Susen Hunter

hardlyclerkin

Susen Hunter

Susen

Hunter

Vegan

Visionary

Cori

Emmett:

Released

Page 6

Goldskye

Ranch Resort

Fun Family

Getaway

Page 15

MAY

2013

FREE

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CONTENTS

MEMORIES OF YESTERYEAR

THE FOOD CHAIN

BY ARLIE WOOD

PAGE 12

THE DOMESTIC DIVA

CELEBRATE CINCO DE MAYO

WITH FRESH SALSA


TAKE A DAYCATION

DAVIS, OK

BY JIM JOPLIN

PAGE 18

TAYLOR B’S BEAT

“ACCIDENTAL RACIST”

PAGE 30

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OKIE MAGAZINE www.okiemagazine.com Page 3


Susen Hunter spent her

formative years on an awardwinning

dairy farm in Pennsylvania.

She was a member of 4-H clubs

for horses, dairy, livestock, and

gardening, as well as a member of

the United States Pony

Club and the Future

Farmers of America.

Her family’s 400 acre

operation ranked as

one of the top three

dairy farms in the

state, and she often

competed at the state

and national levels in

many events with a

variety of animals and

projects.

Her diet was

dairy-free due to her

intolerance of lactose

which was diagnosed

when she was a baby.

Then, when she was

13, she had a traumatic

experience that would

set her on the course

to eventually becoming

vegan. This turning

point came after a

male calf had escaped

from an enclosure and

she found him curled

up asleep with two of

the family dogs. She

adopted him as a pet

and named him Fat

Face. Fat Face learned

to come when she

called, and she moved him into the

horse barn and pasture where he

stayed with the horses and dogs.

Over the course of several weeks,


personality and enjoyed being

spoiled.

Susen was deeply attached

to Fat Face, but the time came

Susen Hunter

Vegan Visionary by Audrey Dolar Tejada

when her father loaded him up

with the other male calves to

take to auction.No amount of

pleading could spare his life.

Susen realized the fate that

awaited him. Despite the sanitized

advertising and euphemisms

used in the agribusiness industry,

Fat Face would be taken to a

slaughterhouse. From that point

forward, Susen never again ate red

meat.

Eventually, she would go on to

be a pescetarian in her 20s (vegan

except for the consumption of sea

food) and then ovo-pescetarian in

her 30s (vegan except for eggs and

sea food.) By the time she reached

40, she was ready to commit to

being 100% vegan (no animal

products consumed at all.)

Susen believes

people should adopt a

vegan lifestyle for three

main reasons. First,

the consumption of

only plant based foods

results in overall better

health. “The standard

American diet has led

to more heart disease,

cancers, and other

diseases prevalent in

our society,” she said.

“Three out of every


attributed directly to

what someone has put

in their mouth. Decades

of research prove that

plant based diets are

a healthier alternative


Second, plant based

agricultures are more

easily sustainable

and have a less

harmful impact on the

environment. Finally,

being vegan means

choosing compassion

over cruelty.

What is often

perceived as “the

preaching or arrogance

of vegans,” she said, is actually “an

overwhelming sense of sadness

and frustration felt by vegans who

know how animals are really treated

on farms, in slaughterhouse,

in circuses, in zoos, and in

laboratories.” She shows me a new

tattoo on her right arm. “AHIMSA”

is written out in an elaborate script,

OKIE MAGAZINE www.okiemagazine.com Page 4


harm none. It is a Buddhist, Hindu,

and Jainist principle of nonviolence,

compassion, and respect for all

sentient life.

After high school, Susen earned

multiple degrees, including a B.S. in

Psychology, a B.A. in Comparative

Religions, and an M.A. in

Education. She is also an ordained

minister with a D. Div. degree and

has performed over 2,000 wedding

ceremonies.

After retiring

from an

earlier

career,

she went

to culinary

school and

earned her


as a sous

chef. She

has taught

cooking

courses at

the Penn

State and

Purdue

extension

programs and

spent some time in the Caribbean

where she was a private chef

aboard yachts.

After settling north of Nashville,

Tennessee, Susen landed in

Lawton four years ago for family


thought was, “What am I going to

eat? I’m going to starve.”

She was quickly installed as the

produce manager at the Health

Food Center at the corner of

Sheridan and Gore. “Thirty years

ago, we ate tofu, beans, rice, nuts,

fruits and veggies. That was it,”

she recalled. Since then, vegans

have achieved critical mass in

the mainstream with companies


enjoy.

As a result, the Health Food

Center now has a large selection of

prepared vegan foods, faux meats,

dairy-free cheeses, and dairy-free

milk alternatives. Susen expanded

the produce section, and organic

produce now arrives twice a week

to restock. Year round, there are

several varieties of apples, citrus,

greens, fresh berries, sprouts, and

salad mixes, along with organic

garlic, ginger, and more. The store

also stocks the staples found in

the vegan kitchen, such as quinoa,

rice, tofu, nutritional yeast, and raw

nuts.

For people who would like to

transition to veganism, the number

one step, she said, is to “Cut out the


sweeteners, and high fructose

corn syrup are the top priorities to

eliminate. Become aware of what

you put into your body; start to

consciously think about what you

eat. Transition to more plant based

foods every day. Cut the red meat,

poultry, and other meats. Then,

cut dairy and eggs out of your diet.

Whatever you want, believe me,

there is now a vegan version.”

As we sit together in her historic,


Russell terriers, Poohkie and

Buttons, are at her feet. The dining


of antique pewter wares, vintage

china, Victorian era furniture, and

a large,original oil painting of the

Hunter family castle in County

Ayrshire, Scotland. Her Lawton

homestead includes an acre of

land inside city limits on which she

creates a lush and bountiful organic

garden.

Susen preserves, cans, and

dehydrates her own produce, hosts

juicing parties with friends at her


to cater a vegan party on-site as a

personal chef.

She can often be found

representing

the Health Food

Center at local

health fairs

at Cameron

University

and Ft. Sill.

Susen teaches

cooking classes

for several

organizations

around town

including a

bariatric support

group.

She also has

been active in

the Plant-a-

Row campaign

encouraging gardeners to plant

extra rows of vegetables earmarked

for donation to the Lawton Food

Bank.

Her dream is to open a vegan

deli and raw juice/smoothie bar in

Lawton to give people a healthier

option than the fast food and chain

restaurants that are available. With

the high demand for healthier food

choices, the concept is a much

needed and welcome addition to

our community.

Overall, Susen brings

tremendous creativity and a wealth

of knowledge about the vegan

lifestyle and urban homesteading

to Lawton. She is a visionary and a

pioneer with decades of experience

behind her who hopes to be a

catalyst for change in Lawton by

introducing a healthier way of living.

