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2013

Fifty-First Legislature, First Session, 2013


HIGHLIGHTS

OF THE

FIFTY-FIRST LEGISLATURE

FIRST SESSION, 2013

»«

NEW MEXICO LEGISLATIVE COUNCIL SERVICE

MAY 2013

Effective Dates

▸ Acts carrying an emergency clause - immediately upon signature by the governor

▸ All other acts - June 14, 2013 (or at a date specified in the act)


New Mexico Legislative Council Service

411 State Capitol

Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501

(505) 986-4600

www.nmlegis.gov

202.194438


TABLE OF CONTENTS

FIFTY-FIRST LEGISLATURE, FIRST SESSION, 2013

Introduction

AGRICULTURE ............................................................................................................................................. 1

ALCOHOL ...................................................................................................................................................... 3

ANIMALS AND LIVESTOCK ....................................................................................................................... 3

APPROPRIATIONS AND FINANCE ........................................................................................................... 4

Fiscal Fireworks ................................................................................................................................... 5

General Appropriation Act ................................................................................................................ 7

Feed Bill ............................................................................................................................................ 10

Public Finance ................................................................................................................................... 10

Tobacco Settlement Permanent and Program Funds ...................................................................... 11

Capital Outlay ................................................................................................................................... 12

New Mexico Finance Authority ....................................................................................................... 14

BUSINESS AND FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS ....................................................................................... 14

CHILDREN AND FAMILIES ...................................................................................................................... 16

CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS ....................................................................................................... 17

CRIMINAL LAW AND COURTS .............................................................................................................. 18

CULTURAL AFFAIRS .................................................................................................................................. 20

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ................................................................................................................... 20

EDUCATION ................................................................................................................................................ 21

Public Education ............................................................................................................................... 22

Post-Secondary Education ................................................................................................................ 24

ELECTIONS .................................................................................................................................................. 27

EMPLOYMENT AND LABOR .................................................................................................................... 28

ENERGY AND NATURAL RESOURCES ................................................................................................. 30

ETHICS .......................................................................................................................................................... 31

GAME AND FISH ......................................................................................................................................... 32

GAMING ........................................................................................................................................................ 32

HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES ......................................................................................................... 33

Health Care ....................................................................................................................................... 34

Health Coverage................................................................................................................................ 35

Disability Supports and Services ...................................................................................................... 37

Long-Term Care ................................................................................................................................ 38

INDIAN AND INTERGOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS ............................................................................... 38

INSURANCE ................................................................................................................................................ 39

LAW ENFORCEMENT, PUBLIC SAFETY AND CORRECTIONS ....................................................... 40

MILITARY AND VETERANS' AFFAIRS .................................................................................................... 42

MOTOR VEHICLES AND TRANSPORTATION ..................................................................................... 43

PROFESSIONAL AND OCCUPATIONAL LICENSURE ........................................................................ 45

PUBLIC OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES .................................................................................................... 48

REAL PROPERTY AND LAND USE .......................................................................................................... 52


STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT ...................................................................................................... 53

Legislature ......................................................................................................................................... 53

Open Records and Meetings ............................................................................................................ 53

Operations ......................................................................................................................................... 54

Organization...................................................................................................................................... 54

Property and Procurement ............................................................................................................... 55

Special Districts and Land Grants .................................................................................................... 57

TAXATION .................................................................................................................................................... 58

Administration .................................................................................................................................. 58

Economic Incentives ......................................................................................................................... 59

Gross Receipts Tax ............................................................................................................................ 61

Liquor Excise Taxes .......................................................................................................................... 61

Property Tax ...................................................................................................................................... 61

UTILITIES...................................................................................................................................................... 62

WATER ........................................................................................................................................................ 62

APPENDICES

APPENDIX A — DATA ON LEGISLATION .............................................................................................. 66

APPENDIX B — APPROPRIATIONS AND REVENUE ............................................................................ 68

Table 1 - Summary of General Fund Appropriations ..................................................................... 68

Table 2 - General Appropriation Act of 2013 ................................................................................. 70

Chart 1 - General Fund Appropriations, Fiscal Year 2014 .............................................. 76

Chart 2 - General Fund Appropriations, Fiscal Year 2013 .............................................. 77

Chart 3 - General Fund Appropriations, Fiscal Years 2013 and 2014 ............................ 77

Table 3 - General Appropriation Act Vetoes ................................................................................... 78

Table 4 - Bills Affecting General Fund Revenue ............................................................................. 84

Table 5 - Bills Affecting Other State Revenue ................................................................................. 85

Table 6 - Bills Affecting Local Government Revenue ..................................................................... 86

Table 7 - Legislative Authorization for New Mexico Finance Authority

Public Project Revolving Fund Projects............................................................................ 87

Table 8 - Legislative Authorization for New Mexico Finance Authority

Water Project Fund and Acequia Project Fund Projects ................................................. 91

APPENDIX C — CAPITAL OUTLAY .......................................................................................................... 93

Table 9 - 2013 Capital Outlay Projects by Category (summary)...................................................... 93

Table 10 - 2013 Capital Outlay Projects by County (summary) ...................................................... 94

Table 11 - 2013 Capital Outlay Projects by Agency (summary) ...................................................... 95

Table 12 - 2013 Capital Outlay Projects by County (detail) ............................................................ 96

Chart 4 - 2013 Capital Outlay Projects ........................................................................ 113

Table 13 - 2013 Capital Outlay Reauthorizations ......................................................................... 114

APPENDIX D — EFFECTIVE DATES OF LAWS 2013 ........................................................................... 123

APPENDIX E — CONCORDANCE .......................................................................................................... 137

INDICES

BILL INDEX ................................................................................................................................................. 149

GENERAL INDEX ...................................................................................................................................... 151


"Our State Legislature, in view of new conditions and multiplicity of problems, has discharged its

duty measurably well. In the warmth of discussion and diversity of view, some have charged it with

sins, principally those of omission; but the discriminated and candid mind approves its work as a

whole, and confidence is strengthened in its fidelity to the duty of legislating wisely and well for the

promotion of the general welfare of the new State."

- 1913 New Mexico Blue Book Introduction

New faces abounded in both chambers as the First Session of the Fifty-First Legislature convened

with the largest freshman class since 1985 and a nearly complete turnover in legislative leadership — 31

brand-new members and a new speaker of the house; a new senate president pro tempore; new house

majority and minority leaders; and three new whips.

The issues facing the legislature, however, were familiar and are the foundation of policymaking:

consideration of a state budget in the face of only slightly improved state revenue; last-minute (literally)

approval of a compromise tax package; establishment of a health insurance exchange, as mandated by

federal law; enactment of implementing legislation for voter-approved constitutional amendments; and

reforms to the public employee pension systems.

For the second year in a row, development of the state's budget — the legislature's primary job —

was not as painful as it had been during the 2009, 2010 and 2011 sessions. The fiscal year 2014 budget is

approximately $5.9 billion — just about the same amount approved by the legislature before the recent

recession and about 4.4% over the current year's budget.

After all-day and all-night discussions among legislators and the executive, the legislature approved

a tax package in the waning moments of the session that was cobbled together from bills heard prior to

and during the session. The bill lowered corporate income tax rates and offered incentives for television

producers and for manufacturers. Additionally, the legislation was designed to ensure that "big-box" stores

pay their fair share of New Mexico taxes and that companies claiming the high-wage jobs tax credit are, in

fact, entitled to it. Controversy about the actual fiscal impact of the tax package and the manner in which

it was approved lingered after the session adjourned.

As in past sessions, the legislature considered and rejected several high-profile controversial issues,


1,300

1,200

1,100

1,000

House

Senate

Total

900

800

700

600

500

400

300

200

100

including proposals to stop issuing driver's

licenses to people in the country illegally, end the

"social promotion" of third grade students who

are struggling to read and require background

checks of people buying guns at gun shows. And

despite approximately 10 hours of hearings, the

Senate Rules Committee did not vote on

whether to recommend that the senate confirm

the governor's nominee for secretary of public

education.

The Highlights is an annual publication of

the Legislative Council Service that summarizes

much, but not all, of the legislative action during

each session. The omission of certain legislation

or issues should not be interpreted as an

indication that they are not important; each is

important to someone. Many issues in the

Highlights defy single-topic categorization, so every

effort has been made to organize and cross-

reference the contents. A complete listing of bills that passed is included in the concordance located in

Appendix E.

0

BILL ACTION SUMMARY

Intro'd Passed Enacted Vetoed

636 119 91 28

609 179 137 42

1,245 298 228 70


FIFTY-FIRST LEGISLATURE

FIRST SESSION, 2013


AGRICULTURE

In the last few years, the general category of agriculture has been eclipsed by elections, education,

taxes and other pressing issues of an increasingly urbanized state. But this year saw a resurgence of interest

in agriculture, with 31 bills introduced on the topic. Some bills deal with protecting the state's chile

production and others with ensuring an adequate statewide food infrastructure. Agricultural interests

were also prevalent in the General Appropriation Act of 2013. In addition to the regular appropriations

for New Mexico State University's College of Agriculture, the New Mexico Department of Agriculture

(NMDA), agricultural experiment stations and the cooperative extension service, the state budget bill

includes $100,000 for the Public Education Department (PED) to distribute to school districts and charter

schools to purchase New Mexico-grown fresh fruits and vegetables for school meal programs.

As for non-appropriation measures, in addition to the chile-centric bills that were introduced,

those that passed were ones that for the most part modernized several NMDA statutes to ensure that New

Mexico consumers and the environment are protected while agriculture-related business owners have an

easier time conducting their businesses.

The New Mexico Commercial Feed Act, enacted in Senate Bill 91 (Chapter 23), is a

modernization of the old Commercial Feed Law, which is repealed by the new act. The new act is based

on a model act developed by the Association of American Feed Control Officials and comports with U.S.

Department of Agriculture and Food and Drug Administration requirements, which will make working

with federal agencies and other states much easier. The law updates the definitions; clarifies exemptions

to the act; clarifies that the act applies to commercial feed for livestock, other commercial feed, mineral

feed, pet food and specialty pet food; updates labeling requirements for commercial feed and customer

formula feed; ensures adequate enforcement powers of the NMDA, including injunctions and inspection

warrants; and aligns fines with the Criminal Code.

Senate Bill 138 (Chapter 207) repeals fruit and vegetable standards statutes. These sections of

law, enacted in 1949, are not necessary, and have not been for many years, because the NMDA operates

under the Produce Marketing Act, which was enacted in 1963.

The Plant Protection Act, amended by Senate Bill 184 (Chapter 15), was brought to the

legislature by the NMDA to give the department flexibility to protect the public from possible infestations

within the plant-nursery industry while still keeping that industry viable. The industry has seen major

changes since the act was first signed into law in 1959, such as the advent of big-box stores selling plants

and the development of massive wholesale nurseries that supply those stores as well as more traditional

nurseries. In addition, the rise of new plant pests threatens both nursery stock and plants in the natural

or planted environment. These industry changes are occurring at the same time that NMDA resources are

shrinking. Perhaps the most significant changes in the bill are to give the NMDA authority to inspect

nursery stock-associated documents to verify stock origins and the history of pesticide treatments and to

AGRICULTURE

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AGRICULTURE

2

eliminate the unrealistic requirement that the NMDA make annual inspections of all nurseries in the state

and all nursery stock grown in the state before the stock is offered for sale.

The New Mexico Fertilizer Act is another agriculture-related enforcement statute that has not

been amended in recent years. Working from sections of law that were last amended in 1975, Senate Bill

268 (Chapter 112) amends the act by erasing the distinction of "commercial" fertilizer and modernizing

many of the provisions. Like the New Mexico Commercial Feed Act, the New Mexico Fertilizer Act is

based on national model legislation proposed by the Association of American Plant Food Control

Officials. Standardization and uniformity with other states in labeling and distribution requirements

make it easier for manufacturers and distributors to sell in interstate commerce. The new law grants the

NMDA authority to examine records relating to the distribution of fertilizer and soil conditioners and to

determine methods of analysis and sampling — a provision that is interesting because it provides not only

consumer protection but also a means of information-gathering and -sharing with other state and federal

agencies regarding fertilizers containing such ingredients as ammonium nitrate and anhydrous ammonia,

which are bomb-making materials. As for deficiency sampling, the bill requires the NMDA to retain

official samples that establish a penalty for nutrient deficiency for a minimum of 90 days from issuance of

a deficiency report. Additional consumer and environmental protection is provided by prohibiting the

distribution of adulterated fertilizer products.

As important as chile, red or green, is to New Mexico, it is not surprising that the state has a New

Mexico Chile Advertising Act. Senate Conservation Committee Substitute for House Judiciary

Committee Substitute for House Bill 238 (Chapter 85) and Senate Judiciary Committee Substitute for

Senate Bill 234 (Chapter 211) are virtually identical bills that make several changes to that act to address

the increased competition in the market from non-New Mexico-grown chile peppers. The bills prohibit a

person from advertising chile or chile products using a New Mexico geographic name — for example, the

name of a town or river — unless the chile is grown in New Mexico. Persons already using New Mexico

geographic names to advertise before the bills' effective date must add a disclaimer to their chile products

that the chile is not grown in New Mexico if that is the case. Restaurants may use New Mexico geographic

names to describe menu items as long as the source of any chile in the item is not misrepresented. The

NMDA is authorized to issue stop-sale, use or removal orders to violators as an enforcement mechanism.

Related to agricultural land use, Senate Bill 510 (Chapter 219) provides that an owner who

wishes for tax purposes to have land assessed using the agricultural valuation method must submit the

relevant application no later than 30 days after the date of mailing by the county assessor of the notice of

valuation.

Related Bill

Senate Bill 202 - commercial driver's license for farm-related service industry vehicles - see Motor Vehicles

and Transportation

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


ALCOHOL

A number of bills addressing the serving of alcohol survived the legislative process this year,

including measures to provide limited licenses for special venues and events and to increase the hours

during which alcohol may be served. Also addressed were alcohol server permits; training; and penalties

for serving alcohol to minors. Bills that increase annual production caps on microbrewers and small

winegrowers — Senate Bill 81 and Senate Bill 116 — are discussed in the Taxation section.

The standard offerings of bed and breakfast establishments are well known, and House Bill 506

(Chapter 159) and Senate Bill 423 (Chapter 150) add a new element by permitting these establishments

to serve limited amounts of beer and wine to guests in conjunction with food. It is unlikely that guests

will be offered a chance to enjoy a beer with their cereal, but enjoying a mimosa with their huevos

rancheros may become the norm. Certainly, cheese and crackers in the afternoon will benefit from this

new law. The local public governing body or local option district of the jurisdiction in which a bed and

breakfast is domiciled, however, may disallow the issuance of licenses.

Senate Bill 154 (Chapter 209) allows dispensers, restaurant licensees or clubs that are licensed to

sell alcoholic beverages on Sundays to start selling alcoholic beverages one hour earlier — at 11:00 a.m.

rather than at noon.

Senate Bill 424 (Chapter 148) allows the director of the Alcohol and Gaming Division of the

Regulation and Licensing Department (RLD) to issue fee-based, one-year, renewable permits for alcohol-

tasting events on licensed premises. Permits allow wine, beer, cider and spirits to be served. Prior to an

event, the appropriate authorities must be notified.

Current law provides for a fourth degree felony penalty for a certified server who sells or serves

alcohol to a minor. Senate Bill 259 (Chapter 213) reduces that penalty for a first offense to a

misdemeanor but retains the fourth degree penalty for a second or subsequent violation. The bill also

reduces the term of a server permit from five years to three years, thereby increasing the frequency

required for alcohol server training.

Related Bills

Senate Bill 81 - microbrewer annual production cap increase - see Taxation

Senate Bill 116 - small winegrower annual production cap increase - see Taxation

Senate Bill 190 - Interlock Device Fund use - see Motor Vehicles and Transportation

Senate Bill 345 - open container law exceptions - see Motor Vehicles and Transportation

SFC/Senate Bill 397 - local liquor excise tax - see Taxation

Senate Bill 442 - ignition interlock licenses - see Motor Vehicles and Transportation

ANIMALS AND LIVESTOCK

There was an increase in animal-related legislation this year over last year following recent local

and national attention on horse slaughter and welfare, coyote hunt contests and the overpopulation of

feral hogs. Themes in legislation ranged from protecting animals from people, on the one hand, to

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013 3

ALCOHOL


APPROPRIATIONS AND FINANCE

4

protecting people from animals, on the other.

House Bill 316, which would have prohibited coyote-killing contests, sparked a two-hour-plus

floor debate in the house, marked by the contrast in sensibilities of animal-rights activists and those of

rural residents and ranchers. Supporters of the bill argued that the contests were inhumane and senseless;

opponents praised the practice as effective at keeping in check the population of an obnoxious predator.

Ultimately, the bill failed by a vote of 30 to 38.

Laws direct how state and local public entities must dispose of tangible personal property, and this

year, a bill establishes provisions for the disposition of retired K-9 dogs. Under Senate Conservation

Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 139 (Chapter 9), upon a finding by the secretary of public safety

that a K-9 is not a threat to public safety, a governing public body wishing to retire the dog must first offer

the dog to its trainers free of charge. If not accepted, the dog is then offered to a nonprofit organization

and, finally, to a good home. The same provision is added to Section 33-2-5 NMSA 1978, which deals

with K-9s owned by the Corrections Department.

Horses, too, received attention in the session. Senate Bill 274 (Chapter 49) creates the Horse

Shelter Rescue Fund, which will be administered by the New Mexico Livestock Board to aid horse rescues

and homeless horses in the state by distributing money from the fund to horse rescue and retirement

facilities registered by the board. The bill also allows a taxpayer to designate all or part of the taxpayer's

refund to the Horse Shelter Rescue Fund.

Since 1889, The Livestock Code has included a provision that requires railroads to fence their

rights of ways to protect livestock. The enforcement mechanism of that provision, however, was

inadequate. Senate Bill 326 (Chapter 145) improves enforcement by providing a cause of action against a

railroad by an adjacent landowner to receive compensation for any costs, including attorney fees, of

fencing a railroad right of way abutting that landowner's property.

Related Bills

Senate Bill 72 - racehorse testing - see Gaming

Senate Bill 320 - assistance animals - see Health and Human Services

SJC/Senate Bill 444 - Horse Racing Act amendments - see Gaming

APPROPRIATIONS AND FINANCE

The December 2012 consensus general fund revenue estimate painted a mildly improving picture,

with fiscal year (FY) 2012 total recurring revenue revised upward by $56 million — primarily from oil and

gas withholding and reversions — and FY 2012 reserves at 14% of recurring appropriations. In addition,

FY 2013 total recurring revenue was revised upward by $20 million, mostly as a result of revising gross

receipts taxes, personal income taxes and reversion estimates. At the same time, however, the corporate

income tax forecast was revised downward. The estimate also projected that, for FY 2014, the legislature

would have $283 million in "new money" to spend, with new money calculated by subtracting the current-

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


year recurring appropriations from the next fiscal year's recurring revenue.

In the mid-session review, although the consensus group determined that a new estimate was not

necessary, the group noted a few concerns for the legislature's consideration. One concern is the

tremendous increase in tax credits. The high-wage jobs tax credit, in particular, has turned out to be more

costly than expected and is not serving the purpose for which it was enacted — namely, to create jobs.

Most of the tax credit claims have been for jobs created from previous business activity, rather than for

new jobs.

The federal sequestration could have a major impact on New Mexico's economy because of the

state's reliance on federal spending through the military, national laboratories and education, as well as its

reliance on social services funding. Of the more than $6 billion in federal funding assumed in the

General Appropriation Act of 2013, health and human services receives the bulk, at nearly $4.5 billion.

Public schools and higher education receive the next-highest amount, at a little more than $1.1 billion

combined. Transportation receives about $407.5 million, and public safety receives nearly $63.5 million.

At 12.8%, New Mexico ranks fourth in the nation for federal spending as a percentage of state gross

domestic product. With an economy so heavily reliant on federal spending, New Mexico cannot help but

feel the effects of sequestration, whether directly through the state's budget or less directly through

reductions at military bases and the national laboratories. The state faces significant funding reductions if

Congress fails to act to ameliorate the effects of sequestration — a reduction of approximately $76 million

when compared with FY 2013 nondefense social program spending, with approximately $135.6 million

more in defense cuts. These reductions leave the state's economy unsettled, and unless the economy is

diversified, the state could face a frightening future.

Economic diversification is easier said than done. Public sector job losses continue to be a drag

on private sector gains, and the Bureau of Business and Economic Research at the University of New

Mexico (UNM) projects that the state will not regain its previous jobs peak until 2016. The promise of

jobs and economic growth is purportedly one of the reasons the governor agreed to participate in the

federal Medicaid expansion program, and although it looks positive for high-wage job potential and is, for

the most part, exempt from sequestration, Medicaid remains part of the congressional/executive debate.

After federal funding, the oil and gas industry has been New Mexico's saving grace, but even increased gas

production through the use of hydraulic fracturing, or "fracking", and other new technologies might not

be enough to save the state's economy from a disastrous sequestration hit.

Fiscal Fireworks

In addition to concerns over the fiscal impact of federal sequestration, the 2013 legislative session

began with a stunning display of fiscal fireworks on two fronts: unreconciled cash in the state's account;

and special education maintenance of effort (SPED MOE) liabilities.

APPROPRIATIONS AND FINANCE

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013 5


APPROPRIATIONS AND FINANCE

6

♦ Cash Reconciliation

The legislature received a report that the state's cash surplus could be $70 million to $460 million

less than anticipated. The problem began in FY 2007, when a critical application within the Statewide

Human Resource, Accounting and Management Reporting System that would have reconciled general

ledger cash account balances with fiscal agent bank balances was not implemented. As FY 2014

approaches, the Department of Finance and Administration (DFA) and the state treasurer still have not

reconciled cash to bank statements. Because the actual magnitude of the problem is unknown, the DFA

adjusted the state's year-end reserves to reflect a contingent liability of $70 million, which is the minimum

amount allowed by the Governmental Accounting Standards Board when such a liability is unknown.

♦ Special Education Maintenance of Effort

The legislature also received reports that since 2010, New Mexico may not have met its state-level

SPED MOE as required by Part B of the federal Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA-B). In

accepting federal IDEA-B funds, the state guarantees that it will use this funding to supplement, rather

than supplant, state support of special education. The state must maintain its highest level of state

funding when it accepts federal IDEA-B funds, and not doing so would place New Mexico's special

education funding in a tenuous position. In addition to having to make up funding shortfalls, failure to

meet state-level SPED MOE could result in a cumulative and ongoing reduction in federal payments for

special education. Such a reduction would not, however, alter the state's requirement to continue making

consistent funding levels available; rather, it means the state would have to make up the sizeable amount

of lost federal funding.

There is still uncertainty as to the precise amount of the funding shortfall for each year. The PED

and the legislature await word from the U.S. Department of Education (USDE) as to whether the state's

appeal of its denied waiver request for FY 2010 and FY 2011 will be successful. The target for state-level

SPED MOE is approximately $432.8 million, which was the funding level in FY 2009, the last high year.

According to the PED waiver request, the state missed that target by about $15.3 million in FY 2010 and

by about $28.2 million in FY 2011; however, the USDE has indicated that the two-year shortfall may

actually be as high as $103 million based on certain PED published data — data that the PED claims are in

error. The amount of the shortfall for FY 2012 is uncertain as well because it depends in part on the

USDE's ruling on the waiver appeal.

For FY 2013 and FY 2014, the General Appropriation Act of 2013 provides contingent

appropriations as follows:

Section Source FY 2013 FY 2014

Sec. 4 - budget state equalization guarantee distribution $16,000.0

Sec. 4 - budget general fund $10,000.0

Sec. 5 - special education "lockbox" and driver's license fees $20,000.0

appropriations (driver's ed funding)

Sec. 6 - supplemental

and deficiency

appropriations

state equalization guarantee distribution $20,000.0

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


The USDE may not approve the state's plan for funding FY 2013 and FY 2014 shortfalls because

it relies heavily on taking money from the state equalization guarantee distribution and resetting the unit

value in both fiscal years. After much discussion and negotiation, the legislature passed a bill to provide

state-level SPED MOE funding from the operating reserve if other appropriations are insufficient or if the

state's proposal for funding is denied by the USDE. This bill — House Appropriations and Finance

Committee Substitute for House Bill 628 — is discussed in the Education section.

General Appropriation Act

The General Appropriation Act

of 2013, House Appropriations and

Finance Committee Substitute for

House Bills 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6 (Chapter

227, p.v.) (House Bill 2), appropriates

$5.9 billion for FY 2014 recurring

expenses, adding $230 million over the

FY 2013 appropriation, an increase of

about 4% and less than the December

revenue estimate for "new money".

House Bill 2 leaves projected general

fund reserves of $659 million,

representing approximately 11% of FY

2014 recurring appropriations.

The division of New Mexico's

recurring operating budget can be parsed into six broad categories, identified in Table 2 and Chart 1, both

of which are found in Appendix B. The broad categories derive from Section 4 of the General

Appropriation Act of 2013 and include Public Schools, Higher Education, Human Services, Public Safety,

Judicial and General Government, and the categories, in turn, can be delineated by programs and agencies

to which budgetary dollars are specifically appropriated.

♦ Public Schools

Higher Education

13.5%

Keeping with recent budget trends, New Mexico's public schools account for the single largest FY

2014 appropriation, representing 42.5% of the state's overall general fund budget. With the

appropriation totaling nearly $2.57 billion — an amount that exceeds the FY 2013 appropriation by about

$112 million — the legislature and the governor appear to agree on the importance of investing in the

state's public schools. Early childhood programs are the clear winner in this year's public education

budget debate; programs such as pre-kindergarten and K-3 Plus; family, infant and toddler child care,

known as the FIT program; and home visitation share in the $22 million appropriation.

APPROPRIATIONS AND FINANCE

GENERAL APPROPRIATION ACT

GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATIONS

Fiscal Year 2014

$5,877,015,868

Judicial

3.5%

Human Services

27.8%

Public Schools (b)

42.5%

Public Safety

6.4%

General Government (a)

6.1%

(a) Legislature, General Control, Commerce and Industry, Agriculture, Energy and Natural Resources

(b) Other Education, Public School Support

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013 7


APPROPRIATIONS AND FINANCE

8

As discussed under the Fiscal Fireworks subheading above, the need to rectify underfunding in

previous fiscal years for the SPED MOE for early learning, as well as other educational initiatives, became

a focal point of the 2013 session. That focus resulted in two House Bill 2 appropriations: 1) a $10

million categorical supplemental appropriation for distribution consistent with the funding formula; and

2) an authorization to transfer $16 million from the state equalization appropriation to a supplemental

education appropriation if the federal waiver requested by the PED is denied.

♦ Higher Education

Higher education and special schools represent 13.5% of the FY 2014 budget, or more than $790

million. Performance improvement measures were clearly recognized by legislators as vital areas of

concern and budgetary dollars, with more than $20 million dedicated to course, degree and certificate

completion. Benefiting from an additional $100,000 will be the mathematics, engineering and science

achievement program. The Educational Retirement Fund will also benefit, with $3.8 million

appropriated for higher education employer contributions. The appropriation is contingent upon

pension solvency reforms, which successfully passed both houses and were signed into law.

With an increase of $8.7 million, categorical funding for higher education will see more funding

available for agricultural extensions, athletics, health sciences and special schools, as well as nearly $6

million for compensation increases for institutions and for research and public service projects.

♦ Human Services

With an overall appropriation of $1.6 billion, the combined subcategories of health, hospitals and

human services in House Bill 2 make up about 28% of the budget for FY 2014, which is consistent with

FY 2013's appropriation as a percentage of the budget.

Most agencies falling under the human services category will receive increased appropriations in

FY 2014. The Veterans' Services Department will receive $3.29 million, a 14% increase from the previous

fiscal year's appropriation. Conversely, the Commission on the Status of Women, which provides

information, support services and career development to individuals and groups designed to improve the

economic health and well-being of women in New Mexico, will receive no FY 2014 general fund money

after the governor's $125,000 veto of all of the funding appropriated by the legislature. (Section 5 of

House Bill 2 contains a provision extending the period of time for expending the commission's $125,000

general fund appropriation from FY 2013.) The appropriation to the Aging and Long-Term Services

Department totals $44.7 million.

The Human Services Department (HSD) appropriation totals $1.04 billion. After several

consecutive years of dramatic increases for Medicaid program spending, House Bill 2 appropriates $929.9

million for Medicaid — a 2.7% increase, but much lower than FY 2013's 4.1% increase from the previous

fiscal year. The temporary assistance for needy families (TANF) program receives $104.7 million,

including an increase of $3.5 million for quality child care assistance, one of the TANF programs. The

general fund increase for the income support program includes $830,000 for general assistance and the

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


supplemental nutrition assistance program.

The Department of Health (DOH) receives more than $301 million. The developmental

disabilities Medicaid waiver program, which provides clients with services and support that allow eligible

individuals with developmental disabilities to participate as active members of their communities, receives

an increase of $4.6 million. The Legislative Finance Committee (LFC) notes that at the end of FY 2012,

despite 3,888 people being served under the program, 5,911 were on its waiting list. House Bill 2 also

includes $2 million for adolescent substance abuse treatment and an increase of $675,000 for sexual

assault treatment contractual services.

The general fund appropriation to the Children, Youth and Families Department (CYFD) is in

excess of $219 million, an increase of more than $11 million from FY 2013. The general fund

appropriation to the early childhood services program includes $9.2 million for the pre-kindergarten

program and $125,000 for services that provide early childhood oral-deaf spoken language education to

deaf and hard-of-hearing children who use cochlear implants and hearing aids.

♦ Public Safety

Programs and operations related to public safety will see roughly a $10 million increase — about

2.6% — in general fund appropriations, with the increase fairly evenly split between the Corrections

Department and the Department of Public Safety (DPS). The DPS appropriation includes $1.9 million

for vehicle fleet replacement and $878,000 for increasing officer pay by one step in the DPS step pay plan.

The increase amounts to approximately 3% and is aimed at reducing the high vacancy rates at the DPS.

♦ Judicial

Accounting for about 3.5% of the state's overall budget, New Mexico's judicial branch of

government receives $207.5 million in House Bill 2 — an increase of about 4% from the FY 2013

appropriation. The $207.5 million reflects the remaining amount after the governor's $140,000 veto for

the court-appointed special advocate program in southern New Mexico. The FY 2014 appropriation

includes $500,000 from the Local DWI Grant Fund for drug courts. Perhaps not surprisingly, the Second

Judicial District Court, the Second Judicial District Attorney's Office and the Bernalillo County

Metropolitan Court, all located in the state's largest metropolitan area, combine to consume the lion's

share of the judicial branch appropriation in an amount equaling $61.4 million. Notably, the Public

Defender Department receives $41.8 million, an increase from FY 2013 of about $1.67 million.

♦ Other Appropriations and Transfers

For the first time since 2008, state employees receive a raise, albeit a small one. Section 8 of

House Bill 2 appropriates a little more than $14 million for employee compensation, providing a 1%

salary increase for all executive branch state employees, including executive exempt employees; judicial and

district attorney personnel; higher education faculty and staff; and public school employees.

Commissioned state police and motor transportation officers receive an overall 4% raise: 3% in Section 4

appropriations and 1% in Section 8.

APPROPRIATIONS AND FINANCE

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APPROPRIATIONS AND FINANCE

10

Although the bill, as passed, contained a provision allowing the DFA to transfer up to $70 million

from the general fund's "allowance for potential loss account", the governor vetoed the provision. Section

11 of House Bill 2 provides a $17 million transfer from the operating reserve to the Appropriation

Contingency Fund to address reductions in federal funding to state agencies resulting from the federal

sequestration. Section 12 of the bill provides specific transfer authority in the event that transfers to the

general fund at the end of FY 2013 are insufficient to meet appropriations. If such a shortfall materializes,

the governor, with approval from the State Board of Finance, may transfer up to $120 million from the

operating reserve to the general fund's appropriation account to meet FY 2014 obligations.

♦ Special and Supplemental Deficiencies Appropriations

Special and supplemental nonrecurring appropriations in House Bill 2 are located in Sections 5

and 6, respectively, and total $93.2 million, down from $104.2 million in FY 2013. Highlights in these

sections include:

(1) an appropriation of $1.4 million to the Administrative Office of the Courts to

purchase information technology equipment, furnishings and vehicles for 11 district courts;

(2) an appropriation of $224,900 to the First Judicial District to prosecute a fraud case

affecting the city and county of Santa Fe;

(3) an appropriation of $9.2 million to the General Services Department (GSD) for

transfer to the Group Self-Insurance Fund; and

(4) a $2.9 million appropriation to the Department of Environment (NMED) to match

federal funds for cleanup of Superfund hazardous waste sites in New Mexico.

Feed Bill

House Bill 1 (Chapter 1), commonly referred to as the "Feed Bill", appropriates $23.65 million

from the general fund to various legislative agencies for expenditure in FY 2013 and FY 2014. Of that

total, an $8.64 million appropriation provides for the operations of the 2013 legislative session. An

appropriation of $15 million for FY 2013 and FY 2014 provides funding for interim activities, including

the operations of the Legislative Council Service (LCS); Legislative Education Study Committee (LESC);

LFC; Senate Rules Committee; house and senate chief clerks' offices; and Legislative Information System.

Public Finance

The Convention Center Financing Act is revised in House Bill 73 (Chapter 190) to make the act

applicable to all incorporated municipalities and H class counties. The act previously applied only to

certain incorporated municipalities based on population. Pursuant to this law, incorporated

municipalities and H class counties, all of which are included in the definition of "qualified

municipalities", are allowed to impose convention center fees on patrons of lodging facilities, such as

hotels and motels. These fees are used by qualified municipalities in the operation and maintenance of

convention centers, which are now more narrowly defined in the act. The law also allows two qualified

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


municipalities, if they are located in the same county within 20 miles of each other and if they have each

enacted an ordinance allowing imposition of convention center fees, to enter into a joint powers

agreement related to collection and expenditure of revenue from convention center fees.

The legislature showed more than usual interest this year in amending laws that have been on the

books virtually unamended for a long time, some since statehood. Bonding was one such area of interest,

with several bills introduced to amend bond statutes, though only one was signed into law. House Bill

503 (Chapter 158) amends provisions related to the sale of bonds by counties, municipalities and school

districts to allow these entities to sell bonds not only at a competitive sale, but also at a negotiated sale. A

negotiated sale is advantageous to a smaller bond issuer because it provides an opportunity for negotiation

with an underwriter in advance. In a competitive sale, the bond issuer can demonstrate transparently that

its borrowing cost is the lowest possible at the time of the sale.

The governor vetoed an Investments and Pensions Oversight Committee-endorsed bill that would

have changed the membership of the State Investment Council and made other changes to the laws

governing the council and Investment Office. Senate Bill 24 (Chapter 65), which was also endorsed by

the committee and was introduced at the behest of the state treasurer, makes several changes to the Local

Government Investment Pool (LGIP), the first being to give it that name in statute rather than

"Participating Government Investment Fund", as it was previously designated. The investment language is

broadened to allow the state treasurer and local governments to invest in securities backed by the full faith

and credit of the U.S. government and its agencies and instrumentalities, rather than listing all of those

entities. The biggest change is to increase, to 35% in the aggregate, the percentage of general fund and

bond proceeds that may be invested in the LGIP. The state treasurer may also invest in securities issued

by the state, state agencies, state institutions, counties, municipalities, school districts, community college

districts or other subdivisions of the state, as well as in other states' securities. The original bill would have

made rating the LGIP discretionary, but through amendment, mandatory rating was reinstated. The

mandatory rating provision was originally added to the law after two former state treasurers were indicted;

the legislature wanted a national rating agency to monitor the LGIP so that imprudent actions could be

caught and rectified. This protection, however, costs approximately $30,000 per year and does not

guarantee the safety of principal or collateralized deposits.

Tobacco Settlement Permanent and Program Funds

APPROPRIATIONS AND FINANCE

Pursuant to a 1998 Master Settlement Agreement (MSA) between 46 states and the four largest

tobacco companies in the U.S., New Mexico receives an annual tobacco settlement payment that has

historically been between $35 million and $45 million. Early on, New Mexico segregated its settlement

revenues from the general fund, depositing them instead in the Tobacco Settlement Permanent Fund,

which was supposed to make annual distributions to the Tobacco Settlement Program Fund. The

distribution to the program fund was limited to 50% of the MSA settlement funds received in the

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APPROPRIATIONS AND FINANCE

preceding fiscal year; the remaining 50% was to be retained in the permanent fund to build the corpus of

the fund. In 10 of the fiscal years since the creation of the Tobacco Settlement Permanent Fund,

however, no part of the annual MSA settlement revenues was retained in the permanent fund; the

legislature instead put the entire amount into direct spending. A 2003 change in the law also made the

Tobacco Settlement Permanent Fund a reserve fund of the state, meaning it could be expended, under

certain circumstances, to avoid an unconstitutional deficit.

12

Senate Finance Committee Substitute for Senate Finance Committee Substitute for Senate Bill

113 and Senate Education Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 392 (Chapter 228, p.v.) was designed as

a compromise between two camps: those who want money that had been diverted from the Tobacco

Settlement Permanent Fund over the years to be restored to the fund; and those who want to use the fund

to make up for the shortfall in the Lottery Tuition Fund and to invest in early childhood programs. The

governor vetoed a provision that would have transferred $50 million from the general fund to the

Tobacco Settlement Permanent Fund. Under the bill's remaining provisions, 25% of the FY 2014 MSA

payment is distributed from the permanent fund to the Lottery Tuition Fund and 25% is distributed from

the permanent fund to the program fund for appropriation for direct services provided by early childhood

care and education programs administered by the CYFD. While the governor approved the portion of the

bill that appropriates funds from the Tobacco Settlement Permanent Fund to the Lottery Tuition Fund,

in her veto message, she warned that she would not do so again and admonished the legislature to provide

for the long-term solvency of the Lottery Tuition Fund.

The General Appropriation Act of 2013 includes several appropriations from the Tobacco

Settlement Program Fund, with a total expenditure of approximately $19.2 million:

(1) $249,300 to the Indian Affairs Department for tobacco cessation and prevention

programs for Native American communities throughout the state;

Capital Outlay

(2) $1.3 million to the HSD for breast and cervical cancer treatment;

(3) $7.9 million to the HSD for Medicaid;

(4) $5.7 million to the DOH for smoking cessation and prevention programs;

(5) $748,000 to the DOH for diabetes prevention and control services;

(6) $239,000 to the DOH for HIV/AIDS prevention, services and medicine;

(7) $128,600 to the DOH for breast and cervical cancer screening; and

(8) $2.96 million for UNM Health Sciences Center research and public service projects.

Although over the course of the past several years there have been many attempts at capital outlay

reform — subcommittees formed and dissolved; a desire for change spoken about in numerous meetings;

and legislation proposed to ensure widespread planning, prioritizing and coordination of funding for

capital outlay projects — real change has not emerged. The legislature takes seriously its charge as the

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APPROPRIATIONS AND FINANCE

appropriating body and wants to maintain its control over what is appropriated in each district for capital

projects. In her veto message of last year's capital bill, the governor said, "The capital outlay process is in

dire need of reform...". In the absence of actual reform taking place, however, the executive sent

legislators a letter in late December asking that surveys be completed on any capital outlay projects the

legislators intended to introduce during the session; the same request went out to legislators within days of

adjournment. The timing of these requests made it difficult for legislators to respond in a timely or

complete manner, although many tried. The gridlock between legislative and executive perspectives on

the spending of capital dollars is intact.

This year's capital outlay bill, Senate Finance Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 60 and

House Taxation and Revenue Committee Substitute for House Bill 337 (Chapter 226, p.v.), has a short

title, thus making history — the 2013 Work New Mexico Act. The bill authorizes approximately $222.5

million from the sale of severance tax bonds for a wide range of statewide and local projects. This total

includes nearly $4.5 million for construction and equipment for senior centers statewide; $43 million for

state buildings, including juvenile detention and correctional facilities, health facilities and renovations to

deteriorating state buildings statewide, and improvements to cultural facilities; nearly $17 million for

water quality improvements, dams and meters statewide; nearly $20 million for water and wastewater

system improvements in communities across the state; nearly $12.7 million for local road projects; and

approximately $37 million for local government improvements, such as community centers, parks, cultural

facilities, county complexes and law enforcement facilities. The bill also authorizes approximately $51

million to be appropriated from other state funds, including several Department of Game and Fish funds,

the Miners' Trust Fund, the Public Project Revolving Fund and the Public School Capital Outlay Fund.

The governor vetoed a total of $4,402,350 from projects in the capital outlay bill, noting in her

executive message her support for projects that were vetted and prioritized by local communities, state and

local agencies and elected leaders. Bernalillo County had the highest amount of vetoed projects at

$1,227,350, with Santa Fe County running second at $729,500. High among the vetoed projects were

those relating to sports equipment and facilities, animal shelters, technology upgrades, Navajo chapter

houses and facilities, marquees and public art restoration.

House Taxation and Revenue Committee Substitute for House Bill 353 (Chapter 202, p.v.) is

this year's capital outlay reauthorization bill and contains changes to 52 projects from prior-year

appropriations. The number of reauthorizations has decreased considerably over the past few years

because so many appropriations left on the books were voided in the 2009 and 2010 solvency efforts to

shore up the general fund. Changes made in the bill's reauthorizing language include changing the

purposes, extending the time frames, changing the administering agencies and expanding the purposes for

projects. The bill also contains changes to special appropriations made in prior years.

Three reauthorizations were vetoed by the governor, in effect keeping the original language and

time frames for projects intact. Vetoed reauthorizations would have purchased furnishings for use by the

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BUSINESS AND FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

disabled, extended a project expenditure period for a land grant and provided funding for a mainstreet

project.

14

Details for projects contained in both capital outlay bills may be found in Appendix C.

New Mexico Finance Authority

As is required every year, the New Mexico Finance Authority (NMFA) received legislative

authorization for making loans and grants for various infrastructure projects around the state. House Bill

70 (Chapter 21) authorizes loans from the Public Project Revolving Fund; Senate Bill 228 (Chapter 24)

authorizes loans and grants from the Water Project Fund and grants from the Acequia Project Fund. Lists

of all projects authorized in these bills are included in Appendix B.

House Bill 580 (Chapter 14) authorizes the NMFA to issue additional revenue bonds for the

Regional Cancer Treatment Center at the Gila Regional Medical Center in Grant County and the Nor-

Lea General Hospital in Lea County. The authorization is limited to $3 million, divided between $2.25

million for the Gila Regional Medical Center and $750,000 for Nor-Lea.

Senate Finance Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 12, which was passed in response to a 2012

scandal involving a fraudulent NMFA audit, would have changed the membership of the NMFA, imposed

new restrictions and required the establishment of an audit committee. The governor, however, vetoed

the measure.

Related Bills

House Bill 205 - State Financial Regulation Fund - see Business and Financial Institutions

House Bill 417 - Cultural Affairs Department Enterprise Fund - see Cultural Affairs

HAFC/House Bill 628 - SPED MOE funding - see Education

HHGIC/House Bill 654 - Group Self-Insurance Fund use - see Public Officers and Employees

Senate Bill 2 - State Aviation Fund use - see Motor Vehicles and Transportation

Senate Bill 39 - College District Tax Act bond use - see Education

Senate Bill 101 - energy conservation bonds - see Energy and Natural Resources

Senate Bill 173 - State Financial Regulation Fund - see Business and Financial Institutions

Senate Bill 190 - Interlock Device Fund use - see Motor Vehicles and Transportation

Senate Bill 274 - Horse Shelter Rescue Fund - see Animals and Livestock

Senate Bill 572 - Property Control Reserve Fund use - see State and Local Government

Senate Bill 586 - sole community provider payment expansion - see Health and Human Services

BUSINESS AND FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

Successful bills from the session that concern business and have no taxation implications address

issues on car dealerships, business authorization certificates, payday loans, mortgage foreclosures and

secured transactions. House Business and Industry Committee Substitute for House Bill 641, which

significantly reduces corporate income tax rates, is fully discussed in the Taxation section.

House Business and Industry Committee Substitute for House Bill 202 (Chapter 13) amends

the statute concerning unlawful acts for car dealers to prohibit car manufacturers, distributors or their

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BUSINESS AND FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

representatives from requiring dealers to relocate, construct, remodel or otherwise substantially alter a

dealership facility within 10 years of previous construction or unless necessary to comply with health and

safety laws or technology requirements.

Identical bills House Bill 347 (Chapter 88) and Senate Bill 180 (Chapter 97) increase the

application fee for a business authorization certificate from $500 to $1,000 and increase the amount of

the paid-up capital required for a for-profit trust company to maintain a certificate from $150,000 to

$500,000. The increases are the first since the law was enacted in 1973.

Senate Floor Substitute for Senate Education Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 630

(Chapter 221) amends parts of the New Mexico Small Loan Act of 1955 that relate to loan product

reporting and enforcement. The bill clarifies that small loan licensees must include in their mandated

reports to the Financial Institutions Division of the RLD data only on loans that exceed a certain annual

interest rate. The new law also gives the division discretion in imposing penalties on licensees that fail to

comply with reporting requirements.

In response to a multistate lawsuit against the five largest mortgage servicers in the nation, House

Bill 205 (Chapter 11) and Senate Bill 173 (Chapter 69) establish the State Financial Regulation Fund to

receive New Mexico's portion of the lawsuit settlement proceeds. The fund will be administered by the

Financial Institutions Division and will be used for consumer protection and foreclosure protection

efforts.

Senate Bill 146 (Chapter 137) amends definitions in the Uniform Commercial Code, the body of

statute relating to secured transactions. The bill clarifies the perfection of security interests, control of

electronic chattel paper, priority in certain interests, discharge of account debtor, restrictions of

assignments of promissory notes, content of financial statements, filing procedures of secured interests

and the collection and enforcement of a secured party.

Related Bills

House Bill 46 - chartering and regulating corporations by secretary of state - see State and Local Government

House Bill 72 - motor vehicle and trailer lease agreements - see Motor Vehicles and Transportation

HBIC/House Bill 194 - intrastate motor carrier regulation - see Motor Vehicles and Transportation

House Bill 401 - State Investment Council investment in New Mexico businesses - see State and Local

Government

House Bill 506 - bed and breakfast beer and wine license - see Alcohol

HBIC/House Bill 641 - corporate income tax rate deduction and combined reporting - see Taxation

Senate Bill 154 - Sunday alcohol sales - see Alcohol

Senate Bill 240 - space flight liability limits - see Economic Development

SCORC/Senate Bill 328 - intrastate motor carrier regulation - see Motor Vehicles and Transportation

Senate Bill 423 - bed and breakfast beer and wine license - see Alcohol

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013 15


CHILDREN AND FAMILIES

CHILDREN AND FAMILIES

16

The legislature passed several bills that enacted or extended child welfare provisions, from

providing for home visiting services to providing additional safeguards against abuse, abandonment and

neglect of children.

The Safe Haven for Infants Act allows a person to leave an unwanted infant at a hospital and, in

so doing, avoid criminal prosecution for abandonment or abuse. With the changes made by House Bill

374 (Chapter 20), the act now provides that an infant may be left at a fire station or law enforcement

agency. Beyond increasing the number and types of "safe haven" sites, the bill clarifies that the act's

protections extend only to infants left at locations in which a member of the site's staff is present at the

time of the transfer of custody.

Senate Bill 41 (Chapter 50) imposes background check requirements on parties involved with

certain CYFD emergency placements. Under the new law, when the department considers placing a child

in the home of someone who has a familiar relationship with the child, it must conduct a name-based

criminal record check of the adults in the home. Within 15 days of placement, the agency must conduct a

fingerprint-based criminal record check of adult household members. The bill permits the department to

remove a child from a home in which an adult refuses to comply with the fingerprinting requirements. It

also provides terms under which an adult may contest a placement denial based on the results of a name-

based background check.

Senate Bill 365 (Chapter 118) requires the CYFD to establish a statewide program that provides

periodic home visiting services to eligible families who opt to receive the services. Those eligible for these

services include pregnant women; expectant fathers; and parents and primary caregivers of children from

birth to kindergarten entry. The services must be "research-based" and use current evidence-based "best

practices" to achieve positive outcomes in terms of infants born healthy; home environments that are safe

and nurturing; children and families that are physically and mentally healthy; children being ready for

school; and families that are connected to formal and informal supports in their communities. Section

2951 of the federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act provides for federal grants to fund certain

evidence-based maternal, infant and early childhood home visiting programs, and it is possible that the

home visiting program created in Senate Bill 365 will qualify for these federal funds.

The Children's Trust Fund was originally established to fund "innovative projects" to address child

abuse and neglect. Senate Bill 297 (Chapter 25) amends the Children's Trust Fund Act to provide for

additional applications of the fund and to allow the board that operates the fund to devise programs and

projects to advocate for the prevention of child abuse and neglect. The bill also expands the governing

board membership from nine to 13 nonpartisan members.

Senate Bill 299 (Chapter 144) modifies and clarifies the law regarding marriage licenses and the

marriage ceremony. The law now directs that social security numbers of marriage license applicants be

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CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS

collected and maintained in county records for use in child support enforcement and provides a definition

of "solemnize" to mean "to join in marriage before witnesses by means of a ceremony". The law specifies

who is authorized to solemnize a contract of marriage to include both retired and active judges. It also

restricts the issuance of licenses and the solemnizing of marriages in regard to persons under 18 years of

age, while providing for certain exceptions. An important clarification is that a marriage pursuant to New

Mexico law must be conducted in New Mexico under a marriage license issued by a county clerk of this

state. In most cases, a couple desiring to wed must appear in person to apply for a marriage license. The

new law provides that health tests and physician certificates are no longer required when applying for a

marriage license, unless the secretary of health requires these by rule; eliminates any legal distinction

between the rights of children born in or out of wedlock; increases the penalty for a person violating the

marriage license laws to a misdemeanor; and provides that a county clerk is responsible on the clerk's

official bond for damages resulting from the clerk's failure to perform statutory duties.

Related Bills

House Bill 104 - AMBER alert expansion - see Law Enforcement, Public Safety and Corrections

House Bill 173 - Uniform Child Abduction Prevention Act - see Criminal Law and Courts

Senate Bill 58 - immunization reporting - see Health and Human Services

Senate Bill 132 - Uniform Interstate Enforcement of Domestic Violence Protection Orders Act - see Law

Enforcement, Public Safety and Corrections

Senate Bill 247 - pre-kindergarten services bids - see State and Local Government

CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS

Of the 24 joint resolutions proposing constitutional amendments that were introduced during the

session, only two were approved by the legislature, and these will appear on the ballot in the general

election in November 2014. The LCS publication, Brief Analyses and Arguments For and Against the

Constitutional Amendments, which contains explanations of all constitutional amendments to appear on the

general election ballot, will be released in the summer of 2014.

Senate Joint Resolution 7 (C.A. 2) is a simple constitutional change that has been in the

legislature before, and this time was the charm. The resolution proposes to have a student regent at

Northern New Mexico State School, or Northern New Mexico College as it is commonly known. Now

that Northern New Mexico College is a four-year school, this change follows the boards of regents of the

other four-year schools in the state.

Currently, the Constitution of New Mexico prohibits conducting a school election with any other

type of election. House Joint Resolution 2 (C.A. 1) proposes to amend the constitution to allow school

elections to be held in conjunction with nonpartisan elections, while still prohibiting their being held with

any partisan election.

Related Bills

House Bill 46 - chartering and regulating corporations by secretary of state - see State and Local Government

House Bill 358 - Judicial Standards Commission implementing legislation - see Criminal Law and Courts

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013 17


CRIMINAL LAW AND COURTS

HAFC/HJC/House Bill 483 - Public Defender Department implementing legislation - see Criminal Law

and Courts

CRIMINAL LAW AND COURTS

18

As is the norm, there were many bills related to criminal law that were introduced during the

2013 legislative session, but only a handful passed, and few survived gubernatorial vetoes. One of the bills

that passed is enabling legislation for a constitutional amendment adopted in 2012. Another bill tweaks

the Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act, and a third establishes a scheme for penalty

assessments by the State Parks Division of the Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department

(EMNRD).

The most significant debates of the session on criminal law matters, however, concerned two bills

that did not pass. New Mexico joined the national conversation on penalties for use of marijuana with

the introduction of House Bill 465. The bill would have reduced the penalties for possession of

marijuana and, most significantly, would have made first offense possession of four ounces or less of

marijuana a civil penalty, rather than a criminal penalty. The bill was vigorously debated before narrowly

passing the house of representatives, but the senate took no action on the bill. The session also saw

memorials introduced that were related to this issue, but those, too, did not pass.

New Mexico also joined the national debate on gun laws. An attempt was made this session to

enact gun control legislation that, as initially conceived, would have required background checks on most

firearms purchasers in private sales to determine if they are prohibited by law from possessing a firearm.

House Judiciary Committee Substitute for House Bill 77 was significantly modified during committee

hearings to narrow its scope to sales of firearms at gun shows and to require that the Administrative Office

of the Courts report certain adjudications of persons with mental disorders and involuntary commitments

for mental disorders to the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The bill attracted a great deal of attention,

with ardent supporters for both its adoption and its defeat, and was being debated on the senate floor

when the session ended. A scattering of other bills introduced during the session attempted to change the

state's concealed carry laws, including a measure to allow concealed weapons to be carried by employees in

schools, but none progressed very far.

One of the three criminal law bills that passed was House Appropriations and Finance

Committee Substitute for House Judiciary Committee Substitute for House Bill 483 (Chapter 195).

The bill implements an amendment to the Constitution of New Mexico approved by the voters in

November 2012 that created an independent Public Defender Department. The bill severs the existing

connection between the Public Defender Department and the Corrections Department, to which the

Public Defender Department had been administratively attached. It also amends the Public Defender Act

to reflect the independence of the Public Defender Department, creates a Public Defender Commission to

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


oversee the department and amends the duties and responsibilities of the chief public defender

accordingly.

CRIMINAL LAW AND COURTS

Another criminal law bill, House Judiciary Committee Substitute for House Bill 570 (Chapter

152), amends the Sex Offender Registration and Notification Act. The bill includes changes to

definitions, changes to certain deadlines for registering, additions to the information required upon

registration as a sex offender, changes to verification procedures and a list delineating what information

can be made available on the DPS sex offender web site.

Senate Conservation Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 94 (Chapter 136) establishes State

Parks Division penalty assessment misdemeanors and incorporates a process for issuing penalty

assessments under the Boat Act.

Four bills passed that have a direct impact on the functioning of the state's court system. Perhaps

most important was House Bill 358 (Chapter 154), which implements an amendment to Article 6 of the

Constitution of New Mexico approved by the voters in November 2012. The bill adds a mandatory

position for a municipal judge on the Judicial Standards Commission and adds an additional non-legal

member to the commission. House Judiciary Committee Substitute for House Bill 107 (Chapter 192)

adds a provision to the statutes regarding the collection of fees for municipal courts and municipal penalty

assessments that allows a municipality with a population under 3,000 to transfer surplus fees to the

municipality's general fund. House Bill 151 (Chapter 26) allows magistrate judges who are in a magistrate

district with a population of more than 200,000, who are not members of the State Bar of New Mexico

and who are licensed to practice law in the state to remain as magistrate judges if they are in service when

their district passes the 200,000 population bar. The bill also clarifies that the bar admission requirement

applies to appointments as well as elections to the judgeship. House Bill 173 (Chapter 156) enacts the

Uniform Child Abduction Prevention Act, which allows a court to issue abduction prevention orders in a

child-custody proceeding on the court's own motion, upon petition by a party in a child-custody

proceeding or upon a warrant from a prosecutor or other public authority if there is a credible risk of

abduction of the child.

Related Bills

House Bill 104 - AMBER alert expansion - see Law Enforcement, Public Safety and Corrections

HJC/House Bill 178 - electronic citations - see Law Enforcement, Public Safety and Corrections

HJC/House Bill 368 - San Juan County magistrate precincts - see Elections

House Bill 374 - Safe Haven for Infants Act expansion - see Children and Families

House Bill 443 - civil actions for unpaid or underpaid wages - see Employment and Labor

Senate Bill 41 - emergency child placement background checks - see Children and Families

Senate Bill 107 - Uniform Real Property Transfer on Death Act - see Real Property and Land Use

Senate Bill 240 - space flight liability limits - see Economic Development

Senate Bill 299 - marriage licenses and ceremonies - see Children and Families

Senate Bill 442 - ignition interlock licenses - see Motor Vehicles and Transportation

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013 19


CULTURAL AFFAIRS

CULTURAL AFFAIRS

20

The two cultural affairs bills from the session that were enacted into law primarily affect the

Cultural Affairs Department (CAD). The first is a measure to re-brand state monuments, and the second

establishes new department funding sources.

After a study conducted under the auspices of the CAD showed that potential tourists were more

likely to understand and want to see a "historic site" instead of a "monument", Senate Bill 70 (Chapter 67)

changes the name of the department's State Monuments Division to the "State Historic Sites and

Monuments Division" and changes the names of the several state monuments to historic sites. The new

names are:

▸ Coronado Historic Site;

▸ Jemez Historic Site;

▸ Fort Selden Historic Site;

▸ Bosque Redondo Memorial and Fort Sumner Historic Site;

▸ Lincoln Historic Site;

▸ El Camino Real Historic Trail Site;

▸ Fort Stanton Historic Site; and

▸ Taylor Reynolds Barela Mesilla Historic Site.

