) and the South Australian Film Corp.

The Journey Beyond Road Trauma website aims to provide a sanctuary for those affected by road trauma.

People can find support, join the online community, tell their story via a blog or a digital story and create a

memory space and place a Tribute Pin for a loved one.

The project also aims to inform the greater community about the people behind road accident statistics

through and educational awareness campaign.

The objective of the site is the hope that more and more people will consider their personal ability and

behaviour when driving, and thereby help to lower the number of fatalities and injuries on our roads.

It is hoped by participating in this online community and sharing stories of road trauma that many will find

solace in the stories while others will be educated about the causes and affects of road trauma.

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Teacher Awareness Kit

Dealing With Road Trauma at School

The Journey Beyond Road Trauma website is a ‘place’ where a school community can come to terms with a

road trauma tragedy.

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Though Tribute Pins, blogs and dedicated memory space

teachers and students can both express their feelings and also

find support for their grief.

Contributions such as poems, artwork and messages can be

uploaded and shared - thereby offering a degree of solace to

the individual as well as the school community.

The learning activities in the Units of Study may assist students

in understanding and rationalising an overwhelming sense of

sadness caused by closely related road trauma.

However, it should be stressed that JBRT is not a counselling service and those affected personally by road

trauma in the school community should be encouraged to seek professional support.

A list of support organisations can be found at journeybeyondroadtrauma.org/cms/support-services

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Teacher Awareness Kit

Definitions

• The term road trauma describes the impact of physical injuries sustained by the crash as well as the

emotional suffering suffered by people left to care for those injured in a crash or to grieve the loss of a

person.

• A definition of the term trauma by the Australian Academy of Science*

The word ‘trauma’ is especially appropriate to describe the injuries inflicted by road crashes. The medical

profession uses it for any bodily injury or wound, but more literally it means ‘a powerful shock that may

have long-lasting effects’ – an apt description for the sudden violence of a road crash.

• Various thesaurus definitions of trauma include disturbance,

shock, suffering, upset, pain, strain and distress and while road

trauma is mostly associated with motor vehicle crashes, the

term road trauma can also refers to crashes involving rail, tram,

motorbikes, bicycles, scooters and pedestrians.

• Definition licit drugs (dictionary.com)

legal; lawful; legitimate; permissible.

• Definition illicit drugs (dictionary.com)

1. not legally permitted or authorised; unlicensed; unlawful

2. disapproved of or not permitted for moral or ethical reasons

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Teacher Awareness Kit

Bibliography

Nova: Science In The News (Online Publication August 2006)

http://www.science.org.au/nova/070/070key.htm

Statistics

Australian Government Department of Infrastructure and Transport

Road Crash Statistics

http://www.infrastructure.gov.au/roads/safety/road_fatality_statistics/index.aspx

This site includes data from a variety of sources including the Australian Bureau of Statistics (ABS) and

Australian Transport Safety Bureau publications, and police road crash data collected by the New South Wales

Roads and Traffic Authority.

References

Accident and Education and Rehabilitation Foundation Ltd

http://www.aerf.com.au/

NSW Government Motor Accidents Authority Youth Injury Prevention

http://www.maa.nsw.gov.au/default.aspx?MenuID=156

NSW Motor Accidents Authority Youth Road Safety Campaign

www.arrivealive.com.au

South Australian Department of Transport Energy and Infrastructure

http://www.dtei.sa.gov.au/roadsafety

Journey Beyond Road Trauma Website

www.journeybeyondroadtrauma.org

RACV

http://www.racv.com.au/wps/wcm/connect/internet/primary/road+safety

RAC WA

http://rac.com.au/About-Us/Community/Community-education.aspx

RACQ

http://www.racq.com.au/motoring/driving/road_safety/road_safety_documents

NRMA

http://www.mynrma.com.au/about/secondary-school.htm

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