You can follow Susen’s healthy

living chef page on Facebook

atwww.Facebook.com/GreenVees.

OKIE MAGAZINE www.okiemagazine.com Page 5


y hanging lanterns, Oklahoma

singer Cori Emmett was embracing

her freedom. She stood in front

of a microphone with oversized

headphones on and sang and

did not leave this space. But each

song she recorded for “Released”

suggests she was soaring.

There is little wonder why

Emmett sounds like she has grown

wings and


recording in a

Nashville studio

has been her

hope since

taking part in a

talent show at


“I felt like

I have been

working all my

life on music and


free to record

this project,”

she said. “I

was recording

in Nashville

which is where

I wanted to be,

working with

people at the top of their game.”

To get there, Emmett began

playing shows throughout the

southwest Oklahoma and Texas

circuit. She gave a performance

at Tootsie’s World Famous Orchid

Lounge during the Country Music

Awards (CMA) Festival when she

was 12.

She has since gone on to play

at Toby Keith’s I Love This Bar

in OKC and Thackerville, NBA

Thunder Opening Day Celebration

and Oklahoma City’s Opening

Night New Year’s Eve Celebration

for three years. In between shows,

she began playing guitar at 13 and

Cori Emmett

Released

formed a band, No U Turn, by the

time she was 14.

A culmination of her past

success, “Released” also captures

her in the present and secures her

future in country music. Emmett

is letting loose and expressing

more than a concept or a feeling,

however. This record is about

breaking free — as a singer, an

artist and a woman.

She started making trips back

and forth to Nashville over the past

year where she learned from her

mentor, Katrina Elam, a singersongwriter

who had a number one

hit with “Easy” by Rascal Flatts and


she wanted to draw attention to

her vocal prowess, and she said

she saw the potential each track


blessed to have a friend who held

a key to hundreds of songs written

by some of the best writers in the

business, and out of these, Emmett


ready for radio before heading

to the Alex the Great Studio in

Nashville.

Sessions commenced when

Emmett joined up-and-coming

producer and Ten out of Tenn

founding member Kevin Grosh in

the studio. They started with “Girls

Night Out In Dixie,” a track Emmett


“I was like, ‘oh man, that is the

toughest one,’” she said, “because

the timing was

so tricky and

they had a

skeleton track

so all the music

was not on

there yet. I am

pretty tough on

myself because

all the others

were easy

compared to

this one.”

But she

makes it sound

easy singing


in a threatening

rumble before

taking over

like a tempest:

“We’re hell on

wheels when we show up,” she

sings, “a little bit of pretty and a

little bit of tough.” She may be

indulging in late night revelry at

the honkytonk with her female

cohorts, but she is asserting

her independence by rejecting

cowboys, too.

Emmett plots her revenge by


true dating strategy in “Act Like

A Lady.” Her scheme is far more

subtle than smashing a Louisville

slugger into car like Carrie

Underwood does in “Before He

Cheats,” but Emmett does more

damage by whispering sweet little

Photography by Steve Miller

OKIE MAGAZINE www.okiemagazine.com Page 6


lies, dancing with other guys and

calling back when she feels like it.


but induces chills when adding a

touch of vibrato to a single note

or lifting her voice to harmonize

on “Try,” a track written in part by

Hillary Lindsey and Luke Laird.

Lindsey won a Grammy Award for

Best Country Song for “Jesus, Take

the Wheel” recorded by Underwood

herself, while Laird has written with

Miranda Lambert, Lady Antebellum

and Little Big Town. The song rocks


strength and resiliency Emmett is

known for.

Emmett later admits to her one

and only weakness in “Can’t Say

No To You,” a sonnet-like country

love song. She’s nobody’s fool

and has never had a problem

with saying goodbye, but Emmett

cannot resist a good thing when

she sees it. She knows the heart

wants what the heart wants.

“Darlin’, stars shine whenever

you’re with me,” she confesses.“I

melt like the ice in my sweet tea.

I’m bulletproof; I just can’t say no

to you.” Emmett makes this song

a vulnerable moment for her as

delicate piano and guitar melodies

compliments the tenderness in her

voice. Songwriter Sarah Buxton,

who also penned “Stupid Boy” for

Keith Urban, shares songwriting

credit for this track.

Although Emmett is no stranger

to recording in studios, working on

this project was like nothing she

had done before.

“I had been in the studio doing

recordings since I was 10 years


“I didn’t just go in and record one

song. They took me through each

one and I recorded it several times

and went in and listened and chose

parts that I liked best. I knew I had

done pretty good when Kevin yelled

and got all excited and came into


Emmett said she felt as if

the producers she worked with

understood what she wanted

to accomplish. Sessions found

Emmett crafting her songs and

taking full reign of her sound to

ensure each track would be what

she wanted in the end.

“We would send the tracks back

and forth and I would tell them that I

wanted a little less on this and more

on that as far as instruction. It was

a tedious process because I had

to know what I wanted it to sound

like — what kind of vibe and feel I

wanted for my listener,” she said.

One of the songs

listed on “Released”

comes from her

original work. Back in

2007, she impressed

Chris Hicks, a

musician who had

toured with Reba

McEntire, Brooks

and Dunn, and Sara

Evans, and who

now is the director

of the Academy of

Contemporary Music

“School of Rock”

at the University of

Central Oklahoma

(ACM@UCO). After

showing him what

she was capable of

with her voice, they

wrote songs together.

She chose one of

their collaborations,

“Country Bound,” a

tune she wrote with

her sister, Chelsey.

“This song is the

roll your windows down, turn the

radio up and hit the old dirt road

theme,” she said. “This one really

makes me feel free.”


she is throwing a release party

for “Released” on May 3 at the

Hastings location in Lawton. She is

scheduling several performances,

including playing at the Lawton Arts

For All Festival on May 10 and is

opening for Diamond Rio in Hobart

on May 25.To follow her concert

schedule, country music fans can


OKIE MAGAZINE www.okiemagazine.com Page 7


MAY 2013

calendar of events

Community

MAY 2

Lawton-Fort Sill National Day of Prayer

New City Hall, Lawton

Intercession from 8 a.m. - 12 p.m. & 1 p.m. - 6 p.m.

Programs from 12 p.m. - 1 p.m. & 6 p.m. - 8 p.m.

580.248.6927

MAY 4

Spring Garage Sale

1-78th Parking Lot, Fort Sill

8 a.m.

fortsillmwr@gmail.com

Lawton March for Babies

Goodyear, Lawton

1 p.m. - 3 p.m.

580.730.8946

MAY 6

Relay for Life Golf Scramble

The Territory Golf Club, Duncan

11 a.m.

580.255.2869

MAY 7

Huntington’s Disease Support Group

1st Tuesday of each month

Westminster Presbyterian Church

7 p.m.