House Bill 417 (Chapter 32) creates the Cultural Affairs Department Enterprise Fund, which

allows the department to keep revenue generated by the museums and monuments or historic sites, as well

as money from the sale of property, such as deaccessions. Money in the fund is subject to appropriation

by the legislature.

Related Bill

Senate Bill 195 - Bataan-Corregidor Heritage Month - see Military and Veterans' Affairs

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Of the relatively few economic development bills that passed during the session, the one with the

highest profile concerned one of the state's newest industries — commercial space flight, which could have

a major impact on the south-central region of the state. Other successful measures addressed the statewide

mainstreet program and issues concerning eligibility for and use of public money on economic

development projects.

Following the practice in several other states, Senate Bill 240 (Chapter 131) extends the current

limits of liability accorded to space flight entities to manufacturers and suppliers of components, services

or vehicles used in space flight activities. The act also extends the sunset of the Space Flight Informed

Consent Act from 2018 to 2021.

The legislature made an effort to promote rural economic development with House Bill 76

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(Chapter 60) and Senate Bill 185 (Chapter 62), identical bills that require that the mainstreet program

coordinator assist in the development of the frontier communities program. Another measure that will

help rural communities, House Business and Industry Committee Substitute for House Bill 581

(Chapter 201) (House Bill 581), allows retail businesses in smaller municipalities to gain access to public

funding. Article 9, Section 14 of the Constitution of New Mexico, commonly known as the "antidonation

clause", prohibits the state or political subdivisions from using public money for private benefit except for

certain purposes, including economic development. The Local Economic Development Act was enacted

to implement this economic development exception to the antidonation clause; House Bill 581 amends

that act to include retail businesses located in municipalities with populations of 10,000 or less in the list

of entities qualified to receive public money for economic development purposes.

House Bill 352 (Chapter 43) requires that any public support provided for an economic

development project be provided in exchange for a substantive contribution. The qualifying entity

receiving public support shall provide security to the local or regional government body sufficient to secure

the obligations of the qualifying entity under the terms of the agreement. The government body shall

enforce the agreement against a qualifying entity that fails to perform its substantive contribution and

shall recover that portion of the public support for which the qualifying entity failed to provide a

substantive contribution. The bill also clarifies that the project participation agreement for an economic

development project that uses public support provided by the state to a local or regional government body

shall include a recapture agreement for the state.

EDUCATION

What may have started out as a line in the sand during the 2012 interim, when the PED

promulgated teacher evaluation rules without the passage of authorizing legislation, perhaps hardened into

a concrete divide as the session progressed, with the executive on one side of the divide and some

legislators on the other. Of the approximately 40 successful measures that could be loosely classified as

public and higher education bills for the 2013 session, the governor either vetoed (with a message) or

pocket vetoed (without a message) more than half — 22 bills — with the remainder signed into law.

One of the earliest divisive issues involved consideration of the General Appropriation Act of

2013 (discussed fully in the Appropriations and Finance section) in both the house and the senate, with

some legislators advocating for as much funding as possible "above the line" and other legislators and the

executive advocating for certain public education funding issues to be funded "below the line". Above-the-

line appropriations are distributed through the public school funding formula, allowing local boards of

education to make policy decisions about expenditure of those funds, while below-the-line appropriations

are categorical and must be expended specifically on those issues described in the appropriation with no

local board discretion.

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EDUCATION


EDUCATION

Public Education

22

Besides "above the line" and "below the line", a few other new buzzwords and buzz phrases came

into the legislative education lexicon during the session, including "component unit" and "SPED MOE".

On some days, it seemed as though one could not go anywhere in the capitol without hearing those terms

in one context or another — in committee meetings, floor sessions and even casual conversations among

the wall leaners in the hallways.

For several years, both the LFC and the LESC, as well as the standing committees in both

chambers, have been concerned about the fiscal infrastructure of school districts and charter schools and

especially concerned about timely and accurate audits. Bills were passed in recent sessions to require

school boards and governing bodies of charter schools to create audit committees and to provide financial

penalties for late audits. According to the Governmental Accounting Standards Board, charter schools are

component units for the state if they are state chartered and for the local school district if they are locally

chartered. As such, audit findings or a qualified audit of a charter school affects the audit of its chartering

authority, be that the state or the local school district. Although locally chartered charter schools operate

independently from school districts, they are considered component units for auditing purposes. Bills

were introduced to sever that connection between school districts and charter schools, but none passed.

Senate Bill 333 would have established, among its provisions, chartering authority oversight of charter

school conflicts of interest, but it was pocket vetoed. The governor also pocket vetoed House Bill 522,

which would have required charter schools to verify to their respective chartering authorities that they are

meeting all of their federal grant requirements.

SPED MOE, as noted in the Appropriations and Finance section, concerns the state-level special

education maintenance of effort requirement in IDEA-B. If the state accepts federal funds under that act,

those funds may not supplant state funds; the state must "maintain its effort" and provide no less than its

highest level of funding for special education. The USDE, however, may find that New Mexico has not

met its maintenance of effort requirement since 2009. The finding could subject the state to cumulative

and ongoing financial penalties through reduction of the federal contribution to special education in the

state and a requirement that the state make up the difference. The PED has requested for waivers for FY

2010 and FY 2011, which were denied by the federal government but which are currently under appeal.

House Appropriations and Finance Committee Substitute for House Bill 628 (Chapter 191) provides

"just-in-case" appropriations to supplement appropriations in the General Appropriation Act of 2013 to

address making up the shortfall in maintenance of effort funding in previous fiscal years.

The K-3 Plus program, which began seven years ago as a pilot project, is a proven success at

preparing students in high-poverty public schools for kindergarten through third grade by allowing at least

24 additional instructional days for participants. Senate Education Committee Substitute for House Bill

310 (Chapter 175) lowers the threshold for school participation from 85% to 80% of students who are

eligible for free or reduced-fee lunch or for schools that received a D or F in the school rating program in

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the previous year. Program funding is based on enrollment on the fifteenth day of the program, and

applications for the program are due to the PED by March 15 for the succeeding fiscal year. Final funding

is contingent on the final unit value for the state equalization guarantee distribution set by the secretary of

public education. Students are evaluated at the beginning of the K-3 Plus program, and their progress is

measured by department-approved summative and formative evaluations.

Following reports of tragedies across the country related to cyberbullying and its effects on

students, as well as dissemination of a 2011 report revealing that nearly 44% of middle school students

and nearly 19% of high school students had experienced cyberbullying, the legislature chose to expand the

state's bullying law. House Bill 54 (Chapter 178) revises the law that requires the PED and local school

boards to take action to prevent bullying in public schools specifically to include cyberbullying prevention

measures. The amended version of the law provides an August 2013 deadline for local school boards to

promulgate policies targeted at cyberbullying prevention. Policies promulgated pursuant to this law must

address cyberbullying recognition training, reporting procedures, investigation requirements and

discipline measures to be taken in response to confirmed instances of cyberbullying. To assist with

implementation of this law, the statute provides a detailed definition of cyberbullying, which includes

electronic communications that are targeted to and actually received by another student.

Senate Bill 302 (Chapter 113) allows for the generation of program units for home school

students who take one or more classes at public schools. The program unit is determined by multiplying

the number of home school students who are enrolled in one or more classes by the cost differential factor

of 0.25 per class per student up to the enrollment required to be a qualified student, which is one-half or

more of the PED-approved minimum course requirements.

Two measures, Senate Bill 464 (Chapter 203) and House Bill 462 (Chapter 187), allow school

districts, for one more year only, certain flexibility in school matters as they continue to face issues of fiscal

solvency because of the economic downturn and decreased state support. The bills allow the PED to

waive Public School Code and department rules pertaining to class load, teaching load, length of school

day, staffing patterns, subject areas and instructional material. This waiver provision was first put into

effect in the 2009 special session, and Senate Bill 464 and House Bill 462 extend it for one last school

year, through FY 2014.

House Bill 542 (Chapter 16) enacts the Community Schools Act to provide a strategy for

organizing resources, including partnerships, in a community to ensure student success. Another effort

aimed at helping students succeed, House Bill 300 (Chapter 198), requires that school districts allow

pregnant students and new fathers to take as many as 10 days of excused absences from classes for their

child's birth and allow student parents to take off four days per semester for prenatal or child care.

Senate Bill 164 (Chapter 108) prohibits the use of state equalization guarantee distributions for

outreach activities and for student room-and-board expenses at the New Mexico School for the Arts

charter school.

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EDUCATION


EDUCATION

24

After starting out as a bill to ensure the reporting of student data — in particular, data on African

American students in institutions of higher education — House Education Committee Substitute for

House Bill 112 (Chapter 196) provides for the disaggregation of data in various student reports in higher

and public education by the same factors required in reports to the federal government. Data to be

collected include the categories of gender, Caucasian, non-Hispanic, Hispanic, African American,

American Indian or Alaska Native, Native Hawaiian or other Pacific Islander, Asian, two or more races

and "other". The "other" category will include students in a sample so small that the students could be

personally identified, which would violate the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974.

Among the numerous public education measures that the governor vetoed or pocket vetoed was a

bill that would have prohibited local school boards, the PED or charter schools from contracting with

private entities to manage public schools — an issue that has garnered significant attention lately as

corporate educational entities become increasingly prominent in the charter-school arena nationwide.

Two other bills that went down would have addressed concerns with the A-B-C-D-F Schools Rating Act by

either repealing and replacing the act altogether or amending it to create a school grading framework and

an alternative method for calculating school grades. Had various other measures been signed into law, the

Public Education Commission would have become an independent entity with chartering authority over

charter schools; high school students would have been able to earn a seal of bilingual proficiency; high

school student competence assessments would have been aligned with state-adopted common core

standards; evidence of teacher competency would have been required for advancement in the three-tiered

licensure system; and a council created by the PED would have developed a system for evaluating the

performance of teachers and principals.

Post-Secondary Education

Most of the speculation about important higher education bills that the legislature would examine

during the session centered on concerns about the solvency of the Lottery Tuition Fund, which, according

to LFC estimates, will be insolvent by FY 2014. The 2012 legislature passed a joint memorial requesting

that the Higher Education Department (HED), together with the LESC and the LFC, study issues related

to lottery scholarship solvency during the 2012 interim, but that study was not undertaken.

During the 2013 session, the legislature considered approximately 10 bills related to lottery

scholarships, including several that proposed to expand legislative lottery scholarship eligibility. While

none of the proposed measures passed, two simple memorials, one from the house and one from the

senate, requesting a study did pass; depending on interim committee workload, the topic may be

considered during the 2013 interim. Senate Finance Committee Substitute for Senate Finance

Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 113 and Senate Education Committee Substitute for Senate Bill

392 (Chapter 228, p.v.) provides supplemental funding from the Tobacco Settlement Permanent Fund to

the Lottery Tuition Fund for FY 2014. The governor vetoed the section of the bill that would have

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transferred $50 million from the general fund operating reserve to the Tobacco Settlement Permanent

Fund, leaving that fund to absorb the funding provided for early childhood education and the Lottery

Tuition Fund.

Senate Bill 301 (Chapter 171) increases the family income threshold for eligibility for New

Mexico Scholars Act scholarships from $30,000 to $60,000 and provides an automatic cost-of-living

adjustment (COLA) in future years. The scholarship requires that the recipient achieve a score of at least

25 or more on the American College Test or an SAT equivalent score; have a class rank in the top 5% of

the student's high school class; and maintain a 3.0 grade point average on a 4.0 scale.

House Bill 247 (Chapter 34) establishes a military war veteran scholarship program for veterans

who have been honorably discharged from the U.S. armed forces; who were New Mexico residents at the

time of entry into the armed forces or lived in New Mexico for 10 years or more; and who have been

awarded a medal for service in support of a U.S. military campaign or armed conflict after August 1,

1990. The bill creates the Military War Veteran Scholarship Fund in the state treasury, to be

administered by the HED, which shall use the fund to reimburse post-secondary educational institutions

under the exclusive control of the state for tuition payments, fees and book allowances for veterans who

also meet the educational institution's satisfactory academic progress requirements. The Veterans' Services

Department shall determine the eligibility of an applicant who applies for the scholarship and certify to

the HED those approved for the scholarship.

Amendments made to the Post-Secondary Educational Institution Act by Senate Judiciary

Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 638 (Chapter 59) bring New Mexico law into compliance with

recent amendments to federal law regulating for-profit post-secondary institutions. The amendments

remove full or partial exemptions for out-of-state institutions with a physical presence in New Mexico and

require private, for-profit post-secondary institutions to register with the state and adopt procedures for

resolving student complaints.

In a 2008 report, the LFC found that, among financial aid programs administered by the HED,

loan repayment programs are preferable to loan-for-service programs. The Teacher Loan Repayment Act,

enacted in House Bill 53 (Chapter 177), provides that public school teachers practicing in "high-risk

teacher positions" can apply for teacher education loan repayment awards to help with repayment of loans

they obtained pursuing their education to become educators. Language in the bill states that its purpose is

to increase the number of public school teachers teaching in schools that are located in high-poverty areas

and in which a significant number of students are falling below proficiency levels. The Teacher Loan

Repayment Act includes limitations on the types of loans that can be repaid using money awarded under

the act and establishes contractual terms for any teacher who applies for and receives such an award, one

of the most significant of which is the teacher's commitment to serve in a high-risk teacher position for

two full school years.

Some of the funding available to offset the law school loan repayment obligations of public service

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EDUCATION


EDUCATION

employees has been untapped in recent years, perhaps because of the program's terms: salaries for entry-

level public defenders and district attorneys exceed the $45,000 loan repayment program maximum.

Senate Bill 349 (Chapter 147) increases the salary cap to $55,000 and makes more attorneys eligible for

the program's benefits.

26

Senate Bill 39 (Chapter 37) amends the College District Tax Act to expand the purpose of bonds

issued pursuant to that act to include purchase and installation of computer hardware and software and to

repeal the prohibition of issuing bonds for less than a five-year period.

In an effort to keep pace with other states as they enact laws related to social networking web sites,

the legislature passed Senate Judiciary Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 422 (Chapter 223) to

prohibit institutions of higher education from requesting or requiring that a student, applicant or

potential applicant for admission provide a password to that person's social networking account. The bill

also makes it unlawful for an institution of higher education to deny admission to an applicant or

potential applicant based on a refusal to provide access to a social networking account, or for an

institution of higher education to take disciplinary action against a student based on a refusal to provide

access to a social networking account.

"Digital geospatial data" is electronic information that includes the geographic or spatial location

and characteristics of features and boundaries on, above and the below the earth's surface. House Bill 493

(Chapter 18) designates the resource geographic information system within the Earth Data Analysis

Center at UNM as the "state digital geospatial data clearinghouse" to serve as a publicly accessible

repository for digital spatial data. As provided in the bill, the clearinghouse will become the state's

centralized coordinator and manager of geographical information systems, providing consistent standards

and access to this information for education, infrastructure, public safety, health, natural resources and

economic development.

New Mexico has a wealth of scientific and technical talent among its post-secondary educational

institutions, national laboratories and various research institutes. House Bill 562 (Chapter 130) creates a

technology research collaborative to bring that talent together to develop and commercialize new

intellectual property for the state and to establish advanced technology centers and a corresponding work

force. The collaborative will include the state's post-secondary institutions, national laboratories and

research institutes and will be administratively attached to the New Mexico Institute of Mining and

Technology.

Higher education legislation, in general, did not experience the same high proportion of vetoes

that public education bills did. Measures that passed but were not signed into law by the governor

included a bill that would have included all physical education student credit hours in determining

funding for community colleges; a bill that would have authorized certain class B counties to impose a

property tax for purchase, construction, renovation or improvement of a four-year post-secondary

institution; and a bill that would have exempted post-secondary institutions of a certain size from paying

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enewable energy charges to utility providers.

Related Bills

HVEC/House Bill 232 - local school board candidate campaign finance reports - see Elections

House Bill 416 - anesthesiologist assistant student licensure - see Professional and Occupational Licensure

Senate Bill 140 - Poison and Drug Information Center - see Health and Human Services

Senate Bill 247 - pre-kindergarten services bids - see State and Local Government

ELECTIONS

Dozens of bills affecting elections were introduced during the session, as is often the case in any

session following a presidential election. Only two of the bills that became law actually address issues that

arose during the last election, namely adequate polling site staffing and the amount of time allowed to

hear nominating petition challenges. While legislation did pass to extend campaign reporting

requirements to school elections, agreement could not be reached on addressing constitutional

deficiencies in the Campaign Reporting Act or the Voter Action Act.

During the 2012 election, the courts struggled with tight deadlines for hearing challenges to

candidates' nominating petitions, while some voters struggled with long lines at their polling places.

Senate Rules Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 485 (Chapter 121) moves the deadline for filing

declarations of candidacy and nominating petitions one week earlier to allow an additional week for

courts to consider nominating petition challenges, while House Voters and Elections Committee

Substitute for House Bill 219 (Chapter 189) clarifies the minimum staffing and equipment standards for

polling places required on election day.

Two bills, House Voters and Elections Committee Substitute for House Bill 225 (Chapter 184)

and House Bill 497 (Chapter 91), address voter registration. The former allows qualified electors to

complete an electronic certificate of registration at offices of the Motor Vehicle Division of the Taxation

and Revenue Department (TRD) and sign with an electronic signature, while the latter, which will take

effect beginning July 1, 2015, allows voters to update their existing voter registration certificates

electronically.

House Voters and Elections Committee Substitute for House Bill 232 (Chapter 180) imposes

new reporting requirements on candidates for school boards in school districts with more than 12,000

students and for community college boards. The candidates must now report their contributions and

expenditures following each school election.

House Bill 93 (Chapter 53) clarifies the methods by which disbursements from campaign

accounts may be made by allowing payments to be made by either check or any other method by which

the date, amount and payee of the transaction are automatically recorded.

Precincts for San Juan County magistrate divisions are renumbered by House Judiciary

Committee Substitute for House Bill 368 (Chapter 89) to coincide with precinct changes made by the

county in 2011. The measure also equalizes the populations of the divisions.

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013 27

ELECTIONS


EMPLOYMENT AND LABOR

EMPLOYMENT AND LABOR

28

The legislature made substantial changes to the Unemployment Compensation Law this year, the

most significant of which replaces the existing system that determines how much an employer must

contribute into the Unemployment Compensation Fund with a new system effective January 1, 2015.

Changes made to the Workers' Compensation Act include development of a program to identify and

notify extra-hazardous employers and clarification of death benefits for beneficiaries; in addition, the

Safety and Fraud Division of the Workers' Compensation Administration is replaced with the

Enforcement Bureau. The Minimum Wage Act was amended to give wage collection actions preferential

scheduling by the courts, and wage discrimination based on an employee's sex is now prohibited with the

enactment of the Fair Pay for Women Act. Other successful measures exempt certain airlines from having

to pay overtime in certain cases and prohibit employers from asking or requiring a prospective employee to

provide the password to the employee's social networking account, with exceptions provided in both of

these laws.

Several major changes are made to the Unemployment Compensation Law by Senate Finance

Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 334 (Chapter 133). The law extends the employer contribution

schedule 2 through the end of 2014; however, beginning in 2015, the reserve ratio system that has been in

effect for several years to determine the appropriate employer contribution schedule is replaced with a new

benefit ratio system. Under the benefit ratio system, an employer's contribution rate is based on the

employer's benefit ratio and the reserve factor. An employer's benefit ratio is determined by dividing the

employer's benefit charges during the preceding three years by the employer's total annual taxable payroll

during the same time period. The reserve factor will range between 0.5 and 4.0 to ensure that the

Unemployment Compensation Fund maintains an "adequate reserve", which is the balance of the

Unemployment Compensation Fund needed to pay between 18 and 24 months of benefits at the average

of the five highest years of benefits paid in the last 25 years. The contribution rate of an employer that has

been contributing for less than 12 months will be the average of the contribution rates for all contributing

employers in the employer's industry. The law also provides for an excess claims premium for employers

that have a benefit ratio, when calculated, that exceeds the maximum allowable benefit ratio of 5.4%. The

premium cannot exceed 1% of the employer's average payroll.

Other provisions in the Unemployment Compensation Law are addressed in House Bill 329

(Chapter 132). The bill removes the double affirmation rule, under which a claimant who received

unemployment compensation benefits, but was ultimately found to be disqualified or ineligible for those

benefits, was not required to pay the benefits back to the Unemployment Compensation Fund. With the

double affirmation rule removed, the Workforce Solutions Department may now recover the amount of

benefits that are overpaid to a claimant. House Bill 329 also imposes a civil penalty of 25% of the amount

of overpaid benefits determined to have been paid to a claimant due to fraud. As a condition of receiving

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EMPLOYMENT AND LABOR

federal grant money to administer a state's Unemployment Compensation Law, the federal Department of

Labor requires a penalty of at least 15% of the amount of overpayment against the claimant, and that

amount must be deposited in the fund used for the payment of unemployment benefits. This

requirement is met by providing that 15% of the overpaid amount be deposited in the Unemployment

Compensation Fund; the additional penalty of 10% of the overpaid amount is to be deposited in the

Employment Security Department Fund to help pay expenses related to administering the Unemployment

Compensation Law. A civil penalty of up to $10,000 is imposed on an employer that fraudulently

prevents or reduces the payment of benefits to a claimant; this penalty will be deposited in the

Unemployment Compensation Fund.

Senate Bill 275 (Chapter 134) makes multiple and varied changes to the Workers' Compensation

Act. The bill raises the minimum threshold for a mandatory safety visit for employers subject to the act

that hold an annual workers' compensation premium liability of $5,000 to $15,000. The Workers'

Compensation Administration is required to develop a program to identify and notify extra-hazardous

employers, and those employers shall formulate and implement an accident-prevention plan or be subject

to a $5,000 penalty. The bill clarifies benefits upon the death of a worker to ensure that any children of

the worker receive benefits and states that all parties to a dispute concerning medical treatment are

entitled to request a medical examination of the injured worker involved in the dispute. The Safety and

Fraud Division of the Workers' Compensation Administration is replaced by the Enforcement Bureau,

with some duties transferred to the administration. The bill removes the provision that previously

restricted a person employed as ombudsman from holding another position in the Workers'

Compensation Administration for at least one year upon leaving the position of ombudsman. The

director of the administration may now serve parties a copy of the director's recommendation regarding a

disputed claim in formats other than certified mail, including electronic communication. The bill also

removes the requirement that a hearing on a claim for benefits be held in the county in which the injury

occurred; hearings may now be held at an administration office located nearest to where the injury

occurred or by videoconference or telephone.

House Bill 443 (Chapter 182) amends the Minimum Wage Act to give civil actions and appeals

of civil actions to collect unpaid or underpaid wages preferential scheduling by the courts, to the same

extent as civil actions to collect employer contributions under the Unemployment Compensation Law.

The law is intended to reduce the financial hardship suffered by affected workers when their day in court

is delayed.

The Fair Pay for Women Act, enacted in House Labor and Human Resources Committee

Substitute for House Bill 216 (Chapter 12), prohibits wage discrimination based on an employee's sex

and provides an aggrieved employee with additional options to assert the right to equal wages and stronger

remedies when violations occur. Employer retaliation for claims arising under the Fair Pay for Women

Act is prohibited.

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013 29


ENERGY AND NATURAL RESOURCES

30

Senate Bill 352 (Chapter 216) exempts airlines from the overtime provisions of Section 50-4-22

NMSA 1978 if the overtime hours are not required by the employer and are arranged by a voluntary

agreement between workers who trade shifts pursuant to a written agreement between the workers. The

agreement cannot require the worker to work more than 13 consecutive days, 16 hours in a day or 60

hours within a week. The exemption will expire on July 1, 2015.

The worldwide boom in the use of social networking web sites has resulted in a concurrent

interest in related laws. Senate Bill 371 (Chapter 222) prohibits employers from requesting or requiring a

prospective employee to provide a password to gain access to the prospective employee's social networking

account. Employers that are exempt from this law include federal, state or local law enforcement agencies,

and nothing in this law prevents government agencies from conducting background checks if they are

required by law.

Related Bills

HBIC/House Bill 641 - high-wage jobs tax credit eligibility - see Taxation

Senate Bill 233 - workers' compensation claim attorney fees - see Insurance

Senate Bill 557 - rural job tax credit eligibility - see Taxation

ENERGY AND NATURAL RESOURCES

Energy-related statutes experienced a few minor tweaks during the session, but no major new

initiatives were enacted. One successful measure clarifies that the commissioner of public lands shall

charge lease rates for geothermal resources at the same rate charged by the federal Bureau of Land

Management (BLM); another gives sole jurisdiction over solar energy-derived electric wiring to the

Construction Industries Division of the RLD; and a third gives the State Board of Finance responsibility

for allocating the amount of federal bonds to be used for clean energy among "large local governments" in

the state. The legislature also tweaked the Efficient Use of Energy Act to reduce costs to electric utilities

and their customers.

The commissioner of public lands must set royalty rates for the use of geothermal resources from

state lands equal to rates set by the BLM as a result of enactment of House Bill 85 (Chapter 125). The

bill gives the State Land Office authority to adopt regulations that will maintain geothermal resources as

sustainable resources and prevent multiple developments from depleting one another's ability to generate

energy from the same geothermal resource. The bill also makes the state Geothermal Resources Act

consistent with federal provisions; clarifies a distinction between uses of the earth's hot water below 250

degrees Fahrenheit and water above 250 degrees Fahrenheit; and excludes the use of heat above 250

degrees Fahrenheit if used in a heat exchange. This bill was introduced to help foster geothermal resource

development in New Mexico, thereby stimulating economic development, with a corresponding benefit to

State Land Office revenues from trust lands that may have geothermal leases.

House Energy and Natural Resources Committee Substitute for House Bill 279 (Chapter 86)

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emoves the EMNRD from the set of entities that promulgate rules related to permits for solar system

installations. The bill clarifies that solar electricity generating equipment is electrical wiring and,

accordingly, is subject to the provisions of the Construction Industries Licensing Act. Under the new law,

only the Construction Industries Division and the Construction Industries Commission are responsible

for devising uniform solar-installation permitting procedures. These entities are also responsible for

identifying which bureaus within the RLD should regulate solar-related installations.

The federal American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 created qualified energy

conservation bonds that may be issued by each state and by "large local governments" to finance clean

energy projects and activities. The maximum national bond volume is set at $3.2 billion, of which New

Mexico may issue no more than $20.6 million worth of bonds. Senate Bill 101 (Chapter 46) provides for

the State Board of Finance to determine the amount to be allocated to each large local government, which

is defined in accordance with federal law as a municipality or county with a population greater than

100,000 or an Indian tribal government. The bill also establishes mechanisms for the State Board of

Finance to distribute the state's remaining allocation to qualified bond issuers for qualified energy

conservation bonds. Clean energy projects may include energy efficiency, renewable energy, clean fuels,

efficient transportation and public outreach.

The Efficient Use of Energy Act addresses energy efficiency and load management, which are cost-

effective resources used by public utilities to enable the utilities to provide affordable and reliable energy

to customers. Senate Judiciary Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 621 (Chapter 220) and House

Business and Industry Committee Substitute for House Bill 267 (Chapter 124) amend the act in several

ways to require that public utilities acquire only some of the cost-effective and achievable energy-efficiency

and load management resources that are available in the utilities' service territories. The bills reduce

energy-efficiency targets for electric utilities; allow public utilities to recover energy-efficiency costs and load

management costs as long as they do not exceed 3% of a customer's bills, excluding gross receipts taxes

and certain fees, or $75,000, whichever amount is less; and require that an electric utility direct at least

5% of the total amount it recovers for energy-efficiency costs to benefit low-income customers.

Related Bills

House Bill 494 - pipeline excavation notice requirement - see Utilities

SFC/Senate Bill 14 - sustainable building tax credits - see Taxation

Senate Bill 160 - biodiesel special fuel excise tax deduction - see Taxation

ETHICS

Ethics-related legislation that not only passed but also survived the governor's veto pen focused on

procurement issues and are fully discussed under the Property and Procurement subheading of the State and

Local Government section. Senate Bill 182 tightens restrictions on sole source and emergency procurement,

imposes due diligence requirements, restricts who may make emergency procurements and adds a fourth

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013 31

ETHICS


GAME AND FISH

degree felony to available penalties for violations. Senate Bill 448 addresses improper and illegal conduct

by state contractors and subcontractors and provides debarment and suspension procedures. A third

ethics bill — House Judiciary Committee Substitute for House Voters and Elections Committee Substitute

for House Bill 133 — would have required state and local contractors and prospective contractors to

disclose certain campaign contributions, but it was vetoed.

GAME AND FISH

32

Bills relating to game and fish this year primarily dealt with fees, licenses and penalties. Successful

measures provide for special licensing for nonresident disabled veterans to hunt oryx, reduce fees for

minors to fish, designate short-term special fishing event permits and amend penalty provisions for certain

hunting and fishing violations. A bill was introduced that would have banned animal killing contests, but

it died for lack of agreement among stakeholders.

Section 17-3-13.7 NMSA 1978 provides that nonresident disabled active duty members or

veterans of the U.S. armed forces who are undergoing a rehabilitation program that involves hunting

activities and that is sponsored by the federal government or a nonprofit organization authorized by the

federal government and is under the direction of a military or federal Veterans Administration

rehabilitation center may purchase certain hunting licenses at the resident rate. House Bill 186 (Chapter

126) amends that section to add oryx as a hunting species that such a veteran can hunt at the resident fee.

Senate Bill 73 (Chapter 135) amends penalties for certain hunting and fishing violations.

Previous law provided that any license or permit issued pursuant to the provisions of Chapter 17 NMSA

1978 could be suspended or revoked and license privileges could be withheld for a definite period not to

exceed three years from any person procuring a license through misrepresentation, violating any provisions

of Chapter 17 NMSA 1978 or hunting without a proper license. Under the amended penalties in Senate

Bill 73, the period of suspension, revocation or withholding of license privileges may now be for a definite

period of time with no limit.

Under the provisions in House Energy and Natural Resources Committee Substitute for House

Bill 61 (Chapter 29), the director of the Department of Game and Fish may now designate, by special

permit, fishing events during which the requirement for a fishing license or permit is waived for the

event's participants. Such special fishing event permits may last for a term no longer than three days.

Senate Bill 106 (Chapter 5) provides for children under the age of 18 to obtain a fishing license

for $2.00. Prior to this measure, the reduced fee applied only to children ages 14 to 17.

GAMING

Late in the legislative session, the governor and the Navajo Nation concluded negotiations on

amendments to the Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact between the nation and the state, which

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HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

expires in mid-2015. The proposed amendments were submitted to the Legislative Committee on

Compacts, which held a hearing with less than a week remaining in the session. While the committee

endorsed the proposed amendments, no action was taken by the legislature. Gaming-related bills that did

pass and were signed into law concerned the horse racing industry.

Horse racing in New Mexico recently received national media attention for the level of

unauthorized performance-affecting drugs used in racehorses in the state and the lack of sanctions

imposed for that use. To address this criticism, Senate Bill 72 (Chapter 102) creates the Racehorse

Testing Fund to be used by the State Racing Commission to test for illegal performance-affecting drugs in

horses. Beginning January 1, 2015, the fund will consist of a portion of taxes imposed on gross amounts

wagered each day at New Mexico racetracks. It also requires that the laboratory conducting the testing

meet or exceed an identified national testing standard established by the Association of Racing

Commissioners International, Incorporated.

Senate Judiciary Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 444 (Chapter 103) updates the Horse

Racing Act in several ways. It substantially increases the civil fine for each violation of the act, from a

maximum of $10,000 to a maximum of $100,000, or 100% of a prize purse related to a violation,

whichever is greater. If a violation is for the administration of certain illegal substances to horses, the

violation must now be reported to the district attorney and to horse race licensing bodies in other

jurisdictions. In addition, a license issued by the State Racing Commission cannot be issued to a person

who has a license suspended in another jurisdiction. The bill adopts a national standard for laboratory

testing of drugs and other foreign substances that might be administered to a racehorse; it also adopts a

nationally recognized definition for the types of illegal drugs and foreign substances used in racehorses

that could trigger a fourth degree felony charge for a person caught administering or conspiring to

administer those drugs or substances.

HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

The health-related bills that were signed into law spanned a wide range of topics, including public

health provisions, patient safety, changes to privacy laws, provider scopes of practice and behavioral health

matters. Much of the legislation concerned health care coverage, both through public programs such as

Medicaid and through private health insurance. One of the most high-profile pieces of legislation to be

signed into law creates a health insurance exchange pursuant to a mandate in the federal Patient

Protection and Affordable Care Act. (See Senate Corporations and Transportation Committee Substitute

for Senate Public Affairs Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 221 & Senate Public Affairs Committee

Substitute for Senate Bill 589 under the Health Coverage subheading below.) Other successful bills require

that health coverage plans offer certain health benefits or benefits delivery mechanisms and address the

rights of and services for individuals living with disability.

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HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Health Care

34

House Judiciary Committee Substitute for House Consumer and Public Affairs Committee

Substitute for House Bill 658 (Chapter 183) amends the Vital Statistics Act and directs the DOH to

establish a way to register and certify births resulting in still birth. Upon registration of a spontaneous

fetal death, the department will, upon the request of the woman delivering a birth resulting in still birth

or a family member whom the woman designates, issue a certificate of birth resulting in still birth.

With changes made to the New Mexico Drug, Device and Cosmetic Act in House Bill 393

(Chapter 157), pharmacists may now combine prescription refills for dangerous drugs that are not

controlled substances so long as certain information accompanies the prescription. Absent a specific

prohibition on the prescription or label, a pharmacist may combine fills to dispense up to a 90-day

quantity of dangerous drugs that are not controlled substances. If a prescriber indicates on the original

prescription that a dangerous drug that is not a controlled substance may be refilled as needed, or "prn", a

pharmacist may dispense a 12-month supply under certain circumstances. In addition, pharmacists may

now dispense a dangerous drug upon a drug order from a health care practitioner or a practitioner's agent

for use at an inpatient or outpatient facility.

Senate Bill 58 (Chapter 93) amends the Immunization Act to require physicians, nurses,

pharmacists and other health care providers to report immunizations to the state's immunization registry,

unless the patient or the guardian of a minor patient refuses to allow this reporting. Previously, the duty

of the practitioner to report was discretionary. This change will provide the DOH with a more complete

source of information for public health concerns, such as natural disasters, childhood immunizations and

outbreaks of disease. It will also provide health care practitioners with a more comprehensive online

source of immunization records for individual patients.

Senate Bill 140 (Chapter 56) establishes in statute the existing New Mexico Poison and Drug

Information Center, which operates at the UNM Health Sciences Center. The bill mandates that the

Poison and Drug Information Center be accredited and that it perform certain functions, which include

providing poison- and drug-related information and educating the public and professionals on poison and

drug treatment.

An ST segment-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) is the most dangerous type of heart

attack, resulting from a sudden blockage of one of the three coronary arteries that supplies blood to the

heart. Getting treatment quickly is crucial to survival. Senate Bill 198 (Chapter 6) adds a new section to

the Emergency Medical Services Act to require the DOH to certify a hospital as a STEMI-receiving or

-referring center if the hospital has been accredited by the Society of Cardiovascular Patient Care or

another nationally recognized accreditation organization. The DOH is also authorized to adopt rules

relating to STEMI-accredited hospitals and to facilitate coordination among STEMI-accredited and non-

accredited health care facilities statewide.

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HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

Currently, only a peace officer who personally witnesses illegal or dangerous behavior, or a

physician or psychologist, may authorize the emergency transport of a mentally ill person who presents a

danger to self or others for a mental health evaluation. Under the provisions of Senate Judiciary

Committee Substitute for Senate Public Affairs Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 271 (Chapter 39),

qualified mental health professionals licensed for independent practice who practice at community mental

health centers or core service agencies may also authorize emergency transport of a mentally ill person who

is threatening harm to self or others for mental health evaluation.

Senate Bill 311 (Chapter 72) changes confidentiality provisions of the Human Immunodeficiency

Virus Test Act to allow the DOH to disclose human immunodeficiency virus test results to: 1) the subject

of the test, or an authorized representative or guardian or custodian of the test subject; 2) the person who

ordered the test, or agents or employees of the person ordering the test; 3) municipal, county, state, federal

or tribal public health agencies involved in public health activities that have security and confidentiality

standards for human immunodeficiency virus test results equal to or more protective than those of the

DOH; and 4) health care personnel, where necessary to protect the health of the individual who is the

subject of the test or an individual who has been significantly exposed to the subject of the test if based

upon documentation to substantiate the need for access to another person's test results. The bill also

requires that anyone who discloses a positive test result to the subject of the test shall provide counseling,

or refer the test subject to counseling, regarding the test results, the possible need for additional testing

and the availability of appropriate services, as well as the benefit of contacting any persons who may have

exposed the test subject to the virus, or persons whom the test subject may have exposed to the virus.

Another measure concerning disclosure of health information, Senate Bill 310 (Chapter 28),

repeals privacy provisions with accompanying misdemeanor penalties for disclosure of viral hepatitis status

to unauthorized persons. With the repeal of these provisions, disclosure of hepatitis status is governed by

those provisions that exist in other state and federal law, such as the federal Health Insurance Portability

and Accountability Act of 1996 and the state's Electronic Medical Records Act.

Senate Bill 586 (Chapter 151) expands sole community provider payment provisions in the

Indigent Hospital and County Health Care Act. The bill's amendments to the act allow additional

payments to sole community provider hospitals pursuant to waiver agreement, rule, law or state Medicaid

plan amendment, thus making it possible for these facilities to receive supplemental payments from the

state's Centennial Care Medicaid waiver program.

Health Coverage

Since 2009, private insurers operating in the individual and group health insurance markets in

the state have been required to cover the diagnosis and treatment of autism spectrum disorder for

individuals who are 22 years of age and younger and enrolled in high school, or who are 19 years of age

and younger regardless of school enrollment. Treatment coverage includes speech therapy, occupational

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therapy, physical therapy and applied behavioral analysis. With the passage of House Bill 22 (Chapter

185), as of January 1, 2015, those same benefits must be offered to state employees and state retirees and

their dependents who are covered under the Group Benefits Act.

36

"Telemedicine" is a term used to describe an interactive audio-visual medium of delivering health

care service or supervision, where a patient is in one location and a health care provider is in another

location. The provider either provides supervision to an on-site health care provider or provides direct

consultation to the patient. Senate Judiciary Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 69 (Chapter 105)

provides that covered benefits in private individual and group health insurance, as well as group coverage

provided to state employees and retirees and their dependents, may be provided through telemedicine.

Senate Corporations and Transportation Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 156 (Chapter

138) provides that private insurers in the individual and group health insurance market that provide

prescription drug coverage may not make major changes to a prescription drug formulary before 120 days

have passed after any previous change and that the insurer must provide at least 60 days' notice to affected

insured individuals before making those changes. The changes include instances when an insurer seeks

to: 1) reclassify a drug to a higher tier of the formulary; 2) reclassify a drug from a preferred classification

to a non-preferred classification, unless it is to a lower tier of the formulary; 3) increase the cost-sharing,

copayment, deductible or co-insurance charges for a drug; 4) remove a drug from the formulary; 5)

establish a prior authorization requirement; 6) impose or modify a drug's quantity limit; or 7) impose a

step therapy requirement, meaning that another therapy must be tried before that drug is made available.

Furthermore, an insurer must provide written notice regarding certain rights that an insured individual

has regarding prescription drug coverage.

The federal Medicaid program allows states to encourage the purchase of long-term care insurance

by exempting from Medicaid eligibility asset tests the value of certain long-term insurance benefits

received. Senate Bill 196 (Chapter 139) establishes a qualified state long-term care insurance partnership

program to take advantage of this federal program. After exhausting an eligible long-term insurance

policy, an individual may now qualify for Medicaid institutional care or home- and community-based care

even with assets that exceed the federally determined limits of $2,000, plus the value of a burial plan, if

the excess in assets is equal to or less than the value of the benefits provided under the individual's long-

term care policy.

With the passage of Senate Corporations and Transportation Committee Substitute for Senate

Public Affairs Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 221 & Senate Public Affairs Committee Substitute

for Senate Bill 589 (Chapter 54), the state now has a statutory infrastructure for the establishment and

operation of a health insurance exchange called the "New Mexico Health Insurance Exchange". The

federal Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act requires that each state establish its own health

insurance exchange, operate an exchange in partnership with the federal government or allow the federal

government to establish an exchange in the state. The Martinez Administration had already notified the

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HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES

federal government that New Mexico intended to establish its own health insurance exchange and make

health insurance coverage available in the individual and small-group insurance markets. The exchange

shall be operated by a board of directors in accordance with rules that the superintendent of insurance

promulgates. The board of the exchange shall also operate the New Mexico Health Insurance Alliance

until the alliance statute is repealed on January 1, 2015. On July 1, 2013, all contracts of the alliance

relating to the development and implementation of a health insurance exchange will be binding and

effective on the New Mexico Health Insurance Exchange. The board is authorized to fund the operations

of the exchange through assessments or other means, provided that it not assess insurers that offer in the

state only limited-scope insurance, such as disease-specific or other policies that supplement major medical

insurance.

When a patient needs authorization from health insurance for a prescription, obtaining

authorization has involved exchanges of telephone calls, faxes or forms, which can cause extensive delays.

In light of the ever-increasing use of electronic prescribing, Senate Bill 296 (Chapter 170) requires

Medicaid contractors, insurers and health management organizations to accept, by January 1, 2014, the

electronic submission of a uniform prior authorization form from health care practitioners who prescribe

drugs to patients in the state. The law requires the Insurance Division of the Public Regulation

Commission (PRC) — now the Office of Superintendent of Insurance — and the Board of Pharmacy to

develop a uniform prior authorization request form, taking existing federal forms and electronic standards

into consideration. Authorizing entities will have three days to respond to the authorization request, after

which time it will be deemed granted.

Disability Supports and Services

The Brain Injury Advisory Council is made up of people living with brain injury, caregivers,

family members and health care professionals whom the governor appoints to advise the state in providing

services relating to brain injury. The council has no rulemaking authority; it is strictly advisory in nature.

House Bill 227 (Chapter 127) moves the council from the Developmental Disabilities Planning Council

to the Governor's Commission on Disability.

The HSD has administered the brain injury services program since 2011. Through this program,

individuals receive service coordination, life skills coaching, crisis intervention services and other support

services. The HSD also operates a statewide brain injury hotline to refer individuals in need of services to

those services. The program was transferred by mechanism of the General Appropriation Act of 2011

from the Aging and Long-Term Services Department, which had administered the program from FY 2004

to FY 2011, to the HSD. Previous to that, the DOH had administered the program, and the Brain Injury

Services Fund established in statute had cited the DOH even after the program's transfer to the Aging and

Long-Term Services Department. With the passage of House Bill 130 (Chapter 44), the Brain Injury

Services Fund established in statute to be managed by the DOH is transferred to the HSD, and any

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INDIAN AND INTERGOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS

money, contracts and references in law of the Brain Injury Services Fund are transferred from the Aging

and Long-Term Services Department to the HSD.

38

In 2003, the legislature created the Office of Guardianship at the Developmental Disabilities

Planning Council. The office is charged with carrying out the provisions of the Office of Guardianship

Act, including rulemaking — namely, the office seeks the appointment of guardians and mental health

treatment guardians through the probate court. Senate Bill 152 (Chapter 107) creates a nonreverting

Office of Guardianship Fund to receive all gifts, donations, bequests and interest income that the Office

of Guardianship receives or that accrues to the money in the fund.

In order to conform with changes to federal disabilities law, Senate Bill 320 (Chapter 57) changes

the definition of those animals that provide assistance to disabled individuals from "service animal" to

"assistance animal" and narrows the definition of "assistance animal" to include only qualified assistance

dogs and qualified miniature horses. The bill also provides a new misdemeanor penalty for those

individuals who hold out any animal to be an assistance animal when that animal does not meet the

statutory definition of an assistance animal.

Long-Term Care

Senate Bill 335 (Chapter 114) sets out a refund policy that must be part of any contract between

an assisted living facility and a resident of the facility. In addition, the act outlines how a deceased

resident's belongings are to be handled, and charges that may be imposed, by a facility upon the death of a

resident of the facility.

Related Bills

House Bill 374 - Safe Haven for Infants Act expansion - see Children and Families

House Bill 416 - anesthesiologist assistant student licensure - see Professional and Occupational Licensure

Senate Bill 41 - emergency child placement background checks - see Children and Families

Senate Bill 99 - Dental Amalgam Waste Reduction Act - see Water

Senate Bill 297 - Children's Trust Fund uses and governing board - see Children and Families

Senate Bill 342 - nurse and certified nurse-midwife medical imaging - see Professional and Occupational

Licensure

Senate Bill 365 - home visiting services program - see Children and Families

INDIAN AND INTERGOVERNMENTAL AFFAIRS

The one bill from the session to be signed into law concerning Native Americans addresses the

difficult topic of suicide prevention, which is of critical importance to the state's tribes, nations and

pueblos. Senate Bill 447 (Chapter 7) establishes an 11-member Native American Suicide Prevention

Advisory Council to assist in developing policies, rules and priorities for the New Mexico Clearinghouse

for Native American Suicide Prevention.

As also noted in the Gaming section, late in the session, the governor and representatives of the

Navajo Nation concluded negotiations on amendments to the nation's Class III gaming compact with the

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state, which is due to expire in mid-2015. The proposed amendments were submitted to the Legislative

Committee on Compacts, which held a hearing with less than a week remaining before adjournment.

While the committee endorsed the proposed amendments, no action was taken by the legislature.

INSURANCE

Few insurance-related bills were signed into law this year, but two were quite prominent. One

implements the 2012 constitutional amendment that moves regulation of the insurance industry out of

the PRC and into an independent Office of Superintendent of Insurance. The other, which resulted in

extended floor debates, establishes a health insurance exchange pursuant to federal health care reform

requirements. This bill — Senate Corporations and Transportation Committee Substitute for Senate

Public Affairs Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 221 & Senate Public Affairs Committee Substitute for

Senate Bill 589 — is discussed in the Health and Human Services section.

At the general election in November 2012, the voters adopted constitutional amendments that

had the effect of transferring regulatory authority over the insurance industry from the PRC to the new

and constitutionally created independent Office of Superintendent of Insurance. House Judiciary

Committee Substitute for House Bill 45 (Chapter 74) is the enabling legislation that implements this

constitutional mandate, effective July 1, 2013. The bill replaces references to the Insurance Division of

the PRC with references to the Office of Superintendent of Insurance throughout the New Mexico

Insurance Code. As one might expect, the head of the Office of Superintendent of Insurance is the

superintendent of insurance. A critical aspect of the constitutional provision addressed in this legislation

is the creation of an Insurance Nominating Committee, whose fundamental purpose is to select a

qualified superintendent, to serve for a term of four years, in a manner designed to eliminate political

pressure in the selection process. The committee is composed of nine members: four selected by the

governor; four selected by the New Mexico Legislative Council; and one selected by the other eight

committee members. Composition of the committee includes representatives of insurance consumers and

the insurance industry, subject to provisions avoiding conflicts of interest. The committee also has the

authority to remove the superintendent for cause, but only after notice and a hearing.

The Portable Electronics Insurance Act, enacted by Senate Judiciary Committee Substitute for

Senate Bill 206 (Chapter 140), expands regulatory requirements for insurance covering the repair or

replacement of cell phones and other portable electronics devices. The act provides for a new limited

insurance sales license to vendors of electronic devices if they have received training and provide

information to the consumer at the point of sale regarding the nature of the insurance coverage and how

to submit a claim. The act also establishes rights and obligations of the parties regarding termination of

insurance coverage and provides that a person who acts as an adjuster for portable electronics insurance

claims is exempt from the requirement to obtain a license.

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LAW ENFORCEMENT, PUBLIC SAFETY AND CORRECTIONS

40

The cap on eligible attorney fees of a claimant or an employer for a single accidental injury claim

is increased in Senate Bill 233 (Chapter 168) from $16,500 to $22,500. The bill gives a workers'

compensation judge authority to exceed by $5,000 the maximum attorney fee provided if the judge finds

that a claimant, an insurer or an employer acted in bad faith and the injured worker or employer suffered

economic loss as a result.

Senate Bill 312 (Chapter 100) addresses a situation in which the holder of a life insurance policy

dies and the beneficiary, out of a lack of awareness of the policy, fails to submit a benefits claim. Life

insurers must now attempt to locate these life insurance beneficiaries upon a holder's death, and

unclaimed benefits escheat to the state. The bill also discourages fraudulent practices in the use of

certificates of insurance forms. Prior to entering into contracts, many general contractors, commercial

lenders and others require proof that the other party is protected by liability insurance. Senate Bill 312

establishes terms for certificates of insurance, which are sometimes used in lieu of actual insurance policy

forms as proof of insurance, and prohibits the use of certificates of insurance that are unfair, misleading or

deceptive.

Senate Bill 192 (Chapter 63) is a cleanup bill that amends Section 59A-31-1 NMSA 1978 to

clarify that Chapter 59A, Article 31 NMSA 1978 applies only to contracts of surety insurance, as defined

in Section 59A-7-8 NMSA 1978 and that these contracts are subject to the applicable provisions of both

Chapter 59A, Articles 5 and 18 NMSA 1978.

Related Bills

House Bill 22 - autism spectrum disorder coverage for state employees and retirees - see Health and Human

Services

SJC/Senate Bill 69 - telemedicine in group coverage plans - see Health and Human Services

SCORC/Senate Bill 156 - prescription drug formulary changes - see Health and Human Services

Senate Bill 196 - long-term care insurance partnership program - see Health and Human Services

SCORC/SPAC/Senate Bill 221 & SPAC/Senate Bill 589 - New Mexico Health Insurance Exchange - see

Health and Human Services

Senate Bill 296 - prescription drug prior authorizations - see Health and Human Services

LAW ENFORCEMENT, PUBLIC SAFETY AND CORRECTIONS

The legislature's concern with law enforcement and public safety was quite evident this session,

with 49 bills introduced and seven signed into law. Successful measures on these topics focused on

missing persons, victims of crimes, DNA evidence, electronic citations and the criminal justice system in

Bernalillo County. While issues related to overcrowding in correctional facilities were not resolved during

the session, the legislature considered those and several other issues in bills related to corrections,

probation and parole, and four of those bills became law.

Two bills improve the notification systems for missing persons and children. House Bill 131

(Chapter 81) adds a new section to the Missing Persons Information and Reporting Act to add a "silver

alert" procedure to be used when elderly individuals go missing. Regarding missing children, the DPS

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states that there is a high likelihood that harm will come to a child who is abducted in connection with a

custody dispute. In response to this concern, the legislature amended New Mexico's AMBER alert law

in House Bill 104 (Chapter 51) to allow the declaration of an AMBER alert following a child's abduction,

even if the person believed to have abducted the child is the child's relative.

House Judiciary Committee Substitute for House Bill 304 (Chapter 200) expands the scope of

rights for victims of human trafficking. It creates a civil cause of action for human trafficking victims,

provides a process for sealing the records of victims who have been charged with crimes arising out of the

actions of a human trafficker and expands the benefits that are to be provided to victims.

Senate Bill 132 (Chapter 47) enacts the Uniform Interstate Enforcement of Domestic Violence

Protection Orders Act. The act allows for protection orders issued in other states to be enforced in New

Mexico by the courts and law enforcement agencies and provides necessary guidelines and restrictions.

The legislature amended several sections of law in House Judiciary Committee Substitute for

House Bill 178 (Chapter 197) to allow law enforcement officers to use electronic citations for petty

misdemeanors; offenses related to game, fish and outdoor recreation; and violations of the Motor Vehicle

Code. This change codifies a practice that is reportedly already in place in various jurisdictions

throughout the state and that will reportedly save significant resources and time.

House Bill 608 (Chapter 199) creates the Bernalillo County Criminal Justice System Review

Commission, which will include a representative of each agency involved in the criminal justice system in

Bernalillo County. The commission will review the criminal justice system in order to identify changes

and propose recommendations that will improve each agency's ability to carry out its duties, and it will

provide a report to appropriate agencies and the legislature on or before June 30, 2015.

With amendments made to the DNA Identification Act in Senate Bill 149 (Chapter 208), the

secretary of public safety will no longer select the administrative center to administer the DNA

identification system. Instead, the administrative center will be located in the crime laboratory of the law

enforcement agency in the largest municipality in a class A county with a population over 500,000. The

bill makes further amendments to the act to effectuate this change and clarifies language regarding the

collection of DNA fees from offenders.

Procedures related to persons serving periods of probation or parole and to supervision of those

persons are revised in two bills that were signed into law. Senate Bill 143 (Chapter 48) amends the

Probation and Parole Act to double, from 20 to 40, the maximum caseload of Corrections Department

officers who conduct intensive supervision programs. Officers will be assisted in managing their increased

caseloads with programs and other resources that were put in place by the department in the last several

years. With respect to a county that has a misdemeanor compliance program to monitor defendants'

compliance with the conditions of probation imposed by a district or magistrate court, Senate Bill 20

(Chapter 104) raises the maximum amount a judge may require a defendant to pay for probation costs

from $30.00 per month to $50.00 per month.

LAW ENFORCEMENT, PUBLIC SAFETY AND CORRECTIONS

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MILITARY AND VETERANS' AFFAIRS

42

The Adult Community Corrections Act addresses programs that are used for certain offenders

instead of placing those offenders in the custody of the Corrections Department. Senate Bill 145

(Chapter 165) amends the Adult Community Corrections Act to eliminate the state and local selection

panels that have been used to screen and identify criminal offenders sentenced to imprisonment for

possible placement in a community corrections program. The bill also changes some of the procedures by

which counties, municipalities and private organizations may apply for funding for community corrections

programs provided through the Community Corrections Grant Fund.

Senate Bill 40 (Chapter 55) amends the definition of "contraband" as it applies in a prison, jail or

other correctional facility to include an electronic communication or recording device.

Related Bills

House Bill 374 - Safe Haven for Infants Act expansion - see Children and Families

Senate Bill 41 - emergency child placement background checks - see Children and Families

SCONC/Senate Bill 139 - K-9 dog retirement - see Animals and Livestock

SJC/SPAC/Senate Bill 271 - emergency transport for mentally ill - see Health and Human Services

Senate Bill 396 - law enforcement vehicle purchases - see State and Local Government

MILITARY AND VETERANS' AFFAIRS

Several bills were signed into law that benefit and honor veterans and members of the armed

forces. Military service members, their spouses and recent veterans who move or are transferred to New

Mexico can be issued professional licenses on an expedited basis if they have a license from another

location that has similar licensing requirements to New Mexico. Members of the armed forces, the

reserves or the New Mexico National Guard who are deployed or on temporary duty assignment may

suspend public utility or telecommunications services without a penalty or a reconnection fee. House Bill

247, which is discussed in the Education section, establishes a military war veteran scholarship program for

certain honorably discharged veterans. April has been designated as a month to honor World War II

soldiers who were prisoners of war in the Bataan Peninsula.

House Bill 180 (Chapter 33) provides for the expedited issuance of professional licenses for

military service members, their spouses and recent veterans who receive an honorable discharge and who

file for application of a license on or after July 1, 2013. The license will be issued if the applicant holds a

license from another jurisdiction that has substantially similar requirements for the license; however, the

license cannot be renewed unless the license holder satisfies the requirements for renewal for the

respective profession pursuant to Chapter 61, Articles 2 through 34 NMSA 1978.

House Judiciary Committee Substitute for House Bill 175 (Chapter 193) and Senate Public

Affairs Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 574 (Chapter 35) are duplicate bills that allow a member of

a branch of the U.S. armed forces, the reserves or the New Mexico National Guard who is deployed or on

temporary duty assignment for longer than 30 days to suspend some or all municipal, county, public

utility or telecommunications services without a penalty or reconnection fee.

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April is designated as "Bataan-Corregidor Heritage Month" by Senate Bill 195 (Chapter 2). The

World War II soldiers held as prisoners of war in the Bataan Peninsula, many of whom were from New

Mexico, and their infamous march will be remembered during April of every year.

Related Bill

House Bill 247 - military war veteran scholarship program - see Education

MOTOR VEHICLES AND TRANSPORTATION

In addition to amending the manner in which the state responds to criminal violations of the

Motor Vehicle Code, the legislature approved a restricted commercial driver's license for farm-related

vehicles, a shift to help new motor carrier businesses start up in the state, a change to motor vehicle and

trailer lease agreements, an expansion of who may qualify as driver education instructors and the issuance

of certain license plates that protect the identity of the driver.

Governmental entities occasionally need protective or undercover motor vehicle license plates for

the safety of their employees. Senate Bill 51 (Chapter 66) allows for the issuance of protective and

undercover license plates for state agencies, counties, municipalities, Indian nations, tribes or pueblos and

other entities that are not subject to vehicle registration pursuant to Section 66-6-14 NMSA 1978. An

undercover license plate is registered with a fictitious name and address so that it cannot be traced back to

the entity that has custody of the vehicle, but the vehicle must be used solely for legitimate law

enforcement purposes. A protected license plate is registered with the name and address of the entity that

has custody of the vehicle, and the vehicle must be used for sensitive activities that would place the entity's

employee at a higher risk of personal injury if knowledge of the activity were made public, not including

undercover law enforcement activities.