MAY 18

Bark for Life

Altus Dog Park

9 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

amandamhagg@gmail.com

Lawton Public Library

MAY 2

Get Loose with Mother Goose

Lawton Public Library

Every Thursday, 10:15 a.m.

Ages 0 - 3 & caregivers, 580.581.3450

After School Book Club

Lawton Public Library

Every Thursday, 4:30 p.m.

Ages 3rd - 5th Grade

580.581.3450

Weekly Story Time

Lawton Public Library

Every Thursday, 11 a.m.

Ages 0 - 6 & caregivers

580.581.3450

MAY 3

Story Craft

Lawton Public Library

Every Friday, 10:30 a.m.

Ages 2 - 6 & caregivers

580.581.3450

MAY 28

Teen Book Club

Lawton Public Library

6:30 p.m.

580.581.3450

Area Events

MAY 1

Lawton Noon Lions Carnival

Great Plains Coliseum, Lawton

Through May 5

580.351.2857

MAY 3

Rock ‘N Rumble Car Show and Cruise

Main Street, Altus

Friday, 7 p.m., Saturday 7 a.m.

580.482.0210

MAY 7

Taste of Home Cooking Show

McMahon Auditorium, Lawton

6:30 p.m.

580.581.3600

OKIE MAGAZINE www.okiemagazine.com Page 8


MAY 9

Freedom’s Thunder Motorcycle Safety Rally

Sheridan Theatre/ Impact Zone, Fort Sill

8:30 a.m.

580.442.4215 or 580.442.4466

MAY 16

Family Game Night

Great Plains Technology Center

10 a.m. - 8 p.m.

580.695.5535

MAY 18

Armed Forces Day Parade

6th & C Avenue, Lawton

10 a.m.

580.355.3541

Red River Rocketeers Rocket Launch

Cape Greenwood, Duncan

12 p.m.

580.656.4781

www.rrrocketeers.homestead.com

MAY 31

14th Annual Carp Tournament

Duncan Lake, Duncan

Friday, 5 p.m. until Saturday, 2 p.m.

580.255.9538

Fishing and Tackle Show

Stephens County Fairgrounds, Duncan

Friday, Noon - 6 p.m. & Saturday 8 a.m. - 3 p.m.

580.656.6181

Health and Fitness

MAY 4

Technicolor Run

Cameron University Football Stadium

9:31 a.m.

580.580.5406

Local Flavor

MAY 3

24th Annual Chisholm Trail Stampede PRCA

Rodeo

Stephens County Fairgrounds, Duncan

7:30 p.m.

580.467.2800

MAY 4

Saturday Morning Kid - Friendly Hikes

Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge Visitor’s Center

9 a.m. Every Saturday. April 6, 13, 30, 27

Arts

MAY 10

Arts for All Festival

Shepler Park, Downtown Lawton

Friday,4 p.m. - 8 p.m., Saturday, 10 a.m. - 8 p.m., Sunday,

Noon - 5 p.m.

580.248.5384

MAY 16

Lunch Bag Lecture

Leslie Powell Gallery, Lawton

12:15 p.m. - 12:45 p.m.

Illustrating for American Greeting Cards: The Strawberry

Shortcake Story

Featured Speaker: Muriel Fahrion

580.357.9526

Theatre

MAY 3

“Tuesdays With Morrie”

Centenary United Methodist Church, Lawton

Friday & Saturday 8 p.m.

580.591.6730

Seniors

Beginner’s Painting Class

Each Monday, 12:30 p.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Center for Creative Living, Lawton

580.248.0471

Basic Beginner’s Basket Weaving

Each Monday, 10 a.m.

Center for Creative Living, Lawton

Call Eleanor @ 580.248-0471

Seniors Quilting Bee

Each Tuesday, 10 a.m.

Medicine Park Community Center, Lunch provided!

580.529.2739

Mountain Boomers Hiking Club

Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge Visitor’s Center

Second Monday of every month

9 a.m.

580.429.2197

OKIE MAGAZINE www.okiemagazine.com Page 9


OKIE MAGAZINE www.okiemagazine.com Page 10


Community News

LaSill Optimist Youth Orchestra

Last fall the LaSill

Optimist Youth Orchestra

began rehearsing under

the baton of Ms. Kathy

Liticker. The group is now

preparing for their Spring

Concert on Monday, May 13

in the Prairie Building at the

Lawton Colliseum Complex

at 7 p.m. Admission is free.

The concert will include

“The Russian Sailor’s

Dance” by Gliere, “Two

Waltzes” by Chopin,


Berlioz and the beautiful

“Rhosymedre” by Ralph von Williams.

LOYO is a new opportunity for music students

in grades 9-12 to have a full orchestra experience.

Participating students are from the greater Lawton-Ft.

Sill area. The ensemble includes the full complement

of winds and percussion along with the string sections.

Being a member of LOYO helps young people

develop life skills that encourage them to be better

students and successful

leaders in their career of

choice. These talented

students work toward

excellence, responsibility,

and teamwork.

Any interested young

musicians in the area are

encouraged to contact Ms.

Liticker, 330.671.6765 or

kliticker@lawtonps.org, to

be included on the mailing

list for auditions next fall.

Messages may also be

left with Susan Diekman at

580.353.2574.

The LaSill Optimist Club is generously sponsoring

this new organization. The Optimists goal and purpose

is to support youth activities in our community. Their


youth of SW Oklahoma. Optimist projects vary from


essay and oratorical contests for college scholarships

and the Childhood Cancer Foundation.

A Salute to Arts for All 2013

Southwestern Medical Center invites you to an

opening reception at the Pride Gallery where they

will be presenting “A Salute to Arts for All

Festival 2013,” as a tribute to Lawton’s Arts

for All Festival.

The opening reception for this show will

be held on May 2, from 5 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

The exhibit will run from May 2 through

July 12 in Southwestern Medical Center’s

Pride Gallery in Lawton.

In a salute to Arts for All 2013, the Pride

Gallery is exhibiting two Arts for All artists.


uses dynamic color in a contemporary yet primitive

style to portray scenes of rural New Mexico and

Oklahoma . Jim’s work will be seen throughout the

festival grounds since he is also the designer of this

year’s Arts for All logo that will be used on all t-shirts.

Gary Tai Poon is a master of traditional Chinese

bamboo brushwork. His work has been featured

throughout China and the United States. He uses

watercolor on silk with a strong use of black and

subtle color. Working on silk requires

exact strokes as lines cannot be altered or

diluted.

2013 Arts for All Festival T-shirts will be

available for purchase prior to Arts for All at

the Pride Gallery exhibit opening. They will

be available at a discounted price.

For more information on this exhibit,

contact the Pride Gallery curator, Diana

Brown, at 580.492.5500.

The Pride Gallery is located inside

Southwestern Medical Center, which is located at 5602

SW Lee Boulevard in Lawton.

The Arts for All Festival will be held May 10 - May

12 at Shepler Park in downtown Lawton. For more

information on the Arts for All Festival, visit www.artsfor

allfestival.org for a complete listing of artists and a

schedule of events.

OKIE MAGAZINE www.okiemagazine.com Page 11


New Home

on the Horizon?

Call Kathy Suttles

It’s not about loans ,it’s about lives.

Office 580.699.5881

Cell: 580.695.7555

ksuttles@firstmortgageco.com

NMLS #2024

NMLS #233437

Paws For A

Cause

Pet Expo

Great Plains

Coliseum

Saturday, May 4th

10 a.m. - 4 p.m.

A family fun event

for everyone

including the

critters!

Animal Rescues

Pet Organizations

Vendor Booths

Contests & Prizes

Drawings and

More!

For more

information call

580.536.9530

OKIE MAGAZINE www.okiemagazine.com Page 12


We all look forward to the

greening of spring, but let us go to

the grocery store while turning back

the calendar 75 years.

We go to the small produce


potatoes and yams, cabbage,

turnips, beets, and onions. All of

these staples will keep for months

without refrigeration.

There are no tomatoes, sweet

peppers, peaches, nectarines, kiwi,


celery and iceberg lettuce that have

been rushed by railroad, packed

in ice in refrigerated cars, coming

from thousands of miles away.

We have apples, bananas,

oranges, and grapefruit but high

speed refrigerated transportation

is many years down the road; still

the orchards in Florida, Rio Grande

Valley, and California are producing

great quantities of fruit in their warm

sunlit climate.

How can that fruit go to market

in Lawton, Oklahoma, without


wooden boxes-- dried fruit. Apples,

apricots, peaches, and other fruits

which can be soaked in water,

cooked, and used like fresh fruit in

cobbler, pies, or my favorite, fried

pies.

All winter we have gone without

fresh vegetables like tomatoes,

okra, corn, but now spring is

coming on and everyone is rushing

to have a garden. Small or large,

they will bring fresh vegetables,

but you need plants to start that

garden.


around the southeast corner of 8th

street and H Avenue where a large

corner lot has been covered with

wooden frames with glass doors on

top. In spite of the winter weather,

tomato, pepper, onions, and sweet

potato plants have thrived in these

Memories of Yesteryear:

The Food Chain

frames called hotbeds.

Making these hotbeds function

requires several things and the

Lawton area was unique in that

supply. Several dairies sold milk,

butter, and cream but there was

a byproduct that didn’t sell so

readily-- manure.

Each hotbed required an eight

to twelve inch layer of manure at

the bottom where the fermentation

by Arlie D. Wood

provided

heat to the

hotbed. This

was topped

with about

eight inches

of soil in

which the

seedlings

were grown.

My father

was often

paid to haul

manure from

the dairies

in his wagon

and paid to

deliver it to

this plant

operation for

preparation

of new beds. He also plowed

garden spots; sometimes for a pig

or goat which we butchered, or

even for produce from the garden.

Some people prepared their

own gardens with a garden plow

designed to be pushed by one

person. The ground was hard and

ropes were often tied to the plow

so one person could push while

another pulled. Some spaded

large areas by hand

for their garden

doing whatever they

possibly could to

get those ripe juicy

tomatoes, okra,

tomatoes, peppers,

onions, yams,

potatoes, squash into

the pot and on the

table after a winter’s

absence.

Today’s fresh

produce department

existed only in those

gardens planted in

about every available

square foot of soil.

OKIE MAGAZINE www.okiemagazine.com Page 13


Great selection of foods

for special dietary needs

Gluten-free, wheat-free,

organic and fresh products




Sports and Fitness



OKIE MAGAZINE www.okiemagazine.com Page 14


Imagine stumbling

upon treasure somewhere

close to home. Some


with stacks of cash

while others dream of


with diamond jewelry.

But there are a few

that seek an escape

from their everyday

routines and distractions

like cellphones and

computers.

They need not look any

farther. The GoldSkye Ranch

Resort in Fletcher, Oklahoma

values outdoor recreation,

show-stopping entertainment

and a simple kind of life above

everything else.

Tucked away in a small

town but surrounded by

natural splendor, GoldSkye

fosters the perfect atmosphere

for families to enjoy.According

to manager Misty Terry,this

was the idea from the

beginning. Owners Allen and

Goldie Dickey bought the land

in 2009 and opened in 2010 to

ensure their family and others

could enjoy time together.

“They wanted to not only

give their kids and their

grandkids a place to go as

a family but also for other

families to go and have that

adventure as well — that maybe living

in a big town would maybe never have


or go camping and be away from

everything.”


horseback riding are only some of

the actives open to GoldSkye guests.

GoldSkye Ranch Resort also invites

guests to stay in one of its rustic

cottages and serves as a backdrop

for beautiful outdoor weddings and an

ideal location for corporate events.

“It’s our secret, but once you get

there, you won’t want to leave,” Terry


concerts, and we try to do thing that


Oklahoma City. We wanted this to be

Goldskye Ranch Resort

Fun Family Getaway

closer to home.”

GoldSkye is currently scouring

the region for homegrown acts with

its ongoing “GoldSkye’s Got Talent”


live voting is set for May 4. Judges

will name the winner and GoldSkye


musicians twenty free hours to record

and produce tracks in its studios along

with a generous cash prize.

Music matters to owner Allen

Dickey — he has worked with

Nigerian-born British singer-songwriter

Sade and other European acts and

has plans to build a studio on the

resort.

“That is his passion — he loves to

sing, he loves to produce, he loves

by Sarah Brewer

to write. He is always

thinking of new things for

us to do — that is what he

wants to do,” Terry said.

In addition to serving

as a mecca for musicians

and developing artists,

GoldSkye hosts and

promotes local acts and

invites more widely-known

artists for performances.

Some of the artists that

have graced the stage at

GoldSkye include Lonestar

and JB and the Moonshine

Band. Country duet Steel

Magnolia made an impression

Terry counts as one of her

fondest memories.

“Steel Magnolia went

above and beyond for us. We

had a young child who had

Down’s Syndrome and she

was dancing the whole time

she was there. They [Steel

Magnolias] actually brought

her on stage and she danced

and sang — everything. It

was such a good moment for

us to just sit back and see

that we were able to give this

little girl something she could

remember forever.

Goldskye sponsors several

underprivileged children so


gatherings and other outdoor

activities during its summer

camp. Seeing the excited smiles on


enjoys, according to Terry.

“That is what we love to do — we

love to give that experience and that

is the hope for our upcoming camp —


to come and help out so we can bring

more kids that have never been on a


the country, but some for these kids

have never done anything like that

before. It is a big plus for us to see the

smiles on their faces.”