Senate Bill 202 (Chapter 210) provides for the issuance of a restricted commercial driver's license

for drivers in certain farm-related service industries, including agriculture-chemical businesses; custom

harvesters; farm retail outlets and suppliers; and livestock feeders. The restricted license must meet all of

the requirements of the New Mexico Commercial Driver's License Act except for a knowledge and skills

test. The driver must have a good driving record and meet other qualifications. The driver is limited to

operating class B and class C vehicles. The limited tank vehicle endorsement and the hazardous materials

endorsement, which are automatic to the license, are the only endorsements allowed. The only placarded

hazardous materials that can be carried in a vehicle driven by a driver with a restricted license are limited

amounts of diesel fuel, liquid fertilizers and solid fertilizers.

MOTOR VEHICLES AND TRANSPORTATION

While several bills passed during the session reduce the purview of the PRC, House Business and

Industry Committee Substitute for House Bill 194 (Chapter 77) and Senate Corporations and

Transportation Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 328 (Chapter 73) address an area still under the

commission's authority: intrastate regulation of motor carriers that transport people — such as taxis,

shuttles and limousines — and property and household goods for hire. The bills amend the Motor Carrier

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013 43


MOTOR VEHICLES AND TRANSPORTATION

Act to make it easier to start new motor carrier businesses in New Mexico by limiting the ability of existing

motor carriers to protest applications. No protests are allowed of applications to operate as a household

goods carrier; a specialized passenger carrier, such as a tour bus or limousine service; a shuttle other than

an airport shuttle; or a taxi in any community not currently served by a full-service taxi company. Where

protests are allowed, the burden of proof is now placed on the protesting party, and the law requires that

the PRC grant an application unless doing so will harm the level of transportation service available to the

community. The law also protects the level of service available to a community by requiring that, once the

community has at least one full-service taxi company, any new taxi companies entering that territory must

provide the same level of service. Ambulances continue to be regulated as monopolies. The law changes

most motor carrier rates to "file and use" so that companies no longer have to wait for the PRC to pre-

approve their rates. The only exceptions are ambulances, tow trucks performing nonconsensual tows and

full-service taxis, which must get permission for rate increases. The law also narrows the antitrust

exemption for motor carriers so that they are no longer allowed to come together and file common rates,

although they are still allowed to discuss best practices and terms of service. In addition to maintaining all

previous safety, financial responsibility and consumer protection requirements, the law adds several new

protections, such as making it a violation of the Unfair Practices Act to charge a predatory price.

44

House Bill 72 (Chapter 52) addresses provisions in some motor vehicle and trailer lease

agreements. The bill applies to agreements to lease motor vehicles or trailers for purposes other than

family, personal or household use, and it predominantly affects leases for fleets of motor vehicles.

Terminal rental adjustment clauses are sometimes included in these lease agreements to provide an

incentive for the lessee to maintain the property in good condition. The clauses often require that a lessee

who chooses not to buy the property at the end of the lease period pay the difference between the

contract's stipulated end-of-lease purchase price and the property's resale value. House Bill 72 bars

terminal rental adjustment clauses from being construed as a sale of the leased property or as a security

interest in the property.

Several bills make clarifications and revisions in the Motor Vehicle Code, most of them relatively

minor. House Bill 164 (Chapter 31) clarifies language in the code regarding the limits on using speeding

violations for suspension or revocation of a license or to affect a driver's automobile insurance. Senate

Bill 35 (Chapter 204) mandates that a person cited for no vehicle registration, insurance or driver's license

shall not be convicted if the person produces evidence of compliance in court. Senate Bill 36 (Chapter

205) adds penalty assessments for some violations of the Motor Vehicle Code and requires courts to notify

the TRD if a defendant fails to appear in court on a charge of violating the Motor Vehicle Code. Senate

Bill 37 (Chapter 163) clarifies provisions in the code concerning suspended or revoked licenses.

Senate Bill 248 (Chapter 212) removes the requirement that a person hold a valid New Mexico

operator's or chauffeur's license to qualify to be a driver education instructor and allows those with any

valid operator's or chauffeur's license to qualify.

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


Open container laws forbid the operation of a motor vehicle with a container of alcoholic

beverage that is open, has the seal broken or is partially consumed and within reach of vehicle occupants.

Until now, New Mexico's open container law was noncompliant with federal law because it included

exceptions for medicinal or religious purposes. Because of the exceptions, which are contrary to the

absolute prohibition required by the federal government, the Federal Highway Administration could

withhold a portion of federal highway funds otherwise apportioned to New Mexico. Senate Bill 345

(Chapter 172) addresses this problem by eliminating the two exceptions.

Senate Bill 442 (Chapter 101) amends the Ignition Interlock Licensing Act to allow a person

convicted of homicide by vehicle or great bodily harm by vehicle while under the influence of intoxicating

liquor or drugs to apply for an ignition interlock license upon completion of the person's sentence,

including any period of probation or parole.

There is a conflict in existing law regarding how money in the Interlock Device Fund may be

spent for indigent persons required to have interlock devices in their vehicles. Senate Bill 190 (Chapter

98) addresses the conflict by removing language in Section 11-6A-3 NMSA 1978 relating to how the

money can be used from the fund, thus deferring to Section 66-8-102.3 NMSA 1978, which provides for

installing, removing and leasing interlock devices with money in the Interlock Device Fund.

Senate Bill 2 (Chapter 19) clarifies that the money distributed to the State Aviation Fund

pursuant to Section 7-1-6.7 NMSA 1978 may be used for planning, program administration, construction,

equipment, materials and maintenance of a system of airports, navigation aids and related facilities for the

air service assistance program.

Related Bills

House Bill 120 - locomotive fuel gross receipts and compensating tax deductions - see Taxation

HVEC/House Bill 225 - voter registration at Motor Vehicle Division offices - see Elections

Senate Bill 160 - biodiesel special fuel excise tax deduction - see Taxation

Senate Bill 326 - railroad right of way livestock fencing - see Animals and Livestock

PROFESSIONAL AND OCCUPATIONAL LICENSURE

The legislature continued to take an active role in regulating professions and occupations. As is

done on a regular basis pursuant to the Sunset Act, sunset dates were extended for various professional

licensing boards and commissions. Legislation signed into law provides for electronic license applications

and renewals, repeals antiquated laws regarding meat inspection and processors and clarifies certain

construction industry licensing and oversight issues. Real estate professionals are the subject of multiple

new laws, as are health care practitioners in a variety of fields. House Bill 180, which is discussed in the

Military and Veterans' Affairs section, expedites the professional licensure process for certain military service

members, their spouses and recent veterans.

PROFESSIONAL AND OCCUPATIONAL LICENSURE

House Business and Industry Committee Substitute for House Bill 62 (Chapter 30) and Senate

Public Affairs Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 79 (Chapter 68) streamline licensure processes by

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013 45


PROFESSIONAL AND OCCUPATIONAL LICENSURE

making it possible for applicants to obtain, renew, reactivate or reinstate a professional or occupational

certification, permit, registration or license electronically.

46

During the 2012 interim, the legislative Economic and Rural Development Committee heard

hours of testimony by a variety of stakeholders in an effort to permit building inspectors to obtain

certification to inspect statewide. The resulting House Bill 348 (Chapter 153) and Senate Bill 249

(Chapter 142) achieve that, and they also establish the position of certified building officials to allow

counties, municipalities and other political subdivisions flexibility in terms of who can conduct

inspections, while still providing the state with some oversight of the inspection process.

House Bill 101 (Chapter 76) amends the Hoisting Operators Safety Act to clarify license

requirements and exemptions and disciplinary action for violations and replaces criminal penalties with

administrative penalties.

Real estate brokers' licensure provisions are revised in Senate Judiciary Committee Substitute for

Senate Bill 212 (Chapter 167), which amends the definitions of "associate broker", "client", "customer"

and "qualifying broker" and deletes the definition of "real estate salesperson", thus realigning real estate

broker categories and licensee provisions. The bill raises the maximum premium per licensee allowed for

a group professional liability insurance policy for which the New Mexico Real Estate Commission may

contract; clarifies requirements for continuing education of real estate brokers and licensure qualifications

for brokers from other states; and provides that acting as a broker without a license issued by the New

Mexico Real Estate Commission is punishable as a fourth degree felony. All other violations of the act are

treated as misdemeanors.

Real estate broker opinions as to the value or likely sale price of real property are not legal

appraisals, and yet there is a perception that some mortgages in the past might have been based upon such

broker opinions. Senate Bill 205 (Chapter 111) clarifies that real estate brokers who give such opinions

are not violating the Real Estate Appraisers Act as long as certain conditions apply.

Senate Corporations and Transportation Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 279 (Chapter

143) (Senate Bill 279) amends the definitions of "appraisal management company" and "appraiser". The

revised appraiser definition clarifies that an appraiser "holds a state license, registration or certified license

in good standing". The bill amends the Appraisal Management Company Registration Act to reflect

provisions in federal law and provide for registration standards, fees and compliance with the uniform

standards of professional appraisal practice. Automated valuation models are defined and provided for,

and, as in Senate Bill 205, Senate Bill 279 provides for broker price opinions. The bill also provides for

independence of appraisals and criminal background checks of any person who owns more than 10% of

an appraisal management company, and it clarifies the Real Estate Appraisers Board's authority to issue,

deny, revoke or suspend registration, license or certification.

With the passage of Senate Bill 372 (Chapter 162), the Board of Barbers and Cosmetologists now

has the power to issue cease and desist orders to persons violating the provisions of the Barbers and

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


Cosmetologists Act or the Body Art Safe Practices Act. The bill also establishes penalties for certain

violations of the provisions of the Body Art Safe Practices Act.

House Bill 416 (Chapter 129) provides additional circumstances under which an anesthesiologist

assistant student is exempt from the licensure requirement found in the Anesthesiologist Assistants

Act. The former version of the law allowed an exemption from the licensure requirement for an

anesthesiologist assistant student if that student was practicing under the direct supervision of an

anesthesiologist. With the revisions to the law in House Bill 416, an anesthesiologist assistant student

may now practice without a license if the student is supervised by an anesthesiologist, a licensed

anesthesiologist assistant or a second-year, third-year or fourth-year resident anesthesiologist. The New

Mexico Medical Board reports that this change in the law is a safe way to improve efficiency and

effectiveness in an operating room.

Senate Bill 342 (Chapter 116) allows nurses and certified nurse-midwives who meet certain

requirements to perform certain non-diagnostic, non-ionizing medical imaging procedures without having

to obtain licensure under the Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy Health and Safety Act.

Among its various amendments to the Speech-Language Pathology, Audiology and Hearing Aid

Dispensing Practices Act, Senate Bill 181 (Chapter 110) establishes a scope of practice for clinical fellows

of speech-language pathology, clarifies the scope of practice and requirements for licensure of audiologists,

increases the membership of the Speech Language Pathology, Audiology and Hearing Aid Dispensing

Practices Board from 10 to 11 members and conforms state licensure to national standards. The measure

also establishes bilingual-multicultural endorsement requirements for qualified license holders.

In recent years, New Mexico has transferred responsibility for meat inspection to the U.S.

Department of Agriculture and no longer needs sections of law that govern inspection and licensing of

meat processors. To better reflect current practices, House Bill 154 (Chapter 84) repeals unnecessary

meat inspection and licensing laws.

In compliance with provisions of the Sunset Act, Senate Finance Committee Substitute for

Senate Bill 163 & Senate Public Affairs Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 174 (Chapter 166) delays

the sunset and continues the operations of the Board of Nursing Home Administrators; Board of Barbers

and Cosmetologists; Board of Landscape Architects; Coal Surface Mining Commission; Water Quality

Control Commission; and Animal Sheltering Board.

House Bill 274 (Chapter 36) modifies the requirements for appointment for certain members of

the Manufactured Housing Committee and clarifies that, as used in the Manufactured Housing Act, the

term "director" refers to the director of the Manufactured Housing Division and the Construction

Industries Division of the RLD.

PROFESSIONAL AND OCCUPATIONAL LICENSURE

Related Bills

House Bill 180 - military service member and spouse licensure - see Military and Veterans' Affairs

House Bill 506 - bed and breakfast beer and wine license - see Alcohol

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013 47


PUBLIC OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES

Senate Bill 259 - alcohol server permits - see Alcohol

Senate Bill 423 - bed and breakfast beer and wine license - see Alcohol

PUBLIC OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES

48

The First Session of the Fifty-First Legislature could very well be dubbed the "session of public

pension reform". After years of debate and consideration, introduction of multiple reform initiatives and,

eventually, compromise and agreement by stakeholders across the gamut, the legislature passed several

significant public employee pension reform pieces and sent them to the governor.

Two measures were vetoed. Senate Bill 114, which was not related to pension solvency, would

have allowed legislators who missed the deadline to enroll in the latest legislative retirement plan to do so

by retroactively making the applicable payments plus interest, and it would have increased the annual

contribution legislators make going forward. In her veto message, the governor stated that the legislative

retirement plans are already too generous and too costly to the taxpayers. She also vetoed Senate Finance

Committee Substitute for Senate Judiciary Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 25, a bill that would have

addressed solvency within the judicial and magistrate retirement funds, and though she acknowledged in

her veto message the funds' dire straits, she again cited the cost to taxpayers as a reason for vetoing the

measure.

In addition to the pension reform bills that did get signed into law, there were also successful

measures to increase monthly benefits for retired volunteer firefighters; to change life and disability

insurance available to state and local public employees; to impose new qualifications for PRC

commissioners; and to change county classifications and salaries.

Senate Finance Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 27 (Chapter 225) revises the act governing

the Public Employees Retirement Association (PERA) system. Within its multiple plans, the PERA system

covers 31,000 retirees and beneficiaries and 55,400 active members. Perhaps most notably, the new law

creates a second tier of members initially hired on or after July 1, 2013. These "Tier 2" members will have

to work longer before acquiring a vested property right in their pensions — Tier 2 nonpublic safety

members for eight years, and Tier 2 public safety members for six years. When a Tier 2 member retires,

that member's final average salary used for pension calculation will be based on five consecutive years of

service credit instead of three years. The multiplier used in a Tier 2 member's pension calculation is

reduced — state and municipal nonpublic safety members will have a 2.5% multiplier, and public safety

members will have a multiplier ranging from 3% to 3.25%, depending on the member's coverage plan.

In an effort to encourage long-term service for both Tier 1 and Tier 2 PERA members, and under

most coverage plans, the new law allows a member to earn a pension of up to 90% of the member's final

average salary — 30 years of service credit for a Tier 1 member and 36 years of service credit for a Tier 2

member.

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


Age and service requirements to qualify for normal, nondisability retirement increase for all Tier 2

members. Nonpublic safety members in Tier 2 have two retirement options: satisfy the requirement of 65

years of age with eight years of service credit; or satisfy the "Rule of 85", which requires that the member be

of any age and have at least eight years of service credit and that the sum of the member's age and years of

service credit equals at least 85. For Tier 2 public safety members, the age and service requirements under

normal retirement are 60 years of age with six years of service credit, or any age with at least 25 years of

service credit.

Employee and employer contributions are revised as well, with a 1.5 percentage point increase to

employee contributions for members earning more than $20,000 annually and a 0.4 percentage point

increase to employer contributions. Along with these contribution increases, the new law includes a

significant change concerning municipal "pick-ups" — the statutorily authorized practice by which an

affiliated employer may pay up to 75% of its employees' contribution obligations. To address the potential

burden for public employers as a consequence of the increase in employee contributions, the new law

allows an affiliated public employer to forgo picking up any portion of the July 1, 2013 employee

contribution increase. After that, employee contribution increases that might occur may be paid in part as

a pick-up by an employer pursuant to a vote in favor by the applicable governing body or by execution of a

collective bargaining agreement.

The new law affects the manner in which the PERA will calculate and apply a member's service

credit earned under multiple coverage plans. In essence, service credit earned under more than one

coverage plan will be calculated pursuant to the plan under which the service credit is earned, rather than

calculating all earned service credit under the provisions applicable to the plan under which the member

ultimately retires.

The PERA projects that the new law's changes to the annual COLA provisions will result in the

most significant and immediate savings for the pension funds. The COLA is reduced from a 3%

compounding COLA to a 2% compounding COLA, adjusting on July 1 each year. Regardless of a

member's status as Tier 1 or Tier 2, a member retiring pursuant to normal retirement on and after July 1,

2013 will wait up to seven full calendar years for a COLA, depending on the member's age at retirement.

However, the new law allows for a sort of "grandfathering in" of members preparing to retire between July

1, 2013 and June 30, 2016. These retirees will wait from two to four full calendar years before receiving

their first COLA. Because both the judicial and the magistrate retirement systems' COLA provisions are

covered under the PERA statute, the changes in the COLA that apply to PERA retirees apply to judicial

and magistrate retirees as well.

PUBLIC OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES

The other major pension reform bill signed into law, Senate Bill 115 (Chapter 61), revises

statutes concerning the educational retirement system, commonly referred to as the "ERB". The ERB

covers 130,141 active, retired and inactive members, including teachers, administrators and other

employees of New Mexico's public schools, colleges and universities as well as employees of certain state

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PUBLIC OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES

agencies with educational programs. Like the PERA funds, the ERB funds took a significant hit as a

consequence of the dips in the stock market in recent years. Senate Bill 115 includes sizeable increases to

employee contributions for members earning more than $20,000 annually. The contribution rate from

July 1, 2013 through June 30, 2014 is 10.1% of salary, and it will increase to 10.7% on July 1, 2014. The

contribution rate for members whose annual salary is $20,000 or less is 7.9% of salary.

50

The new law establishes three tiers of ERB membership, based on the initial date of membership:

1) Tier 1, with initial membership on or before June 30, 2010; 2) Tier 2, with initial membership after

June 30, 2010 but before July 1, 2013; and 3) Tier 3, with initial membership on and after July 1, 2013.

Age and service requirements for nondisability retirement differ among the three tiers, and a "soft"

minimum retirement age imposed on new members allows them to retire before age 55 but reduces their

annuities. In addition, COLAs are available at age 65 for Tier 1 and Tier 2 members but not until age 67

for Tier 3 members, and COLAs for nondisability retirees are tied to the "funded ratio" — the ratio

between the actuarial value and the actuarial accrued liability — of the ERB fund.

Unlike other state public pension coverage plans, the volunteer firefighters retirement plan is not

funded by contributions from members or employers. These firefighters are not salaried employees, and,

therefore, their retirement benefits do not derive from employment; rather, the benefits are funded by the

Fire Protection Fund. An annual appropriation of $750,000, which is transferred to the Volunteer

Firefighters Retirement Fund, is the amount required to meet the fund's current statutory obligations, and

the plan is nearly 168% funded. Because the members have not received a benefit increase since the

plan's inception in 1983 and the PERA predicts no negative impact on the plan's solvency resulting from

an increase, House Bill 275 (Chapter 79) amends the Volunteer Firefighters Retirement Act to increase

the benefit payments under the act. The monthly benefit increases from $200 to $250 for a volunteer

firefighter retiree who is at least 55 years of age and who has accrued 25 or more years of service credit.

The benefit increases from $100 to $125 for a retiree who is at least 55 years of age and has accrued 10 or

more years, but less than 25 years, of service credit.

House Health, Government and Indian Affairs Committee Substitute for House Bill 654

(Chapter 186) changes state and local employer and employee contributions on basic life insurance and

disability insurance. Effective July 1, 2013, the employer will pay 100% of the basic life insurance

premium and the employee who chooses to carry disability insurance will be responsible for 100% of the

disability insurance premium. The swap saves the state nearly $973,000 annually and gives employees who

become disabled a tax advantage on the insurance income, which is treated as tax-free income by the

Internal Revenue Service. The net effect of the contribution swap is negligible on the employee, costing

approximately $2.40 in take-home pay each pay period for employees making less than $50,000. In

addition to the premium swap, the law includes the Group Self-Insurance Fund in the list of funds among

which the Risk Management Division of the GSD is allowed to transfer money.

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


One of the three constitutional amendments concerning the PRC approved by voters in

November 2012 required the legislature to establish "increased qualifications" and continuing education

requirements for commissioners serving in the future. The question of just what those qualifications

should be resulted in substantial debate in both chambers. House Judiciary Committee Substitute for

House Bills 47 & 89, which passed the house but was not acted upon by the senate, took a detailed

approach in identifying levels of experience and education required for commission membership. Senate

Judiciary Committee Substitute for Senate Rules Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 8 (Chapter 64)

(Senate Bill 8) was initially less exacting than the house bill but later was substantially amended to more

resemble that bill. Ultimately, the approved conference committee report for Senate Bill 8 reflects a

compromise between the two bills: to be qualified for commission membership in the future, a person

shall have 10 years of professional experience in an area regulated by the commission, have a combined

10-year total of experience and education in areas regulated by the commission or be a currently sitting

commissioner. The report also provides a detailed definition of "professional experience"; a requirement

that candidates for office prove their qualifications by affidavit; a provision for challenging a candidate's

qualifications; requirements that commissioners receive ethics training and 32 hours annually of

continuing education; and authority to withhold compensation if a commissioner fails to meet the annual

education requirements.

House Bill 334 (Chapter 188) provides for salary increases for elected county officials and

eliminates county classifications for counties of first through fifth classes because New Mexico does not

have any counties that are not class A, B or C or H class counties. Pursuant to Article 4, Section 27 of the

Constitution of New Mexico, the salary increases provided in the new law are not effective until after the

next election. The increases will be effective

for terms beginning on or after January 1,

2014.

Related Bills

House Bill 22 - autism spectrum disorder

coverage for state employees and retirees -

see Health and Human Services

Senate Bill 349 - public service law loan

repayment program - see Education

Position Class A

PUBLIC OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES

Class B -

↑ $300 m

Class B -

↓ $300 m Class C H Class

county commissioner $34,005 $26,257 $18,725 $18,725 $13,777

treasurer 75,327 65,855 56,386 56,386 6,889

assessor 75,327 65,855 56,386 56,386 6,889

sheriff 78,555 68,654 58,969 58,969 6,889

county clerk 75,327 65,855 56,386 56,386 6,889

probate judge 33,143 23,028 13,129 13,129 4,031

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013 51


REAL PROPERTY AND LAND USE

REAL PROPERTY AND LAND USE

52

The legislature passed and the governor signed into law three property-related bills. One

introduces to New Mexico's laws a set of provisions particular to homeowner associations; another creates

a mechanism for the nonprobate transfer of real property upon an owner's death; and a third amends a

definition of the New Mexico Subdivision Act.

New Mexico has laws governing condominiums but not homeowner associations. For the past

seven years, the legislature has considered bills to create a basic, standardized framework for the operation

of these associations, and this year's version passed both houses unanimously. Senate Judiciary

Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 497 (Chapter 122), the Homeowner Association Act, includes

several notice and disclosure provisions to make lot owners and potential purchasers of lots in homeowner

associations aware of association bylaws and financial records. The act also sets out duties of a

homeowner association's elected board members, guidelines for transition of declarant control and voting

procedures.

New Mexico joins other states in adopting the Uniform Real Property Transfer on Death Act with

the passage of Senate Bill 107 (Chapter 38). The act sets out the manner in which an individual may

transfer property to one or more beneficiaries upon the transferor's death without probate. The law also

expressly lays out the form to be used, including commonly asked questions and answers, when creating a

transfer on death deed; establishes requirements for the revocation of a deed; and articulates the effect of

a deed — both before and after the transferor's death — on affected parties.

Senate Floor Substitute for Senate Bill 176 (Chapter 96) alters the definition of "subdivision" in

the New Mexico Subdivision Act. The change makes an initial division of a tract of land into two parcels

not subject to the act but clarifies that any subsequent division of land from either parcel that takes place

within five years of the initial division is subject to the act. The bill also requires in such cases that certain

documents be filed with the county clerk, including a survey and, if a parcel is subsequently conveyed, a

deed, indicating that such further subdivision will subject the parcel to the act.

Related Bills

House Bill 37 - delinquent property tax sales - see Taxation

HFl/HJC/HTRC/House Bills 371 & 355 - public improvement districts - see State and Local Government

House Bill 448 - watershed district land removal - see State and Local Government

SJC/Senate Bill 212 - real estate broker licensure - see Professional and Occupational Licensure

Senate Bill 283 - watershed district land removal - see State and Local Government

SJC/Senate Bill 289 - property valuation limitation - see Taxation

Senate Bill 326 - railroad right of way livestock fencing - see Animals and Livestock

SJC/Senate Bill 406 - property tax on divided or combined real property - see Taxation

SJC/SCONC/Senate Bill 480 - subdivision water rights - see Water

Senate Bill 510 - agricultural land valuation - see Agriculture

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT

The session saw many pieces of legislation introduced in an ongoing effort to address concerns

over how the state and its political subdivisions operate and handle taxpayer money. A push for greater

transparency and accountability showed up in successful legislation regarding the availability of public

records, timely public notice of meetings and clarification of agency procurement responsibilities. Efforts

to limit the size of government showed up in measures that combine divisions within the GSD and

establish stricter standards for incorporating new municipalities. Legislation was also signed into law to

implement last year's voter-approved transfer of constitutional responsibility to charter and regulate

corporations from the PRC to the secretary of state. One piece of legislation with a major impact on

smaller local governments phases out the hold harmless distributions they have been receiving from the

state for nearly a decade and allows them to increase their local gross receipts taxes. That bill — House

Business and Industry Committee Substitute for House Bill 641 — is discussed in the Taxation section.

Legislature

House Concurrent Resolution 1, which is discussed under the Open Records and Meetings

subheading below, establishes a rule to govern how the legislature will handle requests for access to

legislative records.

When more than one bill is enacted during a legislative session that amends the same section of

law, the New Mexico Compilation Commission has been required to compile only the last bill signed by

the governor. This has, at times, resulted in confusion about what law is in effect and consequent

litigation. House Bill 546 (Chapter 176) requires that the commission, in consultation with the LCS,

reconcile and compile any nonconflicting multiple amendments to the same section of law while keeping

the practice of compiling only the last act signed in the case of conflicting amendments.

Senate Bill 232 (Chapter 141) codifies the LCS policy of using gender-neutral language for bill

drafting, unless the context requires gender-specific language.

Open Records and Meetings

The legislature adopted a joint rule clarifying how it will respond to requests under the Inspection

of Public Records Act (IPRA). House Concurrent Resolution 1 (Joint Rule 12-1) establishes the LCS as

the custodian of legislative records for the purpose of responding to IPRA requests. Past practice had

been that the LCS closely consulted with other legislative agencies in responding to requests. While

portrayed by some as a response to an increasing number of requests for public officials' emails, the joint

rule does not distinguish among the various forms of public records but does note the constitutional

privilege in Article 4, Section 13 of the Constitution of New Mexico that may apply to some

communications of legislators.

STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT

Several provisions of the recording statutes are updated by Senate Bill 307 (Chapter 214), which,

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STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT

in part, requires counties to maintain their recording indexes in searchable formats, clarifies what must be

entered into a county recording index, changes certain provisions affecting what types of documents must

be acknowledged prior to recording and standardizes how state agencies will comply with the Uniform

Electronic Transactions Act.

54

As a move toward more transparency and more involvement of citizens in government, House

Bill 21 (Chapter 42) amends the Open Meetings Act to require that draft agendas of meetings of any

public body except the legislature and the courts be available to the public at least 72 hours prior to the

meeting and that a final agenda be provided at least 36 hours prior to the meeting. If a public body takes

action on an emergency matter, it must report that action and the circumstances creating the emergency to

the attorney general within 10 days, unless the action was taken under a declaration of a state or national

emergency.

Operations

Until now, state law has given no specific direction to fire departments concerning the payment of

stipends to volunteer firefighters to offset actual expenses. House Bill 615 (Chapter 80) specifically allows

public agencies to pay stipends for actual expenses if: 1) a firefighter is, indeed, a volunteer as provided in

the federal Fair Labor Standards Act; and 2) the services performed are not the same type of services that

the volunteer is employed to perform for the same public agency paying the stipend. Another bill

regarding firefighting, Senate Bill 431 (Chapter 78), helps counties deploy as many first responders as are

readily available in emergencies, such as fast-moving open-land wildfires. The bill allows counties to

contract with individuals, in addition to contracting with municipalities, for firefighting services.

House Bill 401 (Chapter 181) amends public finance law to permit the State Investment Council

to invest in New Mexico businesses that are established on state lands to perform technology transfer,

research and development, research commercialization, manufacturing, training, marketing or public

relations in any field of science or technology using research developed at a state institution of higher

education or a national laboratory.

Organization

House Bill 46 (Chapter 75) sets forth procedures for implementing a constitutional amendment

ratified by voters in November 2012 to transfer responsibility for chartering and regulating corporations

from the PRC to the secretary of state. House Bill 46 establishes the secretary of state as the regulatory

authority over corporations; provides for the transfer to the secretary of state of personnel, funding and

equipment used by the Corporations Bureau of the PRC; and provides that obligations, legal actions,

official acts and references in law made or entered into by or on behalf of the Corporations Bureau shall

remain in force as if made or entered into by or on behalf of the secretary of state.

Senate Bill 339 (Chapter 115) merges the Property Control Division and Building Services

Division of the GSD and names the merged division the "Facilities Management Division". Most of the

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


changes in law simply change the name of the Property Control Division to the Facilities Management

Division.

The DFA developed two important municipal bills for introduction this session. One, which

would have changed the procedures for disincorporation of a municipality, did not pass. The other,

Senate Bill 438 (Chapter 120), provides additional requirements to be met for municipal incorporation.

Newly incorporated municipalities often struggle with the twin demons of revenue and service delivery, in

part because the threshold for incorporation has been low until now. Petitioners, who may wish to

incorporate for somewhat ill-defined reasons or out of dissatisfaction with a county's service delivery, may

not have a clear understanding of the obligations municipalities have to their residents and the state.

With the passage of Senate Bill 438, petitioners wishing to incorporate are now required to develop a

municipal services and revenue plan that demonstrates how the proposed municipality will provide at least

three services from a list of municipal services and that shows it will have a tax base sufficient to pay the

costs of those services. Upon notification of receipt of a petition of incorporation from the board of

county commissioners, the Local Government Division of the DFA will convene a municipal

incorporation review team to consider the petition and the required census results and evaluate the

municipal services and revenue plan to determine if the proposed municipality will meet the requirements

of Chapter 3, Article 2 NMSA 1978. If the review team finds that the proposed municipality does not

meet the requirements of that article, it will notify the board of county commissioners and the petitioners

of deficiencies in the petition and suspend the attempt to incorporate. If petitioners do not resubmit an

acceptable amended plan within three months, they may not submit another petition for at least one year.

Property and Procurement

When originally created in statute, the Property Control Reserve Fund could be used only for the

purchase or construction of state buildings in Santa Fe. Senate Bill 572 (Chapter 174) amends the statute

to allow the Property Control Division — now the Facilities Management Division — to use the fund to

renovate or plan for the construction or renovation of state buildings throughout the state.

STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT

The ways in which local public bodies, state agencies and the state purchasing agent operate and

make purchases pursuant to the Procurement Code are revised in Senate Bill 443 (Chapter 70). In an

effort to clarify procurement responsibilities, the bill provides that state agencies and local public bodies

have to identify their "central purchasing office" and "chief procurement officers" to the state purchasing

agent each year and each time a new chief procurement officer is hired. The state purchasing agent is

required to maintain a list of all designated chief procurement officers and make the list available to the

public. Additionally, the state purchasing agent is now responsible for establishing a certification training

for all chief procurement officers. After July 1, 2015, certain purchasing functions will be restricted to

certified chief procurement officers. The list of exemptions from the Procurement Code is expanded to

include increased purchase amount limitations and training materials and books in electronic format.

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013 55


STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT

56

Senate Bill 182 (Chapter 40) attempts to deter abuse in sole source and emergency procurement.

This legislation was produced in response to a 2008 LFC effectiveness review of procurement within the

GSD and was endorsed by the LFC. The new law adds checks to improve propriety in procurement. It

tightens the rules on what types of goods and services may be procured through a sole source contract and

prohibits the solicitor from drafting need specifications to artificially exclude all but one provider of goods

or services. In both sole source and emergency procurement, the state purchasing agent or central

purchasing office must use due diligence in determining the basis for the emergency or in selecting a

contractor. Further, a designee of the state purchasing agent or central purchasing office may no longer

make an emergency procurement. Senate Bill 182 also expands publication requirements; expands

agencies' recordkeeping requirements; adds an element of intent to the Procurement Code's penalties

section; and adds a fourth degree felony to the available penalties.

Three bills revise caps for construction-related contracts. Senate Bill 341 (Chapter 215) amends a

section of the Procurement Code that allows the Property Control Division — now the Facilities

Management Division — to enter into contracts for the redesign, major renovation or remodeling of

current state buildings and the construction of necessary state buildings. To account for the increase in

construction costs since the time of that section's enactment, the bill increases the cap on contracts from

$500,000 to $5 million. It also eliminates the requirement that the division report such contracts at State

Board of Finance meetings. Senate Bill 340 (Chapter 146) removes the $10 million maximum allowable

construction cost for design and build project delivery systems that are determined to be in the best

interest of the state or a local public body after consideration of minimum efficiency and adequacy

criteria. Senate Bill 266 (Chapter 99) revises the monetary limitations within Procurement Code

provisions that allow a state agency to procure multiple architectural, engineering and construction

contracts using just a single request for proposals or price agreement. Under the new provisions, no

individual contractor shall receive more than $2 million for multiple contracts in a four-year period, and

no single contract in a multiple source procurement shall be for more than $500,000.

The Procurement Code restricts contracting with state agencies or local public bodies when a

contractor's or subcontractor's conduct is improper or illegal and provides debarment and suspension

procedures. Senate Bill 448 (Chapter 41) includes certain civil violations and clarifies the debarment and

suspension procedures, particularly when the contractor or subcontractor is already in a contractual

relationship with an agency or public body. For continuity, there is an exemption that, under certain

circumstances, allows completion of currently active projects.

Senate Bill 247 (Chapter 71) addresses a concern of the CYFD that the Procurement Code-

required submission of competitive bid proposals from pre-kindergarten service providers is too onerous

for communities with the greatest need for such services. The bill exempts from the Procurement Code

purchases by the department of pre-kindergarten services made pursuant to the Pre-Kindergarten Act.

Senate Bill 396 (Chapter 217) exempts law enforcement vehicles from the American-made

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


equirement in the Procurement Code.

Special Districts and Land Grants

Watershed districts, which are, in part, responsible for the maintenance and operation of flood

control structures in certain areas of the state, have experienced a loss of members over the years. This has

resulted in less revenue for the districts without a corresponding decrease in obligations. Current law

makes it relatively easy for landowners to detach their land from watershed districts or dissolve their

district to avoid payment of obligations incurred while the landowner was a district member. As

watershed district membership declines, remaining members are left with an increasing share of the

burden of the district's obligations. The provisions of House Bill 448 (Chapter 17) and Senate Bill 283

(Chapter 169), while still allowing the discontinuance of districts and removal of land from a district,

make it more difficult to do so when a district has continuing obligations.

House Floor Substitute for House Judiciary Committee Substitute for House Taxation and

Revenue Committee Substitute for House Bills 371 & 355 (Chapter 45) makes several substantive

changes to the Public Improvement District Act. An extensive application for formation of a district must

be submitted to the governing body of the county or municipality in which the district is proposed to be

located. Prior to constructing or acquiring new public infrastructure improvements, a district board must

also approve a feasibility study that includes several new requirements regarding the costs and benefits of

the improvements.

The bill also limits general obligation capacity to 0.5% of the sum of appraised value of the

taxable and commercial property in the district, excluding public infrastructure improvements. Prior to

issuing special levies, the district board must set a maximum levy for each class or property; however,

unless a local government has enacted an ordinance providing a greater limitation, no special levy may be

issued if the total tax and assessment for a class of property exceeds 1.95% of the anticipated market value

for that class of property.

STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT

A seller of property within a public improvement district has a duty to provide a purchaser with a

written notice of information regarding the property, the district and any property tax or special levy that

has been or may be imposed by the district board. The district board must file this information with the

county clerk upon formation of a district and within 30 days prior to June 1 and December 1 of each year.

There were a number of bills affecting the state's historic land grant communities this year.

Senate Bill 5 (Chapter 8) incorporates the San Antonio del Rio Colorado Land Grant-Merced into the

chapter of New Mexico statutes that governs land grants that are political subdivisions of the state; House

Bill 34 (Chapter 83) does the same for the Tecolote Land Grant-Merced. Senate Bill 38 (Chapter 4)

transfers the keeping and maintenance of the New Mexico community land grant registry from the

secretary of state to the Land Grant Council. Senate Bill 10 (Chapter 3) repeals a duplicative section of

the Engineering and Surveying Practice Act regarding procedures for conducting surveys within or

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013 57


TAXATION

bordering land grants.

Related Bills

House Bill 37 - delinquent property tax sales - see Taxation

HJC/House Bill 45 - Office of Superintendent of Insurance - see Insurance

House Bill 227 - Brain Injury Advisory Council - see Health and Human Services

House Bill 352 - economic development project public support - see Economic Development

House Bill 506 - bed and breakfast beer and wine license - see Alcohol

HBIC/House Bill 641 - local government hold harmless payments - see Taxation

SFl/Senate Bill 93 - municipal water storage tank and facility contracts - see Utilities

SFl/Senate Bill 176 - subdivision clarifications and filings - see Real Property and Land Use

Senate Bill 423 - bed and breakfast beer and wine license - see Alcohol

SJC/SCONC/Senate Bill 480 - subdivision water rights - see Water

Senate Bill 586 - sole community provider payment expansion - see Health and Human Services

TAXATION

58

With federal sequestration policy tempering signs that the economy may be moving in a positive

direction, the legislature focused on tax policy that maintains revenue neutrality. During the session, the

corporate income tax received the most attention, followed closely by proposals for a single sales factor

apportionment formula for multistate corporations. Combined reporting was again proposed and offered

as a method to maintain revenue neutrality if the corporate income tax rate were reduced. The legislature

also addressed higher-than-expected costs of various tax credits enacted in previous sessions by introducing

bills to clarify and close perceived loopholes in those credits. The body remained consistent in its desire

for tax policy that requires taxpayer reporting on all tax benefits approved.

One high-profile bill — House Business and Industry Committee Substitute for House Bill 641,

discussed under the Economic Incentives subheading below — combined many of these tax policies. On the

last morning of the session, the bill was amended in the senate to allow for a reduction in the corporate

income tax rate and the election of a single sales apportionment formula while maintaining revenue

neutrality to the extent possible. The house concurred with the senate's amendments in the final minutes

of the session.

Administration

House Bill 299 (Chapter 27) makes several significant changes to the Tax Administration Act.

Taxpayers now have 180 days, rather than 90 days, to file an amended return that is the result of Internal

Revenue Service action. The secretary of taxation and revenue may extend, for a maximum of 12 months,

the date on which payment of any tax is required or on which any return required by provision of the Tax

Administration Act must be filed. The bill clarifies that administrative processes apply to the denial or

granting of a credit or rebate. The protest filing period is 90 days rather than 30 days. A hearing officer

has the discretion to postpone or continue a hearing. The bill also eliminates the requirement for

attorney general approval for abatements under $20,000.

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


Prior to enactment of House Bill 172 (Chapter 179), multistate taxpayers received a credit capped

at 5.5% of apportionable income, which could result in a refund in excess of total liability because the

5.5% credit cap was greater than the 4.9% top income tax rate. House Bill 172 conforms Section 7-2-13

NMSA 1978 with the 2003 personal income tax rate reductions for multistate taxpayers and specifies that

the credit cannot exceed a taxpayer's personal income tax liability.

House Bill 315 (Chapter 87) amends the Tax Administration Act to provide for special

agreements for alternative gross receipts taxpayers. The bill allows the payment of gross receipts tax by a

person who is not the liable taxpayer upon approval by the secretary of taxation and revenue. That person

must assume the rights and responsibilities as taxpayer pursuant to the Tax Administration Act. The bill

simplifies the manufacturing gross receipts deduction that was passed during the 2012 legislative session

by allowing gross receipts tax liability for electricity and other utilities that are not consumed in the

manufacturing process and not otherwise deductible to be passed on to manufacturers.

Economic Incentives

On the last day of the session, the legislature combined various tax policies into a single package,

House Business and Industry Committee Substitute for House Bill 641 (Chapter 160). The bill cuts the

corporate income tax rate over five years from 7.6% to 5.9%, while the lowest corporate income tax rate of

4.8% remains unchanged. In addition, certain corporations may now use a single sales factor for tax

purposes. A taxpayer whose principal business activity is manufacturing may elect to use only the sales

factor to apportion income to the state rather than using all three traditional factors — property factor,

payroll factor and sales factor. The bill offsets the revenue reductions from those actions by phasing out

certain local government hold harmless provisions over a 15-year period and requiring certain unitary

corporations to file a combined return. Certain multistate corporations that have retail outlets in New

Mexico with floor space of 30,000 square feet or more under one roof are now required to file combined

tax returns as well, a practice known as "combined reporting". Exempt from the combined reporting

requirement are multistate corporations with that same amount of retail space that also have a nonretail

operation in New Mexico employing at least 750 employees.

In order to offset the loss of state revenue to the local governments, the bill authorizes

municipalities and counties to impose a local gross receipts tax increase not to exceed .375%. A

municipality that has a population of less than 10,000 and chooses not to impose the increase will

continue to receive the hold harmless distribution, and a county with a population of less than 48,000

that chooses not to impose the increase will continue to receive the distribution.

The bill maintains the original film production tax credit provisions of House Taxation and

Revenue Committee Substitute for House Bill 379, which was passed by the legislature but vetoed by the

governor. The film production tax credit increases by 5% for certain direct production expenditures for

productions that order at least six episodes in a single season or for wages and fringe benefits paid to a

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013 59

TAXATION


TAXATION

New Mexico resident directly employed by the film production company. Additionally, various

requirements are tightened, additional eligibility requirements are imposed and the scope of direct

production expenditures for which film production tax credits may be claimed is expanded.

60

The bill also provides definitions and clarifies the eligibility of qualifying jobs for the high-wage

jobs tax credit. Finally, the bill provides a definition of "consumable" that excludes tangible personal

property that is not typically considered a manufacturing consumable from the deduction from gross

receipts on sales to manufacturers.

Senate Bill 557 (Chapter 58) excludes a job from the rural job tax credit eligibility if the job is

created due to a business merger, acquisition or other change in organization; if the eligible employee was

terminated from employment in New Mexico by another employer involved in the merger, acquisition or

other change; and if the job is performed by the person who performed the job or its functional equivalent

prior to the merger, acquisition or other change or by a person replacing the person who performed the

job or its functional equivalent prior to the merger, acquisition or other change. Jobs created due to an

eligible employer entering into a contract or becoming a subcontractor to a contract with a governmental

entity that replaces one or more entities performing functionally equivalent services for the governmental

entity in New Mexico are also excluded from eligibility, unless the job is a qualifying job that was not

being performed by an employee of the replaced entity. These clarifications are similar to the provisions

for the high-wage jobs tax credit included in House Business and Industry Committee Substitute for

House Bill 641, discussed above.

Senate Finance Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 14 (Chapter 92) extends to December 31,

2016 the effective date of the sustainable building tax credits pursuant to the Income Tax Act and the

Corporate Income and Franchise Tax Act. The bill also reduces the amount of the cap of the credits in

each act to $1 million for sustainable commercial buildings and $4 million for sustainable residential

buildings. In addition, the term "multi-family dwelling" is moved from the definition of a sustainable

residential building to the definition of a sustainable commercial building and is subject to that cap. The

bill adjusts procedures for how the tax credits are applied against a taxpayer's income tax liability to allow

for more consistent application across all taxpayers.

Senate Bill 160 (Chapter 109) provides definitions for special fuel that is biodiesel and blended

biodiesel and provides a deduction from the special fuel excise tax for biodiesel. When computing the

special fuel excise tax due during a tax period, a rack operator may deduct the amount of biodiesel that is

received or manufactured and delivered to the rack operator in the state for blending or resale. The rack

operator must report the deduction to the TRD separately, and the department must report the costs and

benefits of the deduction in 2017, and every five years thereafter, to the interim Revenue Stabilization and

Tax Policy Committee and the LFC.

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


Gross Receipts Tax

The deduction from the gross receipts tax and compensating tax for locomotive fuel pursuant to

Section 7-9-110.3 NMSA 1978 is expanded by House Bill 120 (Chapter 123). The deduction may now be

taken by common carriers that make a capital investment of $50 million or more in railroad infrastructure

improvements on or after July 1, 2012, provided that the improvements do not include those required by

a regulatory agency to correct problems, including preventive maintenance.

Liquor Excise Taxes

Two bills address statutory caps on beer and wine production. Senate Bill 81 (Chapter 94)

increases the annual production cap for microbrewers from 5,000 barrels to 15,000 barrels of beer. The

liquor excise tax is $.08 per gallon on the first 10,000 barrels sold and $.28 per gallon on all gallons sold

over 10,000 barrels. Senate Bill 116 (Chapter 95) increases the annual production cap for small

winegrowers from 950,000 liters to 1.5 million liters. Additionally, the bill provides a liquor excise tax of

$.30 per liter on each liter sold over 950,000 liters.

Senate Finance Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 397 (Chapter 218) increases the local

liquor excise tax from 5% to 6% and expands the use of revenue from the local liquor excise tax to

include social detoxification as a form of treatment. The bill also specifies revenue distributions required

in a joint powers agreement to fund social detoxification treatment programs.

Property Tax

House Bill 37 (Chapter 155) requires the Property Tax Division of the TRD to conduct at least

one sale for delinquent property taxes in each county in which delinquent properties are listed in each

calendar year beginning in 2014. The bill also allows the Property Tax Division and a county treasurer to

enter into a written agreement to postpone the delinquent property tax sale.

Senate Judiciary Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 289 (Chapter 161) allows for the

automatic application of the limitation of value provided pursuant to Section 7-36-21.3 NMSA 1978 if a

property owner applies for the limitation and provides proof of eligibility for three consecutive years

immediately prior to the tax year for which the application is made.

Senate Judiciary Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 406 (Chapter 119) provides special

procedures for the administration of property tax on real property when it is divided or combined. For

valuation of property in this situation, the county must determine the taxes, penalties and interest due on

the property by using the prior year's tax rate, if the current rate has not been set, and the prior year's

value, if the current value has not been set, and proceed to immediately collect the taxes through the

taxable year in which the property is divided or combined. The bill also provides special procedures for

filing with the county clerk a document or instrument to divide or combine real property when taxes are

owed.

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013 61

TAXATION


UTILITIES

Related Bills

HFl/HJC/HTRC/House Bills 371 & 355 - public improvement districts - see State and Local Government

Senate Bill 274 - Horse Shelter Rescue Fund tax refund donations - see Animals and Livestock

Senate Bill 510 - agricultural land valuation - see Agriculture

UTILITIES

62

After the 2012 session saw no utilities-related bills signed into law for the first time in years, the

2013 session produced three. No unifying theme emerged — topics covered water utilities, pipelines and

telecommunications.

Incumbent rural telecommunications carriers — those carriers that serve fewer than 50,000 access

lines in New Mexico — will see a reduction in regulation due to the passage of House Bill 58 (Chapter

194). In addition, the PRC will establish rules regarding use of the State Rural Universal Service Fund,

reporting requirements for carriers eligible for the fund and a cap on the surcharge passed along to the

customer. The bill reduces the time it takes for small rural companies to get proceedings, such as rate

cases, through the PRC to no more than one year. It also corrects a definition concerning rural telephone

companies.

House Bill 494 (Chapter 90) updates the manner in which owners and operators of pipelines and

other underground facilities provide a response to potential excavators that an area to be excavated does

not contain underground facilities that might be damaged or cause safety problems if encountered during

the excavation.

Senate Floor Substitute for Senate Bill 93 (Chapter 164) enacts a new section of the

Procurement Code to allow municipalities to enter into multiyear service contracts for the engineering,

repair or maintenance of water storage tanks and facilities. Such contracts must not require a municipality

to pay in a year more than the amount it receives in water utility charges. Work must be reviewed by a

licensed engineer, and work performed to ensure legal compliance must be itemized separately and paid

for over a period of at least three years.

WATER

Water issues continue to be a major concern given the extreme drought the state has experienced

over the past few years. Two bills that passed during the session relate to the availability of water, while

two others relate to its quality.

In 1995, the legislature enacted a statute mandating that developers obtain a sufficient amount of

water rights to serve the needs of a proposed development before they could get final plat approval for

certain new residential developments. However, this mandate expired in 1997, in effect allowing counties

to impose the requirement or not. Senate Judiciary Committee Substitute for Senate Conservation

Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 480 (Chapter 224) reinstates the mandate and also allows

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


developers to obtain plat approval by having a water supply agreement for the development with an

existing water supplier. The bill also prohibits the approval of a plat if the water supply is based on water

supplied by domestic wells. Senate Judiciary Committee Substitute for Senate Conservation Committee

Substitute for Senate Bill 479 (Chapter 173) extends these same provisions to all plat approvals for

subdivisions of lands from which irrigation water rights appurtenant to the land have been severed.

House Floor Substitute for House Energy and Natural Resources Committee Substitute for

House Bill 415 (Chapter 128) requires that the NMED compile a list of contaminants that require testing

pursuant to the federal Safe Drinking Water Act. The list shall be compiled at least every 12 months and

shall include the contaminants the department will test in the subsequent 12 months. When determining

which contaminants will be tested and included in the list, the department shall take into consideration

the availability of funds in the Water Conservation Fund, the needs of the public water supplies being

tested and public health and safety.

In 2006, the house of representatives passed memorials creating the Mercury Exposure Reduction

Task Force and a dental work group to address concerns raised about the effect that dental amalgams

containing mercury may have on the state's water supply. The resulting task force and work group's dental

mercury exposure reports made recommendations that dentists install systems to separate dental amalgams

from the water supply and provide for the safe disposal of amalgams. This year saw the passage of the

Dental Amalgam Waste Reduction Act in Senate Bill 99 (Chapter 206), which requires that dentists

install a system to separate dental amalgams and provide for their safe disposal by December 31,

2014. The law requires that the separator system conform to manufacturer recommendations and

established oversight of compliance with the law by the New Mexico Board of Dental Health Care. The

board shall consider noncompliance with this law as grounds for a finding of unprofessional conduct

subject to board penalties and discipline. The law exempts from its provisions dental offices that do not

work with amalgams; orthodontists; periodontists; oral maxillofacial surgeons and oral maxillofacial

radiologists; oral pathologists; and portable dental offices that lack a fixed wastewater discharge

connection.

Related Bills

House Bill 448 - watershed district land removal - see State and Local Government

Senate Bill 283 - watershed district land removal - see State and Local Government

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013 63

WATER


APPENDICES


APPENDIX A

DATA ON LEGISLATION

Fifty-First Legislature, First Session, 2013

TOTAL LEGISLATION 1,2 HOUSE SENATE TOTAL

Bills 754 714 1,468

Joint Resolutions 15 12 27

Joint Memorials 51 58 109

Memorials 104 105 209

Concurrent Resolutions 1 0 1

Resolutions 0 0 0

INTRODUCTIONS

TOTAL: 925 889 1,814

3

Bills and Generic Substitutes 636 609 1,245

Joint Resolutions 13 12 25

Joint Memorials 49 58 107

Memorials 103 103 206

Concurrent Resolutions 1 0 1

Resolutions 0 0 0

PASSAGE

TOTAL: 802 782 1,584

Bills 119 179 298

Joint Resolutions 1 1 2

Joint Memorials 28 22 50

Memorials 84 79 163

Concurrent Resolutions 1 0 1

Resolutions 0 0 0

TOTAL: 233 281 514

PERCENTAGE OF INTRODUCTIONS PASSED

Bills 18.7% 29.4% 23.9%

Joint Resolutions 7.7% 8.3% 8%

Joint Memorials 57.1% 37.9% 46.7%

Memorials 81.6% 76.7% 79.1%

Concurrent Resolutions 100% N/A 100%

Resolutions N/A N/A N/A

TOTAL: 29.1% 35.9% 32.4%

ENACTED

Signed by Governor (not including partial vetoes) 89 135 224

Signed by Governor with Partial Vetoes 2 2 4

VETOED

TOTAL: 91 137 228

Vetoed by Governor's Message 14 22 36

Pocket Vetoed 4

14 20 34

TOTAL: 28 42 70

PERCENTAGE OF PASSED BILLS VETOED 23.5% 23.5% 23.5%

1

There were 49 generic bills introduced in the house and 49 in the senate; however, if they were not substituted into substantive

bills, they are not counted in these statistics.

2

Includes substitutes counted as separate bills.

3

Does not count substitutes, with the exception of generic substitutes.

4

Pursuant to Article IV, Section 22 of the Constitution of New Mexico.

66 Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


100

100

100

100

1,300

1,200

1,100

1,000 Bill Action Summary

Special Session 2011

900

800

700

600

500

Bill Action Summary

Special Session 2011

400

300

200

100

0

House

Senate

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

BILL ACTION SUMMARY

Fifty-First Legislature, First Session, 2013

Bill Action Summary

Special Session 2011

Introduced Passed Enacted Vetoed

636 119 91 28

609 179 137 42

0

House

Introduced

50 Total

Passed

3

Enacted

2

Vetoed

1

0Senate

Introduced 41 Passed 6 Enacted 3 Vetoed 3

House Total 50 91 3 9 2 5 1 4

Senate 41 6 3 3

Total 91 9 5 4

100

100

Bill Action Summary

90%

1,245 298 228 70

0

Introduced Special Session Passed 2011

Enacted Vetoed

House

Senate

50

80% 41

3

6

2

3

1

3

Total 91 9 5 4

70%

60%

50%

Bill Action Summary

Special Session 2011

40%

30%

20%

10%

0%

House

Senate

Bill Action Summary

Special Session 2011

0

Introduced

House 50 Total

0Senate

Introduced 41

Passed

3

Passed 6

Enacted

2

Enacted 3

Vetoed

1

Vetoed 3

House Total 50 91 3 9 2 5 1 4

Senate 41 6 3 3

Total 91 9 5 4

PERCENTAGE PASSED

Bills Joint Resolutions Joint Memorials Memorials

19% 8% 57% 82%

29% 8% 38% 77%

24% 8% 47% 79%

0

Introduced Passed Enacted Vetoed

House 50 3 2 1

Senate 41 6 3 3

APPENDIX A

67


APPENDIX B

TABLE 1

SUMMARY OF GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATIONS

Fifty-First Legislature, First Session, 2013

(in thousands)

Fiscal Year Fiscal Year

2013 2014

GENERAL APPROPRIATION ACT (GAA) OF 2013 (Ch. 227)

Section 4. Operating Expenses

A. Legislative 4,020.2

B. Judicial 207,502.6

C. General Control 168,368.2

D. Commerce and Industry 46,869.5

E. Agriculture, Energy and Natural Resources 66,424.1

F. Health, Hospitals and Human Services 1,636,436.9

G. Public Safety 377,492.9

H. Transportation -

I. Other Education 66,951.8

J. Higher Education 790,166.1

K. Public School Support 2,498,741.7

Subtotal for Fiscal Year 2014 Operating Expenses $5,862,974.0

Section 5. Special Appropriations 91,273.5

Subtotal for Special Appropriations (Non-Recurring) $91,273.5

Section 6. Supplemental and Deficiency Appropriations 1,951.9

Subtotal for Supplementals and Deficiencies (Non-Recurring) $1,951.9

Section 8. Compensation Appropriations $14,041.9

Subtotal for Compensation Appropriations $14,041.9

Section 11. Fund Transfers

$17 million is transferred from the operating reserve to the appropriation

contingency fund to address reductions in federal funding to state agencies

resulting from the federal sequestration.

Section 12. Transfer Authority

If revenue transfers to the general fund at the end of FY 2013 are not

sufficient to meet appropriations, the governor, with state board of finance

approval, may transfer up to $120 million from the operating reserve to the

appropriation account of the general fund to meet that fiscal year's

obligations. $60 million is transferred from the FY 14 operating reserve

to the appropriation account of the general fund for shortfall.

FISCAL YEAR TOTALS - GENERAL APPROPRIATION ACT $93,225.4 $5,877,015.9

FISCAL YEARS 2013 AND 2014 - GAA $5,970,241.3

68 Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

TABLE 1 (continued)

SPECIAL APPROPRIATION BILLS

HB 1 (Chapter 1) Feed Bill 9,271.8 14,377.9

TOTAL - SPECIAL APPROPRIATION BILLS $9,271.8 $14,377.9

FISCAL YEAR TOTALS - GAA AND SPECIAL

APPROPRIATIONS $102,497.2 $5,891,393.8

FISCAL YEARS 2013 AND 2014 - GAA AND SPECIALS $5,993,891.0

APPENDIX B

69


APPENDIX B

TABLE 2

GENERAL APPROPRIATION ACT OF 2013

Fifty-First Legislature, First Session

House Appropriations and Finance Committee Substitute for

House Bills 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6 (Chapter 227, p.v.)