GoldSkye Ranch Resort is

located at 14277 NE Dillan Ln in

Fletcher, OK. For more information,

call 580.549.4013 or visit www.

goldskyeresort.com.

OKIE MAGAZINE www.okiemagazine.com Page 15


The Domestic Diva

Celebrate Cinco de Mayo with Fresh Salsa

Easy Blender Salsa Peach Mango Salsa Salsa Verde

1- 14 oz can diced tomatoes

1- 10 oz can orginal Rotel

1/2 small onion, roughly

chopped

1 clove garlic, peeled and

smashed

1/2-1 jalapeno, seeded or not

(depends on how spicy you like

it)

1 teaspoon honey

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon ground cumin

small to medium size handful of

cilantro, washed

juice of 1 lime

Put all the ingredients in the

base of a food processor or

good blender and pulse to

combine for 30 seconds or so


chopped and salsa is desired

consistency. Taste for seasoning

and adjust to taste. Serve with

chips or over tacos.

1 large ripe peach

1 large ripe mango

3 medium-size tomatoes

1/2 sweet onion

1/2 green, red, or yellow bell

pepper

1 clove garlic, minced

2 teaspoons (or more) minced

fresh Jalapeno pepper

1/2 cup (or more) freshly

chopped cilantro

1 tablespoon lemon or lime juice

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 tablespoon sugar

Peel the mango and peach and

chop both into small chunks

Dice the tomato, sweet onion,

and bell pepper into small

chunks. In a mixing bowl, stir

together the peach, mango,

tomato, onion, bell pepper,

garlic, Jalapeno pepper,

and cilantro. Add the lemon

juice, salt, and sugar and stir

well to coat. Let rest at room

temperature for 15 minutes for


until needed.This salsa can be

frozen for later use!

4 medium to large tomatillos

1/2 of a white onion roughly

chopped

1/2 cup loose packed cilantro

leaves

juice of one lime

1 small jalapeno seeded and

roughly chopped

pinch of sugar

salt and pepper to taste

Preheat your broiler. Remove

papery husks and stems from

the tomatillos and cut them in

half. Line a baking pan with foil

and place tomatillo halves cut

side down in the pan.

Broil tomatillos 6-8 minutes, until


easily pierced with a fork.

Place tomatillos, onion, cilantro,

lime juice, jalapeno and sugar

into a blend and puree about 10-

20 seconds (until well mixed).

OKIE MAGAZINE www.okiemagazine.com Page 16


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seems he is afraid on how to act. He is very loving, loves

to give kisses and to be petted. He is doing really well

on housebreaking and loves ropes, bones and sticks

as chew toys. He gets along with other dogs small or

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OKIE MAGAZINE www.okiemagazine.com Page 17


Over the next few months, I’ll be

sharing a number of “daycations”

that you and your family might

enjoy. As the name implies, these

destinations would make for perfect

day trips.


Oklahoma, located on Highway 7,

85 miles west of Lawton. The trip

only takes about an hour and a half,

and there are activities that are

great for the entire family.


before crossing over I-35, at the

Bedre Chocolate Factory. Bedre

is an American Indian company


in the heart of Oklahoma. This

manufacturing facility is owned and

operated by the Chickasaw Nation.


any sweet tooth, including gourmet

chocolates, gift baskets and other

traditional candies. While on site

guests may step into the viewing

gallery and see chocolate being

made before their eyes. Chocolate

is produced and packaged Monday

through Friday, 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. If

tour groups consist of more than

eight guests, appointments are

required.

If you’re a gambler, Treasure

Valley Casino, an oasis for the

traveler and local gamer alike, is

located just over the interstate.

Take a Daycation

Davis, OK by Jim Joplin


experience for electronic gamers

and table aces. Four hundred of

today’s hottest e-games line the


can choose from Texas Hold ‘em,

blackjack, Ultimate Texas Hold ‘em,

and Three Card Poker. The Main

Street Grill is located on-site. The

Inn at Treasure Inn is attached to


As you make your way into town,

you’ll immediately cross the

railroads tracks, where you’ll

see the old Santa Fe Depot.

Refurbished 1907, the Santa

Fe Depot features history of

Davis, Murray County, Turner

Falls Park and early-day

families. The Depot is listed

on the National Registration

of Historic Places. Native

American

exhibits

with

original

beaded clothing

items donated

by family

of Nelson

Chigley are on

display, along

with a loom

dating back to

1850. Military

exhibits, vintage

clothing, large


Daily, Price broom factory, school

picture displays, and a territorial

room displaying home life in prestatehood

days are also featured.

When you’re ready for some

grub, you should check out Smokin

Joe’s Rib Ranch which features

a wide variety of barbecue items

including smoked ribs, pulled

pork, chopped beef and smoked

brisket as well as delicious

homemade sides. At the end of a

delicious meal, try to save some

room for a one-of-a-kind dessert,

Strawberries on a Cloud. Smokin


catering services. Located at 3154

Jolleyville Rd near Turner Falls,

there is always a hungry crowd

enjoying great barbeque. For

directions or more information call

580.369.2818.

If you’re looking for an awesome

cultural experience, I suggest you

check out the Chickasaw Culture

Center just east of Davis. The


a diverse history of the people.

That means that it’s the perfect

place to introduce children to their

ancestors. Through rich, colorful

interactive exhibits, history comes

alive in a tangible way. With walkthrough

exhibits, live storytellers

and hands-on classes, kids can

learn and still be entertained. For

more information about the Center,

visit www.chickasawculturalcenter.

com which includes information

about operating hours, ticket prices,

and much more.

I’ve barely touched on all of the

fun and interesting things to do in

and around Davis. Check it out for

yourself, and you’ll see how this

could be a great daycation with

your family.

OKIE MAGAZINE www.okiemagazine.com Page 18


ACROSS

1. Wings

5. Finger or toe

10. Garments of goat hair

14. Classify

15. Beautify

16. Exploded star

17. Valentine

19. Pace

20. Poetic dusk

21. Gladden

22. Mob

23. Toil

25. Calabash

27. An Old Testament king

28. Denim

31. Love intensely

34. Informs

35. Eccentric

36. Not

37. A sudden short attack

38. Portend

39. French for “Friend”

40. Communion table

41. A tart fruit

42. Lawfulness

44. Perish

45. Angry

46. An informal term for

money

50. Country estate

52. Lift

54. Rodent

55. Two-toed sloth

56. Silver-grey wingless insect

58. Camp beds

59. Contemptuous look

60. Initial wager

61. Leg joint

62. Excrete

63. Bambi was one

DOWN

1. Something of value

2. Not upper

3. Sporting venue

4. French for “Summer”

5. Showy bloom

6. Something to shoot for

7. Satyr

8. Insurgent

9. Explosive

10. Domestic breed of rabbit

11. Council chamber

12. Keen

13. Satisfy

18. Make fun of

22. Embraces

24. Deviate

26. Unique

28. Disorderly revelry

29. Cocoyam

30. Biblical garden

Solution on page 27

31. A Freudian stage

32. British title

33. Come into being

34. Unsteady in gait

37. Flutter

38. Red vegetable

40. Winglike

41. About a US quart

43. Excite

44. Abandon

46. Inhabits

47. Pee

48. Hindu social division

49. Aromatic solvent

50. Mire

51. Nameless

53. Away from the wind

56. South southeast

57. Craze

OKIE MAGAZINE www.okiemagazine.com Page 19


CHEERS!