(in thousands)

Fiscal Year Fiscal Year

2013 2014

SECTION 4 - OPERATING EXPENSES

Legislative

Energy Council Dues 32.0

Legislative Building Services 3,988.2

Total Legislative $4,020.2

Judicial

Supreme Court Law Library 1,546.7

New Mexico Compilation Commission 0.0

Judicial Standards Commission 831.2

Court of Appeals 5,691.1

Supreme Court 3,069.9

Administrative Office of the Courts (-$140.0) (2) 43,025.5

Supreme Court Building Commission 861.4

First Judicial District Court 6,285.5

Second Judicial District Court 21,594.0

Third Judicial District Court 6,188.8

Fourth Judicial District Court 2,129.0

Fifth Judicial District Court 6,058.7

Sixth Judicial District Court 3,101.3

Seventh Judicial District Court 2,262.8

Eighth Judicial District Court 2,791.5

Ninth Judicial District Court 3,216.3

Tenth Judicial District Court 792.2

Eleventh Judicial District Court 5,928.1

Twelfth Judicial District Court 3,067.5

Thirteenth Judicial District Court 6,458.7

Bernalillo County Metropolitan Court 22,694.2

First Judicial District Attorney 4,835.2

Second Judicial District Attorney 17,107.2

Third Judicial District Attorney 4,417.8

Fourth Judicial District Attorney 3,048.4

Fifth Judicial District Attorney 4,453.2

Sixth Judicial District Attorney 2,621.0

Seventh Judicial District Attorney 2,383.8

Eighth Judicial District Attorney 2,482.7

Ninth Judicial District Attorney 2,676.7

Tenth Judicial District Attorney 998.0

Eleventh Judicial District Attorney, Div I 3,339.4

Eleventh Judicial District Attorney, Div II 2,086.4

70 Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


Fiscal Year Fiscal Year

2013 2014

Twelfth Judicial District Attorney 2,603.6

Thirteenth Judicial District Attorney 4,808.6

Administrative Office of the District Attorneys 2,046.2

Total Judicial $207,502.6

General Control

Attorney General 9,438.5

State Auditor 2,882.4

Taxation and Revenue Department 54,659.9

State Investment Council 0.0

Department of Finance and Administration (DFA) 14,424.7

DFA-Special Appropriations (-$796.0) (1)(2)(3) 9,572.5

Public School Insurance Authority 0.0

Retiree Health Care Authority 0.0

General Services Department 13,786.0

Educational Retirement Board 0.0

New Mexico Sentencing Commission 529.8

Public Defender Department 41,799.7

Governor 3,587.1

Lieutenant Governor 585.8

Department of Information Technology 855.8

Public Employees Retirement Association 0.0

State Commission of Public Records 2,619.9

Secretary of State 5,567.8

Personnel Board 4,159.8

Public Employees Labor Relations Board 214.0

State Treasurer 3,684.5

Total General Control $168,368.2

Commerce and Industry

Board of Examiners for Architects 0.0

Border Authority 334.8

Tourism Department 10,308.9

Economic Development Department 6,592.8

Regulation and Licensing Department 13,145.2

Public Regulation Commission 7,895.5

New Mexico Medical Board 0.0

Board of Nursing 0.0

New Mexico State Fair (-$50.0) (1) 0.0

State Board of Engineers and Land Surveyors 0.0

Gaming Control Board 5,547.6

State Racing Commission 2,345.4

Board of Veterinary Medicine 0.0

Cumbres and Toltec Scenic Railroad Commission 98.7

Office of Military Base Planning and Support 144.4

Spaceport Authority 456.2

Total Commerce and Industry $46,869.5

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

APPENDIX B

71


APPENDIX B

Fiscal Year Fiscal Year

2013 2014

Agriculture, Energy and Natural Resources

Cultural Affairs Department 28,884.6

New Mexico Livestock Board 975.0

Department of Game and Fish

Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department

0.0

(-$20.0) (1) 1.0 20,938.1

New Mexico Youth Conservation Corps 0.0

Intertribal Ceremonial Office 105.0

Commissioner of Public Lands 0.0

State Engineer 15,521.4

Organic Commodity Commission 0.0

Total Agriculture, Energy and Natural Resources $66,424.1

Health, Hospitals and Human Services

Commission on the Status of Women (-$125.0) 0.0

Office on African American Affairs 700.8

Commission for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Persons 300.0

Martin Luther King, Jr. Commission (-$60.0) (1) 213.8

Commission for the Blind 2,052.9

Indian Affairs Department 2,413.6

Aging and Long-Term Services Department (-$180.0) (2) 44,705.1

Human Services Department (-$900.0) (1)(2) 1,035,916.7

Workforce Solutions Department 3,486.5

Workers' Compensation Administration 0.0

Vocational Rehabilitation Division 5,616.7

Governor's Commission on Disability 918.3

Developmental Disabilities Planning Council 4,951.2

Miners' Hospital of New Mexico 0.0

Department of Health (-$315.0) (2) 301,203.1

Department of Environment 11,468.4

Office of Natural Resources Trustee 87.0

New Mexico Health Policy Commission 0.0

Veterans' Services Department (-$75.0) (2) 3,215.8

Children, Youth and Families Department 219,187.0

Total Health, Hospitals and Human Services $1,636,436.9

Public Safety

Department of Military Affairs 6,810.4

Parole Board 492.9

Juvenile Public Safety Advisory Board 15.0

Corrections Department 269,800.0

Crime Victims Reparation Commission 1,837.1

Department of Public Safety 96,113.2

Homeland Security and Emergency Management

Department 2,424.3

Total Public Safety $377,492.9

72 Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


Fiscal Year Fiscal Year

2013 2014

Transportation

Department of Transportation 0.0

Total Transportation $0.0

Other Education

Public Education Department (PED) 11,711.9

PED - Special Appropriations (-$1,500.0) (2) 55,239.9

Regional Education Cooperatives 0.0

Public School Facilities Authority 0.0

Total Other Education $66,951.8

Higher Education

Higher Education Department 34,725.7

University of New Mexico (-$115.0) (1) 296,571.2

New Mexico State University (-$100.0) (1) 194,053.3

New Mexico Highlands University 29,860.3

Western New Mexico University (-$100.0) (1) 18,868.5

Eastern New Mexico University 43,825.8

New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology 36,435.1

Northern New Mexico College (-$155.0) (1) 10,999.2

Santa Fe Community College 13,350.0

Central New Mexico Community College 51,647.3

Luna Community College 8,172.3

Mesalands Community College 4,296.7

New Mexico Junior College 6,220.5

San Juan College 24,172.5

Clovis Community College 9,640.6

New Mexico Military Institute 2,185.0

New Mexico School for the Blind and Visually

Impaired 1,125.5

New Mexico School for the Deaf 4,016.6

Total Higher Education $790,166.1

Public School Support

State Equalization Guarantee Distribution 2,361,895.8

Transportation Distribution 100,342.5

Supplemental Distribution 2,846.0

Instructional Materials 21,832.8

Indian Education Fund 1,824.6

Supplemental Special Education MOE Distribution 10,000.0

Total Public School Support 2,498,741.7

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

Total Section 4 - 2014 Appropriations $5,862,974.0

APPENDIX B

73


APPENDIX B

Fiscal Year Fiscal Year

2013 2014

SECTION 5 - SPECIAL APPROPRIATIONS

Administrative Office of the Courts 1,365.0

First Judicial District Attorney 224.9

Eleventh Judicial District Attorney, Division II 50.0

Department of Finance and Administration (-$300.0) (1) 1,150.0

General Services Department 9,460.0

Secretary of State 350.0

Personnel Board (-$75.0) (1) 0.0

Economic Development Department 6,800.0

State Racing Commission 67.5

Cumbres and Toltec Scenic Railroad Commission 300.0

Office of Military Base Planning and Support 50.0

Cultural Affairs Department 600.0

New Mexico Livestock Board 350.0

Intertribal Ceremonial Office (-$25.0) (1) 0.0

State Engineer (-$100.0) (1) 7,400.0

Office on African American Affairs 30.0

Martin Luther King Jr. Commission 38.0

Aging and Long-Term Services Department 100.0

Department of Health 2,350.3

Department of Environment 2,841.1

Veterans' Services Department 100.0

Children, Youth and Families Department 375.0

Department of Military Affairs 25.0

Department of Public Safety 3,228.7

Public Education Department 33,400.0

Higher Education Department (-$20,075.0) (1) 50.0

University of New Mexico (-$200.0) (1) 0.0

Eastern New Mexico University 200.0

Computer Systems Enhancement 20,368.0

Total Section 5 - 2013 Appropriations (Nonrecurring) $91,273.5

SECTION 6 - SUPPLEMENTAL & DEFICIENCY

APPROPRIATIONS

Administrative Office of the Courts 400.0

Ninth Judicial District Attorney 136.0

Secretary of State 1,100.0

Office of Military Base Planning and Support 3.9

Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department 100.0

Developmental Disabilities Planning Council 112.0

Department of Public Safety 100.0

Total Section 6 - 2013 Appropriations (Nonrecurring) $1,951.9

74 Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

Fiscal Year Fiscal Year

2013 2014

SECTION 8 - COMPENSATION APPROPRIATIONS*

1% Increase for State Workers

7,319.1

1% Increase for Higher Education Workers

3% Increase for State Police and Motor Transportation

5,844.8

Officers 878.0

Total Section 8 - Compensation Appropriations 14,041.9

*$18,657.1 provided in Section 4 for 1% pay increase for

public school employees.

SECTION 11 - FUND TRANSFERS

$17 million is transferred from the operating reserve to the

appropriation contingency fund to address reductions in

federal funding to state agencies resulting from the federal

sequestration.

SECTION 12 - TRANSFER AUTHORITY

If revenue transfers to the general fund at the end of FY

2013 are not sufficient to meet appropriations, the governor,

with State Board of Finance approval, may transfer up to

$120 million from the operating reserve to the appropriation

account of the general fund to meet that fiscal year's

obligations — $60 million is transferred from the FY 14

operating reserve to the appropriation account of the

general fund for shortfall.

FISCAL YEAR TOTALS - GAA GENERAL FUND $93,225.4 $5,877,015.9

FISCAL YEARS 2013 & 2014 - GAA GENERAL

FUND $5,970,241.3

Key to Numerical Denotations For Governor Vetoes

(1) See Table 3 - Standard Veto

(2) See Table 3 - Sego v. Kirkpatrick

(3) Includes $2 million from operating reserve to State Board

of Finance emergency fund for non-disaster emergencies

APPENDIX B

75


APPENDIX B

CHART 1

GENERAL APPROPRIATION ACT

GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATIONS

Fiscal Year 2014

$5,877,015,868

Public Schools (b)

42.5%

Judicial

3.5%

Public Safety

6.4%

Higher Education

13.5%

General Government (a)

6.1%

Human Services

27.8%

76 Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

(a)

Legislature, General Control, Commerce and Industry, Agriculture, Energy and Natural Resources

(b)

Other Education, Public School Support


General Government (a)

51.6%

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

CHART 2

GENERAL APPROPRIATION ACT

GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATIONS

Fiscal Year 2013

$93,225,400

(a) Legislature, General Control, Commerce and Industry, Agriculture, Energy and Natural Resources

(b) Other Education, Public School Support

Public Schools (b)

42.4%

Human Services

6.4%

Public Safety

3.6%

Higher Education

0.3%

CHART 3

GENERAL APPROPRIATION ACT

GENERAL FUND APPROPRIATIONS

Fiscal Years 2013 and 2014

$5,970,241,268

Public Safety

6.4%

Judicial

3.5%

(a) Legislature, General Control, Commerce and Industry, Agriculture, Energy and Natural Resources

(b) Other Education, Public School Support

General Government (a)

6.8%

Judicial

2.3%

Public Schools (b)

35.8%

Human Services

27.5%

Higher Education

13.3%

APPENDIX B

77


APPENDIX B

TABLE 3

GENERAL APPROPRIATION ACT VETOES

Fifty-First Legislature, First Session

House Appropriations and Finance Committee Substitute for

House Bills 2, 3, 4, 5 & 6 (Chapter 227, p.v.)

(in thousands)

Page Agency Description

Section 3 – General Provisions

3-4 n/a DFA to consult with LFC on FY 2014 revenue and

to present plan to LFC if deficit is anticipated

4 n/a Classifying annual salary greater than $20,000 as a

base annual salary greater than $20,000 or a base

hourly wage greater than $9.579 per hour

Section 4 – Fiscal Year 2014 Appropriations

10 AOC * Special advocate program "in southeast New

Mexico" ($140.0)

33 SIC Converting three vacant classified FTE positions to

three exempt positions

FY 2013

General

Fund

FY 2013

Other State

Funds

FY 2014

General

Fund

38 DFA City of Santa Fe Indian arts promotion $10.0

38 DFA * Youth development programs "in northwest New

Mexico" ($69.0)

38 DFA * Boys and girls clubs "in Rio Arriba County" ($75.0)

38 DFA Mora County ambulances $75.0

38 DFA Rural agriculture-to-markets infrastructure $300.0

38 DFA City of Gallup recruitment of target industries $50.0

38 DFA * One-on-one youth mentoring "in southeast New

Mexico" ($140.0)

38-39 DFA Northwest New Mexico Council of Governments'

broadband feasibility pilot program

44 DFA Building use fees to pay for business office space

management and maintenance services

47 Public Defender

Department

57 Tourism

Department

Language excluding the lease of office space for the

Gallup field office from PDD's budget

Directing the TD to promote TD contracts with

New Mexico businesses

79 PRC Actuarial analysis related to the affordability health

program ($50,000 remains in Insurance Operations

Fund)

78 Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

$50.0

FY 2014

Other State

Funds

$822.2

$50.0


Page Agency Description

82 PRC Language decreasing PRC's special revenues

program by $41,600 if the Fifty-First Legislature

establishes an Office of Superintendent of Insurance

84 New Mexico

State Fair

Students statewide to attend youth development

programs at the state fairgrounds

89 CAD Language specifying the venue, organization and

event for creating a cultural arts collaborative

promoting New Mexico as a cultural tourist

destination

91 CAD * Educational programming for "the Placitas and

Edgewood" libraries ($50.0)

92 CAD Non-reversion of unexpended balances in FY 2014

appropriations to the CAD

94 DGF Off-highway vehicle grants and youth safety

training equipment

96 EMNRD Renewable energy efficiency program funding to be

used for an energy storage task force

103 ISC Language requiring two ISC reports a year to LFC

on expenditures for acequia/community ditch

projects

105-106 Commission on

the Status of

Women

108 Martin Luther

King, Jr.

Commission

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

FY 2013

General

Fund

FY 2013

Other State

Funds

FY 2014

General

Fund

APPENDIX B

$50.0

$20.0

$125,000 appropriation for the commission $125.0

An ACT and SAT preparation program and its

evaluation

111 ALTSD Requiring ALTSD to report to LFC by 5/1/14 on the

status of leveraging community funding for aging

network services

111 ALTSD * Target funding to "the senior center at Kirtland

AFB" ($80.0)

111 ALTSD * Target funding for senior centers in chapters of the

Navajo Nation ($100.0)

113-114 HSD Adjusting HSD funding from brain injury services

fees accrued by AOC and TRD, notwithstanding

provisions of Sections 24-1-24, 35-7-4, 66-8-116.3

and 66-8-119 NMSA 1978 and Laws 2004, Chapter

23, Section 13

114 HSD Designating $500,000 of the general fund

appropriation (other category) to the medical

assistance program for centennial care

114 HSD Designating a portion of HSD's medical assistance

program funding for adjusting personal care

services' reimbursements to reflect regional

differences in program costs

$60.0

FY 2014

Other State

Funds

79

$150.0

$500.0


APPENDIX B

Page Agency Description

116 HSD Designating no less than 15% and no more than

25% of federal LIHEAP funds to be used for

weatherization programs

118 HSD Requirement that HSD submit quarterly reports to

DFA and LFC on federal TANF and state MOE

expenditures

119 HSD * Language limits HSD's behavioral health services

funding for non-Medicaid "in-patient" psychiatric

services "in southern New Mexico" ($250.0)

119 HSD * Language limits HSD's behavioral health services

contractual services category funding to be used for

"residential" substance abuse treatment for women

"in northern New Mexico" ($150.0)

119 HSD Substance abuse treatment services "in Gallup"

131 DoH * School-based health center operations "at Roosevelt

Middle School in Albuquerque" ($110.0)

132 DoH * Encouraging students to pursue health careers "in

southwest New Mexico" expanding appropriation to

statewide funding ($75.0)

132 DoH * Cancer awareness prevention and early detection "in

southern New Mexico" ($30.0)

132 DoH * Operational support for women's health services "in

Santa Fe County" ($130.0)

137 Department of

Environment

Eliminating a performance measure from a

$200,000 appropriation for a mutual domestic water

system alliance

141 VSD * Transporting veterans "from a central location in

Las Vegas" to the Veterans Affairs Medical Center

in Albuquerque ($75.0)

144 CYFD Language of appropriation for pre-kindergarten

programs "in the contractual services category"

144 CYFD Language for early childhood education for deaf

and hard-of-hearing children

148 Corrections

Department

Language for funding the inmate management and

control program at Luna Community College to

conduct community economic development under

CD and HED co-sponsorship

154 DPS Language in funding the statewide law enforcement

support program for the forensic laboratory in

southeastern New Mexico

157 DPS Changing signage along Ben Lujan Memorial

Highway

159 PED LFC and LESC access to the budget management

reporting system and STARS

FY 2013

General

Fund

FY 2013

Other State

Funds

FY 2014

General

Fund

80 Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

FY 2014

Other State

Funds


Page Agency Description

162-163 PED How PED develops a distribution plan for funding

early reading initiatives

163 PED Examples of instructional or professional

development strategies in school district budgets

that PED should review

163 PED Departmental intervention in D- and F-rated schools

includes schools rated D or F for the 2011-2012

school year

163 PED The science, technology, engineering and

mathematics initiative for "level two and level

three" teachers

163 PED No money from special appropriations to PED is to

be retained for administration or oversight of the

appropriations

164 PED Stipulation that PED report to LFC and LESC on

planned use of certain special appropriations

166 HED DFA and LFC involvement in revisions to the

instruction and general purpose funding formula;

HED to report to the legislature by 9/1/13

167 HED General Knowles legislative scholarship program at

the New Mexico Military Institute

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

FY 2013

General

Fund

FY 2013

Other State

Funds

FY 2014

General

Fund

APPENDIX B

FY 2014

Other State

Funds

81

$500.0

167 HED Boys and girls state program $75.0

168 HED: UNM UNM baseball program $115.0

180 HED: NMSU For NMDA to meet the purposes of the Acequia and

Community Ditch Fund

$100.0

184 HED: WNMU The service learning program $100.0

190 HED: NNMC Faculty salary adjustments $155.0

202 PED Verification by the secretary of public education

that a 1% salary increase is in school budgets for

teachers and for licensed or unlicensed school

employees

203 PED Review by LFC and LESC on the use of and need

for the state equalization guarantee distribution to

meet MOE requirements

204 PED Prohibit the use of the state equalization guarantee

distribution to pay for student recruitment or school

promotional/marketing activities

205 PED Approval of school budgets contingent on verified

1% salary increase for transportation employees

207 PED 9/30/13 deadline for a $300,000 appropriation to

receive matching funds for support of the Indian

Education Act


APPENDIX B

Page Agency Description

207-208 PED LFC and LESC review of the supplemental special

education MOE requirements

Section 5 – Special Appropriations

208 LCS From legislative cash balances for budgetary

standing committees expenses

208 LCS From legislative cash balances for Disabilities

Concerns Committee expenses

209 LCS From legislative cash balances for LCS and LFC to

provide support services for SHARE and for the

reconciliation of cash variances

FY 2013

General

Fund

FY 2013

Other State

Funds

FY 2014

General

Fund

82 Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

$50.0

$50.0

$750.0

209 AOC AOC staff study $50.0

209 AOC LFC oversight on the amount of all Southwest

border prosecution initiative funds that do not revert

at the end of FY 2013

210 DFA Emergency funding to support protective custody

and social detoxification services in the City of

Gallup

210 DFA Funding for the New Mexico Rodeo Council for

high school and 4-H rodeos

211 DFA Assessment levied by GSD on state agencies and

local public bodies for equitable shares of group self

-insurance; required report from GSD to DFA and

LFC by 6/15/13 on GSD's plan to address solvency

of the Group Self-Insurance Fund

212 Personnel Board $150,000 appropriation for a study of the classified

services reclassification and compensation system

213 CAD Removing the stipulation that any unexpended or

unencumbered balances remaining at the end of FY

2013 and FY 2014 of the $6,543,600 appropriation

to the CAD shall not revert

214 Intertribal

Ceremonial

Office

$350.0

$50.0

$25,000 to promote the intertribal ceremonial $25.0

214 OSE $100,000 for a weather modification program in

Lea and Roosevelt counties

218 PED LFC/LESC review of MOE requirements

219 PED Stipends for teachers and school leaders who move

from A- or B-rated schools to D- or F-rated schools

219 PED Planned-expenditures report to LFC and LESC,

with a follow-up report of the progress on

expenditures by 1/1/14

$100.0

$13,860.0

FY 2014

Other State

Funds


Page Agency Description

219 PED LFC review of supplemental funding for increased

fuel costs incurred by schools

220 HED $75,000 for a feasibility study of establishing a

UNM branch in Gallup as an independent

community college

220 HED $20 million to replenish the Higher Education

Endowment Fund

220 HED Utility infrastructure and fire suppression

improvements at UNM-Gallup

Section 6 – Supplemental and Deficiency Appropriations

221 n/a Agency certification to LFC that other funds are

unavailable for specified supplemental/deficiency

appropriations

221 DFA Adjustment of the allowance for potential loss

account of the general fund operating reserve

222-223 PED LFC/LESC review and certification of MOE

requirements

Section 7 – Data Processing Appropriations

224 TRD LFC review of TRD's gentax system maintenance

and support

224 GSD One-time assessment for the Group Self-Insurance

Fund

225 DoIT Information Technology Commission certification

of necessary SHARE expenditures

225 DoIT Monthly reports to LFC on SHARE

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

FY 2013

General

Fund

$75.0

$20,000.0

$200.0

$1,135.8

FY 2013

Other State

Funds

FY 2014

General

Fund

APPENDIX B

FY 2014

Other State

Funds

$22,835.8 $13,860.0 $1,210.0 $2,097.2

TOTAL VETOES $40,003.0

* This veto may be problematic because it strikes selective language, thereby expanding the appropriation from a specific use to

a general or statewide use. In State ex rel. Sego v. Kirkpatrick, the New Mexico Supreme Court said, "The power of partial veto

is the power to disapprove. This is a negative power, or a power to delete or destroy a part or item, and is not a positive power,

or a power to alter, enlarge or increase the effect of the remaining parts or items. It is not the power to enact or create new

legislation by selective deletions.... Thus, a partial veto must be so exercised that it eliminates or destroys the whole of an item

or part and does not distort the legislative intent, and in effect create legislation inconsistent with that enacted by the Legislature,

by the careful striking of words, phrases, clauses or sentences."

83


APPENDIX B

TABLE 4

BILLS AFFECTING GENERAL FUND REVENUE

($ in thousands)

(all amounts are recurring unless noted)

Fiscal Year

Bill No. Chap. Subject 2013 2014 2015 2016

HB 22 42 Autism Coverage in Group Health Coverage — Indeterminate —

HB 46 75 Transfer Regulation of Corporations to Secretary

of State

(350.0) (200.0) (200.0) (200.0)

HB 53 177 Teacher Loan Repayment Act — Indeterminate —

HB 120 123 Locomotive Fuel Gross Receipts Deduction (2,975.0) (2,940.0) (3,010.0)

HB 172 179 Limit Credit for Taxes Paid to Another State 1,390.0 1,450.0 1,530.0

HB 358 154 Add Judicial Standards Commission Members (4.5) (6.0) (6.0) (6.0)

CS/HB 483 195 Public Defender Commission (52.0) (127.0) (77.0) (77.0)

HB 506;

SB 423

159;

150

Bed and Breakfast Beer and Wine License 2.0 2.0 2.0

CS/HB 628 191 Special Education Funding (20,000.0) (16,000.0) — Nonrecurring —

CS/HB 641 160 Omnibus Tax Package 9,818.0 4,063.0 (42,367.0)

SB 2 19 State Aviation Fund Uses (950.0) (988.0) (1,026.0)

CS/SB 14 92 Extend Sustainable Building Tax Credit (5,000.0) (5,000.0) (5,000.0)

CS/SB 27 225 PERA Changes (2,288.0) (2,288.0)

SB 72 102 Racehorse Testing (350.0) (700.0)

SB 81 94 Microbrewery Threshold for Liquor Excise Tax (146.0) (339.0) (392.0)

SB 116 95 Small Winery Threshold for Liquor Excise Tax (85.0) (178.0) (379.0)

CS/SB 221 54 NM Health Insurance Exchange — Indeterminate —

SB 268 112 NM Fertilizer Act Inspections (67.0) (67.0) (67.0)

SB 424 148 Alcohol Tasting Permits 23.0 23.0 23.0

SB 572 174 Property Control Reserve Fund Changes 532.1 532.1

Note:

1 Up to the amounts indicated can be appropriated from the General Fund Operating Reserve

84 Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

1


Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

TABLE 5

BILLS AFFECTING OTHER STATE REVENUE

($ in thousands)

(all amounts are recurring unless noted)

Fiscal Year

Bill No. Chap. Subject 2013 2014 2015 2016

HB 18 82 Drinking Water System Financing (2,000.0) — Nonrecurring —

HB 18 82 Drinking Water System Financing 2,000.0 — Nonrecurring —

APPENDIX B

HB 22 185 Autism Coverage in Group Health Coverage 250.0 250.0 3

CS/HB 45 74 Transfer Insurance Regulation from PRC (1,399.2) (1,399.2) (1,399.2)

CS/HB 45 74 Transfer Insurance Regulation from PRC 1,399.2 1,399.2 1,399.2 5

HB 53 177 Teacher Loan Repayment Act — Indeterminate —

HB 101 76 Hoisting Operator Licensing and Penalties (165.0) (165.0) (165.0)

HB 120 123 Locomotive Fuel Gross Receipts Deduction (1,063.0) (1,050.0) (1,075.0) 8,9

HB 186 126 Oryx Hunting for Veterans at Resident Rate 1.5 1.5 1.5 10

HB 205;

SB 173

11; 69 Create State Financial Regulation Fund 1,000.0 11

CS/HB 216 12 Fair Pay for Women Act — Indeterminate —

CS/HB 225 184 Electronic Voter Registration Changes (45.0) — Nonrecurring —

HB 275 79 Volunteer Firefighter Retirement Benefits Increase (200.0) (200.0) (200.0) 14

HB 580 14 NMFA Bonds for Hospitals (1,157.0) (151.0) (151.0) 15

CS/HB 641 160 Omnibus Tax Package 28.0 57.0 77.0 8,9

SB 2 19 State Aviation Fund Uses 950.0 988.0 1,026.0 16

CS/SB 27 225 PERA Changes 30,722.8 38,915.6 17

SB 54 22 Local Government Planning Fund Appropriation 2,000.0 18

SB 54 22 Local Government Planning Fund Appropriation (2,000.0)

SB 72 102 Racehorse Testing 350.0 700.0 19

SB 81 94 Microbrewery Threshold for Liquor Excise Tax (104.0) (241.0) (278.0) 20

CS/SB 113

& 392

CS/SB 113

& 392

CS/SB 113

& 392

CS/SB 113

& 392

228,

p.v.

228,

p.v.

228,

p.v.

228,

p.v.

Transfer from Tobacco Settlement Permanent Fund (19,750.0) — Nonrecurring — 21

Transfer from Tobacco Settlement Permanent Fund 9,875.0 — Nonrecurring — 22

Transfer from Tobacco Settlement Permanent Fund 9.875.0 — Nonrecurring — 23

CYFD Appropriation from Tobacco Funds (9,750.0) — Nonrecurring — 22

SB 115 61 Educational Retirement Changes 55,000.0 70,000.0 24

85

1

2

4

6

7

12

13

1


APPENDIX B

Fiscal Year

Bill No. Chap. Subject 2013 2014 2015 2016

CS/HB 107 192 Municipal Court Fees for Small Cities — Indeterminate —

HB 120 123 Locomotive Fuel Gross Receipts Deduction (213.0) (210.0) (215.0)

CS/HB 641 160 Omnibus Tax Package 6.0 11.0 (8,700.0)

CS/SB 27 225 PERA Changes — Indeterminate —

CS/SB 397 218 Local Liquor Excise Tax Changes 170.0 158.0 5

Notes:

1 Increase to municipality's general fund

2 Distributions from gross receipts tax

3 FY 2016 amount signifies the beginning of the hold-harmless distribution phase-out

4 Increased local government contribution rates for public employees

5 County alcohol and drug abuse programs

TABLE 5 (continued)

TABLE 6

BILLS AFFECTING LOCAL GOVERNMENT REVENUE

($ in thousands)

Fiscal Year

Bill No. Chap. Subject 2013 2014 2015 2016

SB 116 95 Small Winery Threshold for Liquor Excise Tax (60.0) 20

SB 149 208 DNA Administrative Fee Collection 13.8 25

SB 160 109 Biodiesel Deductions from Special Fuel Excise Tax (574.0) 26,2

SB 233 168 Workers' Compensation Attorney Fees (60.3) 28

CS/SB 334 133 Unemployment Comp. Contribution Formula — Indeterminate —

SB 572 174 Property Control Reserve Fund Changes (2,300.0) — Nonrecurring —

CS/SB 638 59 Registration of Private Colleges (136.2) (136.2) (136.2) 31

Notes:

1 Public Project Revolving Fund

2 Drinking Water State Revolving Loan Fund

3 Public School Insurance Fund

4 Various insurance funds appropriated to Public Regulation Commission

5 Various funds appropriated to Office of Superintendent of Insurance

6

Teacher Loan Repayment Fund

7

Hoisting Operators Safety Act Fund

8

Small Counties Assistance Fund

9

Small Cities Assistance Fund

10

Game Protection Fund

11

State Financial Regulation Fund; transferred from temporary fund

12

Public Liability Fund

13

Taxation and Revenue Department operating accounts

14

Volunteer Firefighters Retirement Fund

15

Rural County Cancer Treatment Fund

16 State Aviation Fund

17 Retirement Fund of PERA

18 Local Government Planning Fund

19 Racehorse Testing Fund

20 Local DWI Grant Fund

21 Tobacco Settlement Permanent Fund

22

Tobacco Settlement Program Fund

23

Lottery Tuition Fund

24

Educational Retirement Fund

25

DNA Identification System Fund

26

State Road Fund

27

Local Governments Road Fund

28

Workers' Compensation Retention Fund

29

Unemployment Compensation Fund

30

Appropriation of Property Control Reserve Fund

31

Post-Secondary Educational Institution Fund

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7

29

30

1

2

3

4


TABLE 7

Legislative Authorization for New Mexico Finance Authority

Public Project Revolving Fund Projects

House Bill 70 (Laws 2013, Chapter 21)

Building, equipment, infrastructure, debt refinance, road, land acquisition, water, wastewater, water

rights, solid waste and special assessment district projects for the following entities in the following

locations:

County Entity

_____________________________________________________________

Bernalillo Albuquerque Public School District

Alice King Community School

Bernalillo County

Nova Corporation

Tijeras

To'hajiilee Economic Development, Inc.

Catron Catron County

Quemado Independent School District

Reserve Independent School District

Cibola Cibola County

Grants

Grants-Cibola County School District

Laguna, Pueblo of

Colfax Colfax County

Maxwell

Miner's Colfax General Hospital

Curry Curry County

Grady

Grady Municipal School District

Melrose

Texico

De Baca De Baca County

Fort Sumner Municipal School District

Dona Ana Anthony

Dona Ana County

Hatch

Las Cruces

Mesilla

Sunland Park

Eddy Artesia

Carlsbad Soil and Water Conservation District

Eddy County

Loving

Loving Municipal School District

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APPENDIX B

Grant Cobre Consolidated School District

Grant County

Hurley

Silver City

Southwest Solid Waste Authority

Guadalupe Vaughn

Harding Mosquero Municipal School District

Roy Municipal School District

Hidalgo Animas Public School District

Lordsburg

Lordsburg Municipal School District

Lea Eunice Public School District

Jal

Jal Public School District

Lea County

Lovington

Lovington Municipal School District

Tatum

Tatum Municipal School District

Lincoln Carrizozo

Corona

Corona Public School District

Greentree Solid Waste Authority

Lincoln County Medical Center

Ruidoso

Ruidoso Downs

Ruidoso Municipal School District

Luna Deming Public School District

McKinley Gallup

Gallup-McKinley County School District

Zuni Public School District

Zuni, Pueblo of

Mora Wagon Mound

Multiple Counties Agriculture, New Mexico Department of

Border Authority

Cochiti, Pueblo of

Eastern New Mexico University

General Services Department

Mesa Vista Consolidated School District

Mining and Technology, New Mexico Institute of

Moriarty-Edgewood School District

Renewable Transmission Authority, New Mexico

Spaceport Authority

Transportation, Department of

University of New Mexico

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Otero Mescalero Apache Tribe

Otero County

Tularosa Municipal School District

Quay House Municipal School District

Logan

Logan Municipal School District

Quay County

San Jon

San Jon Municipal School District

Tucumcari

Tucumcari Public School District

Rio Arriba Chama Valley Independent School District

Dulce Independent School District

Espanola

Northern New Mexico State School

Rio Arriba County

Roosevelt Causey

Dora

Dora Consolidated School District

Elida Municipal School District

Floyd

Floyd Municipal School District

Portales Municipal School District

Roosevelt County

San Juan Aztec Municipal School District

Bloomfield School District

Central Consolidated School District

Farmington Municipal School District

San Juan County

Sandoval Cuba

Cuba Independent School District

Sandia, Pueblo of

Santa Ana, Pueblo of

Southern Sandoval Investment, Pueblo of Santa Ana

Santa Fe Academy for Technology and the Classics

Nambe, Pueblo of

New Mexico National Guard

New Mexico School for the Arts

Santa Fe Community College

Sierra Sierra County

Truth or Consequences Municipal School District

Socorro Magdalena

Socorro

Socorro Consolidated School District

Socorro County

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APPENDIX B

Taos Taos

Taos County

Taos Municipal School District

Torrance Claunch-Pinto Soil and Water Conservation District

Encino

Estancia

Estancia Municipal School District

Moriarty

Mountainair Public School District

Torrance County

Union Clayton

Des Moines

Grenville

Union County

Valencia Belen

Belen Consolidated School District

Los Lunas

Peralta

Valencia County

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TABLE 8

Legislative Authorization for New Mexico Finance Authority

Water Project Fund and Acequia Project Fund Projects

Senate Bill 228 (Laws 2013, Chapter 24)

WATER PROJECT FUND PROJECTS

Water conservation, treatment, recycling or reuse projects for the following entities in the following

locations:

County Entity

________________________________________________________________________

Colfax Cimarron

Dona Ana Camino Real regional utility authority

Rio Arriba Agua Sana water users association

San Miguel Las Vegas

Taos Ojo Caliente Mutual Domestic Water Consumers Association

WATER PROJECT FUND PROJECTS

Water storage, conveyance and delivery projects for the following entities in the following locations:

Bernalillo Sierra Vista Mutual Domestic Water Consumers Association

Cibola Laguna, Pueblo of

Colfax Eagle Nest

Springer

Curry, Quay & New Mexico Water Utility Authority

Roosevelt

Dona Ana Dona Ana Mutual Domestic Water Consumers Association

Hatch

Winterhaven Mutual Domestic Water Consumers Association

Grant Hanover Mutual Domestic Water Consumers Association

Guadalupe Santa Rosa

Lea Eunice

Lincoln Capitan

Carrizozo

Nogal Mutual Domestic Water Consumers Association

Ruidoso

Luna Deming

McKinley Gallup

McKinley County

Otero Alamogordo

Quay San Jon

Tucumcari

Rio Arriba Ancones Mutual Domestic Water Consumers Association

Los Ojos Mutual Domestic Water Consumers Association

Santa Clara, Pueblo of

Santa Cruz Mutual Domestic Water Consumers Association

Union del Llano Mutual Domestic Water Consumers Association

Valley Estates Mutual Water and Sewer Association

San Juan Blanco Mutual Domestic Water Consumers Association

San Miguel El Creston Mutual Domestic Water Consumers Association

El Valle Water Alliance

Las Vegas (continued)

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91


APPENDIX B

County Entity

________________________________________________________________________

(continued)

Santa Fe Cuatro Villas Mutual Domestic Water Users Association

Eldorado Area Water and Sanitation District

Greater Chimayo Mutual Domestic Water Consumers Association

Greater Glorieta Mutual Domestic Water Consumers Association

Santa Fe County

Sierra Elephant Butte

Truth or Consequences

Taos El Salto Mutual Domestic Water Consumers Association

El Valle de Los Ranchos Water and Sanitation District

Lower Des Montes Mutual Domestic Water Consumers Association

Taos Ski Valley

Torrance Estancia

Moriarty

Valencia Belen

WATER PROJECT FUND PROJECTS

Watershed restoration and management projects for the following entities in the following locations:

Bernalillo, Claunch-Pinto Soil and Water Conservation District

Rio Arriba,

Santa Fe &

Valencia

Bernalillo, Claunch-Pinto Soil and Water Conservation District

Santa Fe &

Torrance

Harding Ute Creek Soil and Water Conservation District

Lincoln Upper Hondo Soil and Water Conservation District

Quay Canadian River Soil and Water Conservation District

Sandoval Cochiti, Pueblo of

Santa Fe Acequia de la Otra Banda

Torrance East Torrance Soil and Water Conservation District

WATER PROJECT FUND PROJECTS

Flood prevention project for the following entity in the following location:

Sandoval Cochiti, Pueblo of

Southern Sandoval Arroyo Flood Control Authority

ACEQUIA PROJECT FUND PROJECTS

Acequia projects for the following entities in the following locations:

Grant Heredia community ditch

Mora Canoncito y Encinal Acequia

Rainsville North and South Acequia

Rio Arriba Acequia de la Plaza

Santa Fe Acequia de la Otra Banda

Acequia de Jose Gabriel Ortiz

Acequia del Barranco de Jacona

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TABLE 9

2013 CAPITAL OUTLAY PROJECTS BY CATEGORY

Senate Finance Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 60 and

House Taxation and Revenue Committee Substitute for House Bill 337

(Laws 2013, Chapter 226, p.v.)

__________________________________________________________________________________

CHILDREN AND FAMILY FACILITIES 10 projects $1,076,333

COMMUNITY FACILITIES 34 projects $3,763,517

CORRECTIONS FACILITIES 6 projects $13,125,000

CULTURAL FACILITIES 19 projects $10,687,705

HEALTH FACILITIES 23 projects $18,224,715

HIGHER EDUCATION 53 projects $58,609,594

HIGHWAYS, ROADS AND BRIDGES 70 projects $16,098,070

JUDICIAL FACILITIES 13 projects $4,348,100

LAW ENFORCEMENT AND PUBLIC SAFETY 17 projects $12,680,734

MILITARY AND VETERANS 11 projects $1,362,000

PARKS AND RECREATION FACILITIES 55 projects $7,466,043

PUBLIC BUILDINGS 62 projects $44,583,705

SCHOOLS 162 projects $14,920,825

SENIOR CITIZENS 65 projects $4,548,392

TRANSPORTATION 35 projects $19,335,888

UTILITY AND WASTE 97 projects $19,874,340

WATER AND IRRIGATION 60 projects $18,634,753

Grand Total 792 projects $269,339,714

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APPENDIX C

93


APPENDIX C

TABLE 10

2013 CAPITAL OUTLAY PROJECTS BY COUNTY

Senate Finance Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 60 and

House Taxation and Revenue Committee Substitute for House Bill 337

(Laws 2013, Chapter 226, p.v.)

____________________________________________________________________________________

BERNALILLO 226 projects $45,841,005

CATRON 5 projects $248,350

CHAVES 16 projects $3,396,000

CIBOLA 11 projects $2,137,000

COLFAX 7 projects $6,460,000

CURRY 12 projects $1,470,500

DE BACA 2 projects $250,000

DONA ANA 49 projects $13,629,500

EDDY 25 projects $2,902,000

GRANT 9 projects $8,126,500

GUADALUPE 9 projects $460,900

HARDING 1 project $256,000

HIDALGO 3 projects $466,000

LEA 12 projects $3,475,000

LINCOLN 19 projects $1,463,400

LOS ALAMOS 4 projects $280,000

LUNA 3 projects $1,025,100

MCKINLEY 34 projects $3,592,200

MORA 5 projects $2,145,310

MULTIPLE 15 projects $30,673,000

OTERO 17 projects $11,880,600

QUAY 8 projects $627,300

RIO ARRIBA 33 projects $7,565,800

ROOSEVELT 11 projects $5,443,400

SAN JUAN 16 projects $7,705,900

SAN MIGUEL 24 projects $9,053,810

SANDOVAL 45 projects $6,894,110

SANTA FE 68 projects $18,391,372

SIERRA 7 projects $842,100

SOCORRO 9 projects $7,053,600

STATEWIDE 20 projects $56,998,357

TAOS 30 projects $2,663,700

TORRANCE 14 projects $1,340,600

UNION 5 projects $521,300

VALENCIA 18 projects $4,060,000

Grand Total 792 projects $269,339,714

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TABLE 11

2013 CAPITAL OUTLAY PROJECTS BY AGENCY

Senate Finance Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 60 and

House Taxation and Revenue Committee Substitute for House Bill 337

(Laws 2013, Chapter 226, p.v.)

___________________________________________________________________________________

2ND JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT 2 projects $326,100

ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICE OF THE COURTS 1 project $1,000,000

AGING AND LONG-TERM SERVICES DEPARTMENT 64 projects $4,463,392

ARMORY BOARD, STATE 1 project $500,000

BERNALILLO COUNTY METROPOLITAN COURT 1 project $369,000

BLIND AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED, NEW MEXICO SCHOOL FOR THE 3 projects $9,238,000

BORDER AUTHORITY 1 project $350,000

CAPITAL PROGRAM FUND 17 projects $43,000,000

CULTURAL AFFAIRS DEPARTMENT 4 projects $6,117,336

CUMBRES AND TOLTEC SCENIC RAILROAD COMMISSION 1 project $850,000

DEAF, NEW MEXICO SCHOOL FOR THE 2 projects $8,000,000

EASTERN NEW MEXICO UNIVERSITY 5 projects $4,628,000

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT 1 project $500,000

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT, HIGHER 10 projects $7,605,728

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT, PUBLIC 166 projects $27,727,825

ENERGY, MINERALS AND NATURAL RESOURCES DEPARTMENT 2 projects $3,000,000

ENGINEER, OFFICE OF THE STATE 15 projects $16,897,000

ENVIRONMENT, DEPARTMENT OF 91 projects $19,498,840

FAIR COMMISSION, STATE 4 projects $1,189,000

GAME AND FISH, DEPARTMENT OF 4 projects $12,450,000

HEALTH, DEPARTMENT OF 1 project $900,000

HIGHLANDS UNIVERSITY, NEW MEXICO 2 projects $2,465,000

INDIAN AFFAIRS DEPARTMENT 42 projects $5,676,276

INTERSTATE STREAM COMMISSION 40 projects $1,412,753

LAND OFFICE, STATE 3 projects $570,000

LOCAL GOVERNMENT DIVISION, DFA 202 projects $35,691,870

MILITARY INSTITUTE, NEW MEXICO 1 project $1,000,000

MINERS' HOSPITAL 1 project $3,200,000

MINING AND TECHNOLOGY, NEW MEXICO INSTITUTE OF 3 projects $6,335,000

NORTHERN NEW MEXICO STATE SCHOOL 1 project $900,000

SECRETARY OF STATE 2 projects $7,000,000

SPACEPORT AUTHORITY 1 project $3,000,000

STATE PARKS DIVISION, EMNRD 1 project $1,000,000

STATE UNIVERSITY, NEW MEXICO 15 projects $5,447,790

SUPREME COURT BUILDING COMMISSION 1 project $300,000

TAXATION AND REVENUE DEPARTMENT 1 project $1,500,000

TRANSPORTATION, DEPARTMENT OF 65 projects $12,371,070

UNIVERSITY OF NEW MEXICO 12 projects $9,990,234

WESTERN NEW MEXICO UNIVERSITY 3 projects $2,869,500

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Grand Total 792 projects $269,339,714

APPENDIX C

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APPENDIX C

TABLE 12

2013 CAPITAL OUTLAY PROJECTS BY COUNTY (detail)

Senate Finance Substitute for Senate Bill 60 and House Taxation and

Revenue Committee Substitute for House Bill 337 (Laws 2013, Chapter 226, p.v.)

Bernalillo County

VETO 2ND JUD DIST COMPUTER MONITORS STB $127,850 Albuquerque 15/1

2ND JUD DIST COURT SECURITY EQUIP STB $174,100 Albuquerque 15/2

2ND JUD DIST SERVER STB $152,000 Albuquerque 15/3

VETO 2ND ST IMPROVE BERN CO STB $177,000 36/ 1

2ND STREET/RIO BRAVO INTERSECTION IMP STB $125,000 36/ 2

4TH ST IMPROVEMENTS-LOS RANCHOS STB $681,000 Los Ranchos de Alb 36/15

A MONTOYA ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $35,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 22

VETO ACADEMIA DE ESPERANZA FACILITY STB $45,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 23

ADOBE ACRES ELEM SCHL SEC CAMERAS & IT STB $122,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 24

ALAMEDA BLVD MEDIANS IMPROVE STB $60,000 36/ 3

ALAMEDA ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $60,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 25

ALAMOSA ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $70,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 26

ALB ALAMOSA PARK IMPROVE & BENCHES STB $25,167 Albuquerque 31/ 16

ALB ALTAMONTE LITTLE LEAGUE PARK INFRA STB $110,000 Albuquerque 31/ 17

ALB ARENAL DRAIN BLUFF AREA PARK STB $145,450 31/ 1

ALB BIOPARK JAGUAR YARD JAG JOINT STB $232,500 Albuquerque 31/ 18

ALB CENTRALIZED KITCHEN-MEALS EQUIP STB $75,000 Albuquerque 5/ 1

ALB DALE BELLAMAH PARK IMPROVE STB $109,500 Albuquerque 31/ 19

VETO ALB DEAF CULTURE CTR & APARTMENT COMPLEX STB $60,000 Albuquerque 13

ALB ERNIE PYLE LIBRARY RENOVATE STB $20,000 Albuquerque 31/ 20

ALB EXPLORA CENTER ADDITION & EXHIBITS STB $1,014,041 Albuquerque 31/ 21

ALB FIRE DEPT EAST SIDE FIRE ENGINE PURCHASE STB $688,334 Albuquerque 31/ 22

ALB FIRE ENGINE-WEST SIDE STB $489,128 Albuquerque 31/ 23

ALB HILAND THEATER RENOVATE & EQUIP STB $715,750 Albuquerque 31/ 24

ALB INSTITUTE OF MATH & SCIENCE EXPAND STB $50,000 Albuquerque 18/ 4

ALB LIBRARY SE HEIGHTS STB $570,000 Albuquerque 31/ 25

ALB LOW-INCOME CLINICS DENTAL EQUIP STB $110,000 Albuquerque 31/ 26

ALB MESA VERDE COMTY CTR EQUIP/FURNISH STB $125,000 Albuquerque 31/ 27

ALB METRO FLOOD CONTROL AUTH PED STB $125,000 Albuquerque 21/ 1

ALB MUSEUM OF ART & HISTORY IMPROVE STB $189,444 Albuquerque 31/ 28

ALB NORTH DOMINGO BACA CTR GYM & SPRAY PK STB $180,000 Albuquerque 31/ 29

ALB NORTH DOMINGO BACA MULTIGEN CTR STB $200,000 Albuquerque 31/ 30

ALB PEDESTRIAN & BIKE PATH - OLD TOWN TO BIO STB $15,000 Albuquerque 31/ 31

ALB PETROGLYPH LITTLE LEAGUE BACKSTOPS & STB $50,000 Albuquerque 31/ 32

ALB PETROGLYPH LITTLE LEAGUE FENCE TOPPERS STB $10,000 Albuquerque 31/ 33

ALB PETROGLYPH LITTLE LEAGUE SCORE BOOTHS STB $50,000 Albuquerque 31/ 34

ALB PETROGLYPH LITTLE LEAGUE SCOREBOARDS STB $30,000 Albuquerque 31/ 35

ALB PETROGLYPH LITTLE LEAGUE UTLTY VEHICLE STB $10,000 Albuquerque 31/ 36

ALB POLICE DEPT VEHICLES STB $486,426 Albuquerque 31/ 37

ALB PSD JROTC RIFLES & EQUIPMENT STB $75,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 28

ALB PSD RIFLE SAFETY & MARKSMANSHIP TARGET STB $215,600 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 29

ALB RAILYARDS IMPROVE STB $303,000 Albuquerque 36/ 9

ALB ROADRUNNER LITTLE LEAGUE PARK INFRA STB $100,000 Albuquerque 31/ 38

ALB SAN PEDRO LIBRARY RENOVATE STB $10,000 Albuquerque 31/ 39

ALB SANTA BARBARA-MARTINEZTOWN PARK IMP STB $50,000 Albuquerque 31/ 40

ALB SEXUAL ASSAULT VICTIMS FORENSIC EQUIP STB $7,500 Albuquerque 31/ 41

ALB SOUTH MARTINEZTOWN NEIGHBORHOOD STB $400,000 Albuquerque 31/ 4

ALB VETERANS TRANSITIONAL BLDGS MODS STB $25,000 Albuquerque 31/ 43

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APPENDIX C

ALB W CENTRAL METRO REDEVEL DIST CMTY DEV STB $40,000 Albuquerque 31/ 44

ALB W CENTRAL METRO REDVLP DIST 57TH/CENT STB $100,000 Albuquerque 31/ 45

ALB WESTSIDE LIBRARY CONSTRUCT STB $483,634 Albuquerque 31/ 46

ALBUQUERQUE HIGH SCHL INFO TECH STB $45,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 30

ALVARADO ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $70,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 31

APACHE ELEM SCHL FURNISH & EQUIP STB $10,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 32

ARMIJO ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $68,500 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 33

ATRISCO ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $80,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 34

ATRISCO HERITAGE ACADEMY HIGH SCHL IT STB $70,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 35

BANDELIER ELEM SCHL GROUNDS/PLAYGROUND STB $50,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 36

BANDELIER ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $30,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 37

BARCELONA ELEM SCHL SEC CAMS & INFO TECH STB $50,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 38

BCMC RESTROOMS & EGRESS ACCESS STB $369,000 Albuquerque 7

BEL-AIR ELEM SCHL SECURITY CAM & INFO TECH STB $110,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 39

BELLEHAVEN ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $46,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 40

VETO BERN CO ADULT DAY HABILITATION GREENHOUSE STB $100,000 Albuquerque 31/ 47

BERN CO ALB PARKS INCLUSIVE PLAYGROUND STB $60,000 Albuquerque 31/ 48

BERN CO ATRISCO VALLEY LITTLE LEAGUE FCLTY STB $65,000 31/ 2

BERN CO BARELAS AFFORDABLE HOUSING REHAB STB $203,000 Albuquerque 31/ 49

BERN CO CHILDREN'S SVCS TRAINING CTR EQUIP STB $125,000 Albuquerque 31/ 50

BERN CO HEAD START BUSES STB $170,000 31/ 3

VETO BERN CO LOS VECINOS LAND & SITE IMPROVE STB $60,000 31/ 4

BERN CO MOBILE FOOD UNITS STB $299,900 Albuquerque 31/ 51

VETO BERN CO NATIVE AMERICAN CENTER IMPROVE STB $25,000 31/ 5

BERN CO NORTH VALLEY LITTLE LEAGUE STB $770,000 31/ 6

BERN CO PAJARITO MESA PLAYGROUND & EQUIP STB $75,000 31/ 7

BERN CO PARADISE HILLS COMMUNITY CTR STB $75,000 31/ 8

BERN CO POLICE CRUISERS STB $50,000 31/ 9

VETO BERN CO PUBLIC ART STB $15,000 31/ 10

BERN CO RAPE CRISIS ASSISTANCE INFO TECH STB $7,500 Albuquerque 31/ 52

VETO BERN CO REC & ROLL MOBILE COMMUNITY CTR STB $20,000 Albuquerque 31/ 53

BERN CO RIO GRANDE POOL IMPROVE STB $100,000 31/ 11

BERN CO SHERIFF & POLICE ATHLETIC LEAGUE STB $14,000 Albuquerque 31/ 54

BERN CO SOUTH VALLEY QUIET RR CROSSINGS STB $150,000 36/ 4

BERN CO SOUTH VALLEY YOUTH CRISIS MULTIRM STB $141,500 Albuquerque 31/ 55

BERN CO TENNIS COMPLEX COURTS/WALLS STB $100,000 31/ 12

BERN CO TRANSITIONAL LIVING & RECOVERY CTR STB $757,715 Albuquerque 31/ 56

BERN CO WILDLIFE REFUGE LAND STB $1,114,500 31/ 13

CARLOS REY ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $15,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 41

CEDAR CREST MDWC & SWA WATER SYSTEM STB $151,000 23/ 1

CESAR CHAVEZ COMMUNITY SCHOOL INFO TECH STB $50,000 Albuquerque 18/ 5

CHAMIZA ELEM SCHL PLAYGROUND IMPROVE STB $99,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 42

CHAPARRAL ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $45,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 43

VETO CIBOLA HIGH SCHL WEIGHT ROOM RENOVATE STB $25,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 44

CIEN AGUAS INTERNATL SCHL FACILITY STB $110,000 Albuquerque 18/ 6

CLEVELAND MID SCHL SECURITY CAMERAS & IT STB $60,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 45

CNMCC FIBER OPTIC LOOP STB $1,000,000 Albuquerque 37/1

COCHITI ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $35,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 46

VETO COLLET PARK ELEM SCHL GYM EQUIP/IMPROVE STB $17,500 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 47

CORONADO ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $15,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 48

CYPRESS RD CONSTRUCT STB $197,000 36/ 5

DEL NORTE HIGH SCHL INFO TECH STB $70,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 49

DIGITAL ARTS & TECHNOLOGY ACADEMY BLDG STB $195,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 50

DOLORES GONZALES ELEM SCHL IMPROVE STB $132,500 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 51

DOUBLE EAGLE ELEM SCHL SEC CAMERAS & INFO STB $110,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 52

DOUGLAS MACARTHUR ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $50,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 53

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APPENDIX C

DURANES ELEM SCHL SECURITY CAMERAS & IT STB $55,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 54

VETO EAST CENTRAL AVE ARCHES - ALBUQUERQUE STB $75,000 Albuquerque 31/ 57

EAST MOUNTAIN HIGH SCHL BUS STB $90,000 18/ 1

EAST MOUNTAIN HIGH SCHL INFO TECH STB $50,000 18/ 2

EAST MOUNTAIN HIGH SCHL SECURITY SYSTEM STB $75,000 18/ 3

ECADEMY HIGH SCHL INFO TECH STB $5,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 55

EDMUND G. ROSS ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $45,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 56

EDWARD GONZALES ELEM SCHL FACILITIES STB $50,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 57

EMERSON ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $35,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 58

ERNIE PYLE ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $50,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 59

FOOTHILL DR IMPROVE STB $28,400 36/ 6

FOUR HILLS RD IMPROVE - ALB STB $50,000 Albuquerque 36/10

FREEDOM HIGH SCHL INFO TECH PURCHASE STB $5,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 60

GARFIELD MID SCHL INFO TECH STB $15,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 61

GILBERT L. SENA CHARTER HIGH SCHOOL IT STB $65,000 Albuquerque 18/ 7

GRIEGOS ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $50,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 62

GSD DOH STATE SCIENTIFIC LAB BUILDING REPAIRS STB $3,000,000 Albuquerque 9/ 1

GSD NMDA VETERINARY DIAGNOSIS SVCS TISSUE STB $2,800,000 Albuquerque 9/ 2

HARRISON MID SCHL BOOKS/FURNITURE/IT STB $35,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 63

HAWTHORNE ELEM SCHL INFO TECH PURCHASE STB $10,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 64

HAWTHORNE ELEM SCHL SECURITY CAMERAS & IT STB $108,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 65

HEALTH LEADERSHIP CHARTER HIGH SCHL STB $260,000 Albuquerque 18/ 8

HIGHLAND HIGH SCHL FURNISH/EQUIP STB $20,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 66

HIGHLAND HIGH SCHL INFO TECH STB $30,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 67

HODGIN ELEM SCHL SECURITY CAMERAS & IT STB $142,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 68

HOOVER MID SCHL FACILITIES/INFRA/INFO TECH STB $150,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 69

HUBERT H. HUMPHREY ELEM SCHL SEC CAMERAS/IT STB $35,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 70

INDIAN PUEBLO CULTURAL CTR LAND & BLDGS STB $587,500 Albuquerque 28/ 1

ISLETA PUEBLO SENIOR CENTER-MEALS EQUIP STB $11,700 Isleta Pueblo 5/ 2

JEFFERSON MID SCHL GROUNDS IMPROVE STB $60,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 71

JEFFERSON MIDDLE SCHL INFO TECH STB $30,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 72

JIMMY E. CARTER MID SCHL SITE IMPROVE STB $100,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 73

JOHN ADAMS MID SCHL BOOKS/FURNITURE/IT STB $25,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 74

JOHN ADAMS MID SCHL SECURITY CAMERAS & IT STB $24,500 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 75

JUVENILE DETENTION FCLTIES INFRA IMPROVE STB $2,000,000 Albuquerque 9/ 3

KENNEDY MID SCHL INFO TECH STB $50,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 76

KIRTLAND ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $30,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 77

KIT CARSON ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $30,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 78

LA CUEVA HIGH SCHL ARTS BLDG/LECTURE HALL STB $70,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 79

VETO LA CUEVA HIGH SCHL PHYSICAL ED EQUIP STB $30,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 80

LA CUEVA HIGH SCHL SECURITY CAMERAS & INFO STB $150,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 81

LA LUZ ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $50,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 82

LA MESA ELEM SCHL FURNISH & EQUIP STB $20,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 83

LA MESA ELEM SCHL INFO TECH/LIBRARY STB $10,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 84

LA MESA ELEM SCHL SECURITY CAMERAS & IT STB $50,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 85

LA PROMESA EARLY LEARN CTR BUS STB $80,000 Albuquerque 18/ 9

LA PROMESA EARLY LEARN CTR INFO TECH STB $105,000 Albuquerque 18/ 10

LA PROMESA EARLY LEARNING CTR FURNISH STB $82,000 Albuquerque 18/ 11

LA PROMESA EARLY LEARNING CTR PLAYGROUND STB $158,000 Albuquerque 18/ 12

LEW WALLACE ELEM SCHL INFO TECH & INTERCOM STB $65,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 86

LONGFELLOW ELEM SCHL SECURITY CAMERAS & IT STB $15,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 87

LOS PADILLAS COMMUNITY CTR EARLY CHILD CTR STB $26,667 31/ 14

LOS PADILLAS ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $35,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 88

LOS RANCHOS DE ATRISCO ACEQUIA IMPROVE STB $20,000 29/ 1

LOS RANCHOS ELEM INFO TECH STB $20,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 89

LOVEJOY LANE IMPROVE - BERN CO SOUTH VALLEY STB $47,500 36/ 7

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LOWELL ELEM SCHL SECURITY CAMERAS & IT STB $25,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 90

VETO LYNDON B. JOHNSON MID SCHL WEIGHT ROOM STB $80,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 91

MADISON MID SCHL INFO TECH STB $20,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 92

MANZANO MESA ELEM SCHL SITE & INFRA STB $30,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 93

MARK TWAIN ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $30,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 94

MARK TWAIN ELEM SCHL INFO TECH/BOOKS/FURN STB $50,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 95

MATHESON PARK ELEM SCHL FURNISH & EQUIP STB $20,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 96

MCCOLLUM ELEM SCHL INFO TECH PURCHASE STB $10,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 97

MCKINLEY MID SCHL SECURITY CAMERAS & IT STB $142,468 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 98

MEDIA ARTS COLLAB CHARTER SCHL FCLTIES/LAND STB $235,000 Albuquerque 18/ 13

MISSION AVENUE ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $50,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 99

MITCHELL ELEM SCHL SECURITY CAMERAS & IT STB $110,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/100

MONTE VISTA ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $30,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/101

VETO MONTE VISTA ELEM SCHL INFO TECH & MARQUEES STB $75,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/102

MONTESSORI ELEMENTARY SCHOOL INFO TECH STB $90,000 Albuquerque 18/ 14

MONTEZUMA ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $30,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/103

MONTEZUMA ELEM SCHL SECURITY CAMERAS & IT STB $40,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/104

NAVAJO ELEM SCHL SECURITY CAMS & INFO TECH STB $125,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/105

NEW FUTURES HIGH SCHOOL INFO TECH STB $5,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/106

NM STATE FAIR AFRICAN AMER PERF ARTS CTR STB $59,000 Albuquerque 24/1

NM STATE FAIR AFRICAN AMER PERF ARTS CTR STB $60,000 Albuquerque 24/2

VETO NUESTROS VALORES CHARTER SCHL FACILITY STB $25,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/107

NUESTROS VALORES CHARTER SCHL INFO TECH STB $90,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/108

OSUNA ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $60,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/109

PAINTED SKY ELEM SCHL SECURITY CAMERAS & IT STB $106,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/110

PASEO DEL NORTE FIRE STATION LEFT-TURN BAY STB $275,000 36/ 8

PETROGLYPH ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $60,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/111

REGINALD CHAVEZ ELEM SCHL SEC CAMERAS & IT STB $45,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/112

REGINALD CHAVEZ ELEM SCHL SITE IMPROVE STB $15,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/113

RIO GRANDE HIGH SCHL PERF ARTS BLDG EQUIP/IT STB $100,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/114

ROBERT F. KENNEDY CH SCHL AUTO BODY & PAINT STB $192,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/115

ROBERT F. KENNEDY CHARTER SCHL MEDIA CTR STB $95,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/116

ROUTE 66 VISITORS CTR ON EAST & WEST CENTRAL STB $70,000 Albuquerque 31/ 58

ROUTE 66 VISITORS CTR ON WEST CENTRAL AVE STB $247,105 31/ 15

RUDOLFO ANAYA ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $30,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/117

S.Y. JACKSON ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $25,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/118

SAN ANTONITO ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $36,500 Albuquerque PSD 18/119

SEVEN BAR ELEM SCHL SECURITY CAMERAS & IT STB $25,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/120

SFC STATE FAIR DEFERRED MAINT & INFRA STB $1,070,000 Albuquerque 24/3

SIERRA VISTA ELEM SCHL PRE-K PLAYGROUND STB $125,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/121

SIPI SECURITY CAMERAS & INFRA STB $160,342 Albuquerque 28/ 2

VETO SOUTH VALLEY MULTIPRPS FCLTY REHAB STB $10,000 10

SW AERONAUTICS, MATH & SCI ACAD SOCCER STB $170,000 Albuquerque 18/ 15

SW AERONAUTICS, MATH, SCI ACAD FLIGHT STB $45,000 Albuquerque 18/ 16

SW AERONAUTICS, MATH, SCI ACAD SMART LABS STB $35,000 Albuquerque 18/ 17

SW INTERMEDIATE LEARNING CTR INFO TECH STB $70,000 Albuquerque 18/ 18

SW PRIMARY LEARNING CTR PORTABLE CLASSRM STB $35,000 Albuquerque 18/ 19

SW SECONDARY LEARNING CTR SMART LAB STB $100,000 Albuquerque 18/ 20

TAFT MID SCHL SECURITY CAMERAS & INFO TECH STB $60,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/122

TIERRA ADENTRO CHARTER SCHL FURNISH & EQUIP STB $50,000 Albuquerque 18/ 21

TIJERAS WATER SYSTEM IMPROVE STB $390,000 Tijeras 23/ 2

TIWA BUILDING LIABILITY/SAFETY/CODE STB $1,500,000 Albuquerque 9/ 4

VETO TO'HAJIILEE CHP EMERGENCY MED SVCS BLDG STB $50,000 To'hajiilee Chapter 28/ 3

TOMASITA ELEM SCHL IT & SECURITY CAMERAS STB $112,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/123

TRAMWAY MULTI-USE TRAIL IMPROVE - ALB STB $60,000 Albuquerque 36/11

UNM BASEBALL STADIUM LIGHTING STB $100,000 Albuquerque 44/ 1

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UNM CASTETTER HALL CONSTRUCT STB $850,000 Albuquerque 44/ 2

UNM COMMUTER BUSES STB $160,000 Albuquerque 44/ 3

UNM FARRIS ENGINEERING CENTER DESIGN STB $801,500 Albuquerque 44/ 4

VETO UNM GOLF COURSE PRACTICE FCLTY STB $75,000 Albuquerque 44/ 5

UNM HOSPITAL YOUNG CHILDRENS HEALTH CTR STB $30,000 Albuquerque 44/ 6

VETO UNM JULIAN SAMORA INFO TECH STB $50,000 Albuquerque 44/ 7

UNM MFG ENGINEERING PROGRAM CLEANROOM STB $80,000 Albuquerque 44/ 8

UNM NORTHRUP HALL ASTROGEOLOGY LAB STB $50,000 Albuquerque 44/ 9

UNM SAFETY LIGHTING STB $125,000 Albuquerque 44/10

UNM SCIENCE & MATH LEARNING CENTER PHASE 2 STB $5,000,000 Albuquerque 44/11

UNM STADIUM SCOREBOARD/VIDEO BOARD/FLOOR STB $1,668,734 Albuquerque 44/12

UNSER BLVD/98TH ST/ATRISCO VISTA OFF-RAMPS STB $950,000 Albuquerque 36/12

VALLE VISTA ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $83,400 Albuquerque PSD 18/124

VETO VALLEY HIGH SCHL EQUIP STB $25,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/125

VETO VALLEY HIGH SCHL FOOTBALL EQUIPMENT STB $30,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/126

VALLEY HIGH SCHL REFURBISH/IMPROVE STB $25,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/127

VALLEY HIGH SCHL SPECTATOR ROOF & SEATING STB $25,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/128

VETO VALLEY HIGH SCHL SPORTS PROGRAMS EQUIP STB $30,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/129

VAN BUREN MID SCHL INFO TECH/LIBRARY STB $60,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/130

VOLCANO VISTA HIGH SCHL AWNINGS STB $200,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/ 27

WASHINGTON MID SCHL INFO TECH STB $45,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/131

WEST MESA HIGH SCHL FCLTIES/SITE IMPROVE STB $100,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/132

WEST MESA HIGH SCHOOL INFO TECH PURCHASE STB $50,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/133

WHERRY ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $55,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/134

WHITTIER ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $30,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/135

WILSON MIDDLE SCHL INFO TECH PURCHASE STB $95,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/136

ZIA ELEM SCHL SECURITY CAMERAS & INFO TECH STB $50,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/137

ZIA ELEM SCHL SHADE STRUCTURE STB $50,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/138

ZUNI ELEM SCHL INFO TECH STB $160,000 Albuquerque PSD 18/139

ZUNI RD PEDESTRIAN SAFETY CROSSING - ALB STB $15,000 Albuquerque 36/13

ZUNI ROAD IMPROVE - ALB STB $430,000 Albuquerque 36/14

Total Bernalillo County $47,068,355

Catron County

CATRON CO GIS/911 BLDG IMPROVE STB $25,000 31/ 59

CATRON CO LAW ENFORCEMENT VEHICLES STB $80,000 31/ 60

RESERVE & GLENWOOD SENIOR CENTERS-MEALS STB $3,850 5/ 3

RESERVE MULTIPURPOSE FACILITY FLOORING STB $79,500 Reserve 31/ 61

RESERVE SENIOR CENTER-IMPROVE CODE STB $60,000 Reserve 5/ 4

Total Catron County $248,350

Chaves County

CHAVES CO EAST GRAND PLAINS FIRE DEPT STB $100,000 31/ 62

CHAVES CO MIDWAY FIRE DEPT TANKER TRUCK STB $150,000 31/ 63

DEXTER SIDEWALKS IMPROVE ADA STB $180,000 Dexter 36/16

DEXTER SPORTS COMPLEX LIGHTING & BLEACHERS STB $215,000 Dexter 31/ 64

DEXTER WATER SYSTEM IMPROVE STB $100,000 Dexter 23/ 3

EAST GRAND PLAINS ELEM SCHL PLAYGROUND STB $100,000 Roswell ISD 18/140

ENMU-ROSWELL INFRASTRUCTURE STB $91,000 Roswell 38/1

ENMU-ROSWELL SPECIAL SERVICES KITCHEN STB $100,000 Roswell 38/2

ENMU-ROSWELL WELDING & AUTO MECHANICS STB $100,000 Roswell 38/3

HAGERMAN MUNICIPAL BUILDING RENOVATE STB $193,000 Hagerman 31/ 65

VETO LAKE ARTHUR TRACTOR PURCHASE STB $35,000 Lake Arthur 31/ 66

NMMI BOILERS & CHILLERS REPLACE STB $1,000,000 Roswell 40

VETO ROSWELL BRONZE STATUE NANCY LOPEZ STB $150,000 Roswell 31/ 67

ROSWELL FIRE STATION 1 RENOVATE STB $450,000 Roswell 31/ 68

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ROSWELL FISK BUILDING RESTROOM FACILITY STB $150,000 Roswell 31/ 69

ROSWELL INTERNATL AIR CENTER SEWER LINE STB $112,000 Roswell 23/ 4

ROSWELL PLAYGROUND EQUIPMENT IMPROVE STB $30,000 Roswell 31/ 70

ROSWELL STREETS IMPROVE STB $325,000 Roswell 36/17

Total Chaves County $3,581,000

Cibola County

13TH JUD DIST COURT REN/RELOCATE/FURNISH/EQ STB $300,000 Grants 31/ 71

2ND ST INFRASTRUCTURE IMPROVE - GRANTS STB $259,000 Grants 36/18

VETO ACOMA PUEBLO PARK CONSTRUCT STB $95,000 Acoma Pueblo 28/ 4

ACOMA PUEBLO SENIOR CENTER IMPROVE STB $150,000 Acoma Pueblo 5/ 5

ACOMA PUEBLO VAN STB $61,000 Acoma Pueblo 28/ 5

CEBOLLETA LAND GRANT WWATER SYSTEM STB $205,000 Cebolleta Land Grant 23/ 5

LAGUNA PUEBLO FIRE & RESCUE AMBULANCE STB $120,000 Laguna Pueblo 28/ 6

LAGUNA PUEBLO FIRE & RESCUE SUBSTATION STB $114,000 Laguna Pueblo 28/ 7

NMSU-GRANTS CHILD DEV ED CTR PLAN & DESIGN STB $50,000 Grants 42/ 1

NMSU-GRANTS INFRA IMPROVE STB $500,000 Grants 42/ 2

RAMAH CHP MOUNTAIN VIEW WATERLINE EXTEND STB $50,000 Ramah Chapter 23/ 6

URANIUM AVE CONSTRUCT MILAN PHASE 4 STB $328,000 Milan 36/19

Total Cibola County $2,232,000

Colfax County

CIMARRON PRIMARY CARE & AMBULANCE FCLTY STB $70,000 Cimarron 31/ 72

CIMARRON WATER & WASTEWATER SYSTEM STB $50,000 Cimarron 23/ 7

VETO COLFAX CO WELL FOR MAXWELL STB $75,000 Maxwell 23/ 9

EAGLE NEST WATER SYSTEM IMPROVE STB $65,000 Eagle Nest 23/ 8

LCC-SPRINGER RENOVATE STB $300,000 Springer 37/2

MCMC OUTPATIENT CLINIC-MTF MTF $3,200,000 49

SEO SPRINGER DAMS CONSTRUCT & REHAB STB $2,700,000 Springer 21/ 2

SPRINGER WATER TREATMENT PLANT MODIFY STB $75,000 Springer 23/10

Total Colfax County $6,535,000

Curry County

ALICE CONVERSE CURRY CO-IMPROVE CODE STB $16,300 5/ 6

BAXTER-CURREN SENIOR CENTER-IMPROVE CODE STB $55,000 5/ 7

CLOVIS BUSINESS ENTERPRISE CENTER IMPROVE STB $100,000 Clovis 31/ 73

CLOVIS FOOD BANK ROOF STB $50,000 Clovis 31/ 74

CLOVIS MUNICIPAL AIRPORT WATER SYSTEM STB $300,000 Clovis 23/11

CLOVIS POTTER PARK MARTIN LUTHER KING MEM STB $40,000 Clovis 31/ 75

CURRY CO RD L/CR 14/CR 13 IMPROVE STB $350,000 36/20

CURRY CO ROADS IMPROVE STB $182,500 36/21

MELROSE PSD VOCATIONAL EQUIPMENT STB $15,000 Melrose PSD 18/141

MELROSE SENIOR CENTER-MEALS EQUIP STB $11,700 Melrose 5/ 8

MELROSE WATER SYSTEM IMPROVE STB $100,000 Melrose 23/12

WILHITE RD WIDENING PLAN & DESIGN STB $250,000 Clovis 36/22

Total Curry County $1,470,500

De Baca County

DE BACA CO COLLECTION CENTER BUILDING & EQ STB $175,000 23/13

FORT SUMNER SENIOR CENTER STB $75,000 Fort Sumner 5/ 9

Total De Baca County $250,000

Dona Ana County

VETO 3RD JUD DIST ATTORNEY INFO TECH UPGRADE STB $60,000 16

3RD JUD DIST COURT HVAC & LIGHTING STB $943,000 Las Cruces 31/ 88

AIRPORT ROAD IMPROVE - SANTA TERESA STB $7,000 Santa Teresa 36/33

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ANTHONY DRIVE PEDESTRIAN WALKWAY & STB $50,000 Anthony 31/ 81

ANTHONY MUNICIPAL BLDG STB $425,000 Anthony 31/ 82

ANTHONY STREETS IMPROVE STB $210,000 Anthony 36/28

ANTHONY WSD FARMERS MARKET FACILITY STB $229,000 31/ 76

BAYLOR CANYON RD IMPROVE STB $250,000 36/23

CABALLO SWCD GARFIELD WATERSHED STRUCT STB $175,000 42/ 3

CAMINO REAL REG UTIL AUTH WATER & WASTEW STB $600,000 23/14

CHAPARRAL ANTHONY BALLPARK LIGHTING STB $10,000 Chaparral 31/ 83

CHAPARRAL BETTY MCKNIGHT COMM CTR GAS STB $40,000 Chaparral 31/ 84

CHAPARRAL DELORES WRIGHT PARK IMPROVE STB $50,000 Chaparral 31/ 85

CORONA RD IMPROVE - EAST MESA DONA ANA CO STB $299,000 36/24

DESERT AIRE DRIVE IMPROVE - CHAPARRAL STB $100,000 Chaparral 36/29

DESERT AIRE MDW & SWA WASTEWATER SYSTEM STB $51,000 23/15

DESERT AIRE MDW & SWA WATER SYSTEM STB $50,000 23/16

DONA ANA BALLPARK LIGHTING IMPROVE STB $90,000 Dona Ana 31/ 86

DONA ANA CO BUTTERFIELD PARK BALLPARK STB $60,000 31/ 77

DONA ANA CO DEL CERRO PARK IMPROVE STB $50,000 31/ 78

DONA ANA CO LA MESA BALLPARK IMPROVE STB $40,000 La Mesa 31/ 87

DONA ANA CO PLACITAS CMTY CENTER KITCHEN STB $35,000 Placitas 31/ 98

DONA ANA CO SALEM-GARFIELD CMTY PARK STB $100,000 Salem 31/100

DONA ANA CO SOUTHERN NM FAIR & RODEO FCLTY STB $67,500 31/ 79

DRIPPING SPRINGS RD & SOLEDAD CANYON RD STB $170,000 36/25

KIT CARSON RD IMPROVE - DONA ANA CO STB $339,000 36/26

LAS CRUCES CHILD CRISIS CLINIC RENOVATE & EQ STB $140,000 Las Cruces 31/ 89

VETO LAS CRUCES CIVIC PLAZA CONSTRUCT STB $250,000 Las Cruces 31/ 90

LAS CRUCES HADLEY AVE RECREATION AREA BALL STB $60,000 Las Cruces 31/ 91

LAS CRUCES KLEIN PARK IMPROVE STB $75,000 Las Cruces 31/ 92

LAS CRUCES MESQUITE HISTORIC DIST LIGHTING STB $50,000 Las Cruces 31/ 93

LAS CRUCES PSD FIELD OF DREAMS TURF STB $310,000 Las Cruces PSD 18/142

LAS CRUCES SEWER SYSTEMS CONSTRUCT STB $321,000 Las Cruces 23/18

VETO LAS CRUCES STREETS IMPROVE STB $20,000 Las Cruces 36/31

LAS CRUCES TRANSIT SYSTEM IMPROVE STB $80,000 Las Cruces 36/32

LAS CRUCES VIETNAM WAR MEMORIAL STB $25,000 Las Cruces 31/ 94

LOWER RIO GRANDE PWWA INFO TECH STB $175,000 23/17

MESILLA PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING IMPROVE STB $452,000 Mesilla 31/ 96

MESILLA VALLEY ANIMAL SERVICE VAN DONA ANA STB $215,000 Las Cruces 31/ 95

MESILLA VALLEY REGIONAL DISPATCH AUTHORITY STB $2,250,000 31/ 80

MESQUITE COMMUNITY CTR RENOVATE DONA ANA STB $125,000 Mesquite 31/ 97

NMSU ATHLETIC FACILITIES IMPROVE STB $160,000 Las Cruces 42/ 4

NMSU DONA ANA CMTY COLLEGE INFO TECH INFRA STB $50,000 Las Cruces 42/ 5

NMSU SPEECH & HEARING CLINIC & INFO TECH STB $50,000 Las Cruces 42/ 6

OLD SEQUOIA RD IMPROVE - CHAPARRAL STB $326,000 Chaparral 36/30

RADIUM SPRINGS RECREATION AREA SHADE STB $60,000 Radium Springs 31/ 99

SANTA TERESA PORT OF ENTRY COMMERCIAL LANE STB $350,000 Santa Teresa 8

SANTA TERESA WATER & WASTEWATER IMPROVE STB $3,200,000 Santa Teresa 23/19

SOUTH CENTRAL REG TRANSIT DIST RAIL STUDY STB $55,000 36/27

VETO SUNLAND PARK ANIMAL SHELTER & EQUIP STB $15,000 Sunland Park 31/101

SUNLAND PARK LIFT & UTILITY TRUCKS PURCHASE STB $110,000 Sunland Park 31/102

SUNLAND PARK STREETS & STORM DRAINAGE STB $300,000 Sunland Park 36/34

TORTUGAS ROADS & DRAINAGE IMPROVE STB $250,000 Tortugas 36/35

Total Dona Ana County $13,974,500

Eddy County

ARTESIA GENERAL HOSPITAL ANESTHESIA UPGRD STB $25,000 Artesia 31/104

ARTESIA GENERAL HOSPITAL SECONDARY POWER STB $200,000 Artesia 31/105

ARTESIA GUADALUPE PARK IMPROVE STB $50,000 Artesia 31/106

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ARTESIA HIGH SCHL AUDITORIUM SEATS STB $228,000 Artesia PSD 18/143

ARTESIA HIGH SCHL SEWER LINES REPLACE STB $61,000 Artesia PSD 18/144

ARTESIA INDUSTRIAL PARK WATER TOWER STB $325,000 Artesia 23/20

ARTESIA PSD INFO TECH UPGRADE STB $75,000 Artesia PSD 18/145

ARTESIA YOUTH OUTREACH CENTER IMPROVE STB $55,000 Artesia 31/107

CARLSBAD HALAGUENO ARTS PARK IMPROVE STB $80,000 Carlsbad 31/108

CARLSBAD HIGH SCHL GYM BLEACHERS STB $25,000 Carlsbad MSD 18/146

CARLSBAD HIGH SCHL GYM FLOOR PURCHASE STB $190,000 Carlsbad MSD 18/147

CARLSBAD HIGH SCHL STADIUM SEATING STB $50,000 Carlsbad MSD 18/148

CARLSBAD MSD EARLY CHILDHOOD ED CTR STB $123,000 Carlsbad MSD 18/149

CARLSBAD NOAH'S ARK ANIMAL SHELTER STB $100,000 Carlsbad 31/109

CARLSBAD SUNSET GARDENS CEMETERY STB $25,000 Carlsbad 31/110

EDDY CO NORTH SHOOTING RANGE STB $50,000 31/103

EDDY CO SHERIFF PECOS VLY DRUG TASK FORCE STB $175,000 Carlsbad 31/111

HOPE TRUCK PURCHASE STB $40,000 Hope 31/113

JOE STANLEY SMITH ELEM SCHL IT/SMART BDS STB $60,000 Carlsbad MSD 18/150

LAKE CARLSBAD TENNIS COURTS RESTROOM FCLTY STB $100,000 Carlsbad 31/112

LOVING REFUSE TRUCK STB $150,000 Loving 23/21

NMSU-CARLSBAD CHILD DEVELOPMENT ED CTR STB $195,000 Carlsbad 42/ 7

NMSU-CARLSBAD COURTYARD/ELEVATOR INFRA STB $200,000 Carlsbad 42/ 8

NORTH CANAL ST IMPROVE - CARLSBAD STB $270,000 Carlsbad 36/36

PATE ELEM SCHL INFO TECH/SMART BOARDS STB $50,000 Carlsbad MSD 18/151

Total Eddy County $2,902,000

Grant County

BAYARD CEMETERY CONSTRUCT STB $200,000 Bayard 31/114

CARRASCO AVE & DIAZ AVE LIGHTING IMPROVE STB $182,000 Hurley 36/37

GRANT CO SHERIFF'S DEPT IMPROVE STB $300,000 Silver City 31/115

GSD FT BAYARD MED CTR DECOMM/DEMOLISH STB $4,300,000 9/ 5

SILVER CITY SCOTT PARK FIELDS IMPROVE STB $100,000 Silver City 31/116

SILVER CITY SCOTT PARK FIELDS LIGHTING STB $175,000 Silver City 31/117

WNMU FLEMING HALL IMPROVE STB $169,500 Silver City 45/1

WNMU INFO TECH STB $200,000 Silver City 45/2

WNMU LIGHT HALL RENOVATE/LAND/BLDG/INFRA STB $2,500,000 Silver City 45/3

Total Grant County $8,126,500

Guadalupe County

ACEQUIAS ANTON CHICO/LA LOMA/TECOLOTITO STB $30,000 29/ 2

COLONIAS COMMUNITY DITCH DAM STB $60,000 29/ 3

VETO EAST PUERTO DE LUNA DITCH IMPROVE STB $36,500 29/ 4

HOLLYWOOD RANCH DWUA EQUIPMENT STORAGE STB $25,000 Santa Rosa 23/23

PASTURA MDWCA WATER SYSTEM IMPROVE STB $35,000 Pastura 23/22

PUERTO DE LUNA SR CTR GUADALUPE CO-MEALS STB $5,900 5/10

SANTA ROSA AMBULANCE STB $40,000 Santa Rosa 31/118

VETO SANTA ROSA ANIMAL SHELTER CONSTRUCT STB $10,000 Santa Rosa 31/119

SANTA ROSA BLUE HOLE PARKING STB $85,000 Santa Rosa 31/120

SANTA ROSA FISH PRODUCTION FACILITY STB $150,000 Santa Rosa 25

WEST PUERTO DE LUNA ACEQUIA IMPROVE & LOAN STB $30,000 29/ 5

Total Guadalupe County $507,400

Harding County

NM HWY 39 IMPROVE STB $256,000 36/38

Total Harding County $256,000

Hidalgo County

ENA MITCHELL SENIOR CENTER-MEALS EQUIP STB $2,000 5/11

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HIDALGO CO RD 001 CONSTRUCT STB $364,000 36/39

LORDSBURG HOSPITAL SITE ASBESTOS ABATEMENT STB $100,000 Lordsburg 23/24

Total Hidalgo County $466,000

Lea County

EUNICE MAIN STREET BEAUTIFICATION STB $100,000 Eunice 31/121

EUNICE STREETS IMPROVE STB $210,000 Eunice 36/40

HOBBS PIPELINE FOR RECLAIMED EFFLUENT STB $360,000 Hobbs 23/25

HOBBS UTILITY EXTEND FOR BASEBALL COMPLEX STB $200,000 Hobbs 23/26

JAL POLICE COMPLEX IMPROVE STB $215,000 Jal 31/123

JAL SENIOR CENTER-IMPROVE CODE STB $55,000 Jal 5/12

LEA CO JUDICIAL COMPLEX STB $500,000 Lovington 31/124

LEA CO REGIONAL AIRPORT FIRE STATION STB $110,000 Hobbs 31/122

LOVINGTON WATER METERS & EQUIP STB $350,000 Lovington 23/27

NMJC INFRA IMPROVE STB $1,000,000 Hobbs 37/3

NOR-LEA HOSP DIST LOVINGTON MEDICAL CLINIC STB $375,000 Lovington 31/125

Total Lea County $3,475,000

Lincoln County

ALTO LAKES WSD WATER SYSTEM IMPROVE STB $30,000 23/28

BONITO LAKE WATERSHED RESTORE/IMPROVE STB $74,000 31/126

BONITO RD IMPROVE - LINCOLN CO STB $25,000 36/41

CAPITAN COMMUNITY CENTER STB $50,000 Capitan 31/127

CAPITAN TRUCKS STB $60,000 Capitan 31/128

CAPITAN WATER TANKS IMPROVE STB $100,000 Capitan 23/30

CARRIZOZO DUMP TRUCK STB $30,000 Carrizozo 31/129

CARRIZOZO SENIOR CENTER CONSTRUCT STB $245,000 Carrizozo 5/14

CARRIZOZO WELL HOUSES STB $185,000 Carrizozo 23/31

CORONA PSD ACTIVITY BUS STB $25,000 Corona PSD 18/152

CORONA WATER LINES & EASEMENTS STB $55,000 Corona 23/32

CORONA WATER STORAGE TANKS IMPROVE STB $25,000 Corona 23/33

LINCOLN CO COUNTYWIDE SENIOR CTRS-MEALS EQ STB $49,400 5/13

LINCOLN CO DISTRICT COURT/SHERIFF COMPLEX STB $100,000 Carrizozo 31/130

LINCOLN CO GREENTREE SWA PNEUMATIC TIRE STB $45,000 23/29

NOGAL MDWCA WATER SYSTEM IMPROVE PHASE 2 STB $25,000 Nogal 23/34

RUIDOSO DOWNS AGUA FRIA SEWER EXTENSION STB $140,000 Ruidoso Downs 23/36

RUIDOSO SEWER REPLACEMENT PHASE 2 STB $180,000 Ruidoso 23/35

UPPER RIO HONDO BASIN HYDROLOGIC STUDY STB $20,000 21/ 3

Total Lincoln County $1,463,400

Los Alamos County

CHAMISA ELEM SCHL STORM DRAINAGE STB $45,000 Los Alamos PSD 18/153

LOS ALAMOS CO RADIO SYSTEM DESIGN PHASE 1 STB $25,000 31/131

VETO LOS ALAMOS MATH/SCI ARTWALK STB $50,000 Los Alamos 31/132

LOS ALAMOS MID SCHL LOCKER ROOM ROOF STB $160,000 Los Alamos PSD 18/154

LOS ALAMOS MID SCHL LOCKER ROOM WALLS STB $50,000 Los Alamos PSD 18/155

Total Los Alamos County $330,000

Luna County

BUTTERFIELD TRAIL REGIONAL LANDFILL STB $450,000 Deming 23/37

DEMING-LUNA SENIOR CENTER-MEALS EQUIP STB $25,100 Deming 5/15

LUNA CO REGIONAL LAW ENFORCEMENT COMPLEX STB $550,000 Deming 31/133

Total Luna County $1,025,100

McKinley County

ALLISON ROAD BRIDGE-GALLUP STB $100,000 Gallup 36/44

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BAAHAALI CHP POWERLINE EXTEND STB $150,000 Baahaali Chapter 28/ 8

BACA PREWITT CHP POWERLINE EXTEND STB $125,000 Baca Chapter 28/ 9

VETO CHICHILTAH CHP CHAPTER HOUSE CONSTRUCT STB $100,000 Chichiltah Chapter 28/10

CHURCH ROCK CHP SENIOR CTR STB $193,500 Church Rock Chapter 5/16

DEERSPRINGS RD IMPROVE STB $100,000 Mexican Springs Chapter 36/48

FORD CANYON SENIOR CENTER MCKINLEY CO STB $78,500 Gallup 5/17

VETO GALLUP ANIMAL SHELTER RENOVATE STB $20,000 Gallup 31/134

GALLUP CITYWIDE SENIOR CENTERS-MEALS EQUIP STB $42,600 Gallup 5/18

GALLUP PEDESTRIAN SAFETY IMPROVE STB $175,000 Gallup 36/45

GALLUP VETERANS MEMORIAL PILLARS STB $14,000 Gallup 31/135

GALLUP-MCKINLEY CO PSD MAINT FCLTY ASSESS STB $50,000 Gallup 23/39

GAMERCO WSD WATER SYSTEM IMPROVE STB $100,000 23/38

HOSPITAL DR & COLLEGE DR RECONSTRUCT STB $175,000 Gallup 36/46

HUNTER POINT ROAD IMPROVE-TSA-YA-TOH CHP STB $50,000 Tsa-Ya-Toh Chapter 36/51

IYANBITO CHP HOUSE & PARKING LOT STB $150,000 Iyanbito Chapter 28/11

JOHNSON ROAD IMPROVE-TWIN LAKES CHP STB $100,000 Twin Lakes Chapter 36/53

MANUELITO CHP SENIOR CENTER CONSTRUCT STB $50,000 Manuelito Chapter 5/19

MANUELITO CHP SENIOR CENTER RENOVATE STB $75,000 Manuelito Chapter 5/20

MARIANO LAKE BATHROOM ADDITIONS STB $45,000 Mariano Lake Chapter 28/12

MARIANO LAKE BATHROOM FIXTURES/PLUMBING STB $50,000 Mariano Lake Chapter 28/13

MCKINLEY CO DISABILITY SERVICES VEHICLES STB $50,000 Gallup 31/136

MCKINLEY CO GALLUP INTERTRIBAL OFFICE STB $50,000 Gallup 31/137

MCKINLEY CO RD 19 IMPROVE STB $50,000 36/42

MCKINLEY CO RD 43/SUPERMAN CANYON RD STB $200,000 36/43

VETO MEXICAN SPRINGS CHP MULTIPURPOSE CTR STB $50,000 Mexican Springs Chapter 28/14

NAVAJO NATION LONG-TERM CARE FACILITY STB $170,000 Navajo 5/21

NAVAJO RT 7054 IMPROVE - PINEDALE CHP STB $75,000 Pinedale Chapter 36/49

RED LAKE CHP ROADS IMPROVE STB $20,000 Red Lake Chapter 36/50

VETO RED ROCK CHP SEWER LAGOON STB $50,000 Red Rock Chapter 23/40

VETO ROCK SPRINGS CHP MLTPRPS BLDG ROOF & REPAIR STB $70,000 Rock Springs Chapter 28/15

SKY CITY ROAD - MANUELITO CHP STB $25,000 Manuelito Chapter 36/47

THOREAU CMTY CTR KITCHEN RENOVATE STB $15,000 Thoreau 31/138

TOHATCHI CHP RED WILLOW FARMLAND PUMP SYS STB $600,000 Tohatchi Chapter 23/41

TSA-YA-TOH CHP ADMIN COMPLEX ROAD IMPROVE STB $50,000 Tsa-Ya-Toh Chapter 36/52

TSE'II'AHI CHP HEAD START BUILDING CONSTRUCT STB $125,000 Tse'ii'ahi Chapter 28/16

YA-TA-HEY WSD WATER SYSTEM IMPROVE STB $50,000 Ya-tah-hey 23/42

ZUNI PUEBLO SENIOR CENTER-MEALS EQUIP STB $38,600 Zuni Pueblo 5/22

ZUNI PUEBLO VETERANS MEMORIAL PARK PHASE 1 STB $250,000 Zuni Pueblo 28/17

Total McKinley County $3,882,200

Mora County

MORA CO COMPLEX-CONTINGENCY STB $1,854,000 31/139

MORA SENIOR CENTER-MEALS EQUIP STB $16,310 Mora 5/23

MORPHY LAKE DAM REHABILITATION PROJECT STB $100,000 21/ 4

WAGON MOUND SENIOR CENTER CONSTRUCT STB $175,000 Wagon Mound 5/24

Total Mora County $2,145,310

Multiple Counties

ACEQUIA DE SANTA CRUZ IMPROVE STB $50,000 29/ 6

CNM & WNM CORRECTIONAL FACILITIES UPGRADE STB $4,800,000 9/ 6

CORRECTIONAL FACILITIES SECURITY UPGRADES STB $2,500,000 9/ 7

DOH FACILITIES PATIENT HEALTH & SAFETY STB $4,000,000 9/ 8

DOH FACILITIES UPGRADES NMBHI/NMSVH/SEQUOY STB $1,500,000 9/ 9

ISLETA PUEBLO ASSISTED LIVING & SENIOR CTR STB $240,000 Isleta Pueblo 5/25

ISLETA PUEBLO VETERANS CENTER CONSTRUCT STB $188,000 Isleta Pueblo 28/18

NMSU HARDMAN/JACOB HALLS & CORONA STB $3,500,000 42/ 9

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PASEO DEL VOLCAN CONSTRUCT RIO RANCHO STB $510,000 Rio Rancho 36/54

RAMAH NAVAJO SB GRADER & LOADER PURCHASE STB $185,000 31/140

ROCK SPRINGS CHP VETERANS FCLTY STB $50,000 Rock Springs Chapter 28/19

SANDIA PUEBLO SCHOOL BUSES STB $100,000 Sandia Pueblo 28/20

SEO INDIAN WATER RIGHTS SETTLEMENTS STB $10,000,000 22

SPACEPORT SOUTHERN ACCESS ROAD STB $3,000,000 33

WHITE ROCK CHP HOUSE RENOVATE STB $50,000 White Rock Chapter 28/21

Total Multiple Counties $30,673,000

Otero County

ALAMOGORDO RECLAIMED WATER & EFFLUENT STB $243,000 Alamogordo 23/43

ALAMOGORDO SENIOR CENTER-IMPROVE CODE STB $103,600 Alamogordo 5/26

CLOUDCROFT WASTEWATER TREATMENT FCLTY STB $225,000 Cloudcroft 23/44

MESCALERO APACHE HOUSING DEVELOPMENT STB $200,000 Mescalero 28/22

MUSEUM OF SPACE HISTORY THEATER RENOVATE STB $500,000 Alamogordo 11/1

NMBVI HEALTH SERVICES & JACK HALL PSCOF $838,000 Alamogordo 54/1

NMBVI SITE IMPROVE & CRITICAL INFRA PSCOF $2,900,000 Alamogordo 54/2

NMBVI WATKINS ED CTR RENOVATION PSCOF $5,500,000 Alamogordo 54/3

NMSU-ALAMOGORDO ADVANCED TECH ED CTR STB $111,000 Alamogordo 42/10

NMSU-ALAMOGORDO INFO TECH INFRA STB $131,790 Alamogordo 42/11

OTERO CO MAYHILL COMMUNITY CENTER STB $62,850 Mayhill 31/142

OTERO CO TULAROSA BASIN HISTORY MUSEUM STB $525,000 Alamogordo 31/141

TIMBERON WSD CONTROL & DATA ACQUISITION STB $72,800 Timberon 23/45

TIMBERON WSD MAINTENANCE BARN ELEC SYS STB $42,560 Timberon 23/46

TULAROSA ANIMAL SHELTER METAL BLDG STB $200,000 Tularosa 31/143

TULAROSA EQUIPMENT STB $50,000 Tularosa 31/144

TULAROSA SENIOR CENTER & SITE IMPROVE STB $175,000 Tularosa 5/27

Total Otero County $11,880,600

Quay County

ARCH HURLEY CONSERVANCY DISTRICT EQUIP STB $190,000 Tucumcari 31/145

LOGAN MSD VOCATIONAL/CAREER PGM EQUIP & IT STB $17,000 Logan MSD 18/156

QUAY CO COUNTYWIDE SENIOR CTRS-MEALS EQ STB $45,300 5/28

QUAY CO DETENTION CENTER A/C UNITS STB $50,000 Tucumcari 31/146

QUAY CO TRIGG HOSPITAL WINDOWS STB $100,000 Tucumcari 31/147

SAN JON WASTEWATER SYSTEM STB $100,000 San Jon 23/47

TUCUMCARI SENIOR CENTER-IMPROVE CODE STB $25,000 Tucumcari 5/29

TUCUMCARI WATER & SEWER LINES EAST RTE 66 STB $100,000 Tucumcari 23/48

Total Quay County $627,300

Rio Arriba County

ACEQUIA DE LA PLAZA DE DIXON IMPROVE STB $80,000 Dixon 29/12

ACEQUIA DE LOS BARRIALES IMPROVE STB $45,000 29/ 7

ACEQUIA DEL LLANO DE SANTA CRUZ IMPROVE STB $41,850 29/ 8

ACEQUIA DEL LLANO IMPROVE - DIXON STB $72,000 Dixon 29/13

ACEQUIA DEL MOLINO IMPROVE STB $50,000 29/ 9

ACEQUIA DEL RINCON RIO ARRIBA CO IMPROVE STB $12,000 Embudo 29/14

ACEQUIA MESA DEL MEDIO IMPROVE STB $20,000 Coyote 29/11

ACEQUIAS NORTENAS/RIO DE CHAMA WATER RTS STB $100,000 29/10

ANCONES MDW & WWCA WATER SUPPLY WELL STB $75,000 La Madera 23/52

CANJILON MDWC & MSWA WATER SYSTEM STB $35,000 Canjilon 23/50

CECILIA DITCH REHABILITATION GALLINA STB $30,400 Gallina 29/15

CHAMA SENIOR CENTER-IMPROVE CODE STB $78,000 Chama 5/31

CHAMITA MDWC&SWA WATER SUPP WELL STB $100,000 Chamita 23/51

CTSRRC TRACK & BOILER REHAB & CAR UPGRADES STB $850,000 12

DPS ESPANOLA STATE POLICE DISTRICT OFFICE STB $3,500,000 Espanola 9/10

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EAST RIO ARRIBA SWCD WEED SPRAYING EQUIP STB $50,000 East Rio Arriba SWCD 42/12

ESPANOLA COURT/JAIL REMODEL FOR CITY HALL STB $300,000 Espanola 31/152

ESPANOLA LA JOYA FIRE STATION RENOVATE STB $100,000 Espanola 31/153

ESPANOLA VETERANS' MEMORIAL WALL STB $100,000 Espanola 31/154

GALLINA COMMUNITY DITCH & LOAN PAYOFF STB $15,000 Gallina 29/16

JICARILLA APACHE EMS CARDIAC DEFIBRILLATORS STB $87,000 Dulce 28/24

JICARILLA APACHE EMS VENTILATORS PURCHASE STB $10,000 28/23

LA MADERA MDWCA WATER SYSTEM IMPROVE STB $50,150 23/49

MAPLE & PINE AVE IMPROVE - CHAMA STB $100,000 Chama 36/55

MCCURDY CHARTER SCHOOL BUS STB $100,000 Espanola 18/157

NNMSS JOSEPH MONTOYA BUILDING RENOVATE STB $900,000 Espanola 43

NORTH CENTRAL REGIONAL TRANSIT DIST BUSES STB $170,500 Espanola 31/155

OHKAY OWINGEH JUDICIAL/POLICE/FIRE/CT/JAIL STB $125,000 Ohkay Owingeh 28/25

RIO ARRIBA CO COUNTYWIDE SENIOR CTRS-MEALS STB $115,900 5/30

RIO ARRIBA CO JUVENILE CORRECTIONS VAN & STB $60,000 31/148

RIO ARRIBA CO RECOVERY PROGRAM BLDG STB $105,000 Velarde 31/157

RIO ARRIBA CO RECOVERY PROGRAM INFO TECH STB $75,000 Velarde 31/158

VETO RIO ARRIBA CO SHERIFF EVIDENCE COLLECTION STB $180,000 31/149

VETO RIO ARRIBA CO SHERIFF POLICE VEHICLES STB $70,000 31/150

VETO RIO ARRIBA CO TREASURER INFO TECH STB $125,000 31/151

SAN JOAQUIN DEL RIO DE CHAMA LAND GRANT CTR STB $13,000 San Joaquin del Rio de 31/156

Total Rio Arriba County $7,940,800

Roosevelt County

DORA CSD MULTIPURPOSE BLDG PLUMBING STB $75,000 Dora CSD 18/158

EASTERN NM WATER UTIL AUTH PUMP STATION STB $172,000 Portales 23/54

ELIDA TRASH TRUCK CONTAINER/EQUIP STB $164,000 Elida 23/53

ENMU JACK WILLIAMSON LIBERAL ARTS BLDG STB $4,000,000 Portales 38/4

ENMU KENW-TV EQUIP STB $337,000 Portales 38/5

FLOYD HIGH SCHL BLEACHERS/SEATS/OFFICIALS STB $100,000 Floyd MSD 18/159

PORTALES SENIOR CENTER CSC-MEALS EQUIP STB $22,400 Portales 5/32

PORTALES WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM STB $151,000 Portales 23/55

ROOSEVELT CO EVENTS ARENA COOLING SYSTEM STB $125,000 31/159

ROOSEVELT GENERAL HOSPITAL GAS PIPELINES STB $220,000 Portales 31/160

ROOSEVELT RD A NORTH RECONSTRUCT STB $77,000 36/56

Total Roosevelt County $5,443,400

San Juan County

AZTEC SENIOR CENTER-MEALS EQUIP STB $14,000 Aztec 5/36

BLANCO SENIOR CENTER-MEALS EQUIP STB $13,250 Blanco 5/37

BONNIE DALLAS SENIOR CENTER-MEALS EQUIP STB $6,750 5/33

BONNIE DALLAS SENIOR CTR SAN JUAN CO STB $27,600 5/34

VETO CRYSTAL CHP MULTIPURPOSE BLDG CONSTRUCT STB $50,000 Crystal Chapter 28/27

GADII'AHI/TO'KOI CHP SENIOR CTR DEMOLISH STB $85,000 Gadii'ahi Chapter 28/28

KIRTLAND VALLEY ACRES WASTEWATER SYSTEM STB $2,000,000 Kirtland 23/58

LAKE VALLEY CHP BATHROOM ADDITIONS STB $115,500 Lake Valley Chapter 28/29

LOWER VALLEY SENIOR CTR SAN JUAN CO STB $12,800 5/35

NAGEEZI CHP BATHROOMS, WATER & SEWER STB $50,000 Nageezi Chapter 28/30

VETO NAVAJO NATION COVE VETERANS PROPANE TANKS STB $30,000 28/26

VETO NEWCOMB CHP PARKING LOT STB $50,000 Newcomb Chapter 28/31

SANOSTEE CHP SAFETY EASEMENT CONSTRUCT STB $50,000 Sanostee Chapter 36/57

SHIPROCK IRRIGATION COMPOUND FENCING STB $70,000 Shiprock 28/32

SJC SCHOOL OF ENERGY STB $5,083,200 Farmington 37/4

SOUTHSIDE MDWA WATER SYSTEM/PIPING STB $77,800 23/56

SOUTHSIDE MDWA WATER TANK ERECTION STB $50,000 23/57

TWO GREY HILLS CHP SENIOR GROUP HOME STB $50,000 Two Grey Hills Chapter 5/38

Total San Juan County $7,835,900

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APPENDIX C

San Miguel County

ACEQUIA DEL MOLINO IMPROVE-EAST PECOS STB $25,000 29/17

ACEQUIA MADRE DE VILLANUEVA NORTH INFRA STB $25,000 29/18

ACEQUIA MADRE DE VILLANUEVA NORTHSIDE STB $6,000 29/19

CHAPELLE MDWCA WATER STORAGE TANK STB $32,000 23/59

DPS LAS VEGAS STATE POLICE DISTRICT OFFICE STB $800,000 Las Vegas 9/11

EL CRESTON MDWCA WATER SUPPLY WELL STB $10,000 23/60

EL VALLE WATER ALLIANCE WATER TANK STB $10,000 23/61

LAS VEGAS CITY PSD ACTIVITY BUSES STB $155,000 Las Vegas city PSD 18/160

NMBHI NEW MEADOWS PHASE 2 COMPLETION STB $900,000 Las Vegas 27

NMBHI NEW MEADOWS RENOVATE & CONSTRUCT STB $2,100,000 Las Vegas 9/12

NMHU ATHLETIC FACILITIES IMPROVE STB $165,000 Las Vegas 39/1

NMHU TROLLEY BLDG & FACILITIES INFRA STB $2,300,000 Las Vegas 39/2

PECOS CANYON FIRE & RESCUE TRUCK STB $97,500 Pecos 31/161

PECOS ISD SECURITY SYSTEM INCLUSIVE CAMPUS STB $10,000 Pecos ISD 18/161

PECOS RINCON RD/NM HWY 63 SEWER LINE EXTEND STB $50,000 Pecos 23/64

PECOS WATER LINE CONNECTIONS - NM HWY 63 STB $50,000 Pecos 23/65

ROWE MDWCA WATER SYSTEM PLAN STB $50,000 23/62

SAN MIGUEL CO COUNTYWIDE SENIOR CTRS STB $6,310 5/39

SAN MIGUEL CO ROADS IMPROVE STB $287,000 36/58

SENA MDWCA WATER STORAGE TANK STB $10,000 23/63

SEO BRADNER DAM IMPROVE STB $1,800,000 21/ 5

WEST LAS VEGAS PSD ACTIVITY BUS PURCHASE STB $140,000 West Las Vegas PSD 18/162

WEST PECOS ACEQUIA IMPROVE STB $25,000 29/20

Total San Miguel County $9,053,810

Sandoval County

ARCHIBEQUE DITCH IMPROVE STB $40,000 29/21

BERN CO & SANDOVAL CO REG COMMUNICATIONS STB $150,000 Corrales 31/167

BERNALILLO BARRIER FENCING/TRAIL/CROSSINGS STB $310,000 Bernalillo 31/164

BERNALILLO CORONADO LITTLE LEAGUE IMPROVE STB $25,000 Bernalillo 31/165

BERNALILLO SENIOR CTR CONSTRUCT STB $250,000 Bernalillo 5/44

BLACK ARROYO/MAGGIE CORDOVA PED BRIDGE STB $265,000 Rio Rancho 21/ 7

COCHITI PUEBLO LIBRARY IMPROVE & EQUIP STB $50,000 Cochiti Pueblo 28/34

COCHITI PUEBLO MULTIUSE FCLTY RENOVATE STB $150,000 Cochiti Pueblo 28/35

COCHITI PUEBLO SENIOR CENTER-MEALS EQUIP STB $10,900 Cochiti Pueblo 5/45

CORONADO SWCD RESERVOIRS RENOVATE STB $75,000 42/13

CORRALES LIBRARY READING ROOM STB $100,000 Corrales 31/168

CORRALES RECREATION CTR IMPROVE STB $13,000 Corrales 31/169

VETO CORRALES WATER LINE EXTEND-CASA SAN STB $75,000 Corrales 23/66

CUBA SENIOR CENTER-IMPROVE CODE STB $24,100 Cuba 5/46

CUBA WASTEWATER SYSTEM IMPROVE STB $165,600 Cuba 23/67

CUBA WATER SYSTEM IMPROVE STB $35,000 Cuba 23/68

VETO DIXON ORCHARD REVITALIZATION SANDOVAL CO STB $90,000 31/162

VETO EASTERN SANDOVAL CO LAND PRCHS FOR PARK STB $45,000 20/1

FIVE SANDOVAL INDIAN PUEBLOS INFO TECH STB $52,000 28/33

JEMEZ PUEBLO BUSES PURCHASE STB $95,000 Jemez Pueblo 28/36

JEMEZ PUEBLO FIRE APPARATUS BAYS CONSTRUCT STB $100,000 Jemez Pueblo 28/37

JEMEZ PUEBLO VETERANS BUILDING STB $50,000 Jemez Pueblo 28/38

JEMEZ SENIOR CENTER-IMPROVE CODE STB $44,500 5/40

JEMEZ SPRINGS JUDICIAL/MUNICIPAL COMPLEX STB $195,000 Jemez Springs 31/170

LOMITAS NEGRAS WATER QUALITY STRUCTURE STB $255,000 Corrales 21/ 6

LOS PINOS DITCH IMPROVE STB $25,000 29/22

MEADOWLARK SENIOR CTR-IMPROVE STB $562,600 5/41

MEADOWLARK SENIOR CTR-MEALS STB $29,450 5/42

PLACITAS WATER SYSTEM IMPROVE STB $250,000 Placitas 23/69

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PONDEROSA COMMUNITY DITCH IMPROVE STB $30,000 Ponderosa 29/23

RIO RANCHO ALL-INCLUSIVE PARK STB $182,926 Rio Rancho 31/171

VETO RIO RANCHO CIBOLA LITTLE LEAGUE IMPROVE STB $220,000 Rio Rancho 31/172

RIO RANCHO FIRE STATION 1 STB $520,000 Rio Rancho 31/173

VETO RIO RANCHO LOS RIOS NEIGHBORHOOD RD/DRAIN STB $50,000 Rio Rancho 36/59

RIO RANCHO PSD INFO TECH FOR PARCC ASSESS STB $365,000 Rio Rancho PSD 18/163

RIO RANCHO WATER SYSTEM & WATER LINES STB $1,075,000 Rio Rancho 23/70

SAN FELIPE PUEBLO JUDICIAL COMPLEX STB $155,000 San Felipe Pueblo 28/39

SAN FELIPE PUEBLO SENIOR CENTER-MEALS EQUIP STB $3,600 San Felipe Pueblo 5/47

SAN YSIDRO COMMUNITY DITCH IMPROVE STB $20,000 San Ysidro 29/24

VETO SAN YSIDRO MEDICAL COMPLEX CONSTRUCT STB $10,000 San Ysidro 31/174

SANDOVAL CO COUNTYWIDE SENIOR CTRS-MEALS STB $46,200 5/43

SANDOVAL CO DETENTION CTR CELL DOORS STB $275,000 Bernalillo 31/166

SANDOVAL CO FIRE DEPT AMBULANCES STB $185,000 31/163

SANTA ANA PUEBLO MULTIPURPOSE CENTER STB $50,000 Santa Ana Pueblo 28/40

SANTA ANA PUEBLO POLICE SUBSTATION/HOLDING STB $196,234 Santa Ana Pueblo 28/41

SANTA ANA PUEBLO SENIOR CTR-IMPROVE CODE STB $5,000 Santa Ana Pueblo 5/48

SANTO DOMINGO PUEBLO CURBSIDE TRASH TRUCK STB $150,000 Santo Domingo Pueblo 28/42

TORREON-STAR LAKE CHP WATER LINE STB $50,000 Torreon Chapter 28/43

V. SUE CLEVELAND HIGH SCHL STUDENT PARKING STB $100,000 Rio Rancho PSD 18/164

V. SUE CLEVELAND HIGH SCHL VISITOR PARKING STB $88,000 Rio Rancho PSD 18/165

ZIA PUEBLO WIRELESS ERECTION STB $75,000 Zia Pueblo 28/44

Total Sandoval County $7,384,110

Santa Fe County

1ST JUD DIST INFO TECH WIRING STB $85,000 Santa Fe 31/178

VETO 1ST JUD DIST TOUCHSCREEN COMPUTERS STB $45,000 Santa Fe 14

ACEQUIA AGUA FRIA SYSTEM IMPROVE STB $46,750 29/25

ACEQUIA DE LA CIENEGA IMPROVE SANTA FE CO STB $82,667 La Cienega 29/31

ACEQUIA DE LA CIENEGA WELL ELEC SYSTEM STB $50,386 La Cienega 29/32

ACEQUIA DE LA OTRA BANDA DIVERSION STB $25,000 Pojoaque Pueblo 29/34

ACEQUIA DE LA OTRA BANDA RIVERBANK STB $34,000 Pojoaque Pueblo 29/35

ACEQUIA DE LOS CHUPADEROS IMPROVE STB $40,000 29/26

ACEQUIA DE LOS INDIOS IMPROVE STB $50,000 29/27

ACEQUIA DE MORADA IMPROVE STB $9,500 Santa Fe 29/36

ACEQUIA DE SOMBRILLO IMPROVE STB $4,800 29/28

ACEQUIA DEL POTRERO IMPROVE STB $10,000 Chimayo 29/30

ACEQUIA LARGO DE JACONA IMPROVE STB $16,000 29/29

AGUA FRIA ELEM SCHL INFO TECH/SMART BDS STB $40,000 Santa Fe PSD 18/166

AGUA FRIA WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM STB $50,000 23/71

VETO ARROYO SECO CIRCLE SPEED CONTROL DEVICES STB $20,000 36/60

BENNY CHAVEZ SENIOR CTR SANTA FE CO-IMPROVE STB $45,000 5/49

VETO CAPSHAW MID SCHL MARQUEE STB $10,000 Santa Fe PSD 18/167

DPS LAW ENFORCEMENT ACADEMY DORMS STB $600,000 9/13

EAST VENUS RD IMPROVE PHASE 1 - EDGEWOOD STB $275,000 Edgewood 36/61

EDGEWOOD SENIOR CENTER-IMPROVE CODE STB $100,000 Edgewood 5/51

EL DORADO ELEMENTARY PLAYGROUND FENCING STB $50,000 Santa Fe PSD 18/168

EL DORADO ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ROOFS STB $100,000 Santa Fe PSD 18/169