A Beverage and Cigar Experience by Travis Storck

Temps are warming up and I’m

starting to crave lighter, crisper

beverages and trying to expand

my cigar experiences to the

milder side too. Went to my local

sources and picked these up to

give them a go.

312 Urban Wheat - Goose

Island

Pours a light, hazed pale yellow


nice retention, foamy lacing.

Smell of fresh grain and straw,

some lemon. Flavor of wheat



for some recognition, some

sweetness. Very low hop

bitterness. Mouthfeel is a bit

thin, simple yet very drinkable,

especially when the temps really

begin to rise.

Wild Raspberry Ale - Great

Divide

Pours an interesting, clear,

deep ruby color with a small


leaves patchy lacing. Smell of

tart raspberries is immediate,

some malt sweetness. Taste

begin with light malt sweetness

leading in to a good dose

of juicy raspberry, while still

maintaining an amber ale type

backbone. Balanced hops really

help the fruit bust through. Well

done, crisp and refreshing. I’m

really wanting some cheesecake

about now.

Electra Moscato

(2010) - Quady

Winery

Admittedly, I grabbed

this one because

of the label. Upon

pouring, not getting

much aroma, except

a little pear. First sip


on the tongue. Picked up some

peach, little more pear, light

citrus. Good sweetness. Much

lower alcohol content than most

at only 4.5%. Quite yummy.

Especial No. 3 - Montecristo

Wrapper is light brown, minimal

veining, seams well hidden.

Great construction. The pre-light

draw gave hint of nuttyness.

Burn was smooth, needing no

corrections throughout. First 3rd

was mild and muted. Second

3rd began to open up with nuts,

slight hints of cocoa, touch of

pepper in the back. Last 3rd

mirrored the second. I’d have


more but it is a much milder stick

than what I’m used to. Overall

good smoke and will get again.

Vintage 1999 Connecticut -

Rocky Patel

Picked this up in preparation

for the event on May 10th at

Cigar Oasis as a rep will be onsite

and want to be up on their




looking cigar. Once lit, the burn

was razor smooth. First 3rd was

slightly bitter, some almond


smoke. Second 3rd, mellowed

out, opened to mildly toasted

nuts. Last 3rd, really opened

up to more intense nuts, wood,

earth. Very good mild-medium

smoke.

OKIE MAGAZINE www.okiemagazine.com Page 20


Place a digit from 1 to 9 in each empty cell so every row, every

column, and every 3 x 3 box contains the digits 1 to 9.

Solution on page 27

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Cigars, Briar Pipes, Full

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Lawton, OK

580.357.2830

“Where Cigars Are A Lifestyle”

OKIE Magazine is YOUR Magazine

Send your community news and

events to

editor@okiemagazine.com

to have them listed in the

OKIE Magazine Calendar of Events

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1930 NW Ferris

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Country Right Here in

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We have new items

including boiled

peanuts and a wide

variety of boudin.

ZAPPS Chips, Cajun

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much more.

We Do Special Orders!

Open Noon - 6 p.m.

Monday - Saturday

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for a spell!

OKIE MAGAZINE www.okiemagazine.com Page 21


It must come with

the territory. Red Dirt

country is a sound

steeped in tradition and


southwestern soil from

which the genre gets

its name. Several local

musicians have gone on

to interpret the essence

of the southwest in their

art.

One musician who

intuitively knows what

this spirit sounds like is

Brad Good.

Originally from

Apache, Brad Good

has been making his

mark by playing shows

at venues across

Oklahoma, Texas,

Kansas, Arkansas, and

Missouri for several

years.

He graduated from Oklahoma

State University in Stillwater and

got his start in music sometime

about 1993 when his friend Shane

McGrew was looking for a bassist

and harmony singer in Stillwater.

Good went in to audition and the

two formed a band with guitarist

Rocky Sutton and drummer Tom

Privett. With a soulful, raspy voice

and plenty of stories to tell, he

began branching out as his own

artist with their encouragement.

“Those guys kinda took me

under their wing, and brought

me along on bass — and then

eventually guitar — and the

writing developed after that. It was

just something somebody told me

I was good at, so I kept doing it,”

he said.

His own sound rests

comfortably among music by

American rock legend Bruce

Springsteen and criticallyacclaimed

singer-songwriter

John Mellencamp as well as

Brad Good

‘Round Here by Sarah Brewer

Texas country artists like Robert

Earl Keen. Good cites those


shared with other artists like

Cross Canadian Ragweed, Jason

Boland & the Stragglers, The

Great Divide, No Justice and

Stoney Larue, as the source for

his sound.

“It was a cool time to ‘cut my

teeth’ in Stillwater when there was

a lot of music happening there,”

he said. “The Red Dirt movement

there at the time kinda shaped us

all to an extent. I grew up listening

to southern rock and country and


it all molded me.”

After years of forging his

sound and establishing a strong

presence in the scene, Good is


record this spring.

He went in to record and

produce his single, “’Round

Here,” with Mike McClure at The

Boohatch studio in Ada, and after

releasing the song as a single on

iTunes and Amazon,

Good went on to record

and produce a batch of

ten more original songs

with Salim Nourallah

and Matt Gaskins at

Pleasantry Lane Studio

in Dallas. With a voice

tinged by nostalgia,

he makes it clear that

his roots are integral to

his identity. “We grow

cotton and we raise

cane; we spend our

Sundays prayin’ for rain,”

he asserts. “Just look at

my hands — see them

red dirt stains. Anywhere

else it wouldn’t be the

same.”

The tentative title

of the album, “Third

Generation Son,” comes

from a lyric embedded

in “Highway Headed

Home,” a retrospective tune that


again. Violins murmur before

Good begins to sing. Feather-


feelings of security, making it the

perfect song for cruising some

back roads in any state you pick.

Each song tells a story, and

these tales run the gamut. Some

are lighthearted, some are

serious, and some are true stories

set to a tune. According to Good,

each member of the production

trio had something to contribute

during studio sessions.