ELDORADO AREA WSD WELLS STB $200,000 23/72

ELDORADO ROADS IMPROVE SANTA FE CO STB $151,000 Eldorado at Santa Fe 36/62

GALISTEO CREEK RESTORATION STB $82,000 21/ 8

IAIA FITNESS & WELLNESS FACILITY STB $500,000 28/45

LA CIENEGA COMMUNITY CENTER STB $142,500 La Cienega 31/177

VETO LARRAGOITE ACADEMY MARQUEE STB $10,000 Santa Fe PSD 18/170

MARY ESTHER GONZALES SR CTR-IMPROVE STB $154,000 Santa Fe 5/55

VETO NAMBE COMMUNITY CENTER PARK WATER SYS STB $5,000 Nambe 23/73

109


APPENDIX C

NAMBE DAM IMPROVE STB $50,000 Nambe 21/ 9

NAMBE PUEBLO ACEQUIAS IMPROVE STB $94,000 Nambe Pueblo 29/33

NAMBE PUEBLO ADMINISTRATION BLDG IMPROVE STB $41,700 Nambe Pueblo 28/46

NAMBE PUEBLO SENIOR CENTER-MEALS EQUIP STB $5,400 Nambe Pueblo 5/52

NMSD INFRA RENOVATE-PSCOF PSCOF $7,000,000 Santa Fe 52/1

NMSD MUSEUM/LIBR & DILLON HALL-PSCOF PSCOF $1,000,000 Santa Fe 52/2

VETO POJOAQUE PUEBLO POEH CTR PLASTER/STUCCO STB $100,000 Pojoaque Pueblo 28/47

POJOAQUE PUEBLO SENIOR CENTER-MEALS EQ STB $8,400 Pojoaque Pueblo 5/53

POJOAQUE PUEBLO WELLNESS CTR STB $100,000 Pojoaque Pueblo 28/48

PUBLIC RECORDS, COMM OF FCLTY EXPAND STB $600,000 Santa Fe 9/14

RAMIREZ THOMAS ELEM SCHL PA SYSTEM STB $30,000 Santa Fe PSD 18/171

RIO EN MEDIO SENIOR CENTER-IMPROVE CODE STB $25,000 5/50

SAN ILDEFONSO PUEBLO SENIOR CTR-MEALS EQ STB $6,500 San Ildefonso Pueblo 5/54

SANTA FE AFFORDABLE HOUSING FOR VETERANS STB $50,000 Santa Fe 31/179

VETO SANTA FE BOTANICAL GARDENS-MUSEUM HILL STB $140,000 Santa Fe 31/180

SANTA FE CHILDREN'S MUSEUM IMPROVE STB $117,336 Santa Fe 11/2

SANTA FE CITYWIDE SENIOR CENTERS-MEALS EQ STB $82,072 Santa Fe 5/56

VETO SANTA FE CO CLERK OFFICE EQUIP/INFO TECH STB $50,000 Santa Fe 31/181

SANTA FE CO DISABILITIES INFO TECH STB $33,333 31/175

SANTA FE CO FAIRGROUNDS IMPROVE STB $450,500 Santa Fe 31/182

SANTA FE CO POJOAQUE VALLEY REC FIELDS STB $225,000 31/176

SANTA FE CO WOMEN'S HEALTH SERVICES EQUIP STB $230,000 Santa Fe 31/183

SANTA FE CRISIS TREATMENT CTR & SITE IMPROVE STB $216,000 Santa Fe 31/184

SANTA FE EL MUSEO CULTURAL RENOVATE STB $50,000 Santa Fe 31/185

SANTA FE FARMERS MARKET IMPROVE STB $135,000 Santa Fe 31/186

SANTA FE INDIAN SCHL WELLNESS & ED CENTER STB $708,000 Santa Fe 28/49

SANTA FE LA COMUNIDAD HEAD START PLAYGR STB $50,000 Santa Fe 31/187

SANTA FE LA FAMILIA ALTO SITE STB $50,000 Santa Fe 31/188

SANTA FE LARRAGOITE PARK IMPROVE STB $20,000 Santa Fe 31/189

SANTA FE MEDIANS & SIDEWALKS IMPROVE STB $35,000 Santa Fe 36/63

SANTA FE POLICE STATION EXPAND STB $900,000 Santa Fe 31/190

SANTA FE RODEO ARENA & DISASTER RELIEF FCLTY STB $230,000 Santa Fe 31/191

SANTA FE SW ACTIVITY NODE PARK STB $35,000 Santa Fe 31/192

VETO SANTA FE THEATER & CONVENTION EQUIPMENT STB $65,000 Santa Fe 31/193

SANTA FE WATER HISTORY PARK & MUSEUM PH 2 STB $150,000 Santa Fe 31/194

SFCC HEALTH SCIENCES PGMS EQUIPMENT STB $56,000 37/5

SFCC SIGN LANGUAGE EQUIPMENT & INFO TECH STB $48,750 37/6

SFCC TRADES & TECH BLDG CONSTRUCT/RENOVATE STB $117,778 37/7

VETO SIRINGO RD & OTHER RDS IMPROVE STB $54,500 Santa Fe 36/64

VETO STATE CAPITOL COMPLEX SOLAR ARRAY STB $185,000 Santa Fe 30

STATE LAND OFFICE ELEC UPGRADES-SLMF SLMF $375,000 Santa Fe 55/1

STATE LAND OFFICE ENTRY & SECURITY-SLMF SLMF $105,000 Santa Fe 55/2

STATE LAND OFFICE MORGAN HALL-SLMF SLMF $90,000 Santa Fe 55/3

SUPREME COURT BUILDING RENOVATE STB $300,000 Santa Fe 34

VETO TESUQUE FIRE DEPT SOLAR IMPROVEMENTS STB $15,000 Tesuque 31/195

VETO TESUQUE PUEBLO EDUCATIONAL COMPLEX STB $30,000 Tesuque Pueblo 28/50

TESUQUE PUEBLO WASTEWATER INFRA STB $70,000 Tesuque Pueblo 23/74

TRD EQUIPMENT REPLACEMENT STB $1,500,000 Santa Fe 35

WOOD GORMLEY ELEM SCHL FIRE SECURITY SYS STB $57,000 Santa Fe PSD 18/172

Total Santa Fe County $19,120,872

Sierra County

ELEPHANT BUTTE WATER SYSTEM IMPROVE STB $214,000 Elephant Butte 23/76

SIERRA CO BUILDINGS INFRASTRUCTURE STB $100,000 Truth or Consequences 31/196

SIERRA CO SIERRA VISTA HOSPITAL FACILITIES STB $150,000 Truth or Consequences 31/197

SIERRA CO SOLID WASTE STB $250,000 23/75

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APPENDIX C

T OR C ANIMAL SHELTER STB $100,000 Truth or Consequences 31/198

T OR C SENIOR CTR-IMPROVE CODE STB $25,000 Truth or Consequences 5/57

T OR C SENIOR CTR-MEALS EQUIP STB $3,100 Truth or Consequences 5/58

Total Sierra County $842,100

Socorro County

ALAMO CHP WATER SYSTEM PHASE 3 STB $100,000 Alamo Chapter 23/77

MAGDALENA WATER SYSTEM IMPROVE STB $50,830 Magdalena 23/78

NMIMT GEOLOGY FACILITY STB $6,000,000 Socorro 41/1

NMIMT MAGDALENA RIDGE OBSERVATORY STB $235,000 Socorro 41/2

NMIMT PARKING LOT STB $100,000 Socorro 41/3

SCHOLLE BRIDGE PLAN & DESIGN SOCORRO CO STB $108,670 36/65

SOCORRO CO COUNTYWIDE SENIOR CTRS-MEALS EQ STB $26,100 5/59

SOCORRO RODEO FCLTY & SOCCER FCLTY STB $400,000 Socorro 31/199

SOCORRO SENIOR CENTER-IMPROVE CODE STB $33,000 Socorro 5/60

Total Socorro County $7,053,600

Statewide

AOC SECURITY EQUIP & INFRA IMPROVE STB $1,000,000 4

CAD CULTURAL FACILITIES COMPLETE & EQUIP STB $2,500,000 11/3

CAD MUSEUMS & MONUMENTS CRITICAL REPAIRS STB $3,000,000 11/4

VETO COMM ON DISABILITIES HOME MODIFICATIONS STB $100,000 26

CORRECTIONAL FACILITIES REPAIRS STATEWIDE STB $3,500,000 9/15

EDD MAINSTREET DISTRICTS INFRASTRUCTURE STB $500,000 17

EMNRD STATE PARKS & FORESTRY VEHICLES STB $500,000 19/1

EMNRD STATE PARKS INFRA IMPROVE STATEWIDE STB $1,000,000 20/2

EMNRD WILDFIRE MITIGATION STB $2,500,000 19/2

GFD BEAR CNYN/7 SPRINGS/LK ROBERTS/WLDLF HMF $2,100,000 48

GFD FCLTY REN & WILDLIFE MGMT AREA-GFB GFB $1,475,000 46

GFD STATEWIDE FACILITY RENOVATE-GPF GPF $8,725,000 47

GSD/PCD STATE FACILITIES RENOVATE/DEMOLISH STB $4,500,000 9/16

MAD-AR ARMORIES INFRA STATEWIDE STB $500,000 6

PED PRE-KINDERGARTEN CLASSROOMS-PSCOF PSCOF $2,500,000 53/1

PED SCHOOL BUSES-PSCOF PSCOF $13,000,000 53/2

PUBLIC SCHOOLS ROBOT EQUIPMENT STB $298,357 18/173

SEO SURFACE & GROUND WATER METERS-PPRF PPRF $1,000,000 50

SOS INFO TECH HARDWARE STB $1,000,000 32/1

SOS VOTING TABULATOR SYSTEMS STB $6,000,000 32/2

VETO STATE PUBLIC ART RESTORATION STB $64,000 11/5

WWFCLF CLEAN WATER ACT MATCH FUNDS-PPRF PPRF $1,400,000 51

Total Statewide $57,162,357

Taos County

VETO ACEQUIA DE ARRIBA DEL LLANO DE SAN MIGUEL STB $25,000 El Valle 29/42

ACEQUIA DE LA SEVADILLA CHANNEL STB $15,000 29/37

ACEQUIA DE SAN JUAN DE NEPUMUCENO IMPROVE STB $25,000 29/38

ACEQUIA DEL MONTE DEL RIO CHIQUITO WATER STB $16,000 29/39

ACEQUIAS MADRE/MONTE DEL RIO CHIQUITO LOAN STB $16,400 29/40

AMALIA COSTILLA COMMUNITY CENTER IMPROVE STB $150,000 Amalia 31/204

ANCIANOS SENIOR CENTER TAOS CO-MEALS EQUIP STB $18,200 5/61

ARROYO HONDO MDWCA WATER TREATMENT SYS STB $50,000 Arroyo Hondo 23/85

CERRO COMMUNITY CENTER RENOVATE STB $50,000 Cerro 31/205

EL PRADO WSD WELL/WATER/WASTEWATER STB $50,000 23/79

VETO EL VALLE DE LOS RANCHOS WSD VACTOR TRUCK STB $50,000 23/80

ESTE ES ROAD IMPROVE PHASE 3 - TAOS STB $160,000 Taos 36/66

LAS TRAMPAS MDWC & MSWA FENCE STB $40,000 23/81

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APPENDIX C

LLANO QUEMADO MDWCA WATER SYSTEM STB $25,000 23/82

LOWER ARROYO HONDO MDWC & MSWA EXPAND STB $50,100 23/83

LOWER DES MONTES MDWCA WATER SYSTEM STB $125,000 23/84

QUESTA PUBLIC WORKS VEHICLES & EQUIP STB $50,000 Questa 31/206

QUESTA WASTEWATER SYSTEM IMPROVE STB $50,000 Questa 23/86

QUESTA WATER RIGHTS PURCHASE STB $50,000 Questa 21/10

RED RIVER DAYCARE CENTER STB $50,000 Red River 31/207

RED RIVER PINERIDGE SEWER LINES STB $53,000 Red River 23/87

RED RIVER PUBLIC WORKS GRADER & DUMP TRUCK STB $100,000 Red River 31/208

SAN CRISTOBAL FIRE STATION STB $50,000 San Cristobal 31/209

TALPA COMMUNITY CENTER PARKING & FENCING STB $25,000 31/200

TALPA IRRIGATION RESERVOIR FENCE STB $25,000 29/41

TAOS CO FILEMON SANCHEZ PARK RENOVATE STB $30,000 31/201

TAOS CO SHERIFF VEHICLES STB $80,000 31/202

TAOS CO VETERANS CEMETERY STB $75,000 31/203

TAOS PLAZA RENOVATE-ARTS & CULTURAL DIST STB $25,000 Taos 31/210

TAOS PUEBLO VETERANS LIVING MEMORIAL PARK STB $85,000 Taos Pueblo 28/51

UNM HARWOOD MUSEUM IMPROVE STB $125,000 Taos 44/14

UNM-TAOS CORE STUDENT SUCCESS CENTER STB $1,000,000 44/13

Total Taos County $2,738,700

Torrance County

ALAN AYERS ROAD IMPROVE - ESTANCIA STB $83,000 Estancia 36/67

VETO CANON DE CARNUE LAND GRANT TIENDITA STB $50,000 31/211

VETO CLAUNCH-PINTO SWCD BUILDING & INFRA STB $25,000 Mountainair 42/16

EAST TORRANCE SWCD EDUCATIONAL INFO TECH STB $40,000 East Torrance SWCD 42/15

ENCINO WATER SYSTEM IMPROVE STB $60,000 Encino 23/89

ESTANCIA COMMUNITY CENTER DOORS & IMPROVE STB $110,000 Estancia 31/216

ESTANCIA SEWER SYSTEM IMPROVE STB $20,000 Estancia 23/90

ESTANCIA VALLEY SWA REGIONAL LANDFILL CELL STB $170,000 23/88

MORIARTY WATER SYSTEM IMPROVE STB $450,000 Moriarty 23/91

MOUNTAINAIR MULTIPURPOSE BUILDING STB $70,000 Mountainair 31/218

NMSU SW CTR FOR RANGELAND SUSTAINABILITY STB $160,000 42/14

TORRANCE CO BUILDINGS IMPROVE STB $50,000 31/212

TORRANCE CO COUNTYWIDE SENIOR CTRS-MEALS STB $37,600 5/62

TORRANCE CO DIST 3 & 5 FIRE ENGINES STB $30,000 31/213

VETO TORRANCE CO KXNM RADIO STATION EQUIP STB $25,000 McIntosh 31/217

VETO TORRANCE CO MUSICAL/ART CTR-MOUNTAINAIR STB $25,000 Mountainair 31/219

TORRANCE CO TRI-COUNTY YOUTH MULTIPURPOSE STB $50,000 31/214

TORRANCE CO VOL FIRE STATIONS DIST 3 & 5 STB $10,000 31/215

Total Torrance County $1,465,600

Union County

CLAYTON SENIOR CENTER-MEALS EQUIP STB $1,300 Clayton 5/63

DES MOINES WATER SYSTEM IMPROVE STB $310,000 Des Moines 23/92

UNION CO JUDICIAL COMPLEX PLAN & DESIGN STB $75,000 31/220

UNION CO REGIONAL AQUIFER SYS HYDROLOGIC STB $25,000 21/11

UNION CO ROAD DEPT TRUCK PURCHASE STB $110,000 31/221

Total Union County $521,300

Valencia County

AMY ROAD IMPROVE - VALENCIA CO STB $165,000 36/68

BELEN CSD WILLIE CHAVEZ PARK AGRIC ED STB $100,000 Belen CSD 18/174

BELEN FLOOD CONTROL FCLTY & INFRA STB $425,000 Belen 21/12

BOSQUE FARMS TENNIS COURTS REHAB STB $70,000 Bosque Farms 31/225

BOSQUE FARMS WATER SYSTEM METERS STB $300,000 Bosque Farms 23/94

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APPENDIX C

FRED LUNA SENIOR CENTER VALENCIA CO STB $300,000 5/64

LOS LUNAS ENCHANTMENT LL FIELD ENTRANCES STB $475,000 Los Lunas 31/226

LOS LUNAS SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT CTR STB $1,000,000 Los Lunas 9/17

NORTH BELEN INTERCHANGE DESIGN/CONSTRUCT STB $100,000 Belen 36/70

PERALTA WASTEWATER SYSTEM IMPROVE STB $250,000 Peralta 23/95

SCHOOL OF DREAMS ACAD VEHICLES & TRAILERS STB $100,000 Los Lunas PSD 18/175

VALENCIA CO ANIMAL CONTROL SHELTER STB $150,000 Los Lunas 31/227

VALENCIA CO BARTOLA CANYON WELL STB $15,000 23/93

VALENCIA CO EMERGENCY BACKUP GENERATOR STB $45,000 31/222

VALENCIA CO MANZANO VISTA FIRE DEPT GEN STB $45,000 31/223

VALENCIA CO SHERIFF DEPT PATROL VEHICLES STB $210,000 31/224

VALENCIA HIGH SCHL OUTDOOR AMPHITHEATER STB $100,000 Los Lunas PSD 18/176

WINSTON DR IMPROVE - VALENCIA CO STB $210,000 36/69

Total Valencia County $4,060,000

_______________________________________________________________________________________________

Grand Total $269,339,714

CHART 4

2013 CAPITAL OUTLAY PROJECTS

Senate Finance Committee Substitute for Senate Bill 60 and

House Taxation and Revenue Committee Substitute for House Bill 337

(Laws 2013, Chapter 226, p.v.)

Cultural Affairs

2%

Aging

2%

Water Statewide

7%

Government

11%

Higher Education

22%

Public Schools

10%

Transportation

6%

Other Education

16%

Indian Affairs

2%

Local Government

Environment/Water

8%

Local Government

14%

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APPENDIX C

TABLE 13

2013 CAPITAL OUTLAY REAUTHORIZATIONS

House Taxation and Revenue Committee Substitute for House Bill 353

(Laws 2013, Chapter 202, p.v.)

The reauthorizations that follow contain their full text and are presented in the order in which they appear in the

bill. Projects are arranged in alphabetical order by county; however, because a project sometimes begins its

history in one county and, via the reauthorization language, ends up in a new county, all reauthorized projects are

organized for purposes of the bill under the new county rather than the original county. Historical cites appear in

italics following the text of each reauthorization below and show the laws citations affected by the reauthorization.

SECTION 3. SOUTH VALLEY POOL--EXTEND TIME--GENERAL FUND.--The time of expenditure

for the public education department project originally appropriated in Subsection 52 of Section 55 of Chapter 42 of

Laws 2007 and reappropriated to the local government division in Laws 2011, Chapter 183, Section 9 to plan,

design, equip, construct and redevelop the south valley pool facility and grounds in Bernalillo county is extended

through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 52 of Section 55 of Chapter 42 of Laws 2007 and reappropriated in Laws 2011, Chapter 183, Section 9

SECTION 4. ALBUQUERQUE TOWER PARK-WEST GATE LITTLE LEAGUE IMPROVEMENTS--

EXTEND TIME--GENERAL FUND.--The time of expenditure for the project originally appropriated to the

department of transportation in Subsection 14 of Section 52 of Chapter 347 of Laws 2005 and reappropriated to

the local government division in Laws 2007, Chapter 341, Section 20 and reappropriated again in Laws 2011,

Chapter 183, Section 7 to make improvements for Tower Park-West Gate little league in Albuquerque in

Bernalillo county is extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 14 of Section 52 of Chapter 347 of Laws 2005 and reappropriated in Laws 2007, Chapter 341, Section

20 and reappropriated again in Laws 2011, Chapter 183, Section 7

SECTION 5. NEW MEXICO STATE FAIR ALICE FAYE HOPPES PAVILION FIRE SUPPRESSION

SYSTEM--CHANGE TO INFRASTRUCTURE AND IMPROVEMENTS AT THE STATE FAIR--

SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--The unexpended balance of the appropriation to the state fair commission

originally authorized in Subsection 1 of Section 16 of Chapter 92 of Laws 2008 and reauthorized in Laws 2012,

Chapter 63, Section 15 for a fire suppression system at the Alice Faye Hoppes pavilion at the New Mexico state

fairgrounds shall not be expended for the original or reauthorized purpose but is changed to make infrastructure

and other improvements at the New Mexico state fairgrounds in Albuquerque in Bernalillo county.

Subsection 1 of Section 16 of Chapter 92 of Laws 2008 and reauthorized in Laws 2012, Chapter 63, Section 15

SECTION 6. PETROGLYPH LITTLE LEAGUE CONCESSION STAND--CHANGE TO TRAILER

PURCHASE FOR MOBILE CONCESSION STAND--EXTEND TIME--SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--The

unexpended balance of the appropriation to the local government division in Subsection 129 of Section 3 of

Chapter 7 of Laws 2009 (S.S.) to plan, design and construct a concession stand for the Petroglyph little league in

Albuquerque in Bernalillo county shall not be expended for the original purpose but is changed to purchase and

install a trailer to be used as a mobile concession stand for that little league. The time of expenditure is extended

through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 129 of Section 3 of Chapter 7 of Laws 2009 (S.S.)

SECTION 7. WESTERN NEW MEXICO CORRECTIONAL FACILITY IMPROVEMENTS

PLANNING AND DESIGN--EXPAND PURPOSE--SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--The capital program fund

project in Subsection 2 of Section 5 of Chapter 5 of Laws 2011 (S.S.) to plan and design water, wastewater and

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erosion control improvements at the western New Mexico correctional facility in Cibola county may include

construction.

Subsection 2 of Section 5 of Chapter 5 of Laws 2011 (S.S.)

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

APPENDIX C

SECTION 8. EAGLE NEST ENCHANTED EAGLE PARK ASBESTOS REMOVAL AND BUILDING

DEMOLITION--EXPAND PURPOSE--SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--The local government division project in

Subsection 42 of Section 16 of Chapter 64 of Laws 2012 to remove asbestos, including demolition and debris

removal, from abandoned buildings in Enchanted Eagle park in Eagle Nest in Colfax county may include site

improvements, including materials disposal and soil restoration.

Subsection 42 of Section 16 of Chapter 64 of Laws 2012

SECTION 9. LAKE ROBERTS DAM AND SPILLWAY--CHANGE TO SPRINGER DAMS 1 AND 2--

CHANGE AGENCY--EXTEND TIME--SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--The unexpended balance of the

appropriation to the department of game and fish in Subsection 1 of Section 23 of Chapter 125 of Laws 2009 for

construction and renovations to the Lake Roberts dam and spillway in Grant county shall not be expended for the

original purpose but is appropriated to the office of the state engineer for construction and rehabilitation of dams 1

and 2 in Springer in Colfax county. The time of expenditure is extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 1 of Section 23 of Chapter 125 of Laws 2009

SECTION 10. GRADY FIRE TRUCK PURCHASE--CHANGE TO REPAY A LOAN--SEVERANCE

TAX BONDS.--The unexpended balance of the appropriation to the local government division in Subsection 45 of

Section 16 of Chapter 64 of Laws 2012 to purchase a fire truck for Grady in Curry county shall not be expended

for the original purpose but is changed to pay back a loan for that purpose.

Subsection 45 of Section 16 of Chapter 64 of Laws 2012

SECTION 11. BOSQUE REDONDO MEMORIAL EXHIBITS--EXPAND PURPOSE--EXTEND

TIME--SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--The cultural affairs department project in Subsection 2 of Section 9 of

Chapter 125 of Laws 2009 to purchase and install exhibits at the Bosque Redondo memorial at Fort Sumner state

monument in De Baca county may include design, construction and installation of an exhibition at that memorial.

The time of expenditure is extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 2 of Section 9 of Chapter 125 of Laws 2009

SECTION 12. ANTHONY DRAINAGE IMPROVEMENTS--EXTEND TIME--SEVERANCE TAX

BONDS.--The time of expenditure for the department of transportation project originally authorized in Subsection

7 of Section 24 of Chapter 92 of Laws 2008 and reauthorized in Laws 2011, Chapter 183, Section 42 to plan,

design and construct drainage improvements in Anthony in Dona Ana county is extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 7 of Section 24 of Chapter 92 of Laws 2008 and reauthorized in Laws 2011, Chapter 183, Section 42

SECTION 13. SAN MIGUEL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL RENOVATION--EXTEND TIME--

GENERAL FUND.--The time of expenditure for the project originally appropriated to the local government

division in Subsection 235 of Section 59 of Chapter 92 of Laws 2008 and reappropriated in Laws 2009, Chapter

128, Section 243 and reappropriated again to the public education department in Laws 2011, Chapter 183, Section

40 to renovate the San Miguel elementary school for use by the Gadsden independent school district in Dona Ana

county is extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 235 of Section 59 of Chapter 92 of Laws 2008 and reappropriated in Laws 2009, Chapter 128, Section

243 and reappropriated again in Laws 2011, Chapter 183, Section 40

SECTION 14. SAN MIGUEL ELEMENTARY SCHOOL RENOVATION--EXTEND TIME--

GENERAL FUND.--The time of expenditure for the project originally appropriated to the local government

division in Subsection 234 of Section 59 of Chapter 92 of Laws 2008 and reappropriated in Laws 2009, Chapter

115


APPENDIX C

128, Section 242 and reappropriated again to the public education department in Laws 2011, Chapter 183, Section

39 to renovate the San Miguel elementary school for use by the Gadsden independent school district in Dona Ana

county is extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 234 of Section 59 of Chapter 92 of Laws 2008 and reappropriated in Laws 2009, Chapter 128, Section

242 and reappropriated again in Laws 2011, Chapter 183, Section 39

SECTION 15. LAS CRUCES ARMIJO HOUSE RENOVATIONS--CHANGE TO VIETNAM

VETERANS' MEMORIAL--EXTEND TIME--SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--The unexpended balance of the

appropriation to the cultural affairs department originally authorized in Subsection 5 of Section 7 of Chapter 92 of

Laws 2008 of which fifty-five thousand dollars ($55,000) was reauthorized and appropriated to the local

government division in Laws 2012, Chapter 63, Section 36 to renovate the Armijo house in Las Cruces in Dona

Ana county shall not be expended for the original or reauthorized purpose but is changed to make site

improvements and construct a Vietnam War memorial in veterans' park in Las Cruces in Dona Ana county. The

time of expenditure is extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 5 of Section 7 of Chapter 92 of Laws 2008 and reauthorized in Laws 2012, Chapter 63, Section 36

SECTION 16. NEW MEXICO FARM AND RANCH HERITAGE MUSEUM EXHIBITS AND

TORTUGAS HALL CONSTRUCTION--EXTEND TIME--SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--The time of

expenditure for the cultural affairs department project in Subsection 3 of Section 9 of Chapter 125 of Laws 2009 to

continue construction and completion of Tortugas hall and to purchase and install exhibits at the New Mexico farm

and ranch heritage museum in Las Cruces in Dona Ana county is extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 3 of Section 9 of Chapter 125 of Laws 2009

SECTION 17. SANTA TERESA PORT OF ENTRY STATIC SCALE AND BORDER AUTHORITY

BUILDING--EXTEND TIME--SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--The time of expenditure for the capital program

fund project in Subsection 5 of Section 3 of Chapter 7 of Laws 2009 (S.S.) for construction and to equip and install

a platform static scale at the Santa Teresa port of entry in Dona Ana county and to design, construct, equip and

furnish a building for the border authority at the Santa Teresa border crossing in Dona Ana county is extended

through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 5 of Section 3 of Chapter 7 of Laws 2009 (S.S.)

SECTION 18. SANTA TERESA SAFETY INSPECTION FACILITY--EXTEND TIME--SEVERANCE

TAX BONDS.--The time of expenditure for the project originally authorized to the local government division in

Subsection 149 of Section 3 of Chapter 7 of Laws 2009 (S.S.) and reauthorized to the general services department

in Laws 2011, Chapter 183, Section 52 to plan, design and construct improvements to a safety inspection facility

in Santa Teresa in Dona Ana county is extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 149 of Section 3 of Chapter 7 of Laws 2009 (S.S.) and reauthorized in Laws 2011, Chapter 183,

Section 52

SECTION 19. SANTA TERESA SAFETY INSPECTION STATION--EXTEND TIME--SEVERANCE

TAX BONDS.--The time of expenditure for the local government division project originally authorized in

Subsection 3 of Section 23 of Chapter 42 of Laws 2007 and reauthorized to the capital program fund in Subsection

B of Section 279 of Chapter 83 of Laws 2008 to plan, design and construct a safety inspection station at Santa

Teresa in Dona Ana county and further reauthorized in Laws 2011, Chapter 183, Section 53 for a time extension is

extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 3 of Section 23 of Chapter 42 of Laws 2007 and reauthorized in Subsection B of Section 279 of Chapter

83 of Laws 2008 and reauthorized again in Laws 2011, Chapter 183, Section 53

SECTION 20. SUNLAND PARK MUNICIPAL COMPLEX--CHANGE TO STREETS AND

DRAINAGE IMPROVEMENTS IN SUNLAND PARK--CHANGE AGENCY--EXTEND TIME--SEVERANCE

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APPENDIX C

TAX BONDS.--The unexpended balance of the appropriation to the local government division in Subparagraph

(c) of Paragraph (8) of Subsection A of Section 18 of Chapter 105 of Laws 2010 for a municipal complex in

Sunland Park shall not be expended for the original purpose but is appropriated to the department of transportation

to plan, design, construct and rehabilitate streets and drainage systems in Sunland Park in Dona Ana county. The

time of expenditure is extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subparagraph (c) of Paragraph (8) of Subsection A of Section 18 of Chapter 105 of Laws 2010

SECTION 21. SUGARITE AND MANZANO STATE PARKS AND OTHER STATE PARKS LAND

PURCHASES--CHANGE TO LIVING DESERT ZOO AND GARDENS STATE PARK ELECTRICAL

IMPROVEMENTS--EXTEND TIME--PROCEEDS FROM THE SALE OF THE COTTONWOOD-WALNUT

CREEK PROPERTY IN EDDY COUNTY.--The unexpended balance of the appropriation made from the

proceeds of the sale of the Cottonwood-Walnut creek property in Eddy county in Laws 2004, Chapter 67, Section

1 for purchasing adjacent lands at Sugarite and Manzano state parks or at other parks shall not be expended for the

original purpose but is changed for improvements to the electrical system, including the purchase and installation

of conductors, infrastructure for a new primary service, transformers and meters, at Living Desert Zoo and

Gardens state park in Eddy county. The time of expenditure is extended through fiscal year 2015.

Laws 2004, Chapter 67, Section 1

SECTION 22. SECOND STREET ROAD AND DRAINAGE IMPROVEMENTS IN ROY--EXPAND

PURPOSE TO VARIOUS STREETS IN ROY--SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--The department of transportation

project in Subsection 29 of Section 18 of Chapter 64 of Laws 2012 to plan, design and construct road and drainage

improvements to Second street in Roy in Harding county may include improvements to various streets in Roy.

Subsection 29 of Section 18 of Chapter 64 of Laws 2012

SECTION 23. JAMES MURRAY BUILDING IMPROVEMENTS--EXTEND TIME--SEVERANCE

TAX BONDS.--The time of expenditure for the capital program fund project in Subsection 8 of Section 7 of

Chapter 125 of Laws 2009 to plan, design and construct improvements, including reconfiguring office layout,

remodeling restrooms and replacing the heating, ventilation and air conditioning system, in the James Murray

building in Hobbs in Lea county is extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 8 of Section 7 of Chapter 125 of Laws 2009

SECTION 24. BAAHAALI CHAPTER POWERLINE EXTENSIONS--EXTEND TIME--SEVERANCE

TAX BONDS.--The time of expenditure for the Indian affairs department project authorized in Subsection 89 of

Section 3 of Chapter 7 of Laws 2009 (S.S.) to plan, design and construct powerline extensions in the Baahaali

chapter of the Navajo Nation in McKinley county is extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 89 of Section 3 of Chapter 7 of Laws 2009 (S.S.)

SECTION 25. CROWNPOINT WELLNESS CENTER--EXTEND TIME--GENERAL FUND.--The time

of expenditure for the Indian affairs department project originally appropriated in Subsection 43 of Section 66 of

Chapter 42 of Laws 2007 and reappropriated in Laws 2011, Chapter 183, Section 58 to plan, design, construct,

equip and furnish a wellness center, including purchasing a modular building, in Crownpoint in McKinley county

is extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 43 of Section 66 of Chapter 42 of Laws 2007 and reappropriated in Laws 2011, Chapter 183,

Section 58

SECTION 26. TOHATCHI CHAPTER PARKS AND PLAYGROUNDS--EXTEND TIME--GENERAL

FUND.--The time of expenditure for the project originally appropriated to the local government division in

Subsection 154 of Section 26 of Chapter 2 of Laws 2007 and reappropriated to the Indian affairs department in

Laws 2009, Chapter 128, Section 312 and reappropriated again in Laws 2011, Chapter 183, Section 66 to plan,

design, construct, renovate and equip a skateboard park, volleyball park, picnic area, playground area, trails and

117


APPENDIX C

landscaping in the Tohatchi chapter of the Navajo Nation in McKinley county is extended through fiscal year

2015.

Subsection 154 of Section 26 of Chapter 2 of Laws 2007 and reappropriated in Laws 2009, Chapter 128, Section

312 and reappropriated again in Laws 2011, Chapter 183, Section 66

SECTION 27. TOHATCHI CHAPTER POWERLINE EXTENSION--CHANGE TO MULTIPURPOSE

BUILDING FOR VETERANS--EXTEND TIME--SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--The unexpended balance of the

appropriation to the Indian affairs department originally authorized in Subsection 18 of Section 115 of Chapter 126

of Laws 2004 and reauthorized in Laws 2009, Chapter 128, Section 311 and reauthorized again in Laws 2011,

Chapter 183, Section 67 for a powerline extension project in the Tohatchi chapter of the Navajo Nation in

McKinley county shall not be expended for the original purpose but is changed to plan and design a multipurpose

building for veterans in that chapter. The time of expenditure is extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 18 of Section 115 of Chapter 126 of Laws 2004 and reauthorized in Laws 2009, Chapter 128, Section

311 and reauthorized again in Laws 2011, Chapter 183, Section 67

SECTION 28. LINCOLN AND OTERO COUNTIES FLOOD DAMAGE IMPROVEMENTS--EXTEND

TIME--GENERAL FUND.--The time of expenditure for the appropriation to the homeland security and

emergency management department in Laws 2008 (S.S.), Chapter 8 to plan, design and construct improvements to

roads, bridges and infrastructure damaged by severe flooding in Lincoln and Otero counties is extended through

fiscal year 2015.

Laws 2008 (S.S.), Chapter 8

SECTION 29. SIERRA BLANCA, EAGLE NEST, MALOOF AND YOUTH DIAGNOSTIC AND

DEVELOPMENT CENTER FACILITIES IMPROVEMENTS--EXTEND TIME--SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--

The time of expenditure for the capital program fund project originally authorized in Subsection 7 of Section 6 of

Chapter 42 of Laws 2007 and reauthorized in Laws 2011, Chapter 183, Section 71 for grounds and security

improvements at Camp Sierra Blanca, Eagle Nest, Maloof and youth diagnostic and development center facilities

in multiple counties is extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 7 of Section 6 of Chapter 42 of Laws 2007 and reauthorized in Laws 2011, Chapter 183, Section 71

SECTION 30. LORDSBURG PORT OF ENTRY, SANTA TERESA INSPECTION STATION AND

LAS CRUCES STATE POLICE DISTRICT HEADQUARTERS IMPROVEMENTS--EXTEND TIME--

SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--The time of expenditure for the capital program fund project originally authorized

in Subsection 7 of Section 7 of Chapter 125 of Laws 2009 to equip, furnish and landscape the site, including a spur

road, at the Lordsburg port of entry in Hidalgo county and reauthorized in Laws 2012, Chapter 63, Section 32 to

include planning, designing, constructing, furnishing and equipping renovations at the Santa Teresa inspection

station and the Las Cruces state police district headquarters in Dona Ana county is extended through fiscal year

2015.

Subsection 7 of Section 7 of Chapter 125 of Laws 2009 and reauthorized in Laws 2012, Chapter 63, Section 32

SECTION 31. STATE BUILDINGS DEMOLITION AND DECOMMISSIONING--EXTEND TIME--

SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--The time of expenditure for the capital program fund project in Subsection 22 of

Section 7 of Chapter 125 of Laws 2009 for demolition, decommissioning and asbestos abatement of state

buildings, including the Campbell, Woolston, Mecham and Old Huning buildings on the Los Lunas campus in

Valencia county and the old dormitory at the New Mexico rehabilitation center in Roswell in Chaves county, is

extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 22 of Section 7 of Chapter 125 of Laws 2009

SECTION 32. FIBEROPTIC CONNECTIONS TO STATE FACILITIES AND PURCHASE OF

TELECOMMUNICATIONS EQUIPMENT--CHANGE TO NORTHERN NEW MEXICO STATE SCHOOL

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APPENDIX C

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY INFRASTRUCTURE--CHANGE AGENCY--SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--

The unexpended balance of the appropriation to the department of information technology in Laws 2012, Chapter

64, Section 14 to construct REDI net fiberoptic connections to state facilities and to purchase and install

telecommunications equipment to route traffic to and from the state's network hub in the Simms building in Santa

Fe in Santa Fe county shall not be expended for the original purpose but is appropriated to the board of regents of

northern New Mexico state school to purchase and install information technology, including related equipment,

furniture and infrastructure, at the El Rito and Espanola campuses of northern New Mexico state school in Rio

Arriba county.

Laws 2012, Chapter 64, Section 14

SECTION 33. ACEQUIA DE LA POSECION IMPROVEMENTS--EXPAND PURPOSE TO INCLUDE

LOAN PAYBACK--SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--The interstate stream commission project in Subsection 11 of

Section 15 of Chapter 64 of Laws 2012 to plan, design and construct acequia improvements, including lining, for

the acequia de la Posecion in Truchas in Rio Arriba county may include paying back a loan for that acequia.

Subsection 11 of Section 15 of Chapter 64 of Laws 2012

SECTION 34. NEW MEXICO BEHAVIORAL HEALTH INSTITUTE ASBESTOS ABATEMENT--

EXTEND TIME--SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--The time of expenditure for the capital program fund project in

Subsection 12 of Section 7 of Chapter 125 of Laws 2009 for asbestos abatement at the New Mexico behavioral

health institute in Las Vegas in San Miguel county is extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 12 of Section 7 of Chapter 125 of Laws 2009

SECTION 35. NEW MEXICO BEHAVIORAL HEALTH INSTITUTE FORENSIC SECURITY--

EXTEND TIME--SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--The time of expenditure for the capital program fund project in

Subsection 13 of Section 7 of Chapter 125 of Laws 2009 to plan, design, construct and provide upgrades of

forensic security needs at the New Mexico behavioral health institute in Las Vegas in San Miguel county is

extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 13 of Section 7 of Chapter 125 of Laws 2009

SECTION 36. RAIL RUNNER AVENUE EXTENSION IN BERNALILLO--EXPAND PURPOSE--

SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--The department of transportation project in Subsection 42 of Section 18 of Chapter

64 of Laws 2012 to plan and design an extension of Rail Runner avenue in Bernalillo in Sandoval county may

include construction.

Subsection 42 of Section 18 of Chapter 64 of Laws 2012

SECTION 37. FRED LUNA BUILDING PARKING AREA IN BELEN--CHANGE TO RIO RANCHO

ALL INCLUSIVE PARK--CHANGE AGENCY--EXTEND TIME--SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--The

unexpended balance of the appropriation to the capital program fund originally authorized in Subsection 25 of

Section 7 of Chapter 125 of Laws 2009 to plan, design, construct and equip a parking area for the Fred Luna

building in Belen in Valencia county shall not be expended for the original purpose but is appropriated to the local

government division to design, construct and equip an all inclusive park with high standards of accessibility in Rio

Rancho in Sandoval county. The time of expenditure is extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 25 of Section 7 of Chapter 125 of Laws 2009

SECTION 38. LA FAMILIA MEDICAL CENTER ON ALTO STREET--EXPAND PURPOSE--

EXTEND TIME--SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--The local government division project in Subsection 181 of

Section 3 of Chapter 7 of Laws 2009 (S.S.) to plan, design, construct, equip and furnish an expansion to, and make

improvements to the interior infrastructure of, La Familia medical center on Alto street in Santa Fe in Santa Fe

county may include making improvements to the exterior of that building and site. The time of expenditure is

extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 181 of Section 3 of Chapter 7 of Laws 2009 (S.S.)

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APPENDIX C

SECTION 39. MANUEL LUJAN BUILDING IMPROVEMENTS--EXTEND TIME--SEVERANCE

TAX BONDS.--The time of expenditure for the capital program fund project originally authorized in Subsection

15 of Section 7 of Chapter 125 of Laws 2009 and reauthorized in Laws 2012, Chapter 64, Section 35 for

infrastructure improvements, renovation, furnishing and equipping the Manuel Lujan building in Santa Fe in Santa

Fe county is extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 15 of Section 7 of Chapter 125 of Laws 2009 and reauthorized in Laws 2012, Chapter 64, Section 35

SECTION 40. NEW MEXICO SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF DEFICIENCIES CORRECTION--EXTEND

TIME--SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--The time of expenditure for the public school capital outlay fund project in

Subsection 2 of Section 29 of Chapter 125 of Laws 2009 for asbestos abatement, mold remediation and other

renovations to address critical deficiencies at the New Mexico school for the deaf in Santa Fe in Santa Fe county is

extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 2 of Section 29 of Chapter 125 of Laws 2009

VETO SECTION 41. SANTA FE COUNTY FACILITIES FOR THE DISABLED--CHANGE TO

FURNISHINGS FOR THE DISABLED--SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--The unexpended balance of the

appropriation to the local government division in Subsection 111 of Section 16 of Chapter 64 of Laws 2012 for

improvements and renovations to county-owned facilities for the disabled in Santa Fe county shall not be

expended for the original purpose but is changed to purchase furnishings for use by the disabled in Santa Fe

county.

Subsection 111 of Section 16 of Chapter 64 of Laws 2012

SECTION 42. SANTA FE MULTIMODAL TRANSIT ROAD IMPROVEMENTS--EXTEND TIME--

GENERAL FUND.--The time of expenditure for the department of transportation project originally appropriated

in Subsection 56 of Section 30 of Chapter 2 of Laws 2007 and reappropriated in Laws 2008, Chapter 83, Section

383 and reappropriated again in Laws 2011, Chapter 183, Section 104 to purchase land for, plan, design, construct

and equip road improvements for multimodal transit along Old Santa Fe trail, including El Gancho way, in Santa

Fe in Santa Fe county is extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 56 of Section 30 of Chapter 2 of Laws 2007 and reappropriated in Laws 2008, Chapter 83, Section 383

and reappropriated again in Laws 2011, Chapter 183, Section 104

SECTION 43. ACADEMY FOR TECHNOLOGY AND THE CLASSICS KITCHEN

CONSTRUCTION--CHANGE TO PURCHASE, EXPAND OR RENOVATE FACILITY--EXTEND TIME--

GENERAL FUND.--The unexpended balance of the appropriation to the local government division originally

appropriated in Subsection 644 of Section 68 of Chapter 42 of Laws 2007 and reappropriated to the public

education department in Laws 2011, Chapter 183, Section 106 to construct and equip a kitchen and cafeteria at

Academy for Technology and the Classics charter school in the Santa Fe public school district in Santa Fe county

shall not be expended for the original or reappropriated purpose but is changed to purchase, expand and renovate

the facility for that charter school. The time of expenditure is extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 644 of Section 68 of Chapter 42 of Laws 2007 and reappropriated in Laws 2011, Chapter 183, Section

106

SECTION 44. NEW MEXICO STATE VETERANS' HOME ALZHEIMER'S UNIT--EXTEND TIME--

SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--The time of expenditure for the capital program fund project originally authorized

in Subsection 9 of Section 7 of Chapter 125 of Laws 2009 and reauthorized in Laws 2012, Chapter 63, Section 101

to plan, design, construct, furnish, equip and landscape a skilled nursing Alzheimer's unit at the New Mexico state

veterans' home in Truth or Consequences in Sierra county is extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 9 of Section 7 of Chapter 125 of Laws 2009 and reauthorized in Laws 2012, Chapter 63, Section 101

SECTION 45. RIO RANCHO REGIONAL PARK FACILITY--CHANGE TO SIERRA COUNTY

HOSPITAL--SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--The unexpended balance of the appropriation to the local government

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APPENDIX C

division originally authorized in Subsection 85 of Section 21 of Chapter 92 of Laws 2008 and reauthorized in

Laws 2012, Chapter 63, Section 89 for the all-inclusive regional park facility in Rio Rancho in Sandoval county

shall not be expended for the original or reauthorized purpose but is changed to plan, design, construct and equip a

hospital in Truth or Consequences in Sierra county.

Subsection 85 of Section 21 of Chapter 92 of Laws 2008 and reauthorized in Laws 2012, Chapter 63, Section 89

SECTION 46. NEW MEXICO STATE VETERANS' HOME ALZHEIMER'S UNIT--EXTEND TIME--

REVENUE BONDS.--The time of expenditure for the revenue bond project originally authorized in Subsection C

of Section 8 of Chapter 320 of Laws 2005 and reauthorized in Subsection 3 of Section 94 of Chapter 42 of Laws

2007 for an Alzheimer's unit and other improvements at the New Mexico state veterans' home in Truth or

Consequences in Sierra county and further reauthorized in Laws 2011, Chapter 183, Section 109 to extend the time

is extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection C of Section 8 of Chapter 320 of Laws 2005 and reauthorized in Subsection 3 of Section 94 of Chapter

42 of Laws 2007 and reauthorized again in Laws 2011, Chapter 183, Section 109

SECTION 47. SOCORRO COUNTY VEGUITA HEALTH AND COMMUNITY CENTER--EXTEND

TIME--SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--The time of expenditure for the local government division project

originally authorized in Subsection 185 of Section 3 of Chapter 7 of Laws 2009 (S.S.) to plan, design, construct

and equip the Veguita health and community center in Socorro county is extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 185 of Section 3 of Chapter 7 of Laws 2009 (S.S.)

SECTION 48. ACEQUIA WATER STORAGE PROJECTS STATEWIDE--EXTEND TIME--

SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--The time of expenditure for the office of the state engineer project in Subsection

48 of Section 3 of Chapter 7 of Laws 2009 (S.S.) to repair and rehabilitate acequia water storage projects statewide

is extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 48 of Section 3 of Chapter 7 of Laws 2009 (S.S.)

SECTION 49. APPROPRIATIONS FOR ROAD PROJECTS ENUMERATED IN LAWS 2003 (S.S.),

CHAPTER 3, SECTION 27--EXTEND TIME--SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--The time of expenditure for the

department of transportation road projects authorized in Laws 2008 (S.S.), Chapter 9 for purposes specified in

Paragraphs (1) and (3) through (37) of Subsection A of Section 27 of Chapter 3 of Laws 2003 (S.S.) is extended

through fiscal year 2015.

Laws 2008 (S.S.), Chapter 9

SECTION 50. MOTOR VEHICLE DIVISION FIELD OFFICE RENOVATIONS STATEWIDE--

EXTEND TIME--SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--The time of expenditure for the capital program fund project

originally authorized in Subsection 7 of Section 3 of Chapter 7 of Laws 2009 (S.S.) to plan, design and construct a

motor vehicle division field office in Santa Fe in Santa Fe county and reauthorized in Laws 2012, Chapter 63,

Section 103 to include renovating, improving, furnishing and equipping the motor vehicle division field offices

statewide is extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 7 of Section 3 of Chapter 7 of Laws 2009 (S.S.) and reauthorized in Laws 2012, Chapter 63, Section

103

SECTION 51. SOUTHERN NEW MEXICO REHABILITATION CENTER IMPROVEMENTS--

EXPAND PURPOSE--EXTEND TIME--REVENUE BONDS.--The revenue bond project originally authorized in

Subsection C of Section 8 of Chapter 320 of Laws 2005 and reauthorized in Subsection 1 of Section 94 of Chapter

42 of Laws 2007 for improvements at the southern New Mexico rehabilitation center and further reauthorized in

Laws 2011, Chapter 183, Section 27 to extend the time may include improvements to department of health

facilities statewide. The time of expenditure is extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection C of Section 8 of Chapter 320 of Laws 2005 and reauthorized in Subsection 1 of Section 94 of Chapter

42 of Laws 2007 and reauthorized again in Laws 2011, Chapter 183, Section 27

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APPENDIX C

VETO SECTION 52. CRISTOBAL DE LA SERNA LAND GRANT OFFICE BUILDING--EXTEND TIME--

GENERAL FUND.--The time of expenditure for the interstate stream commission appropriation originally

appropriated in Subsection 31 of Section 67 of Chapter 42 of Laws 2007 and reappropriated to the local

government division in Laws 2011, Chapter 183, Section 119 to purchase land, plan, design, construct, equip and

furnish an office building for La Merced in the Cristobal de la Serna land grant in Taos county is extended through

fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 31 of Section 67 of Chapter 42 of Laws 2007 and reappropriated in Laws 2011, Chapter 183, Section

119

SECTION 53. CERRO COMMUNITY CENTER--CHANGE TO QUESTA COMMUNITY CENTER--

SEVERANCE TAX BONDS.--The unexpended balance of the appropriation to the local government division in

Subsection 132 of Section 16 of Chapter 64 of Laws 2012 for a community center in Cerro in Taos county shall

not be expended for the original purpose but is changed to plan, design, construct, purchase, renovate and furnish a

community center in Questa in Taos county.

Subsection 132 of Section 16 of Chapter 64 of Laws 2012

VETO SECTION 54. ALBUQUERQUE PUBLIC ART WORK--CHANGE TO MORIARTY MAINSTREET

PROJECT ROUTE 66 IMPROVEMENTS--CHANGE AGENCY--EXTEND TIME--GENERAL FUND.--The

unexpended balance of the appropriation to the local government division in Subsection 85 of Section 59 of

Chapter 92 of Laws 2008 and reappropriated in Laws 2012, Chapter 63, Section 6 to plan, design, construct and

install a landmark public art work in Albuquerque in Bernalillo county shall not be expended for the original

purpose but is appropriated to the economic development department to plan, design and construct mainstreet

project Route 66 improvements in Moriarty in Torrance county.

The time of expenditure is extended through fiscal year 2015.

Subsection 85 of Section 59 of Chapter 92 of Laws 2008 and reappropriated in Laws 2012, Chapter 63, Section 6

122 Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


Bill Chapter Title

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

EFFECTIVE DATES OF LAWS 2013

by Bill Number

Emergency

Clause

HB 001 1 Feed Bill, Miera x 1/8/2013

HB 002 227 General Appropriation Act of

2013, Saavedra

HB 018 82 Drinking Water System

Financing, Gonzales

HB 021 42 Public Meeting Agendas 72 Hours

in Advance, Smith & Ivey-Soto

HB 022 185 Autism Coverage in Group Health

Coverage, Smith & O'Neill

HB 034 83 Tecolote Land Grant

Management, M.P. Garcia & R.C.

Martinez

HB 037 155 Annual Delinquent Property Tax

Sales, R. Martinez

HB 045 74 Transfer Insurance Regulation

From Public Regulation

Commission, Taylor & Leavell

HB 046 75 Transfer Corporations from Public

Regulation Commission to

Secretary of State, Taylor &

Keller

HB 053 177 Teacher Loan Repayment Act,

Stapleton

HB 054 178 School Board Cyberbullying

Prevention, Stapleton

HB 058 194 Rural Telecommunications

Carrier Regulation, Rodella

Effective

Date Other Dates and Notes

APPENDIX D

4/5/2013 Sect. 3: appropriations in Sect. 4 are

for FY14

7/1/2013

6/14/2013

1/1/2015

6/14/2013

1/1/2014 Sect. 1: starting 1/1/2014, Taxation

and Revenue Department shall offer

for sale at least one property on

property tax delinquency list in each

county; Sect. 2: act applies to

property tax years beginning

1/1/2014

x 3/29/2013 Sect. 9: Office of Superintendent of

Insurance created as of 7/1/2013;

Sect. 10: initial term for

superintendent is 7/1/2013 to

12/31/2015; Sects. 38 & 39:

temporary provisions for transfer of

staff, records, etc., and for

appointments

7/1/2013 Sect. 9: secretary of state assumes

responsibility for chartering

corporations as of 7/1/2013; Sect.

52: transfers from the Corporations

Bureau to the secretary of state

effective 7/1/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013 Sect. 1: local school boards shall

issue a cyberbullying prevention

policy by 8/2013

6/14/2013

123


APPENDIX D

Bill Chapter Title

HB 061 29 Game and Fish Special Event

Permits, Herrell

HB 062 30 Electronic Professional License

Renewal, Herrell

HB 070 21 New Mexico Finance Authority

Project Revolving Fund Projects,

Lundstrom

HB 072 52 Commercial Car Lease

Adjustment Clauses, Gonzales

HB 073 190 Convention Center Financing Act

to All Cities, Gonzales

HB 076 60 Frontier Communities Program,

Lundstrom

HB 085 125 Geothermal Resource Leasing,

Egolf

HB 093 53 Campaign Fund Transaction

Recording, Cote

HB 101 76 Hoisting Operator Licenses and

Penalties, R. Martinez

HB 104 51 Expand Reasons for Amber Alert,

Fajardo

HB 107 192 Municipal Court Fees for Law

Enforcement, Garcia Richard

HB 112 196 Data in School Accountability

Reports, Powdrell-Culbert

HB 120 123 Locomotive Fuel Gross Receipts,

Lundstrom

HB 130 44 Move Brain Injury Service Fund,

Larranaga

HB 131 81 Silver Alert For Endangered

Persons, Pacheco

HB 151 26 Election of Certain Magistrate

Judges, M.H. Garcia

HB 154 84 Repeal Meat Licensing

Provisions, Larranaga

HB 164 31 Clarify Certain Speed Limit

Violations, Alcon

Emergency

Clause

Effective

Date Other Dates and Notes

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

x 3/15/2013 Sect. 2: qualified entity must certify

desire to pursue loan by end of FY16

x 3/28/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

7/1/2013

6/14/2013

7/1/2013

6/14/2013

7/1/2013 Sect. 1: deductions added for certain

improvements starting 7/1/2012;

Sect. 4: deductions apply to gross

receipts tax and compensating tax

reporting periods starting 7/1/2013

6/14/2013 Sect. 2: current fund, records,

contracts, references in law, etc.,

transfer to Human Services

Department on 7/1/2013

7/1/2013

7/1/2013

6/14/2013

7/1/2013

124 Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


Bill Chapter Title

HB 172 179 Limit Tax Credit Paid to Another

State, J. Trujillo

HB 173 156 Uniform Child Abduction

Prevention Act, Stewart

HB 175 193 Suspension of Utilities for

Deployed Military, Steinborn

HB 178 197 Electronic Criminal Citations and

Fees, Kane

HB 180 33 Military and Spouses Professional

Licensure, R. Martinez

HB 186 126 Oryx Hunting for Veterans at

Resident Rate, McMillan

HB 194 77 Amend Motor Carrier Law Act,

Taylor

HB 202 13 Unlawful Acts For Car Dealers,

Cook

HB 205 11 Create State Financial Regulation

Fund, Hall

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

Emergency

Clause

Effective

Date Other Dates and Notes

APPENDIX D

7/1/2013 Act applies to taxable years starting

1/1/2013

1/1/2014

6/14/2013

7/1/2013

7/1/2013 Sect. 1, E: applies to applications

filed on or after 7/1/2013

6/14/2013

7/1/2013 Sect. 33: various transition dates for

provisions from prior versions of

motor carrier and ambulance

standards acts

x 3/14/2013

6/14/2013

HB 216 12 Fair Pay For Women Act, Egolf 6/14/2013

HB 219 189 Adequate Election Day Polling

Place Staff, Cote

HB 225 184 Electronic Voter Registration

Updates, Smith & Keller

HB 227 127 Move Brain Injury Advisory

Council Functions, Chasey

HB 232 180 School District Campaign

Reporting Act, Smith &

Candelaria

HB 238 85 New Mexico Chile Advertising

Act Violations, R. Martinez

HB 247 34 Military War Veteran Scholarship

Fund, Dodge

HB 267 124 Utility Energy Efficiency and

Load Management, Strickler

HB 274 36 Manufactured Home Committee

and Licensing, Cook

HB 275 79 Volunteer Firefighter Retirement

Benefits, Roch

HB 279 86 Solar Collector Rules For Permits,

Stewart

6/14/2013

7/1/2013

7/1/2013 Sect. 2: transfers of personnel, etc.,

to be made 7/1/2013

7/1/2013 Sect. 3: report filing dates

7/1/2013 Sect. 2, B: some exceptions for

business or brand names or

trademarks in use prior to 7/1/2013

7/1/2013

7/1/2013

6/14/2013

7/1/2013

6/14/2013

125


APPENDIX D

Bill Chapter Title

HB 299 27 Tax Administration Act Changes,

Taylor

HB 300 198 School Excused Absences for

Pregnancy, Doreen Gallegos

HB 304 200 Human Trafficking Civil

Remedies and Services, Chasey

HB 310 175 K-3 Program Eligibility, Stewart

& Soules

HB 315 87 Tax Payment and Manufacturer

Gross Receipts, Strickler

HB 329 132 Recovery of Certain

Unemployment Benefits, Brown

HB 334 188 County Classes and Officer

Salaries, Wooley

HB 347 88 Trust Company Certificate Fees,

Rodella

HB 348 153 Statewide Construction Inspector

Licensing, Rodella

HB 352 43 Local Capital Outlay Project

Contribution, Harper & Keller

HB 353 202 Capital Outlay Project

Reauthorizations, J. Trujillo

HB 358 154 Add Judicial Standards

Commission Members, Cook

HB 368 89 Renumber San Juan Precinct

Numbers, Strickler

HB 371 45 Public Improvement District

Bonds and Levies, Harper

HB 374 20 Safe Haven for Infants Site

Definition, Kane

HB 393 157 Dangerous Drug Disposal

[Dispensing] by Pharmacists,

McMillan

HB 401 181 State Investment in Technology

Transfer Companies, Carl Trujillo

Emergency

Clause

Effective

Date Other Dates and Notes

7/1/2013 Sect. 13: time limits for written

protests differ if mailing or service of

process occurs before or after

7/1/2013

6/14/2013

7/1/2013

x 4/4/2013

x 4/1/2013 Sect. 3: act applies to gross receipts

or governmental gross receipts

received in tax periods beginning

5/1/2013

7/1/2013

6/14/2013 Sect. 9: Sects. 1-5, 7, 8 effective

1/1/2014; Sect. 6 effective 7/1/2013

6/14/2013 Sect. 3: trust companies with

certificates issued as of 12/31/2012

must meet increased capital

requirement by 12/31/2017; Sect. 5:

Sects. 1-3 effective 6/14/2013, Sect.

4 effective 7/1/2017

6/14/2013

7/1/2013

x 4/5/2013 See individual sections for

extensions of appropriation deadlines

or prior authorization references

x 4/3/2013

6/14/2013

7/1/2013 Sect. 12: Sects. 1-4 and 6-10 do not

apply to a public improvement

district application submitted before

1/1/2014

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

126 Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


Bill Chapter Title

HB 415 128 Public Water Supply Contaminant

Testing, Dodge

HB 416 129 Anesthesiologist Assistant

Supervision, Chasey

HB 417 32 Cultural Affairs Department

Enterprise Fund, Varela

HB 443 182 Unpaid Unemployment Civil

Actions, Archuleta

HB 448 17 Removal of Lands from

Watershed Districts, Dodge

HB 462 187 School District Solvency

Flexibility, David Gallegos

HB 483 195 Public Defender Commission,

Maestas

HB 493 18 Geospatial Data Clearinghouse at

UNM, Easley

HB 494 90 Pipeline Location Notices For

Excavators, Easley

HB 497 91 Electronic Voter Registration

Updates, Smith

HB 503 158 GO Bond Negotiated Sales and

Interest Rates, Maestas

HB 506 159 Bed and Breakfast Beer and Wine

License, Irwin

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

Emergency

Clause

Effective

Date Other Dates and Notes

6/14/2013

7/1/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

APPENDIX D

6/14/2013 Sect. 1: secretary may continue

waiver of certain statutory

requirements for school districts for

2013-2014 school year

6/14/2013 Sect. 4: initial appointments for

staggered terms to the Public

Defender Commission to be made

by 7/1/2013; Sect. 6: initial meeting

to be held by 9/1/2013, chief public

defender to be appointed by

10/15/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

7/1/2014 Sect. 1, C: secretary of state to

implement electronic registration

updating by 7/1/2015

6/14/2013

7/1/2013

HB 542 16 Community Schools Act, Miera 6/14/2013

HB 546 176 Compilation of Certain

Amendments into Law, K.

Martinez & M. Sanchez

HB 562 130 Create Technology Research

Collaborative, Garcia Richard

HB 570 152 Sex Offender Tiers, Registration

and Information, Maestas

HB 580 14 New Mexico Finance Authority

Bonds for Hospitals, R. Martinez

x 4/4/2013

6/14/2013

7/1/2013 Sect. 5: amendments apply to a

person found guilty of committing a

sex offense starting 7/1/2013

6/14/2013

127


APPENDIX D

Bill Chapter Title

HB 581 201 Local Economic Development

Project Entities, R. Martinez

HB 608 199 Bernalillo Criminal Justice and

Review, Miera

HB 615 80 Volunteer Firefighter Stipends, R.

Martinez

HB 628 Special Education Funding, K.

Martinez

HB 641 160 Film Production Tax Credit

Changes, Maestas

HB 654 186 Group Insurance Premiums and

Fund Transfers, Saavedra

HB 658 183 Registration of Certain Fetal

Deaths, Alcon

SB 002 19 State Aviation Fund Uses, M.

Sanchez

SB 005 8 San Antonio Land Grant Political

Status, Cisneros & M.P. Garcia

SB 008 64 Public Regulation Commission

Commissioner Qualifications,

Keller & Bandy

SB 010 3 Notice For Surveys on Land

Grants, Rue & M.P. Garcia

SB 014 92 Extend Sustainable Building Tax

Credit, Wirth & Carl Trujillo

SB 020 104 Raise Probation Costs for

Defendants, Neville

SB 024 65 Local Government Investment

Pool, Munoz

SB 027 225 Public Employee Retirement

Changes, Munoz & Varela

Emergency

Clause

Effective

Date Other Dates and Notes

7/1/2013 Sect. 2, D: municipalities and

counties may need to adopt new

local option infrastructure gross

receipt tax to spend economic

development fund money for certain

purposes

6/14/2013 Sect. 1: commission to exist from

7/1/2013 to 6/30/2015

6/14/2013

x 4/5/2013 Sect. 1: act addresses appropriations

and contingencies for maintenance

of effort in FY13 & FY14

6/14/2013 Sect. 15: Sects. 1, 2, 4, 9, 11, 12

effective 7/1/2013, Sects. 3, 7, 8

effective 1/1/2014; other sections

must be read carefully for additional

dates

x 4/5/2013 Sect. 1, E: public employer

payments for basic life insurance

and public employee payments for

disability insurance as of 7/1/2013

1/1/2014

7/1/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013 Sect. 2: continuing education

requirements starting 7/1/2013;

Sect. 3: qualifications apply to

commissioners appointed or elected

after 7/1/2013

x 3/7/2013

1/1/2014 Sects. 1 & 2: tax credit applies to

tax years ending on or before

12/31/2016

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

7/1/2013 This act contains more changes,

phase-ins and tiers than can be noted

here; a careful reading of the act or

of an analysis of the act is needed

128 Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


Bill Chapter Title

SB 035 204 No Conviction for Certain Motor

Offenses, Martinez

SB 036 205 Penalties for Certain Motor

Offenses, Martinez

SB 037 163 Clarify Driver's License

Suspensions, Martinez

SB 038 4 Transfer Community Land Grant

Registry, Martinez & M.P. Garcia

SB 039 37 College District Bonds for Hard

and Software, Rue

SB 040 55 No Electronic Communications in

Jails, Rue

SB 041 50 Background Checks for Children,

Youth and Families Department

Placements, Rue

SB 051 66 Protective and Undercover

License Plates, Rue

SB 054 22 Local Government Planning Fund,

Beffort

SB 058 93 Reports to Immunization Registry,

Beffort

SB 060 226 Severance Tax Bond Projects,

Cisneros

SB 069 105 Insurance Coverage for

Telemedicine Coverage, Ortiz y

Pino

SB 070 67 State Monuments to Historic

Sites, Campos & Tripp

SB 072 102 Racehorse Testing Standards,

Papen

SB 073 135 Game and Fish License

Suspension Periods, Munoz

SB 079 68 Electronic Professional License

Renewal, Rue

SB 081 94 Liquor Tax Microbrew Volume

Limit, Beffort

SB 091 23 New Mexico Commercial Feed

Act, Padilla

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

Emergency

Clause

Effective

Date Other Dates and Notes

7/1/2013

7/1/2013

7/1/2013

x 3/8/2013

6/14/2013

7/1/2013

x 3/28/2013

6/14/2013

APPENDIX D

7/1/2013 Sect. 1: appropriation for FY 14 and

subsequent fiscal years

6/14/2013

x 4/5/2013 Sect. 2: deadlines for severance tax

bond projects; Sect. 3: deadlines for

general fund and other fund projects

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013 Sect. 3 A (3) & (4): certain

appropriations from class A & B

daily capital outlay tax ending

12/31/2014 and beginning 1/1/2015

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

1/1/2014

7/1/2013 Sect. 12: distributor of commercial

feed must file statements with and

pay inspection fee to NMSU board

of regents every quarter

129


APPENDIX D

Bill Chapter Title

SB 093 164 City Water Storage Tank

Contractors, Neville

SB 094 136 Penalties For No Boat Floatation

Devices, Sharer

Emergency

Clause

Effective

Date Other Dates and Notes

7/1/2013

6/14/2013

SB 099 206 Dental Amalgam Waste Act, Wirth 6/14/2013 Sect. 3: dental offices required to

install dental amalgam separator

systems by 12/31/2014; Sect. 5:

installation reporting requirement;

Sect. 8: Board of Dental Health to

make rules by 6/30/2013

SB 101 46 Energy Conservation Bonds, Wirth 6/14/2013

SB 106 5 Special Temporary Fishing

Licenses, Campos

SB 107 38 Uniform Real Property Transfer on

Death, Wirth

SB 113 228 Tobacco Fund for Children, Youth

and Family Department Programs,

Smith

SB 115 61 Educational Retirement Changes,

Ingle

SB 116 95 Liquor Tax Small Winegrower

Volume Limit, Smith

SB 118 106 Economic Development Fund

Reporting, Munoz

SB 132 47 Uniform Enforcement of Domestic

Violence Act, Cervantes

SB 138 207 Repeal Fruit and Vegetable

Standards Statutes, Ingle

SB 139 9 Disposition of State-Owned

Animals, Moores

SB 140 56 New Mexico Poison and Drug

Information Center, Moores

SB 141 10 Protective Vests for Police Dogs,

Morales

SB 143 48 Intensive Probation and Parole

Officer Caseload, O'Neill

SB 145 165 Community Corrections Panels,

O'Neill

SB 146 137 Uniform Commercial Code

Secured Transactions, Ivey-Soto &

Cook

6/14/2013

1/1/2014 Sect. 3: applies to a transfer on death

deed made by a transferor dying on

or after 1/1/2014

7/1/2013

7/1/2013 Each section contains phase-ins for

various retirement components

1/1/2014

6/14/2013 Sect. 3: Sect. 2 effective 7/1/2016

7/1/2013 Sect. 9: see transitional dates

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

7/1/2013

7/1/2013 Sect. 20: effective date of act is

7/1/2013; Sects. 21-26: effectiveness

of various interests and actions prior

to effective date of 2013 act; Sect.

28: priorities of application of act to

pre-effective date conflicting claims

130 Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


Bill Chapter Title

SB 149 208 DNA Administrative Center,

McSorley

SB 152 107 Office of Guardianship Fund,

Padilla

SB 154 209 Hours of Sunday Alcohol Sales,

Ryan

SB 156 138 Formulary Changes in Health

Laws, Candelaria

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

Emergency

Clause

Effective

Date Other Dates and Notes

7/1/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

APPENDIX D

6/14/2013 Sects. 1-5: various restrictions on

changes and notices required for

prescription drug formulary changes

beginning 1/1/2014

SB 160 109 Biodiesel Definitions, Ingle x 4/2/2013 Sect. 5: act applies to special fuel

received starting 5/1/2013; Sect. 6:

effective date of act is 5/1/2013

SB 163 166 Change Board and Commission

Sunset Dates, Cisneros

SB 164 108 Equalization Guarantee at School

for the Arts, Rodriguez

SB 173 69 State Financial Regulation Fund,

Moores

SB 176 96 Subdivision Act Definitions,

Beffort

SB 180 97 Trust Company Certificate Fees

and Requirements, Neville

SB 181 110 Professional Licensure Standards

and Boards, Rue

SB 182 40 Procurement Code Changes, Rue

& Varela

SB 184 15 Plant Protection Act Changes,

Cervantes

SB 185 62 Frontier Communities Program,

Woods

6/14/2013 Sects. 1-8: sunset of various boards

and commissions extended

7/1/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

SB 190 98 DWI Interlock Leasing, Griego 6/14/2013

SB 192 63 Surety Insurance Contracts

Compliance, Griego

SB 195 2 "Bataan-Corregidor Heritage

Month", Payne

SB 196 139 Long-Term Care Insurance

Partnership Program, Cotter

SB 198 6 Hospitals as STEMI Centers,

Morales & Doreen Gallegos

6/14/2013

x 2/4/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

Sect. 3: trust companies with

certificates issued as of 12/31/2012

must meet increased capital

requirement by 12/31/2017; Sect. 5:

Sects. 1-3 effective 6/14/2013, Sect.

4 effective 7/1/2017

131


APPENDIX D

Bill Chapter Title

SB 202 210 Farm-Related Industries Driver's

License, Pirtle

SB 205 111 Real Estate Appraiser Licenses

and Brokers, Griego

SB 206 140 Portable Electronics Insurance

Regulation, Griego

SB 212 167 Nonresident Real Estate Broker

Licensing, Griego

SB 221 54 New Mexico Health Insurance

Exchange Act, Shendo

SB 228 24 New Mexico Finance Authority

Water Fund and Acequia Projects,

Papen

SB 232 141 Gender-Neutral Language in Bills,

Sapien

SB 233 168 Workers' Compensation Attorney

Fees, Sapien

SB 234 211 New Mexico Chile Advertising

Act Violations, Munoz

SB 240 131 Space Flight Informed Consent

Application, Papen

SB 247 71 Childhood Development Services

Procurement, Beffort

SB 248 212 Driver Education Instructor

Requirements, C. Sanchez

SB 249 142 Statewide Construction

Inspectors, Papen

SB 259 213 Increase Alcohol Server Training

Frequency, Burt

SB 266 99 Architecture Multiple Source

Contracts, Griego

SB 268 112 Fertilizer Act Terms and

Penalties, Woods

SB 271 39 Emergency Mental Health

Evaluations, Papen

SB 274 49 Horse Shelter Rescue Fund,

Munoz

SB 275 134 Workers' Compensation Cleanup,

Woods

Emergency

Clause

Effective

Date Other Dates and Notes

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

7/1/2013

6/14/2013

x 3/28/2013 Sect. 3, O: board to be appointed

within 30 days; Sect. 5: preliminary

plan due in 60 days, operation to

begin within 6 months; Sects. 13 &

14: NM Health Insurance Alliance

transfers

x 3/21/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

7/1/2013 Sect. 2, B: exception and

requirement for chile products

marketed before 7/1/2013

6/14/2013 Sect. 4: delayed repeal effective

7/1/2021

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

7/1/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013 Sect. 3: applies to taxable years

beginning 1/1/2013

7/1/2013

132 Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


Bill Chapter Title

SB 279 143 Appraisal Management

Companies, Rue

SB 283 169 Removal of Land from Watershed

Districts, Papen

SB 289 161 Five-Year Senior Property Tax

Freeze, Shendo

SB 296 170 Prescription Drug Insurance

Coverage Review, Papen

SB 297 25 Expand Children's Trust Fund

Functions, Ortiz y Pino

SB 299 144 Marriage License Cleanup, Ivey-

Soto & Cook

SB 301 171 New Mexico Scholars Act

Scholarship Eligibility, Brandt

SB 302 113 Home and Charter School Student

Program Units, Brandt

SB 307 214 Public Records Changes, Ivey-

Soto

SB 310 28 Viral Hepatitis Testing and

Confidentiality, Griego

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

Emergency

Clause

Effective

Date Other Dates and Notes

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

APPENDIX D

6/14/2013 Sects. 1, 5-8: entities required to

accept uniform prior authorization

form starting 1/1/2014; Sects. 2-3:

prior authorization request forms to

be developed by 1/1/2014; Sect. 4:

practitioners may use uniform prior

authorization form after 1/1/2014

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

7/1/2013

6/14/2013 Sect. 2: act applies beginning 2014-

2015 school year

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

SB 311 72 HIV Testing Disclosure, Griego x 3/29/2013

SB 312 100 Unclaimed Insurance Benefits and

Policies, Leavell & Taylor

SB 320 57 Assistance Animal Act Changes,

Rodriguez

SB 326 145 Enforcement of Railroad

Livestock Fencing, Papen

SB 328 73 Motor Carrier Quality of Service

Standards, Griego

SB 334 133 Unemployment Fund

Contributions and Formula, Ingle

SB 335 114 Assisted Living Facility Contract

Refunds, Ingle

7/1/2013 Sect. 1, E & F: an insurer that has

never cross-checked policies against

a death master file prior to 7/1/2013

shall provide a list of all policies and

contracts issued on or after 7/1/2013

by 7/1/2016

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

7/1/2013 Sect. 33: various transition dates for

provisions from prior versions of

Motor Carrier and Ambulance

Standards acts

7/1/2013 Sect. 7: Sect. 2 effective 1/1/2014,

Sects. 1, 3-6 effective 1/1/2015

x 4/2/2013

133


APPENDIX D

Bill Chapter Title

SB 339 115 State Building Services and

Property Control, Ingle

SB 340 146 $10 Million Minimum Design and

Build Projects, Ingle

SB 341 215 Building and Remodel Contract

Threshold Amount, Ingle

SB 342 116 Nurse-Midwife Ultrasound

Procedures, Morales

SB 345 172 Eliminate Some Open Container

Exceptions, Sapien

SB 349 147 Public Service Attorney Loan

Repayments, Wirth

SB 352 216 Airline Employee Shifts and

Hours, Padilla & Christine

Trujillo

SB 353 117 Local Government Record

Indexing and Protection, Morales

SB 365 118 Home Visiting Accountability

Act, Sapien

SB 371 222 No Social Media Access for

Employers, Candelaria

SB 372 162 Barber and Cosmetology Cease

and Desist Orders, Torraco

SB 396 217 American-Made Vehicles in

Procurement Code, Neville

SB 397 218 Local Liquor Tax Proceed Uses

and Rates, Munoz

SB 406 119 Divided and Combined Property

Tax Collection, Sapien

SB 422 223 No College Requests for Student

Social Media, Candelaria

SB 423 150 Bed and Breakfast Beer and Wine

Licenses, Griego

Emergency

Clause

Effective

Date Other Dates and Notes

6/14/2013 Sects. 29 & 30: provide for transfers

needed to merge building services

and property control divisions

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013 Sect. 3: Sect. 1 effective 7/1/2013,

Sect. 2 effective 7/1/2015

x 4/2/2013

6/14/2013 Sect. 3: outcomes measurement

plan due 11/1/2013, annual reports

due beginning 1/1/2014

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

7/1/2013 Sect. 2, C: participating governing

body to submit report to DFA by 4/1

each year, DFA to audit

participating county by 7/1 each year

and report to interim legislative

committee before 9/1 each year

x 4/2/2013

6/14/2013

7/1/2013

SB 424 148 Alcohol Tasting Permits, Griego 7/1/2013

SB 431 78 County Firefighting Contracts,

Smith

SB 438 120 Municipal Incorporation

Requirements, Cervantes

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

134 Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


Bill Chapter Title

SB 442 101 DWI Interlocks for Certain

Crimes, Griggs

SB 443 70 Government Procurement

Requirements, Rue

SB 444 103 Horse Racing Licenses, Testing

and Penalties, Papen

SB 447 7 Native American Suicide

Prevention Council, Shendo &

Jeff

SB 448 41 Procurement Debarring and

Suspension, Cervantes

SB 464 203 School District Solvency

Flexibility, Kernan

SB 479 173 Adequate Subdivision Water

Supplies, Wirth

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

Emergency

Clause

Effective

Date Other Dates and Notes

7/1/2013

APPENDIX D

7/1/2013 Sect. 3: certification program to be

established for chief procurement

officers by 1/1/2015 and only

certified officers can perform certain

acts beginning 7/1/2015

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013 Sect. 1: secretary may continue

waiver of certain statutory

requirements for school districts for

2013-2014 school year

x 4/4/2013

SB 480 224 Subdivision Water Permits, Wirth 6/14/2013

SB 485 121 Nominating Petition Filing and

Resolution Times, Cisneros

SB 497 122 Homeowner Association Act,

Keller

SB 510 219 Agricultural Property Valuation

Times, Rodriguez

SB 555 149 State-Owned Railroad Property

Disposal, Ortiz y Pino

SB 557 58 Rural Job Tax Credit Definitions,

Leavell

SB 572 174 Renovation and Construction of

State Offices, Ingle

SB 574 35 Suspension of Utilities for

Deployed Military, Soules

SB 586 151 Additional Health Care Source

Payments, Griego

6/14/2013

7/1/2013 Sect. 4: recording deadlines for

associations organized before or

after 7/1/2013; Sect. 15:

applicability for various sections

6/14/2013 Sect. 1, F: application for valuation

for agricultural purposes to be made

within 30 days after assessor's

mailing of notice of valuation

6/14/2013

7/1/2013 Sect. 1, L: tax credit claims already

existing or under review before

7/1/2013 remain eligible

x 4/4/2013 Sect. 2: appropriation from reserve

fund to Property Control Division

for FY13

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

135


APPENDIX D

Bill Chapter Title

SB 621 220 Public Utility Efficiency and Cost

Recovery, Cervantes

SB 630 221 Clarify Lender Reporting

Requirement, C. Sanchez

SB 638 59 Registration of Private Colleges,

Keller

Emergency

Clause

Effective

Date Other Dates and Notes

7/1/2013

6/14/2013

6/14/2013

136 Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


BILL TO CHAPTER

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

CONCORDANCE

Fifty-First Legislature, First Session, 2013

APPENDIX E

Legislation Chapter Short Title Sponsor

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________

(An asterisk indicates a bill with an emergency clause.)

* H 1 1 FEED BILL (Miera)

CS/ H 2 227 (pv) GENERAL APPROPRIATION ACT OF 2013 (Saavedra)

H 18 82 DRINKING WATER SYSTEM FINANCING (Gonzales)

H 21 42 PUBLIC MEETING AGENDAS 72 HOURS IN ADVANCE (Smith) (Ivey-Soto)

H 22 185 AUTISM COVERAGE IN GROUP HEALTH COVERAGE (Smith) (O'Neill)

H 34 83 TECOLOTE LAND GRANT MANAGEMENT (Garcia MP) (Martinez)

H 35 Pk Veto USE OF FUNDS BY LAND GRANT COUNCIL (Garcia MP) (Martinez)

H 37 155 ANNUAL DELINQUENT PROPERTY TAX SALES (Martinez R.)

H 40 Pk Veto DESIGNATION OF BENEFIT CORPORATIONS (Cook) (Keller)

* CS/ H 45 74 TRANSFER INSURANCE REGULATION FROM PRC (Taylor) (Leavell)

H 46 75 TRANSFER CORPORATIONS FROM PRC TO SOS (Taylor) (Keller)

H 51 Pk Veto SUMMER SCHOOL ELECTIVE CIVICS CLASSES (Stapleton)

H 53 177 TEACHER LOAN REPAYMENT ACT (Stapleton)

H 54 178 SCHOOL BOARD CYBERBULLYING PREVENTION (Stapleton)

H 58 194 RURAL TELECOMM CARRIER REGULATION (Rodella)

CS/ H 61 29 GAME & FISH SPECIAL EVENT PERMITS (Herrell)

CS/ H 62 30 ELECTRONIC PROFESSIONAL LICENSE RENEWAL (Herrell)

* H 70 21 NMFA PUBLIC PROJECT REVOLVING FUND PROJECTS (Lundstrom)

* H 72 52 COMMERCIAL CAR LEASE ADJUSTMENT CLAUSES (Gonzales)

H 73 190 CONVENTION CENTER FINANCING ACT TO ALL CITIES (Gonzales)

* H 76 60 FRONTIER COMMUNITIES PROGRAM (Lundstrom)

H 83 Pk Veto DRIVER'S ED INSURANCE REDUCTION AGE (Salazar T.)

H 85 125 GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE LEASING (Egolf)

H 93 53 CAMPAIGN FUND TRANSACTION RECORDING (Cote)

H 101 76 HOISTING OPERATOR LICENSES & PENALTIES (Martinez R.)

H 104 51 EXPAND REASONS FOR AMBER ALERT (Fajardo)

H 106 Pk Veto INCREASE VALUE OF CITY PROPERTY FOR LEASE (Cook)

CS/ H 107 192 MUNICIPAL COURT FEES FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT (Garcia Richard)

CS/ H 112 196 DATA IN SCHOOL ACCOUNTABILITY REPORTS (Powdrell-Culbert)

H 120 123 LOCOMOTIVE FUEL GROSS RECEIPTS (Lundstrom)

H 130 44 MOVE BRAIN INJURY SERVICE FUND (Larrañaga)

H 131 81 SILVER ALERT FOR ENDANGERED PERSONS (Pacheco)

CS/CS/ H 133 Veto DISCLOSURE OF CONTRIBUTIONS BY CONTRACTORS (Chasey)

CS/ H 146 Veto SALE OF METHAMPHETAMINE PRECURSORS (Maestas)

H 151 26 ELECTION OF CERTAIN MAGISTRATE JUDGES (Garcia MH)

H 154 84 REPEAL MEAT LICENSING PROVISIONS (Larrañaga)

H 155 Veto REPLACEMENT FEES FOR CAR DISABILITY PLACARDS (Garcia MP)

H 164 31 CLARIFY CERTAIN SPEED LIMIT VIOLATIONS (Alcon)

CS/ H 171 Pk Veto INSURANCE COVERAGE FOR TELEMEDICINE SERVICES (Easley)

H 172 179 LIMIT TAX CREDIT PAID TO ANOTHER STATE (Trujillo J.)

H 173 156 UNIFORM CHILD ABDUCTION PREVENTION ACT (Stewart)

CS/ H 175 193 SUSPENSION OF UTILITIES FOR DEPLOYED MILITARY (Steinborn)

CS/ H 178 197 ELECTRONIC CRIMINAL CITATIONS & FEES (Kane)

H 180 33 MILITARY & SPOUSES PROFESSIONAL LICENSURE (Martinez R.)

H 186 126 ORYX HUNTING FOR VETERANS AT RESIDENT RATE (McMillan)

137


APPENDIX E

H 192 Veto SCHOOL PROGRAM UNITS FOR CERTAIN PERSONNEL (Trujillo CH)

CS/ H 194 77 AMEND MOTOR CARRIER LAW ACT (Taylor)

* CS/ H 202 13 UNLAWFUL ACTS FOR CAR DEALERS (Cook)

H 205 11 CREATE STATE FINANCIAL REGULATION FUND (Hall)

CS/ H 216 12 FAIR PAY FOR WOMEN ACT (Egolf)

CS/ H 219 189 ADEQUATE ELECTION DAY POLLING PLACE STAFF (Cote)

CS/ H 225 184 ELECTRONIC VOTER REGISTRATION UPDATES (Smith) (Keller)

H 227 127 MOVE BRAIN INJURY ADVISORY COUNCIL FUNCTIONS (Chasey)

CS/ H 232 180 SCHOOL DISTRICT CAMPAIGN REPORTING ACT (Smith) (Candelaria)

CS/CS/ H 238 85 NM CHILE ADVERTISING ACT VIOLATIONS (Martinez R.)

H 247 34 MILITARY WAR VETERAN SCHOLARSHIP FUND (Dodge)

H 260 Pk Veto ORIENTAL MEDICINE DOCTOR IMAGING LICENSURE (Kane)

CS/ H 267 124 UTILITY ENERGY EFFICIENCY & LOAD MANAGEMENT (Strickler)

H 273 Veto PUBLIC SCHOOL CAPITAL OUTLAY LEASE PAYMENTS (Stapleton)

H 274 36 MANUFACTURED HOME COMMITTEE & LICENSING (Cook)

H 275 79 VOLUNTEER FIREFIGHTER RETIREMENT BENEFITS (Roch)

CS/ H 279 86 SOLAR COLLECTOR RULES FOR PERMITS (Stewart)

H 282 Pk Veto ALBUQUERQUE ISOTOPES LICENSE PLATE (Maestas)

H 299 27 TAX ADMINISTRATION ACT CHANGES (Taylor)

H 300 198 SCHOOL EXCUSED ABSENCES FOR PREGNANCY (Gallegos DY)

CS/ H 304 200 HUMAN TRAFFICKING CIVIL REMEDIES & SERVICES (Chasey)

* CS/ H 310 175 K-3 PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY (Stewart) (Soules)

* H 315 87 TAX PAYMENT & MANUFACTURER GROSS RECEIPTS (Strickler)

H 327 Pk Veto PHYSICAL EDUCATION CREDIT HOURS FOR FUNDING (Egolf) (Griego)

H 329 132 RECOVERY OF CERTAIN UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS (Brown)

H 334 188 COUNTY CLASSES & OFFICER SALARIES (Wooley)

H 343 Pk Veto HEALTH GROUP BENEFITS FOR NONPROFITS (Dodge)

H 347 88 TRUST COMPANY CERTIFICATE FEES (Rodella)

H 348 153 STATEWIDE CONSTRUCTION INSPECTOR LICENSING (Rodella)

H 352 43 LOCAL CAPITAL OUTLAY PROJECT CONTRIBUTION (Harper) (Keller)

* CS/ H 353 202 (pv) CAPITAL OUTLAY PROJECT REAUTHORIZATIONS (Trujillo J.)

* H 358 154 ADD JUDICIAL STANDARDS COMMISSION MEMBERS (Cook)

CS/ H 368 89 RENUMBER SAN JUAN PRECINCT NUMBERS (Strickler)

FL/CS/CS/ H 371 45 PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT BONDS & LEVIES (Harper)

H 374 20 SAFE HAVEN FOR INFANTS SITE DEFINITION (Kane)

* CS/ H 379 Veto FILM PRODUCTION TAX CREDIT INCREASE (Maestas)

H 392 Veto PUBLIC EDUCATION COMMISSION AS INDEPENDENT (Garcia MH)

H 393 157 DANGEROUS DRUG DISPOSAL BY PHARMACISTS (McMillan)

H 401 181 STATE INVESTMENT IN TECH TRANSFER COMPANIES (Trujillo CA)

FL/CS/ H 415 128 PUBLIC WATER SUPPLY CONTAMINANT TESTING (Dodge)

H 416 129 ANESTHESIOLOGIST ASSISTANT SUPERVISION (Chasey)

H 417 32 CULTURAL AFFAIRS DEPT. ENTERPRISE FUND (Varela)

H 438 Veto NO MANDATORY PAROLE FOR CERTAIN SENTENCES (Stewart)

H 443 182 UNPAID UNEMPLOYMENT CIVIL ACTIONS (Archuleta)

H 448 17 REMOVAL OF LANDS FROM WATERSHED DISTRICTS (Dodge)

CS/CS/ H 460 Veto SCHOOL MANAGEMENT CONTRACTS & CHARTER BOARDS (Stewart) (Keller)

H 462 187 SCHOOL DISTRICT SOLVENCY FLEXIBILITY (Gallegos DM)

CS/ H 481 Veto EVIDENCE OF TEACHER COMPETENCY (Stapleton)

* CS/ H 483 195 PUBLIC DEFENDER COMMISSION (Maestas)

H 493 18 GEOSPATIAL DATA CLEARINGHOUSE AT UNM (Easley)

H 494 90 PIPELINE LOCATION NOTICES FOR EXCAVATORS (Easley)

H 497 91 ELECTRONIC VOTER REGISTRATION UPDATES (Smith)

H 503 158 GO BOND NEGOTIATED SALES & INTEREST RATES (Maestas)

H 506 159 BED & BREAKFAST BEER & WINE LICENSE (Irwin)

* CS/ H 513 Veto CERTAIN SCHOOL TESTS AS COMPETENCE (Stewart)

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H 522 Pk Veto CHARTER SCHOOLS FEDERAL GRANT REQUIREMENTS (Stewart)

H 540 Pk Veto POLICE ATHLETIC LEAGUE LICENSE PLATE (Miera)

H 541 Pk Veto TEACHER LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY & COUNCIL (Miera)

H 542 16 COMMUNITY SCHOOLS ACT (Miera)

* H 546 176 COMPILATION OF CERTAIN AMENDMENTS INTO LAW (Martinez K.) (Sanchez M.)

H 562 130 CREATE TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH COLLABORATIVE (Garcia Richard)

H 569 Veto GAME & FISH LICENSE TIME PERIOD (Sandoval)

CS/ H 570 152 SEX OFFENDER TIERS, REGISTRATION & INFO (Maestas)

H 580 14 NMFA BONDS FOR HOSPITALS (Martinez R.)

CS/ H 581 201 LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROJECT ENTITIES (Martinez R.)

FL/CS/ H 588 Veto COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT TEAMS (Miera)

H 593 Veto COUNTY HIGHER ED FACILITY PROPERTY TAX (Salazar N.)

H 608 199 BERNALILLO CRIMINAL JUSTICE & REVIEW (Miera)

H 615 80 VOLUNTEER FIREFIGHTER STIPENDS (Martinez R.)

H 623 Pk Veto SCHOOL COUNSELOR LEVEL 3 LICENSURE (Trujillo CH)

* CS/ H 628 191 SPECIAL EDUCATION FUNDING (Martinez K.)

* CS/ H 641 160 FILM PRODUCTION TAX CREDIT CHANGES (Maestas)

* CS/ H 654 186 GROUP INSURANCE PREMIUMS & FUND TRANSFERS (Saavedra)

CS/CS/ H 658 183 REGISTRATION OF CERTAIN FETAL DEATHS (Alcon)

S 2 19 STATE AVIATION FUND USES (Sanchez M.)

S 4 Veto DIALYSIS FACILITY GROSS RECEIPTS (Cisneros)

S 5 8 SAN ANTONIO LAND GRANT POLITICAL STATUS (Cisneros) (Garcia MP)

CS/CS S 7 Veto TAX EXPENDITURE & REVENUE BUDGET & REPORTING (Keller) (Varela)

CS/CS/ S 8 64 PRC COMMISSIONER QUALIFICATIONS (Keller) (Bandy)

S 9 Pk Veto STATE INVESTMENT COUNCIL CHANGES (Neville)

* S 10 3 NOTICE FOR SURVEYS ON LAND GRANTS (Rue) (Garcia MP)

CS/ S 12 Veto NMFA CHANGES (Keller) (White)

CS/ S 14 92 EXTEND SUSTAINABLE BUILDING TAX CREDIT (Wirth) (Trujillo CA)

S 16 Veto PUBLIC CAMPAIGN FINANCING CHANGES (Wirth)

S 20 104 RAISE PROBATION COSTS FOR DEFENDANTS (Neville)

S 24 65 LOCAL GOV'T INVESTMENT POOL (Munoz)

CS/CS/ S 25 Veto JUDICIAL RETIREMENT CHANGES (Munoz)

CS/ S 27 225 PUBLIC EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT CHANGES (Munoz) (Varela)

S 35 204 NO CONVICTION FOR CERTAIN MOTOR OFFENSES (Martinez)

S 36 205 PENALTIES FOR CERTAIN MOTOR OFFENSES (Martinez)

S 37 163 CLARIFY DRIVER'S LICENSE SUSPENSIONS (Martinez)

* S 38 4 TRANSFER COMMUNITY LAND GRANT REGISTRY (Martinez) (Garcia MP)

S 39 37 COLLEGE DISTRICT BONDS FOR HARD & SOFTWARE (Rue)

S 40 55 NO ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATIONS IN JAILS (Rue)

* S 41 50 BACKGROUND CHECKS FOR CYFD PLACEMENTS (Rue)

CS/ S 43 Pk Veto REQUIRE HEALTH SERVICES FOR PREGNANT WOMEN (Lopez)

S 51 66 PROTECTIVE & UNDERCOVER LICENSE PLATES (Rue)

S 54 22 LOCAL GOVERNMENT PLANNING FUND (Beffort)

S 58 93 REPORTS TO IMMUNIZATION REGISTRY (Beffort)

* CS/ S 60 226 (pv) SEVERANCE TAX BOND PROJECTS (Cisneros)

CS/ S 65 Veto PRE-RELEASE MEDICAID FOR INCARCERATED PERSONS (Ortiz y Pino)

CS/ S 69 105 INSURANCE COVERAGE FOR TELEMEDICINE COVERAGE (Ortiz y Pino)

S 70 67 STATE MONUMENTS TO HISTORIC SITES (Campos) (Tripp)

S 72 102 RACEHORSE TESTING STANDARDS (Papen)

S 73 135 GAME & FISH LICENSE SUSPENSION PERIODS (Munoz)

CS/ S 79 68 ELECTRONIC PROFESSIONAL LICENSE RENEWAL (Rue)

S 81 94 LIQUOR TAX MICROBREW VOLUME LIMIT (Beffort)

S 90 Pk Veto LOCAL GOVERNMENT CAMPAIGN REPORTING ACT (Padilla)

S 91 23 NEW MEXICO COMMERCIAL FEED ACT (Padilla)

FL/ S 93 164 CITY WATER STORAGE TANK CONTRACTORS (Neville)

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APPENDIX E

CS/ S 94 136 PENALTIES FOR NO BOAT FLOATATION DEVICES (Sharer)

S 99 206 DENTAL AMALGAM WASTE ACT (Wirth)

S 101 46 ENERGY CONSERVATION BONDS (Wirth)

S 106 5 SPECIAL TEMPORARY FISHING LICENSES (Campos)

S 107 38 UNIFORM REAL PROPERTY TRANSFER ON DEATH (Wirth)

CS/CS/ S 113 228 (pv) TOBACCO FUND FOR CYFD PROGRAMS (Smith)

S 114 Veto LEGISLATIVE RETIREMENT QUALIFICATION (Ingle)

S 115 61 EDUCATIONAL RETIREMENT CHANGES (Ingle)

S 116 95 LIQUOR TAX SMALL WINEGROWER VOLUME LIMIT (Smith)

S 118 106 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT FUND REPORTING (Munoz)

S 128 Veto PROSPECTIVE EMPLOYEE CREDIT PRIVACY (O'Neill)

S 131 Veto TRAFFIC TICKET PAYMENT & REPORTING (Cervantes)

S 132 47 UNIFORM ENFORCEMENT OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE ACT (Cervantes)

S 138 207 REPEAL FRUIT & VEGETABLE STANDARDS STATUTES (Ingle)

CS/ S 139 9 DISPOSITION OF STATE-OWNED ANIMALS (Moores)

S 140 56 NM POISON & DRUG INFORMATION CENTER (Moores)

S 141 10 PROTECTIVE VESTS FOR POLICE DOGS (Morales)

S 143 48 INTENSIVE PROBATION & PAROLE OFFICER CASELOAD (O'Neill)

S 145 165 COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS PANELS (O'Neill)

S 146 137 UNIFORM COMMERCIAL CODE SECURED TRANSACTIONS (Ivey-Soto) (Cook)

CS/ S 147 Veto EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY DEFINITIONS (Candelaria)

S 149 208 DNA ADMINISTRATIVE CENTER (McSorley)

S 152 107 OFFICE OF GUARDIANSHIP FUND (Padilla)

S 154 209 HOURS OF SUNDAY ALCOHOL SALES (Ryan)

CS/ S 156 138 FORMULARY CHANGES IN HEALTH LAWS (Candelaria)

S 158 Veto UNIFORM CONSEQUENCES CONVICTION ACT (Cervantes)

S 159 Pk Veto CIVIL CASE RECIPROCAL ATTORNEY FEE AWARDS (Cervantes)

* S 160 109 BIODIESEL DEFINITIONS (Ingle)

CS/ S 163 166 CHANGE BOARD & COMMISSION SUNSET DATES (Cisneros)

S 164 108 EQUALIZATION GUARANTEE AT SCHOOL FOR THE ARTS (Rodriguez)

S 171 Veto DISABILITIES CONCERNS COMMITTEE (Rodriguez)

S 172 Pk Veto SIGNED LANGUAGE PRACTICES BOARD (Rodriguez)

S 173 69 STATE FINANCIAL REGULATION FUND (Moores)

FL/ S 176 96 SUBDIVISION ACT DEFINITIONS (Beffort)

S 180 97 TRUST COMPANY CERTIFICATE FEES & REQUIREMENTS (Neville)

S 181 110 PROFESSIONAL LICENSURE STANDARDS & BOARDS (Rue)

S 182 40 PROCUREMENT CODE CHANGES (Rue) (Varela)

S 183 Pk Veto REPLACE GED TERMS WITH EQUIVALENCY DIPLOMA (Kernan)

S 184 15 PLANT PROTECTION ACT CHANGES (Cervantes)

* S 185 62 FRONTIER COMMUNITIES PROGRAM (Woods)

S 190 98 DWI INTERLOCK LEASING (Griego)

S 192 63 SURETY INSURANCE CONTRACTS COMPLIANCE (Griego)

* S 195 2 "BATAAN-CORREGIDOR HERITAGE MONTH" (Payne)

S 196 139 LONG-TERM CARE INSURANCE PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM (Cotter)

S 198 6 HOSPITALS AS STEMI CENTERS (Morales) (Gallegos DY)

S 202 210 FARM-RELATED INDUSTRIES DRIVER'S LICENSE (Pirtle)

S 203 Pk Veto JUVENILE DETENTION REQUIREMENTS (Ortiz y Pino)

S 205 111 REAL ESTATE APPRAISER LICENSES & BROKERS (Griego)

CS/ S 206 140 PORTABLE ELECTRONICS INSURANCE REGULATION (Griego)

CS/ S 212 167 NONRESIDENT REAL ESTATE BROKER LICENSING (Griego)

CS/ S 217 Veto AUTHORITY FOR PUBLIC SECURITIES TERMS (Morales)

*CS/CS/ S 221 54 NM HEALTH INSURANCE EXCHANGE ACT (Shendo)

* S 228 24 NMFA WATER FUND & ACEQUIA PROJECTS (Papen)

CS/ S 231 Pk Veto SCHOOL DISTRICT & CHARTER SCHOOL INVESTMENTS (Keller) (Hall)

S 232 141 GENDER-NEUTRAL LANGUAGE IN BILLS (Sapien)

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S 233 168 WORKERS' COMP ATTORNEY FEES (Sapien)

CS/ S 234 211 NEW MEXICO CHILE ADVERTISING ACT VIOLATIONS (Munoz)

S 240 131 SPACE FLIGHT INFORMED CONSENT APPLICATION (Papen)

S 247 71 CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES PROCUREMENT (Beffort)

S 248 212 DRIVER EDUCATION INSTRUCTOR REQUIREMENTS (Sanchez C.)

S 249 142 STATEWIDE CONSTRUCTION INSPECTORS (Papen)

S 258 Pk Veto PROFESSIONAL LICENSES FOR MILITARY & SPOUSES (Burt)

S 259 213 INCREASE ALCOHOL SERVER TRAINING FREQUENCY (Burt)

S 266 99 ARCHITECTURE MULTIPLE SOURCE CONTRACTS (Griego)

S 268 112 FERTILIZER ACT TERMS & PENALTIES (Woods)

S 269 Veto DURABLE MEDICAL EQUIPMENT GROSS RECEIPTS (Papen)

CS/CS/ S 271 39 EMERGENCY MENTAL HEALTH EVALUATIONS (Papen)

S 274 49 HORSE SHELTER RESCUE FUND (Munoz)

S 275 134 WORKERS' COMP CLEANUP (Woods)

CS/ S 279 143 APPRAISAL MANAGEMENT COMPANIES (Rue)

S 283 169 REMOVAL OF LAND FROM WATERSHED DISTRICTS (Papen)

S 284 Pk Veto VALUATION OF RENEWABLE ENERGY EQUIPMENT (Leavell)

S 285 Pk Veto LOCAL GOV'T HIGHER ED FACILITY PROPERTY TAX (Martinez)

CS/ S 289 161 5-YEAR SENIOR PROPERTY TAX FREEZE (Shendo)

S 294 Veto CRIMINAL RECORD EXPUNGEMENT ACT (Sanchez M.)

S 296 170 PRESCRIPTION DRUG INSURANCE COVERAGE REVIEW (Papen)

S 297 25 EXPAND CHILDREN'S TRUST FUND FUNCTIONS (Ortiz y Pino)

S 299 144 MARRIAGE LICENSE CLEANUP (Ivey-Soto) (Cook)

S 301 171 NM SCHOLARS ACT SCHOLARSHIP ELIGIBILITY (Brandt)

S 302 113 HOME & CHARTER SCHOOL STUDENT PROGRAM UNITS (Brandt)

S 307 214 PUBLIC RECORDS CHANGES (Ivey-Soto)

S 310 28 VIRAL HEPATITIS TESTING & CONFIDENTIALITY (Griego)

* S 311 72 HIV TESTING DISCLOSURE (Griego)

S 312 100 UNCLAIMED INSURANCE BENEFITS & POLICIES (Leavell) (Taylor)

S 315 Pk Veto CITY OR COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLANS (O'Neill)

S 320 57 ASSISTANCE ANIMAL ACT CHANGES (Rodriguez)

S 321 Pk Veto UTILITY CHARGES FOR CERTAIN SCHOOLS (Payne)

S 326 145 ENFORCEMENT OF RAILROAD LIVESTOCK FENCING (Papen)

CS/ S 328 73 MOTOR CARRIER QUALITY OF SERVICE STANDARDS (Griego)

S 333 Pk Veto SCHOOL LEASES & INTEREST CONFLICTS (Beffort)

CS/ S 334 133 UNEMPLOYMENT FUND CONTRIBUTIONS & FORMULA (Ingle)

* S 335 114 ASSISTED LIVING FACILITY CONTRACT REFUNDS (Ingle)

S 339 115 STATE BUILDING SERVICES & PROPERTY CONTROL (Ingle)

S 340 146 $10 MILLION MINIMUM DESIGN & BUILD PROJECTS (Ingle)

S 341 215 BUILDING & REMODEL CONTRACT THRESHOLD AMOUNT (Ingle)

S 342 116 NURSE-MIDWIFE ULTRASOUND PROCEDURES (Morales)

S 345 172 ELIMINATE SOME OPEN CONTAINER EXCEPTIONS (Sapien)

S 349 147 PUBLIC SERVICE ATTORNEY LOAN REPAYMENTS (Wirth)

S 352 216 AIRLINE EMPLOYEE SHIFTS AND HOURS (Padilla) (Trujillo CH)

* CS/ S 353 117 LOCAL GOV'T RECORD INDEXING & PROTECTION (Morales)

S 365 118 HOME VISITING ACCOUNTABILITY ACT (Sapien)

S 370 Veto SCHOOL RATING MODIFIED ASSESSMENT FORMULA (Sanchez M.)

S 371 222 NO SOCIAL MEDIA ACCESS FOR EMPLOYERS (Candelaria)

S 372 162 BARBER & COSMETOLOGIST CEASE & DESIST ORDERS (Torraco)

S 382 Pk Veto EXCUSED SCHOOL ABSENCES FOR PREGNANCY (Lopez) (Miera)

S 395 Veto PUBLIC WORKS WHISTLEBLOWER CONFIDENTIALITY (Cisneros)

S 396 217 AMERICAN-MADE VEHICLES IN PROCUREMENT CODE (Neville)

CS/ S 397 218 LOCAL LIQUOR TAX PROCEED USES & RATES (Munoz)

S 403 Pk Veto HEALTH ALL-PAYER CLAIMS DATABASE TASK FORCE (Lopez)

* CS/ S 406 119 DIVIDED & COMBINED PROPERTY TAX COLLECTION (Sapien)

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S 415 Veto NO MANDATORY PAROLE FOR CERTAIN SENTENCES (O'Neill)

S 416 Veto RAISE MINIMUM WAGE (Martinez)

CS/ S 422 223 NO COLLEGE REQUESTS FOR STUDENT SOCIAL MEDIA (Candelaria)

S 423 150 BED & BREAKFAST BEER & WINE LICENSES (Griego)

S 424 148 ALCOHOL TASTING PERMITS (Griego)

S 431 78 COUNTY FIREFIGHTING CONTRACTS (Smith)

S 438 120 MUNICIPAL INCORPORATION REQUIREMENTS (Cervantes)

S 442 101 DWI INTERLOCKS FOR CERTAIN CRIMES (Griggs)

S 443 70 GOVERNMENT PROCUREMENT REQUIREMENTS (Rue)

CS/ S 444 103 HORSE RACING LICENSES, TESTING & PENALTIES (Papen)

S 447 7 NATIVE AMERICAN SUICIDE PREVENTION COUNCIL (Shendo) (Jeff)

S 448 41 PROCUREMENT DEBARING & SUSPENSION (Cervantes)

S 458 Veto DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES SERVICE CHANGES (Rodriguez)

S 464 203 SCHOOL DISTRICT SOLVENCY FLEXIBILITY (Kernan)

*CS/CS/ S 479 173 ADEQUATE SUBDIVISION WATER SUPPLIES (Wirth)

*CS/CS/ S 480 224 SUBDIVISION WATER PERMITS (Wirth)

CS/ S 485 121 NOMINATING PETITION FILING & RESOLUTION TIMES (Cisneros)

S 490 Pk Veto ACCURACY OF EYEWITNESS PROCEDURES (McSorley)

CS/ S 491 Pk Veto POST-CONVICTION DNA TESTING ACT (McSorley)

S 495 Pk Veto NMFA BONDS FOR HOSPITALS (Morales)

CS/ S 497 122 HOMEOWNER ASSOCIATION ACT (Keller)

S 510 219 AGRICULTURAL PROPERTY VALUATION TIMES (Rodriguez)

S 539 Pk Veto REMOTE SELLERS GROSS RECEIPTS (Smith)

S 555 149 STATE-OWNED RAILROAD PROPERTY DISPOSAL (Ortiz y Pino)

S 557 58 RURAL JOB TAX CREDIT DEFINITIONS (Leavell)

* S 572 174 RENOVATION & CONSTRUCTION OF STATE OFFICES (Ingle)

CS/ S 574 35 SUSPENSION OF UTILITIES FOR DEPLOYED MILITARY (Soules)

S 586 151 ADDITIONAL HEALTH CARE SOURCE PAYMENTS (Griego)

S 587 Veto STATE SCHOOL GRADES COUNCIL (Morales)

S 588 Veto TEACHER & PRINCIPAL EVALUATION SYSTEM COUNCIL (Morales)

CS/ S 621 220 PUBLIC UTILITY EFFICIENCY & COST RECOVERY (Cervantes)

FL/CS/ S 630 221 CLARIFY LENDER REPORTING REQUIREMENT (Sanchez C.)

CS/ S 638 59 REGISTRATION OF PRIVATE COLLEGES (Keller)

CHAPTER TO BILL

Date

Chapter Signed Legislation Short Title Sponsor

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

(An asterisk indicates a bill with an emergency clause.)

1 Jan.18 * H 1 FEED BILL (Miera)

2 Feb.4 * S 195 "BATAAN-CORREGIDOR HERITAGE MONTH" (Payne)

3 Mar.7 * S 10 NOTICE FOR SURVEYS ON LAND GRANTS (Rue) (Garcia MP)

4 Mar.8 * S 38 TRANSFER COMMUNITY LAND GRANT REGISTRY (Martinez) (Garcia MP)

5 Mar.8 S 106 SPECIAL TEMPORARY FISHING LICENSES (Campos)

6 Mar.11 S 198 HOSPITALS AS STEMI CENTERS (Morales) (Gallegos DY)

7 Mar.11 S 447 NATIVE AMERICAN SUICIDE PREVENTION COUNCIL (Shendo) (Jeff)

8 Mar.11 S 5 SAN ANTONIO LAND GRANT POLITICAL STATUS (Cisneros) (Garcia MP)

9 Mar.13 CS/ S 139 DISPOSITION OF STATE-OWNED ANIMALS (Moores)

10 Mar.13 S 141 PROTECTIVE VESTS FOR POLICE DOGS (Morales)

11 Mar.13 H 205 CREATE STATE FINANCIAL REGULATION FUND (Hall)

12 Mar.14 CS/ H 216 FAIR PAY FOR WOMEN ACT (Egolf)

13 Mar.14 *CS/ H 202 UNLAWFUL ACTS FOR CAR DEALERS (Cook)

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14 Mar.14 H 580 NMFA BONDS FOR HOSPITALS (Martinez R.)