“Salim has awesome ideas. He


he and I either agreed or didn’t,

and Matt Gaskins was kinda

the tie breaker when it came to

that. We all had input. They were

awesome, and always willing to

let my identity come through as

an artist without letting me mess

things up too bad.”

Good said he gets his

OKIE MAGAZINE www.okiemagazine.com Page 22


inspiration from various places;

the fate of a relationship, an

instance from his childhood,

something that made him laugh

or just scenery that captures his

attention.

“There’s several of my


autobiographical, and some

that are

biographical

from a friend’s

perspective.

A couple are

straight up


for the most

part, you

gotta know it

to write it. At

least for me.”

He

assumes

another

perspective

in “Rich Man,”

a timeless

cautionary

tale that

sizzles with

battling guitar

harmonies

and bass

lines. Raw

and startling,

Good warns

about living in

loneliness — the kind of poverty

that can come when priorities

are skewed and twisted beyond

recognition. “He don’t get no

richer, just gets real cold,” Good

observes. “Try as he may he

cannot make change, and his

life unchanged it will remain the

same.”

Good also made the record

by teaming with musicians Matt

Gaskins, Milo Deering, Raegan

Felker, and backup vocalist

Beverly Perry as well as guitarist

Daniel Hines from the Dallas

band Left Arm Tan. They fused

each part of every song together

and Good said he could not be

happier with the results.

“We really just pieced it

together a little at a time,” he said.

“They were great to always make

sure my identity came through. I

listen to most of the tracks, and

think “man, that couldn’t have

been any closer to what I had

in mind.” And then there’s been

some ideas that developed during

tune that lingers with him even

when he less than fully conscious.

“A couple of my songs have

been written in my sleep too,

actually,” he said. “Just woke up

with the whole thing in my head,

got up, wrote it down, and went

back to sleep — that’s happened

— so it comes from all angles,

really.”

An audience

knows when

an artist is in it

for the love of

the game, and

Good said the

best part of

playing gigs and

making music is

seeing his work

resonates with

listeners.

“It’s just a lot

of fun — work

too, but fun

— and when

you hit a good

lick at a show,

and people are


and having a

good time, it’s

really cool. And

seeing people

Courtesy of West Texas Media Group

singing along to

songs you wrote

and knowing they

the process as well.

relate to them — that’s really cool.

Some of the material on the Last month, the Texas Regional

record has been incubating for Radio Music Awards named

some time, and Good said the Good a future face to look for

songs that have stuck with him in 2013. He played a showcase

at The Thirsty Armadillo in Fort

record.

Worth on April 20 with the other

artists and said he was glad to

have met these talented singers

years. Some of it came together and songwriters. He also said he

is thankful to have made a lasting

always something I’m working impression with his music.

on even though no one knows it “Over the years, writing and

usually until I have it done.” singing songs has become what

He loves what he does, and I do,” Good said, “and I feel really

his art certainly imitates life — blessed to have the opportunity

inspiration strikes Good at all to share my music with folks, and

hours, and when it does, he is hopefully they’ll keep coming

quick to record a few lyrics or a back.”

OKIE MAGAZINE www.okiemagazine.com Page 23


Lawton purred from the other

side of my moonlit window. The

cars and horns, the thumping

and gunshots, were all a part

of living in one of the rougher

neighborhoods.

It was the

spring of 1996

and my husband,

myself and our

three month

old daughter

lived in a small,

but cute, two

bedroom house

in the area of

17th and Smith.

I remember

how excited I

was when we

got a new door

that had a peep

hole that I could

look out. This

was a big deal

because, at

least weekly, a

stranger would

knock on the

door and ask

if we could

spare money

for their “kid’s

prescriptions”

or “gas” for their

invisible car. I would be able to

look out before unlocking my

home.

This particular night, my

husband and I had gotten the

baby to sleep, and had gone

to bed early. Around eleven

o’clock, I was pulled from a

deep sleep by banging on our

front door. I tried to wake my

husband, but due to an accident

out by Medicine Park where he

had broken his ankle two days

before, he was on strong pain

relievers and proved impossible

to wake.

I walked to the front door and

looked through the peephole.

Even with the porch light, all

The Night No One Died

I could see was a shadowy,



side of the door and not in clear

view of the peephole. I started

to walk away and go back to

bed when the person started

banging again. This time the

banging was so hard as to rattle

the walls, shaking them with

each blow. The person outside

the door was breathing heavily

enough that I could hear him

from inside. He banged again

with persistence. I heard my

baby daughter rustle in her bed,

disturbed by the banging but not

woken. Bang! Bang! Bang!

I ran to the bedroom and tried

again to

wake my

husband,

but it was

useless.


He snored

away

unaware

of the

dangerous

situation

that was

developing

around him.

Bang! Bang!

Bang!

By this

time, I had

begun

shaking. I


and ever


my being

was on

heightened

alert. I

looked in at

my sleeping

daughter.

I grabbed the phone and tried

dialing 911 but my hands were

shaking so badly that I missed


getting it right. 911’s number

gave me a busy signal. I did not

even know that could happen. I

fumbled the numbers again. All

the time, Bang! Bang! Bang!

The banging was bad

enough, but being able to hear


me deep inside. In my head, I

wondered what would make a

OKIE MAGAZINE www.okiemagazine.com Page 24


person breathe so intensely that

they could be heard through

a wall. I thought it must be

someone animalistic, feral, and

dangerous, possibly from drugs

or insanity. In my head, I kept

thinking, “Please, just go away.”

I threw the phone down

when 911 was still busy on the

second call. I again thought of

my daughter sleeping in her crib.

The banging was getting louder,

and more forceful. The breathing

was heavier, more excited

sounding. BANG! BANG! BANG!


to the bedroom where we kept

a blue-steel Ruger .22. I called

out to my husband twice, but he

continued to sleep. I checked

the safety and slid the clip in

place, before running back into

the living room.

I knew I was shaking too

badly to have much aim and I

needed to steady my hands.

The only thing between the

front door and my daughter’s

bedroom was an over-sized blue

chair. I dropped to my knees

and rested my arms on the chair

which helped steady my hands.

With my back to my daughter’s

room, I leveled the nose of the

gun with the mid-section of the

door. I ran through my head all

the gun safety rules that I had

been taught. Never point a gun

at someone unless you intend

on killing them. Always keep the

safety on unless you intend on


shook out my shoulders and

focused my aim. My daughter’s

steady breathing told me she

had resumed peaceful sleeping.

Bang! Bang! Bang!

I knew that I was shaking

violently enough that I would

probably miss a few shots,

but if I unloaded the full clip I

would at the very least injure the

person enough to protect my

child. I knew it was imperative

to wait until whoever it was

busted through the door before


Day” law required that a person

must be in my home before I


Furthermore, I needed the visual

for good aim and I wanted to see

the person I was going to kill. I

also considered that I was only

about eight feet from the door,

and that I would have to unload

the clip quickly. I could still hear

the banging, the breathing, but


could see the wall shake as if in

slow motion. There was a feeling

of imminent danger and resolve.

All I could think was, “My baby,”

while waiting on the person to

break through my door.

There was no question as


gun. My mind had grown cold,

and calculating; my motherly

instincts were reared back in full

force. I was as cocked as the

gun. I sat on my knees with my


metal loop that encompassed

the trigger so I would not


Suddenly, my neighbor from

next door’s voice permeated the

night, “Oh, God. Let me in. It’s

Chris.” Nose down, safety on.

Disengage. Reevaluate. I shook

my head.

I raced to the door with the

gun in my hand. He stood on the

other side panting, holding his

infant daughter to his chest and

a non-descript handgun hung


hand. He pushed in to the house

and shut the door behind him. I

knew him too well to be afraid;

it was not in him to hurt another

human. I took his baby, Makayla,

from him and he clutched his

chest trying to regain his breath.

He was obviously shaken. I told

him to sit down on the couch

while I carried his daughter in

and laid her next to mine in the

crib. She felt warm and smelled

of coco butter and baby power.

I laid her in the crib and the

babies snuggled against each

other peacefully. Snores came

from my bedroom where my

husband still slept oblivious to

the drama.

I returned to the living room

where my neighbor sat with his

elbows on his knees and the gun

hanging between his clasped


“She pulled a gun on me. We


the gun and was going to kill us,”

he said, speaking about his wife

as he looked across the room to

the doorway where the babies

slept.

He asked if he could leave

Makayla and the gun with me for

the night. I brought him a towel

from the hall cabinet to wrap his

gun in and I stashed it on the top

shelf of the cabinet. After he left,

I ejected the clip from my Ruger,

double checked the safety, and

put it back where it belonged. I

looked in on the sleeping girls

one last time and thought how



went to bed, I lay awake for a

long time looking at my bedroom

ceiling unable to sleep, listening

to the sound of Lawton purring

outside my window.

OKIE MAGAZINE www.okiemagazine.com Page 25


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OKIE MAGAZINE www.okiemagazine.com Page 27


JULIUSTHEROBOT

By Jordan Godlewski

Manda Shae Dickinson is a student at Cameron University

pursuing a Bachelors degree of Fine Art in painting. Along with

being a student at Cameron, Dickinson is a Internet entrepreneur

managing several blogs and social media sites for various projects.

For the past several months, Dickinson has been experimenting

with a variety of new media such as video and animation. One

of Dickinson’s current projects is a coloration on a videogame

commentary channel titled LolitaPlay!

Dickinson said the creation of her art is driven by the many

decisions that she makes every day.

“Actually, it’s kind of funny, making art is a huge force in what

drives my decision making in most areas of my life,” Dickinson

said. “I’ve known for a very long time--since I was probably about

12 years old--that I wanted to work in art, so trying to make

consistent decisions that further my life in that direction drives

both my goals and my want to make art.”

There are many different ways that an artist might describe their

work; Dickinson chooses to describe it as ‘gross.’

“My favorite description of it so far has been ‘gross’,” said

Dickinson. “By my peers it is used in an endearing sense, but

when my work is presented to outsiders the term becomes wildly

accurate.”

“I describe my work as being very technical. My entire process

goes through several stages from thumbnails, to sketches, to

penciling, and final polishing of an artwork. I also work in a range

of styles--varying from cartoons, surrealism, expressive realism,

and sometimes a combination of all of these.” Dickinson said.

Read more about Dickinson at OKIEmagazine.com

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OKIE MAGAZINE www.okiemagazine.com Page 28


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It is a sad day in America

when the best collaboration

between country and rap

artists remains “Over and

Over” by Tim McGraw and

Nelly.

“Accidental Racist,”

a song by Brad Paisley

featuring LL Cool J, is a

song on Paisley’s latest

album Wheelhouse. It

has garnered universal

disdain from music critics

and political talking heads

alike. Not accidental yet

completely racist, two

grown men demonstrate a



The song’s story

is told primarily through Paisley’s point of view.

The opening lines describe him half-apologizing




meant to say is I’m a Skynyrd fan.” However, he later

calls himself “just a proud rebel son with an ol’ can

of worms / lookin’ like I got a lot to learn but from my

point of view.”

Describing himself as “a proud rebel son”

discredits any good will Paisley may have been

attempting to establish. Regardless of what positive

things have come from the American South since


States of America – which called themselves rebels

– has since been used and interpreted as a symbol

of white supremacy. Thus, identifying as a “proud

rebel son” in this context denotes acceptance of the

white supremacist concept.

He continues on with a misunderstanding of

history, claiming “they called it Reconstruction,



“Rubble” cannot be interpreted as a metaphor

for lingering hostile race relations, as he literally

described the Reconstruction era in the previous


widespread ruins of a war a century and a half ago

remain in this modern age.

LL Cool J’s verses see the song take a turn

for the worse. He opens by

addressing Paisley with “Dear

Mr. White Man,” an antiquated

phrase from slavery or minstrel

show days. Before anything

else comes from him, LL raps

from a place of accepted

inferiority.

He later bargains with

Paisley in an attempt to level

and understand one another.

In the most discussed line of

the song, LL claims “if you

don’t judge my gold chains /

I’ll forget the iron chains.” As

comedian Stephen Colbert

sarcastically said on his show,

“That’s a pretty good deal,

Paisley. LL will forget 250

years of enslavement if you

accept his taste in accessories.”


Django Unchained for being historically accurate,

wants to “let bygones be bygones” in a completely

unnecessary conversation, and memorializes

Robert E. Lee. The confusing, race-apologizing

lyrics are headache-inducing at best and infuriating

at worst.

The choice to bring in LL Cool J to rap on a

song about cultural racial tension is a curious one.

Although a pioneer for rap and hip hop, he has never

been known for socially- or politically-conscious

lyrics. Ta-Nehisi Coates of The Atlantic wrote of the


Talib Kweli to record a song about gang violence in

L.A., and [he] wouldn’t call up KRS-ONE to drop a

verse on a love ballad.” LL Cool J is simply out of

place in this song.

Both men have defended “Accidental Racist,”

stating that it was intended to begin a conversation

rather than solve any perceived problems. The

real conversation it started is simple – one man


deep-seeded history, and the other apologizes

for belonging to an ethnic group. Neither side is a

positive way to handle this contention; neither is


Taylor B, an Army Brat via Fort Sill, accepts

all complaints and correspondence at taylorb@

okiemagazine.com.

OKIE MAGAZINE www.okiemagazine.com Page 30


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