15 Mar.14 S 184 PLANT PROTECTION ACT CHANGES (Cervantes)

16 Mar.15 H 542 COMMUNITY SCHOOLS ACT (Miera)

17 Mar.15 H 448 REMOVAL OF LANDS FROM WATERSHED DISTRICTS (Dodge)

18 Mar.15 H 493 GEOSPATIAL DATA CLEARINGHOUSE AT UNM (Easley)

19 Mar.15 S 2 STATE AVIATION FUND USES (Sanchez M.)

20 Mar.15 H 374 SAFE HAVEN FOR INFANTS SITE DEFINITION (Kane)

21 Mar.15 * H 70 NMFA PUBLIC PROJECT REVOLVING FUND PROJECTS (Lundstrom)

22 Mar 21 S 54 LOCAL GOVERNMENT PLANNING FUND (Beffort)

23 Mar 21 S 91 NEW MEXICO COMMERCIAL FEED ACT (Padilla)

24 Mar 21 * S 228 NMFA WATER FUND & ACEQUIA PROJECTS (Papen)

25 Mar 21 S 297 EXPAND CHILDREN'S TRUST FUND FUNCTIONS (Ortiz y Pino)

26 Mar 21 H 151 ELECTION OF CERTAIN MAGISTRATE JUDGES (Garcia MH)

27 Mar 21 H 299 TAX ADMINISTRATION ACT CHANGES (Taylor)

28 Mar.25 S 310 VIRAL HEPATITIS TESTING & CONFIDENTIALITY (Griego)

29 Mar.25 CS/ H 61 GAME & FISH SPECIAL EVENT PERMITS (Herrell)

30 Mar.25 CS/ H 62 ELECTRONIC PROFESSIONAL LICENSE RENEWAL (Herrell)

31 Mar.25 H 164 CLARIFY CERTAIN SPEED LIMIT VIOLATIONS (Alcon)

32 Mar.25 H 417 CULTURAL AFFAIRS DEPT. ENTERPRISE FUND (Varela)

33 Mar.26 H 180 MILITARY & SPOUSES PROFESSIONAL LICENSURE (Martinez R.)

34 Mar.26 H 247 MILITARY WAR VETERAN SCHOLARSHIP FUND (Dodge)

35 Mar.26 CS/ S 574 SUSPENSION OF UTILITIES FOR DEPLOYED MILITARY (Soules)

36 Mar.26 H 274 MANUFACTURED HOME COMMITTEE & LICENSING (Cook)

37 Mar.26 S 39 COLLEGE DISTRICT BONDS FOR HARD & SOFTWARE (Rue)

38 Mar.26 S 107 UNIFORM REAL PROPERTY TRANSFER ON DEATH (Wirth)

39 Mar.26 CS/CS/ S 271 EMERGENCY MENTAL HEALTH EVALUATIONS (Papen)

40 Mar.27 S 182 PROCUREMENT CODE CHANGES (Rue) (Varela)

41 Mar.27 S 448 PROCUREMENT DEBARING & SUSPENSION (Cervantes)

42 Mar.27 H 21 PUBLIC MEETING AGENDAS 72 HOURS IN ADVANCE (Smith) (Ivey-Soto)

43 Mar.27 H 352 LOCAL CAPITAL OUTLAY PROJECT CONTRIBUTION (Harper) (Keller)

44 Mar.27 H 130 MOVE BRAIN INJURY SERVICE FUND (Larrañaga)

45 Mar.27FL/CS/CS/ H 371 PUBLIC IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT BONDS & LEVIES (Harper)

46 Mar.27 S 101 ENERGY CONSERVATION BONDS (Wirth)

47 Mar.27 S 132 UNIFORM ENFORCEMENT OF DOMESTIC VIOLENCE ACT (Cervantes)

48 Mar.27 S 143 INTENSIVE PROBATION & PAROLE OFFICER CASELOAD (O'Neill)

49 Mar.27 S 274 HORSE SHELTER RESCUE FUND (Munoz)

50 Mar.28 * S 41 BACKGROUND CHECKS FOR CYFD PLACEMENTS (Rue)

51 Mar.28 H 104 EXPAND REASONS FOR AMBER ALERT (Fajardo)

52 Mar.28 * H 72 COMMERCIAL CAR LEASE ADJUSTMENT CLAUSES (Gonzales)

53 Mar.28 H 93 CAMPAIGN FUND TRANSACTION RECORDING (Cote)

54 Mar.28 *CS/CS/ S 221 NM HEALTH INSURANCE EXCHANGE ACT (Shendo)

55 Mar.28 S 40 NO ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATIONS IN JAILS (Rue)

56 Mar.28 S 140 NM POISON & DRUG INFORMATION CENTER (Moores)

57 Mar.28 S 320 ASSISTANCE ANIMAL ACT CHANGES (Rodriguez)

58 Mar.28 S 557 RURAL JOB TAX CREDIT DEFINITIONS (Leavell)

59 Mar.28 CS/ S 638 REGISTRATION OF PRIVATE COLLEGES (Keller)

60 Mar.29 * H 76 FRONTIER COMMUNITIES PROGRAM (Lundstrom)

61 Mar.29 S 115 EDUCATIONAL RETIREMENT CHANGES (Ingle)

62 Mar.29 * S 185 FRONTIER COMMUNITIES PROGRAM (Woods)

63 Mar.29 S 192 SURETY INSURANCE CONTRACTS COMPLIANCE (Griego)

64 Mar.29 CS/CS/ S 8 PRC COMMISSIONER QUALIFICATIONS (Keller) (Bandy)

65 Mar.29 S 24 LOCAL GOV'T INVESTMENT POOL (Munoz)

66 Mar.29 S 51 PROTECTIVE & UNDERCOVER LICENSE PLATES (Rue)

67 Mar.29 S 70 STATE MONUMENTS TO HISTORIC SITES (Campos) (Tripp)

68 Mar.29 CS/ S 79 ELECTRONIC PROFESSIONAL LICENSE RENEWAL (Rue)

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APPENDIX E

69 Mar.29 S 173 STATE FINANCIAL REGULATION FUND (Moores)

70 Mar.29 S 443 GOVERNMENT PROCUREMENT REQUIREMENTS (Rue)

71 Mar.29 S 247 CHILDHOOD DEVELOPMENT SERVICES PROCUREMENT (Beffort)

72 Mar.29 * S 311 HIV TESTING DISCLOSURE (Griego)

73 Mar.29 CS/ S 328 MOTOR CARRIER QUALITY OF SERVICE STANDARDS (Griego)

74 Mar.29 *CS/ H 45 TRANSFER INSURANCE REGULATION FROM PRC (Taylor) (Leavell)

75 Mar.29 H 46 TRANSFER CORPORATIONS FROM PRC TO SOS (Taylor) (Keller)

76 Mar.29 H 101 HOISTING OPERATOR LICENSES & PENALTIES (Martinez R.)

77 Mar.29 CS/ H 194 AMEND MOTOR CARRIER LAW ACT (Taylor)

78 Apr.1 S 431 COUNTY FIREFIGHTING CONTRACTS (Smith)

79 Apr.1 H 275 VOLUNTEER FIREFIGHTER RETIREMENT BENEFITS (Roch)

80 Apr.1 H 615 VOLUNTEER FIREFIGHTER STIPENDS (Martinez R.)

81 Apr.1 H 131 SILVER ALERT FOR ENDANGERED PERSONS (Pacheco)

82 Apr.1 H 18 DRINKING WATER SYSTEM FINANCING (Gonzales)

83 Apr.1 H 34 TECOLOTE LAND GRANT MANAGEMENT (Garcia MP) (Martinez)

84 Apr.1 H 154 REPEAL MEAT LICENSING PROVISIONS (Larrañaga)

85 Apr.1 CS/CS/ H 238 NM CHILE ADVERTISING ACT VIOLATIONS (Martinez R.)

86 Apr.1 CS/ H 279 SOLAR COLLECTOR RULES FOR PERMITS (Stewart)

87 Apr.1 * H 315 TAX PAYMENT & MANUFACTURER GROSS RECEIPTS (Strickler)

88 Apr.1 H 347 TRUST COMPANY CERTIFICATE FEES (Rodella)

89 Apr.1 CS/ H 368 RENUMBER SAN JUAN PRECINCT NUMBERS (Strickler)

90 Apr.1 H 494 PIPELINE LOCATION NOTICES FOR EXCAVATORS (Easley)

91 Apr.1 H 497 ELECTRONIC VOTER REGISTRATION UPDATES (Smith)

92 Apr.1 CS/ S 14 EXTEND SUSTAINABLE BUILDING TAX CREDIT (Wirth) (Trujillo CA)

93 Apr.1 S 58 REPORTS TO IMMUNIZATION REGISTRY (Beffort)

94 Apr.1 S 81 LIQUOR TAX MICROBREW VOLUME LIMIT (Beffort)

95 Apr.1 S 116 LIQUOR TAX SMALL WINEGROWER VOLUME LIMIT (Smith)

96 Apr.1 FL/ S 176 SUBDIVISION ACT DEFINITIONS (Beffort)

97 Apr.1 S 180 TRUST COMPANY CERTIFICATE FEES & REQUIREMENTS (Neville)

98 Apr.1 S 190 DWI INTERLOCK LEASING (Griego)

99 Apr.1 S 266 ARCHITECTURE MULTIPLE SOURCE CONTRACTS (Griego)

100 Apr.1 S 312 UNCLAIMED INSURANCE BENEFITS & POLICIES (Leavell) (Taylor)

101 Apr.1 S 442 DWI INTERLOCKS FOR CERTAIN CRIMES (Griggs)

102 Apr.2 S 72 RACEHORSE TESTING STANDARDS (Papen)

103 Apr. 2 CS/ S 444 HORSE RACING LICENSES, TESTING & PENALTIES (Papen)

104 Apr.2 S 20 RAISE PROBATION COSTS FOR DEFENDANTS (Neville)

105 Apr.2 CS/ S 69 INSURANCE COVERAGE FOR TELEMEDICINE COVERAGE (Ortiz y Pino)

106 Apr.2 S 118 ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT FUND REPORTING (Munoz)

107 Apr.2 S 152 OFFICE OF GUARDIANSHIP FUND (Padilla)

108 Apr.2 S 164 EQUALIZATION GUARANTEE AT SCHOOL FOR THE ARTS (Rodriguez)

109 Apr.2 * S 160 BIODIESEL DEFINITIONS (Ingle)

110 Apr.2 S 181 PROFESSIONAL LICENSURE STANDARDS & BOARDS (Rue)

111 Apr.2 S 205 REAL ESTATE APPRAISER LICENSES & BROKERS (Griego)

112 Apr.2 S 268 FERTILIZER ACT TERMS & PENALTIES (Woods)

113 Apr.2 S 302 HOME & CHARTER SCHOOL STUDENT PROGRAM UNITS (Brandt)

114 Apr.2 * S 335 ASSISTED LIVING FACILITY CONTRACT REFUNDS (Ingle)

115 Apr.2 S 339 STATE BUILDING SERVICES & PROPERTY CONTROL (Ingle)

116 Apr.2 S 342 NURSE-MIDWIFE ULTRASOUND PROCEDURES (Morales)

117 Apr 2 *CS/ S 353 LOCAL GOV'T RECORD INDEXING & PROTECTION (Morales)

118 Apr 2 S 365 HOME VISITING ACCOUNTABILITY ACT (Sapien)

119 Apr 2 *CS/ S 406 DIVIDED & COMBINED PROPERTY TAX COLLECTION (Sapien)

120 Apr 2 S 438 MUNICIPAL INCORPORATION REQUIREMENTS (Cervantes)

121 Apr 2 CS/ S 485 NOMINATING PETITION FILING & RESOLUTION TIMES (Cisneros)

122 Apr 2 CS/ S 497 HOMEOWNER ASSOCIATION ACT (Keller)

123 Apr.2 H 120 LOCOMOTIVE FUEL GROSS RECEIPTS (Lundstrom)

144 Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

APPENDIX E

124 Apr.2 CS/ H 267 UTILITY ENERGY EFFICIENCY & LOAD MANAGEMENT (Strickler)

125 Apr.2 H 85 GEOTHERMAL RESOURCE LEASING (Egolf)

126 Apr.2 H 186 ORYX HUNTING FOR VETERANS AT RESIDENT RATE (McMillan)

127 Apr.2 H 227 MOVE BRAIN INJURY ADVISORY COUNCIL FUNCTIONS (Chasey)

128 Apr.2 FL/CS/ H 415 PUBLIC WATER SUPPLY CONTAMINANT TESTING (Dodge)

129 Apr.2 H 416 ANESTHESIOLOGIST ASSISTANT SUPERVISION (Chasey)

130 Apr.2 H 562 CREATE TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH COLLABORATIVE (Garcia Richard)

131 Apr.2 S 240 SPACE FLIGHT INFORMED CONSENT APPLICATION (Papen)

132 Apr.2 H 329 RECOVERY OF CERTAIN UNEMPLOYMENT BENEFITS (Brown)

133 Apr.3 CS/ S 334 UNEMPLOYMENT FUND CONTRIBUTIONS & FORMULA (Ingle)

134 Apr.3 S 275 WORKERS' COMP CLEANUP (Woods)

135 Apr.3 S 73 GAME & FISH LICENSE SUSPENSION PERIODS (Munoz)

136 Apr.3 CS/ S 94 PENALTIES FOR NO BOAT FLOATATION DEVICES (Sharer)

137 Apr.3 S 146 UNIFORM COMMERCIAL CODE SECURED TRANSACT (Ivey-Soto) (Cook)

138 Apr.3 CS/ S 156 FORMULARY CHANGES IN HEALTH LAWS (Candelaria)

139 Apr.3 S 196 LONG-TERM CARE INSURANCE PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM (Cotter)

140 Apr.3 CS/ S 206 PORTABLE ELECTRONICS INSURANCE REGULATION (Griego)

141 Apr.3 S 232 GENDER-NEUTRAL LANGUAGE IN BILLS (Sapien)

142 Apr.3 S 249 STATEWIDE CONSTRUCTION INSPECTORS (Papen)

143 Apr.3 CS/ S 279 APPRAISAL MANAGEMENT COMPANIES (Rue)

144 Apr.3 S 299 MARRIAGE LICENSE CLEANUP (Ivey-Soto) (Cook)

145 Apr.3 S 326 ENFORCEMENT OF RAILROAD LIVESTOCK FENCING (Papen)

146 Apr.3 S 340 $10 MILLION MINIMUM DESIGN & BUILD PROJECTS (Ingle)

147 Apr.3 S 349 PUBLIC SERVICE ATTORNEY LOAN REPAYMENTS (Wirth)

148 Apr.3 S 424 ALCOHOL TASTING PERMITS (Griego)

149 Apr.3 S 555 STATE-OWNED RAILROAD PROPERTY DISPOSAL (Ortiz y Pino)

150 Apr.3 S 423 BED & BREAKFAST BEER & WINE LICENSES (Griego)

151 Apr.3 S 586 ADDITIONAL HEALTH CARE SOURCE PAYMENTS (Griego)

152 Apr.3 CS/ H 570 SEX OFFENDER TIERS, REGISTRATION & INFO (Maestas)

153 Apr.3 H 348 STATEWIDE CONSTRUCTION INSPECTOR LICENSING (Rodella)

154 Apr.3 * H 358 ADD JUDICIAL STANDARDS COMMISSION MEMBERS (Cook)

155 Apr.3 H 37 ANNUAL DELINQUENT PROPERTY TAX SALES (Martinez R.)

156 Apr.3 H 173 UNIFORM CHILD ABDUCTION PREVENTION ACT (Stewart)

157 Apr.3 H 393 DANGEROUS DRUG DISPOSAL BY PHARMACISTS (McMillan)

158 Apr.3 H 503 GO BOND NEGOTIATED SALES & INTEREST RATES (Maestas)

159 Apr.3 H 506 BED & BREAKFAST BEER & WINE LICENSE (Irwin)

160 Apr.4 *CS/ H 641 FILM PRODUCTION TAX CREDIT CHANGES (Maestas)

161 Apr.4 CS/ S 289 5-YEAR SENIOR PROPERTY TAX FREEZE (Shendo)

162 Apr.4 S 372 BARBER & COSMETOLOGIST CEASE & DESIST ORDERS (Torraco)

163 Apr.4 S 37 CLARIFY DRIVER'S LICENSE SUSPENSIONS (Martinez)

164 Apr.4 FL/ S 93 CITY WATER STORAGE TANK CONTRACTORS (Neville)

165 Apr.4 S 145 COMMUNITY CORRECTIONS PANELS (O'Neill)

166 Apr.4 CS/ S 163 CHANGE BOARD & COMMISSION SUNSET DATES (Cisneros)

167 Apr.4 CS/ S 212 NONRESIDENT REAL ESTATE BROKER LICENSING (Griego)

168 Apr.4 S 233 WORKERS' COMP ATTORNEY FEES (Sapien)

169 Apr.4 S 283 REMOVAL OF LAND FROM WATERSHED DISTRICTS (Papen)

170 Apr.4 S 296 PRESCRIPTION DRUG INSURANCE COVERAGE REVIEW (Papen)

171 Apr.4 S 301 NM SCHOLARS ACT SCHOLARSHIP ELIGIBILITY (Brandt)

172 Apr.4 S 345 ELIMINATE SOME OPEN CONTAINER EXCEPTIONS (Sapien)

173 Apr.4 *CS/CS/ S 479 ADEQUATE SUBDIVISION WATER SUPPLIES (Wirth)

174 Apr.4 * S 572 RENOVATION & CONSTRUCTION OF STATE OFFICES (Ingle)

175 Apr.4 *CS/ H 310 K-3 PROGRAM ELIGIBILITY (Stewart) (Soules)

176 Apr.4 * H 546 COMPILATION OF CERTAIN AMENDMENTS INTO LAW (Martinez K.) (Sanchez M.)

177 Apr.4 H 53 TEACHER LOAN REPAYMENT ACT (Stapleton)

178 Apr.4 H 54 SCHOOL BOARD CYBERBULLYING PREVENTION (Stapleton)

145


APPENDIX E

179 Apr.4 H 172 LIMIT TAX CREDIT PAID TO ANOTHER STATE (Trujillo J.)

180 Apr.4 CS/ H 232 SCHOOL DISTRICT CAMPAIGN REPORTING ACT (Smith) (Candelaria)

181 Apr.4 H 401 STATE INVESTMENT IN TECH TRANSFER COMPANIES (Trujillo CA)

182 Apr.4 H 443 UNPAID UNEMPLOYMENT CIVIL ACTIONS (Archuleta)

183 Apr.4 CS/CS/ H 658 REGISTRATION OF CERTAIN FETAL DEATHS (Alcon)

184 Apr.4 CS/ H 225 ELECTRONIC VOTER REGISTRATION UPDATES (Smith) (Keller)

185 Apr.5 H 22 AUTISM COVERAGE IN GROUP HEALTH COVERAGE (Smith) (O'Neill)

186 Apr.5 *CS/ H 654 GROUP INSURANCE PREMIUMS & FUND TRANSFERS (Saavedra)

187 Apr.5 H 462 SCHOOL DISTRICT SOLVENCY FLEXIBILITY (Gallegos DM)

188 Apr.5 H 334 COUNTY CLASSES & OFFICER SALARIES (Wooley)

189 Apr.5 CS/ H 219 ADEQUATE ELECTION DAY POLLING PLACE STAFF (Cote)

190 Apr.5 H 73 CONVENTION CENTER FINANCING ACT TO ALL CITIES (Gonzales)

191 Apr.5 *CS/ H 628 SPECIAL EDUCATION FUNDING (Martinez K.)

192 Apr.5 CS/ H 107 MUNICIPAL COURT FEES FOR LAW ENFORCEMENT (Garcia Richard)

193 Apr.5 CS/ H 175 SUSPENSION OF UTILITIES FOR DEPLOYED MILITARY (Steinborn)

194 Apr.5 H 58 RURAL TELECOMM CARRIER REGULATION (Rodella)

195 Apr.5 *CS/ H 483 PUBLIC DEFENDER COMMISSION (Maestas)

196 Apr.5 CS/ H 112 DATA IN SCHOOL ACCOUNTABILITY REPORTS (Powdrell-Culbert)

197 Apr.5 CS/ H 178 ELECTRONIC CRIMINAL CITATIONS & FEES (Kane)

198 Apr.5 H 300 SCHOOL EXCUSED ABSENCES FOR PREGNANCY (Gallegos DY)

199 Apr.5 H 608 BERNALILLO CRIMINAL JUSTICE & REVIEW (Miera)

200 Apr.5 CS/ H 304 HUMAN TRAFFICKING CIVIL REMEDIES & SERVICES (Chasey)

201 Apr.5 CS/ H 581 LOCAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROJECT ENTITIES (Martinez R.)

202 (pv) Apr.5 *CS/ H 353 CAPITAL OUTLAY PROJECT REAUTHORIZATIONS (Trujillo J.)

203 Apr.5 S 464 SCHOOL DISTRICT SOLVENCY FLEXIBILITY (Kernan)

204 Apr.5 S 35 NO CONVICTION FOR CERTAIN MOTOR OFFENSES (Martinez)

205 Apr.5 S 36 PENALTIES FOR CERTAIN MOTOR OFFENSES (Martinez)

206 Apr.5 S 99 DENTAL AMALGAM WASTE ACT (Wirth)

207 Apr.5 S 138 REPEAL FRUIT & VEGETABLE STANDARDS STATUTES (Ingle)

208 Apr.5 S 149 DNA ADMINISTRATIVE CENTER (McSorley)

209 Apr.5 S 154 HOURS OF SUNDAY ALCOHOL SALES (Ryan)

210 Apr.5 S 202 FARM-RELATED INDUSTRIES DRIVER'S LICENSE (Pirtle)

211 Apr.5 CS/ S 234 NEW MEXICO CHILE ADVERTISING ACT VIOLATIONS (Munoz)

212 Apr.5 S 248 DRIVER EDUCATION INSTRUCTOR REQUIREMENTS (Sanchez C.)

213 Apr.5 S 259 INCREASE ALCOHOL SERVER TRAINING FREQUENCY (Burt)

214 Apr.5 S 307 PUBLIC RECORDS CHANGES (Ivey-Soto)

215 Apr.5 S 341 BUILDING & REMODEL CONTRACT THRESHOLD (Ingle)

216 Apr.5 S 352 AIRLINE EMPLOYEE SHIFTS AND HOURS (Padilla) (Trujillo CH)

217 Apr.5 S 396 AMERICAN-MADE VEHICLES IN PROCUREMENT CODE (Neville)

218 Apr.5 CS/ S 397 LOCAL LIQUOR TAX PROCEED USES & RATES (Munoz)

219 Apr.5 S 510 AGRICULTURAL PROPERTY VALUATION TIMES (Rodriguez)

220 Apr.5 CS/ S 621 PUBLIC UTILITY EFFICIENCY & COST RECOVERY (Cervantes)

221 Apr.5 FL/CS/ S 630 CLARIFY LENDER REPORTING REQUIREMENT (Sanchez C.)

222 Apr.5 S 371 NO SOCIAL MEDIA ACCESS FOR EMPLOYERS (Candelaria)

223 Apr.5 CS/ S 422 NO COLLEGE REQUESTS FOR STUDENT SOCIAL MEDIA (Candelaria)

224 Apr.5 *CS/CS/ S 480 SUBDIVISION WATER PERMITS (Wirth)

225 Apr.5 CS/ S 27 PUBLIC EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT CHANGES (Munoz) (Varela)

226 (pv) Apr.5 *CS/ S 60 SEVERANCE TAX BOND PROJECTS (Cisneros)

227 (pv) Apr.5 CS/ H 2 GENERAL APPROPRIATION ACT OF 2013 (Saavedra)

228 (pv) Apr.5 CS/CS/ S 113 TOBACCO FUND FOR CYFD PROGRAMS (Smith)

146 Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENTS

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

APPENDIX E

Constitutional

Legislation Amendment Short Title Sponsor

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

HJR 2 C.A. 1 SCHOOL ELECTION TIMING, CA (Smith) (Ivey-Soto)

SJR 7 C.A. 2 NORTHERN NM STATE SCHOOL REGENTS, CA (Martinez)

VETOED BILLS

Legislation Short Title Sponsor Action

____________________________________________________________________________________________________

(An asterisk indicates a bill with an emergency clause.)

H 35 USE OF FUNDS BY LAND GRANT COUNCIL (Garcia MP) (Martinez) Pocket Veto

H 40 DESIGNATION OF BENEFIT CORPORATIONS (Cook) (Keller) Pocket Veto

H 51 SUMMER SCHOOL ELECTIVE CIVICS CLASSES (Stapleton) Pocket Veto

H 83 DRIVER'S ED INSURANCE REDUCTION AGE (Salazar T.) Pocket Veto

H 106 INCREASE VALUE OF CITY PROPERTY FOR LEASE (Cook) Pocket Veto

CS/CS/ H 133 DISCLOSURE OF CONTRIBUTIONS BY CONTRACTORS (Chasey) Veto

CS/ H 146 SALE OF METHAMPHETAMINE PRECURSORS (Maestas) Veto

H 155 REPLACEMENT FEES FOR CAR DISABILITY PLACARDS (Garcia MP) Veto

CS/ H 171 INSURANCE COVERAGE FOR TELEMEDICINE SERVICES (Easley) Pocket Veto

H 192 SCHOOL PROGRAM UNITS FOR CERTAIN PERSONNEL (Trujillo CH) Veto

H 260 ORIENTAL MEDICINE DOCTOR IMAGING LICENSURE (Kane) Pocket Veto

H 273 PUBLIC SCHOOL CAPITAL OUTLAY LEASE PAYMENTS (Stapleton) Veto

H 282 ALBUQUERQUE ISOTOPES LICENSE PLATE (Maestas) Pocket Veto

H 327 PHYSICAL EDUCATION CREDIT HOURS FOR FUNDING (Egolf) (Griego) Pocket Veto

H 343 HEALTH GROUP BENEFITS FOR NONPROFITS (Dodge) Pocket Veto

*CS/ H 379 FILM PRODUCTION TAX CREDIT INCREASE (Maestas) Veto

H 392 PUBLIC EDUCATION COMMISSION AS INDEPENDENT (Garcia MH) Veto

H 438 NO MANDATORY PAROLE FOR CERTAIN SENTENCES (Stewart) Veto

CS/CS/ H 460 SCHOOL MANAGEMENT CONTRACTS & CHARTER BDS (Stewart) (Keller) Veto

CS/ H 481 EVIDENCE OF TEACHER COMPETENCY (Stapleton) Veto

*CS/ H 513 CERTAIN SCHOOL TESTS AS COMPETENCE (Stewart) Veto

H 522 CHARTER SCHOOLS FEDERAL GRANT REQUIREMENTS (Stewart) Pocket Veto

H 540 POLICE ATHLETIC LEAGUE LICENSE PLATE (Miera) Pocket Veto

H 541 TEACHER LANGUAGE PROFICIENCY & COUNCIL (Miera) Pocket Veto

H 569 GAME & FISH LICENSE TIME PERIOD (Sandoval) Veto

FL/CS/ H 588 COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT TEAMS (Miera) Veto

H 593 COUNTY HIGHER ED FACILITY PROPERTY TAX (Salazar N.) Veto

H 623 SCHOOL COUNSELOR LEVEL 3 LICENSURE (Trujillo CH) Pocket Veto

S 4 DIALYSIS FACILITY GROSS RECEIPTS (Cisneros) Veto

CS/CS/ S 7 TAX EXPENDITURE & REVENUE BUDGET & REPORTING (Keller) (Varela) Veto

S 9 STATE INVESTMENT COUNCIL CHANGES (Neville) Pocket Veto

CS/ S 12 NMFA CHANGES (Keller) (White) Veto

S 16 PUBLIC CAMPAIGN FINANCING CHANGES (Wirth) Veto

CS/CS/ S 25 JUDICIAL RETIREMENT CHANGES (Munoz) Veto

CS/ S 43 REQUIRE HEALTH SERVICES FOR PREGNANT WOMEN (Lopez) Pocket Veto

CS/ S 65 PRE-RELEASE MEDICAID FOR INCARCERATED PERSONS (Ortiz y Pino) Veto

S 90 LOCAL GOVERNMENT CAMPAIGN REPORTING ACT (Padilla) Pocket Veto

S 114 LEGISLATIVE RETIREMENT QUALIFICATION (Ingle) Veto

147


APPENDIX E

S 128 PROSPECTIVE EMPLOYEE CREDIT PRIVACY (O'Neill) Veto

S 131 TRAFFIC TICKET PAYMENT & REPORTING (Cervantes) Veto

CS/ S 147 EDUCATION TECHNOLOGY DEFINITIONS (Candelaria) Veto

S 158 UNIFORM CONSEQUENCES CONVICTION ACT (Cervantes) Veto

S 159 CIVIL CASE RECIPROCAL ATTORNEY FEE AWARDS (Cervantes) Pocket Veto

S 171 DISABILITIES CONCERNS COMMITTEE (Rodriguez) Veto

S 172 SIGNED LANGUAGE PRACTICES BOARD (Rodriguez) Pocket Veto

S 183 REPLACE GED TERMS WITH EQUIVALENCY DIPLOMA (Kernan) Pocket Veto

S 203 JUVENILE DETENTION REQUIREMENTS (Ortiz y Pino) Pocket Veto

CS/ S 217 AUTHORITY FOR PUBLIC SECURITIES TERMS (Morales) Veto

CS/ S 231 SCHOOL DISTRICT & CHARTER SCHOOL INVESTMENTS (Keller) (Hall) Pocket Veto

S 258 PROFESSIONAL LICENSES FOR MILITARY & SPOUSES (Burt) Pocket Veto

S 269 DURABLE MEDICAL EQUIPMENT GROSS RECEIPTS (Papen) Veto

S 284 VALUATION OF RENEWABLE ENERGY EQUIPMENT (Leavell) Pocket Veto

S 285 LOCAL GOV'T HIGHER ED FACILITY PROPERTY TAX (Martinez) Pocket Veto

S 294 CRIMINAL RECORD EXPUNGEMENT ACT (Sanchez M.) Veto

S 315 CITY OR COUNTY COMPREHENSIVE PLANS (O'Neill) Pocket Veto

S 321 UTILITY CHARGES FOR CERTAIN SCHOOLS (Payne) Pocket Veto

S 333 SCHOOL LEASES & INTEREST CONFLICTS (Beffort) Pocket Veto

S 370 SCHOOL RATING MODIFIED ASSESSMENT FORMULA (Sanchez M.) Veto

S 382 EXCUSED SCHOOL ABSENCES FOR PREGNANCY (Lopez) (Miera) Pocket Veto

S 395 PUBLIC WORKS WHISTLEBLOWER CONFIDENTIALITY (Cisneros) Veto

S 403 HEALTH ALL-PAYER CLAIMS DATABASE TASK FORCE (Lopez) Pocket Veto

S 415 NO MANDATORY PAROLE FOR CERTAIN SENTENCES (O'Neill) Veto

S 416 RAISE MINIMUM WAGE (Martinez) Veto

S 458 DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES SERVICE CHANGES (Rodriguez) Veto

S 490 ACCURACY OF EYEWITNESS PROCEDURES (McSorley) Pocket Veto

CS/ S 491 POST-CONVICTION DNA TESTING ACT (McSorley) Pocket Veto

S 495 NMFA BONDS FOR HOSPITALS (Morales) Pocket Veto

S 539 REMOTE SELLERS GROSS RECEIPTS (Smith) Pocket Veto

S 587 STATE SCHOOL GRADES COUNCIL (Morales) Veto

S 588 TEACHER & PRINCIPAL EVALUATION SYSTEM COUNCIL (Morales) Veto

148 Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


INDICES


FIFTY-FIRST LEGISLATURE

FIRST SESSION, 2013

House Bill 1 ..................................................... 10

House Bills 2 et al. CS/ ...................................... 7

House Bill 21 ................................................... 54

House Bill 22 ................................................... 36

House Bill 34 ................................................... 57

House Bill 37 ................................................... 61

House Bill 45 CS/ ............................................ 39

House Bill 46 ................................................... 54

House Bills 47 & 89 CS/ .................................. 51

House Bill 53 ................................................... 25

House Bill 54 ................................................... 23

House Bill 58 ................................................... 62

House Bill 61 CS/ ............................................ 32

House Bill 62 CS/ ............................................ 45

House Bill 70 ................................................... 14

House Bill 72 ................................................... 44

House Bill 73 ................................................... 10

House Bill 76 ................................................... 20

House Bill 85 ................................................... 30

House Bill 93 ................................................... 27

House Bill 101 ................................................. 46

House Bill 104 ..................................... 17, 19, 41

House Bill 107 CS/ .......................................... 19

House Bill 112 CS/ .......................................... 24

House Bill 120 ........................................... 45, 61

House Bill 130 ................................................. 37

House Bill 131 ................................................. 40

House Bill 133 CS/CS/ .................................... 32

House Bill 151 ................................................. 19

House Bill 154 ................................................. 47

House Bill 164 ................................................. 44

House Bill 172 ................................................. 59

House Bill 173 ........................................... 17, 19

House Bill 175 CS/ .......................................... 42

House Bill 178 CS/ .................................... 19, 41

House Bill 180 ..................................... 42, 45, 47

House Bill 186 ................................................. 32

House Bill 194 CS/ .................................... 15, 43

House Bill 202 CS/ .......................................... 14

House Bill 205 ........................................... 14, 15

House Bill 216 CS/ .......................................... 29

House Bill 219 CS/ .......................................... 27

House Bill 225 CS/ .................................... 27, 45

House Bill 227 ........................................... 37, 58

House Bill 232 CS/ .......................................... 27

House Bill 238 CS/CS/ ...................................... 2

House Bill 247 ..................................... 25, 42, 43

House Bill 267 CS/ .......................................... 31

House Bill 274 ................................................. 47

House Bill 275 ................................................. 50

House Bill 279 CS/ .......................................... 30

House Bill 299 ................................................. 58

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

BILL INDEX

House Bill 300 ................................................. 23

House Bill 304 CS/ .......................................... 41

House Bill 310 CS/ .......................................... 22

House Bill 315 ................................................. 59

House Bill 329 ................................................. 28

House Bill 334 ................................................. 51

House Bill 347 ................................................. 15

House Bill 348 ................................................. 46

House Bill 352 ........................................... 21, 58

House Bill 353 CS/ .......................................... 13

House Bill 358 ........................................... 17, 19

House Bill 368 CS/ .................................... 19, 27

House Bills 371 & 355 Fl/CS/CS/ ....... 52, 57, 62

House Bill 374 ............................... 16, 19, 38, 42

House Bill 393 ................................................. 34

House Bill 401 ........................................... 15, 54

House Bill 415 Fl/CS/ ...................................... 63

House Bill 416 ..................................... 27, 38, 47

House Bill 417 ........................................... 14, 20

House Bill 443 ........................................... 19, 29

House Bill 448 ..................................... 52, 57, 63

House Bill 462 ................................................. 23

House Bill 483 CS/ .......................................... 18

House Bill 493 ................................................. 26

House Bill 494 ........................................... 31, 62

House Bill 497 ................................................. 27

House Bill 503 ................................................. 11

House Bill 506 ................................. 3, 15, 47, 58

House Bill 522 ................................................. 22

House Bill 542 ................................................. 23

House Bill 546 ................................................. 53

House Bill 562 ................................................. 26

House Bill 570 CS/ .......................................... 19

House Bill 580 ................................................. 14

House Bill 581 CS/ .......................................... 21

House Bill 608 ................................................. 41

House Bill 615 ................................................. 54

House Bill 628 CS/ ................................ 7, 14, 22

House Bill 641 CS/ .......................................... 59

House Bill 654 CS/ .................................... 14, 50

House Bill 658 CS/CS/ .................................... 34

House Concurrent Resolution 1 ....................... 53

House Joint Resolution 2 ................................. 17

Senate Bill 2 ..................................................... 45

Senate Bill 5 ..................................................... 57

Senate Bill 8 CS/CS/ ........................................ 51

Senate Bill 10 ................................................... 57

Senate Bill 14 CS/ ............................................ 60

Senate Bill 20 ................................................... 41

Senate Bill 24 ................................................... 11

Senate Bill 27 CS/ ............................................ 48

Senate Bill 35 ................................................... 44

Senate Bill 36 ................................................... 44

Senate Bill 37 ................................................... 44

Senate Bill 38 ................................................... 57

BILL INDEX

151


BILL INDEX

Senate Bill 39 ................................................... 26

Senate Bill 40 ................................................... 42

Senate Bill 41 ................................................... 16

Senate Bill 51 ................................................... 43

Senate Bill 58 ................................................... 34

Senate Bill 60 CS/ ............................................ 13

Senate Bill 69 CS/ ............................................ 36

Senate Bill 70 ................................................... 20

Senate Bill 72 ................................................... 33

Senate Bill 73 ................................................... 32

Senate Bill 79 CS/ ............................................ 45

Senate Bill 81 ................................................... 61

Senate Bill 91 ..................................................... 1

Senate Bill 93 Fl/ ............................................. 62

Senate Bill 94 CS/ ............................................ 19

Senate Bill 101 ........................................... 14, 31

Senate Bill 106 ................................................. 32

Senate Bill 107 ........................................... 19, 52

Senate Bill 113 CS/CS/ .............................. 12, 24

Senate Bill 114 ................................................. 48

Senate Bill 115 ........................................... 49, 50

Senate Bill 116 ............................................. 3, 61

Senate Bill 132 ........................................... 17, 41

Senate Bill 138 ................................................... 1

Senate Bill 139 CS/ ...................................... 4, 42

Senate Bill 140 ........................................... 27, 34

Senate Bill 143 ................................................. 41

Senate Bill 145 ................................................. 42

Senate Bill 146 ................................................. 15

Senate Bill 149 ................................................. 41

Senate Bill 152 ................................................. 38

Senate Bill 154 ............................................. 3, 15

Senate Bill 156 CS/ .................................... 36, 40

Senate Bill 160 ..................................... 31, 45, 60

Senate Bill 163 CS/ .......................................... 47

Senate Bill 164 ................................................. 23

Senate Bill 173 ........................................... 14, 15

Senate Bill 176 Fl/...................................... 52, 58

Senate Bill 180 ................................................. 15

Senate Bill 181 ................................................. 47

Senate Bill 182 ........................................... 31, 56

Senate Bill 184 ................................................... 1

Senate Bill 185 ................................................. 21

Senate Bill 190 ....................................... 3, 14, 45

Senate Bill 192 ................................................. 40

Senate Bill 195 ........................................... 20, 43

Senate Bill 196 ........................................... 36, 40

Senate Bill 198 ................................................. 34

Senate Bill 202 ............................................. 2, 43

Senate Bill 205 ................................................. 46

Senate Bill 206 CS/ .......................................... 39

Senate Bill 212 CS/ .................................... 46, 52

Senate Bill 221 CS/CS/ .................. 33, 36, 39, 40

Senate Bill 228 ................................................. 14

Senate Bill 232 ................................................. 53

Senate Bill 233 ........................................... 30, 40

Senate Bill 234 CS/ ............................................ 2

Senate Bill 240 ..................................... 15, 19, 20

Senate Bill 247 ..................................... 17, 27, 56

Senate Bill 248 ................................................. 44

Senate Bill 249 ................................................. 46

Senate Bill 259 ............................................. 3, 48

Senate Bill 266 ................................................. 56

Senate Bill 268 ................................................... 2

Senate Bill 271 CS/ .................................... 35, 42

Senate Bill 274 ....................................... 4, 14, 62

Senate Bill 275 ................................................. 29

Senate Bill 279 CS/ .......................................... 46

Senate Bill 283 ..................................... 52, 57, 63

Senate Bill 289 CS/ .................................... 52, 61

Senate Bill 296 ........................................... 37, 40

Senate Bill 297 ........................................... 16, 38

Senate Bill 299 ........................................... 16, 19

Senate Bill 301 ................................................. 25

Senate Bill 302 ................................................. 23

Senate Bill 307 ................................................. 53

Senate Bill 310 ................................................. 35

Senate Bill 311 ................................................. 35

Senate Bill 312 ................................................. 40

Senate Bill 320 ............................................. 4, 38

Senate Bill 326 ....................................... 4, 45, 52

Senate Bill 328 CS/ .................................... 15, 43

Senate Bill 333 ................................................. 22

Senate Bill 334 CS/ .......................................... 28

Senate Bill 335 ................................................. 38

Senate Bill 339 ................................................. 54

Senate Bill 340 ................................................. 56

Senate Bill 341 ................................................. 56

Senate Bill 342 ........................................... 38, 47

Senate Bill 345 ............................................. 3, 45

Senate Bill 349 ........................................... 26, 51

Senate Bill 352 ................................................. 30

Senate Bill 365 ........................................... 16, 38

Senate Bill 371 ................................................. 30

Senate Bill 372 ................................................. 46

Senate Bill 396 ........................................... 42, 56

Senate Bill 397 CS/ ...................................... 3, 61

Senate Bill 406 CS/ .................................... 52, 61

Senate Bill 422 CS/ .......................................... 26

Senate Bill 423 ..................................... 15, 48, 58

Senate Bill 424 ................................................... 3

Senate Bill 431 ................................................. 54

Senate Bill 438 ................................................. 55

Senate Bill 442 ....................................... 3, 19, 45

Senate Bill 443 ................................................. 55

Senate Bill 444 CS/ ...................................... 4, 33

Senate Bill 447 ................................................. 38

Senate Bill 448 ........................................... 32, 56

Senate Bill 464 ................................................. 23

Senate Bill 479 CS/CS/ .................................... 63

152 Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


Senate Bill 480 CS/CS/ ........................ 52, 58, 62

Senate Bill 485 CS/ .......................................... 27

Senate Bill 497 CS/ .......................................... 52

Senate Bill 510 ....................................... 2, 52, 62

Senate Bill 557 ........................................... 30, 60

Senate Bill 572 ........................................... 14, 55

Senate Bill 574 CS/ .......................................... 42

Senate Bill 586 ..................................... 14, 35, 58

Senate Bill 621 CS/ .......................................... 31

Senate Bill 630 Fl/CS/ ...................................... 15

Senate Bill 638 CS/ .......................................... 25

Senate Joint Resolution 7 ................................. 17

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

BILL INDEX

153


GENERAL INDEX

2013 Work New Mexico Act .................................. 13

Acequia ................................................................... 14

Acequia Project Fund ............................................. 14

Administrative Office of the Courts ................ 10, 18

Adoption ................................................................. 18

Adult Community Corrections Act ....................... 42

Affiliated public employer ...................................... 49

Aging .................................................8, 37, 38, 41, 47

Aging and Long-Term Services

Department ............................................... 8, 37, 38

Agricultural experiment stations .............................. 1

Agricultural land use ................................................ 2

Agricultural valuation method ................................. 2

Agriculture ................................... 1, 2, 43, 47, 52, 62

Agriculture, New Mexico Department of ................ 1

see also "NMDA"

Agriculture, United States Department of .............. 1

Air service assistance program ................................ 45

Airlines .............................................................. 28, 30

Alcohol ..............................................3, 15, 47, 48, 58

Alcohol server training ............................................. 3

Alcoholic beverages ................................................... 3

Alternative gross receipts taxpayers ........................ 59

AMBER alert .............................................. 17, 19, 41

Anesthesiologist assistant student .............. 27, 38, 47

Animal Sheltering Board ........................................ 47

Animals ............................ 3, 4, 14, 38, 42, 45, 52, 62

Annuities ................................................................. 50

Antidonation clause ............................................... 21

Appraisal Management Company

Registration Act .................................................. 46

Appropriation Contingency Fund ......................... 10

Armed forces ............................................... 25, 32, 42

Assault ....................................................................... 9

Assistance animal .................................................... 38

Attorney fees ................................................. 4, 30, 40

Attorney general ............................................... 54, 58

Audits ................................................................ 14, 22

Autism spectrum disorder .......................... 35, 40, 51

Automated valuation models ................................. 46

Background check................................................... 16

Barbers and Cosmetologists, Board of ............. 46, 47

Bataan-Corregidor Heritage Month ................. 20, 43

Bed and breakfast .............................3, 15, 47, 48, 58

Beer ..................................................................... 3, 61

Behavioral health .................................................... 33

Benefit ratio ............................................................ 28

Benefit ratio system ................................................ 28

Bernalillo County ................................... 9, 13, 40, 41

Bernalillo County Criminal Justice System

Review Commission ........................................... 41

Bernalillo County Metropolitan Court ................... 9

Biodiesel ...................................................... 31, 45, 60

GENERAL INDEX

Blended biodiesel.................................................... 60

BLM ........................................................................ 30

Blood ....................................................................... 34

Board of Barbers and Cosmetologists .............. 46, 47

Board of Landscape Architects ............................... 47

Board of Nursing Home Administrators ............... 47

Board of Pharmacy ................................................. 37

Boat Act .................................................................. 19

Body Art Safe Practices Act .................................... 47

Bomb-making materials ............................................ 2

Bonds ....................................... 11, 13, 14, 26, 30, 31

Brain Injury Advisory Council ............................... 37

Brain Injury Services Fund ............................... 37, 38

Building inspectors ................................................. 46

Building Services Division ...................................... 54

Bullying ................................................................... 23

Bureau of Business and Economic Research ........... 5

Bureau of Land Management ................................. 30

see also "BLM"

Business .......... 1, 5, 14, 15, 21, 31, 43, 45, 53, 58-60

Business authorization certificate ........................... 15

CAD ........................................................................ 20

Campaign reporting ............................................... 27

Cancer ............................................................... 12, 14

Capital outlay ..................................................... 12-14

Capital outlay bill ................................................... 13

Capital projects ....................................................... 13

Capitol .................................................................... 22

Car dealers .............................................................. 14

Centennial Care ..................................................... 35

Central purchasing office ................................. 55, 56

Certificates of insurance ......................................... 40

Charter schools .............................................. 1, 22-24

Chief procurement officers .................................... 55

Chief public defender ............................................. 19

Child .......................... 7, 8, 16, 17, 19, 23, 38, 41, 42

Child Abduction Prevention Act, Uniform .... 17, 19

Child abuse ............................................................. 16

Child support .......................................................... 17

Children ................... 9, 16, 17, 19, 29, 32, 38, 40, 42

Children, Youth and Families Department............. 9

see also "CYFD"

Children's Trust Fund ...................................... 16, 38

Child-custody proceeding ....................................... 19

Chile ...................................................................... 1, 2

Chile Advertising Act, New Mexico......................... 2

Chile production ...................................................... 1

Chile-centric bills ...................................................... 1

Class III gaming compact ................................. 32, 38

Class A county ........................................................ 41

Class B counties ...................................................... 26

Clean energy ..................................................... 30, 31

Coal Surface Mining Commission ......................... 47

154 Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


Cochlear implants..................................................... 9

COLA .......................................................... 25, 49, 50

Colleges ................................. 1, 11, 14, 17, 25-27, 49

Combined reporting ................................... 15, 58, 59

Commercial Code, Uniform .................................. 15

Commercial feed................................................... 1, 2

Commercial Feed Act, New Mexico .................... 1, 2

Commercial property.............................................. 57

Commissioner of public lands ............................... 30

Common core standards ........................................ 24

Community college ..................................... 11, 26, 27

Community Corrections Grant Fund ................... 42

Community corrections programs ......................... 42

Community Schools Act ........................................ 23

Compacts, Legislative Committee on .............. 33, 39

Compensating tax ............................................. 45, 61

Compilation Commission, New Mexico ............... 53

Component units ................................................... 22

Condominiums ....................................................... 52

Conference committee ........................................... 51

Conservation .......................... 2, 4, 14, 19, 31, 62, 63

Constitution............ 12, 17-19, 21, 27, 39, 51, 53, 54

Constitutional amendments ...................... 17, 39, 51

Construction ..........13, 15, 26, 30, 31, 45, 47, 55, 56

Construction Industries Division .............. 30, 31, 47

Consumable ............................................................ 60

Consumer protection ................................... 2, 15, 44

Consumers .......................................................... 1, 39

Contraband ............................................................. 42

Contractors .................................... 32, 37, 40, 56, 60

Controlled substances ............................................ 34

Cooperative extension service .................................. 1

Corporate income tax .......................4, 14, 15, 58, 59

Corporations ........................... 15, 17, 33, 36, 39, 43,

46, 53, 54, 58, 59

Corporations Bureau .............................................. 54

Correctional facilities ................................. 13, 40, 42

Corrections ..................................... 4, 9, 17-19, 40-42

Corrections Department .................... 4, 9, 18, 41, 42

Cost-of-living adjustment ........................................ 25

see also "COLA"

Council Service, Legislative .................................... 10

see also "LCS"

Counties ....2, 9-11, 13, 14, 17, 19, 26-27, 29, 31, 35,

40-43, 46, 48, 51, 52, 54, 55, 57, 59, 61-62

County clerk ......................................... 17, 52, 57, 61

Courts .................. 9, 10, 17-19, 27-29, 38, 41, 44, 54

Coyote-killing contests .............................................. 4

Crime ...................................................................... 41

Criminal law ...................................................... 17-19

Criminal penalties ............................................ 18, 46

Criminal record check ............................................ 16

Cultural affairs .................................................. 14, 20

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

Cultural Affairs Department ............................ 14, 20

see also "CAD"

Cultural Affairs Department Enterprise

Fund .............................................................. 14, 20

Cyberbullying .......................................................... 23

CYFD ...................................................... 9, 12, 16, 56

Dam ............................................................. 13, 17, 62

Dangerous drugs ..................................................... 34

Death .................................. 19, 28, 29, 34, 38, 40, 52

Delinquent property tax sale .................................. 61

Delinquent property taxes ...................................... 61

Dental Amalgam Waste Reduction Act ........... 38, 63

Department of Agriculture, New Mexico ................ 1

see also "NMDA"

Department of Agriculture, United States .............. 1

Department of Environment ................................. 10

see also "NMED"

Department of Finance and Administration ........... 6

see also "DFA"

Department of Health .............................................. 9

see also "DOH"

Department of Public Safety .................................... 9

see also "DPS"

Detoxification, social .............................................. 61

Developmental disabilities ........................... 9, 37, 38

Developmental Disabilities Planning

Council .......................................................... 37, 38

DFA ............................................................... 6, 10, 55

Digital geospatial data ............................................. 26

Digital geospatial data clearinghouse ..................... 26

Disabilities ................................................. 6, 9, 37, 38

Disability, Governor's Commission on .................. 37

Disability insurance .......................................... 48, 50

Disabled ................................................ 14, 32, 38, 50

Disabled veterans .................................................... 32

Disasters .................................................................. 34

Disincorporation .................................................... 55

District attorneys ..................................................... 26

District courts ..................................................... 9, 10

DNA .................................................................. 40, 41

DOH .................................................9, 12, 34, 35, 37

Domestic violence ............................................. 17, 41

Domestic Violence Protection Orders Act,

Uniform Interstate Enforcement of ............. 17, 41

Domestic wells ........................................................ 63

Double affirmation rule ......................................... 28

DPS ............................................................... 9, 19, 40

Driver's license .......................................... 2, 6, 43, 44

Drought ................................................................... 62

Drugs .......................... 1, 9, 27, 33, 34, 36, 37, 40, 45

Early childhood ................................... 7, 9, 12, 16, 25

Early childhood education ..................................... 25

Earned service credit ............................................... 49

GENERAL INDEX

155


GENERAL INDEX

Earth data analysis center ....................................... 26

Economic development ............ 15, 19-21, 26, 30, 58

Economic development projects ............................ 20

Education ............... 1, 5-10, 12, 14, 15, 21-26, 42-44,

46, 49-51, 54

Education Department, Higher ............................. 24

see also "HED"

Education Department, Public ................................ 1

see also "PED"

Education, secretary of public ................................ 23

Education Study Committee, Legislative ............... 10

see also "LESC"

Educational institutions ......................................... 25

Educational retirement ....................................... 8, 49

see also "ERB"

Educational Retirement Fund.................................. 8

Elections ................... 1, 17, 19, 27, 32, 39, 45, 51, 58

Electric utilities ................................................. 30, 31

Electricity .......................................................... 31, 59

Electronic citations ..................................... 19, 40, 41

Electronic prescribing ............................................. 37

Email ....................................................................... 53

Emergencies ............................................................ 54

Emergency medical services .................................... 34

Emergency procurement................................... 31, 56

EMNRD ............................................................ 18, 31

Employees ................ 9, 14, 18, 25, 28-30, 35, 36, 40,

43, 48-51, 59, 60

Employer contribution ........................................... 28

Employer contribution schedule ............................ 28

Employers .............................. 8, 28-30, 40, 49, 50, 60

Employment ................................... 19, 28, 29, 50, 60

Employment Security Department Fund ............... 29

Energy........................................ 14, 18, 27, 30-32, 63

Energy conservation bonds, qualified .................... 31

Energy efficiency ..................................................... 31

Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources

Department ......................................................... 18

see also "EMNRD"

Enforcement Bureau ........................................ 28, 29

Environment ................................................... 1, 2, 10

Environment, Department of ................................ 10

see also "NMED"

Equalization guarantee ................................... 6, 7, 23

ERB ............................................................. 23, 49, 50

Ethics ........................................................... 31, 32, 51

Extra-hazardous employers ............................... 28, 29

Facilities Management Division ........................ 54-56

Fair Pay for Women Act ................................... 28, 29

Families ........................................ 8, 9, 16, 19, 38, 42

Farm-related service industry vehicles ...................... 2

Federal funds .............................................. 10, 16, 22

Federal Individuals with Disabilities

Education Act ....................................................... 6

see also "IDEA-B"

Federal sequestration .................................... 5, 10, 58

Feed bill ................................................................... 10

Felony ................................................3, 32, 33, 46, 56

Fence ......................................................................... 4

Fencing .......................................................... 4, 45, 52

Fertilizer .................................................................... 2

Film ................................................................... 59, 60

Film production tax credit ..................................... 59

Finance and Administration, Department of .......... 6

see also "DFA"

Finance Authority, New Mexico ............................ 14

see also "NMFA"

Finance Committee, Legislative ............................... 9

see also "LFC"

Financial aid ............................................................ 25

Financial Institutions Division ............................... 15

Financial Regulation Fund, State ..................... 14, 15

Fire ........................................................ 16, 18, 50, 54

Fire departments ..................................................... 54

Fire Protection Fund .............................................. 50

Firearms .................................................................. 18

Firefighters .................................................. 48, 50, 54

First Judicial District ............................................... 10

Fishing ..................................................................... 32

Food ........................................................................1-3

Foreclosure protection ............................................ 15

Foreclosures ...................................................... 14, 15

Fracking ..................................................................... 5

Frontier communities program .............................. 21

Fuels ............................................... 31, 43, 45, 60, 61

Funding formula ................................................. 8, 21

Game and fish ................................................... 13, 32

Gaming................................................ 3, 4, 32, 33, 38

Gaming compact ............................................... 32, 38

Gas......................................................................... 4, 5

Gender-neutral language ........................................ 53

General appropriation act ........ 1, 5-7, 12, 21, 22, 37

General fund ........................................ 4, 6-13, 19, 25

General fund reserves ............................................... 7

General Services Department ................................. 10

see also "GSD"

Geothermal resource development ........................ 30

Gila Regional Medical Center ................................ 14

Governmental entities ...................................... 43, 60

Governor .................... 5, 7, 10-14, 21, 22, 24, 26, 32,

37-39, 48, 52, 53, 59

Governor's Commission on Disability ................... 37

Grant County ......................................................... 14

Grants................................................2, 14, 16, 57, 58

Gross receipts ...............................4, 31, 45, 53, 59-61

Gross receipts tax .............................................. 59, 61

156 Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


Group Benefits Act ................................................. 36

Group Self-Insurance Fund ........................ 10, 14, 50

GSD................................................ 10, 50, 53, 54, 56

Guardianship .......................................................... 38

Guardianship, Office of ......................................... 38

Gun control ............................................................ 18

Gun shows .............................................................. 18

Hazardous waste...................................................... 10

Health ............................. 4, 5, 8, 9, 12-15, 17, 26, 27,

33-40, 42, 45, 47, 50, 51, 58, 63

Health care ....................................... 33-37, 39, 45, 63

Health care facilities ......................................... 13, 34

Health care practitioners ........................................ 34

Health care providers ........................................ 34, 36

Health care reform .................................................. 39

Health, Department of ............................................. 9

see also "DOH"

Health information ................................................. 35

Health insurance .............................. 33, 35-37, 39, 40

Health Insurance Alliance, New Mexico ............... 37

Health insurance exchange............ 33, 36, 37, 39, 40

Health Sciences Center .................................... 12, 34

Health, secretary of ................................................. 17

Hearing aids .............................................................. 9

HED ............................................................. 18, 24-27

Hepatitis .................................................................. 35

High school .................................................. 23-25, 35

Higher education ...................... 5, 7-9, 21, 24, 26, 54

Higher Education Department .............................. 24

see also "HED"

High-risk teacher positions ..................................... 25

High-wage jobs .............................................. 5, 30, 60

High-wage jobs tax credit .............................. 5, 30, 60

Historic sites ............................................................ 20

Historic Sites and Monuments Division, State ..... 20

Hoisting Operators Safety Act................................ 46

Hold harmless provisions, local government ......... 59

Home school ........................................................... 23

Home visiting services ...................................... 16, 38

Homeowner Association Act.................................. 52

Homeowner associations ........................................ 52

Horse racing ........................................................ 4, 33

Horse Racing Act ................................................ 4, 33

Horse rescue .............................................................. 4

Horse Shelter Rescue Fund .......................... 4, 14, 62

Horses........................................... 3, 4, 14, 33, 38, 62

Hospitals ...........................................8, 14, 16, 34, 35

Housing ................................................................... 47

HSD ........................................................ 8, 12, 37, 38

Huevos rancheros ..................................................... 3

Human immunodeficiency virus ............................ 35

Human immunodeficiency virus test results ......... 35

Human Services Department ................................... 8

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

see also "HSD"

Human trafficking .................................................. 41

Hunting ................................................................... 32

Hunting licenses ..................................................... 32

Hydraulic fracturing ................................................. 5

IDEA-B ................................................................ 6, 22

Immunization registry ............................................. 34

Immunizations ........................................................ 34

Income tax ......................................... 4, 14, 15, 58-60

Incorporation .......................................................... 55

Incumbent rural telecommunications carriers ...... 62

Indian affairs ..................................................... 12, 50

Indian Affairs Committee ...................................... 50

Indian Affairs Department ..................................... 12

Indigent ............................................................. 35, 45

Indigent Hospital and County Health Care Act ... 35

Information technology .......................................... 10

Infrastructure ....................... 1, 14, 22, 26, 36, 57, 61

Inspection of Public Records Act ........................... 53

see also "IPRA"

Instructional days .................................................... 22

Instructional material ............................................. 23

Insurance ................ 10, 14, 30, 33, 35-37, 39, 40, 44,

46, 48, 50, 58

Insurance Division ............................................ 37, 39

Insurance Nominating Committee ........................ 39

Insurance, Office of Superintendent of ..... 37, 39, 58

Insurance, superintendent of ..................... 37, 39, 58

Insurance premium ................................................ 50

Intellectual property ............................................... 26

Interlock Device Fund .................................. 3, 14, 45

Interlock devices ..................................................... 45

Internal Revenue Service .................................. 50, 58

Interstate commerce ................................................. 2

Investment Council, State .......................... 11, 15, 54

see also "SIC"

Investments and Pensions Oversight

Committee .......................................................... 11

IPRA ........................................................................ 53

Irrigation ................................................................. 63

Irrigation water rights ............................................. 63

Jail ............................................................................ 42

Jobs ................................................................ 5, 30, 60

Judges ................................................................ 17, 19

Judicial and magistrate retirement ......................... 48

Judicial branch .......................................................... 9

Judicial Standards Commission ....................... 17, 19

Kindergarten .......................... 7, 9, 16, 17, 22, 27, 56

K-3 Plus ......................................................... 7, 22, 23

K-9 dogs ..................................................................... 4

Labor .............................. 5, 19, 26, 28, 29, 33, 41, 54

Laboratories ......................................5, 26, 33, 41, 54

Land Grant Council ............................................... 57

GENERAL INDEX

157


GENERAL INDEX

Land grant registry, New Mexico community ........ 57

Land grants ................................................. 14, 57, 58

Land Management, Bureau of................................ 30

see also "BLM"

Land Office, State ................................................... 30

Land use .................................................. 2, 19, 52, 58

Lands, commissioner of public ............................. 30

Landscape Architects, Board of.............................. 47

Law enforcement .......... 13, 16, 17, 19, 30, 40-43, 56

Law enforcement officers ....................................... 41

Law enforcement vehicles ....................................... 56

LCS.............................................................. 10, 17, 53

Legislative Committee on Compacts ............... 33, 39

Legislative Council, New Mexico ........................... 39

Legislative Council Service ..................................... 10

see also "LCS"

Legislative Education Study Committee ................ 10

see also "LESC"

Legislative Finance Committee ................................ 9

see also "LFC"

Legislative retirement.............................................. 48

Legislators..........................................8, 13, 21, 48, 53

LESC ........................................................... 10, 22, 24

LFC ...................................... 9, 10, 22, 24, 25, 56, 60

Liability insurance............................................. 40, 46

Licenses ................................ 3, 16, 17, 19, 32, 42, 44

Licensing ......................................3, 31-33, 42, 45, 47

Licensure ................................... 24, 27, 38, 45-47, 52

Life insurance.................................................... 40, 50

Life insurance beneficiaries .................................... 40

Liquor excise tax ................................................. 3, 61

Livestock....................... 1, 3, 4, 14, 42, 43, 45, 52, 62

Livestock Board, New Mexico .................................. 4

Load management .................................................. 31

Local DWI Grant Fund ............................................ 9

Local government ........ 11, 13-15, 17, 27, 30, 31, 42,

52, 53, 55, 57-59, 62, 63

Local government hold harmless provisions ......... 59

Local liquor excise tax ........................................ 3, 61

Locomotive fuel ................................................ 45, 61

Long-term care insurance ................................. 36, 40

Long-term services ......................................... 8, 37, 38

Lottery ......................................................... 12, 24, 25

Lottery scholarship solvency ................................... 24

Lottery scholarships ................................................ 24

Lottery Tuition Fund .................................. 12, 24, 25

Magistrate ....................................... 19, 27, 41, 48, 49

Magistrate court ...................................................... 41

Magistrate judges .................................................... 19

Maintenance of effort ..................................... 5, 6, 22

see also "SPED MOE"

Manufactured Housing Committee ....................... 47

Manufactured Housing Division ........................... 47

Manufacturing ............................................ 54, 59, 60

Manufacturing gross receipts deduction ................ 59

Marijuana ................................................................ 18

Marriage ...................................................... 16, 17, 19

Marriage ceremony ................................................. 16

Marriage license ................................................ 16, 17

Marriage licenses ............................................... 16, 19

Master Settlement Agreement ................................ 11

Meat inspection ................................................ 45, 47

Meat processors ....................................................... 47

Medicaid.................................... 5, 8, 9, 12, 33, 35-37

Medicaid waiver .................................................. 9, 35

Medical Board, New Mexico .................................. 47

Medical Imaging and Radiation Therapy

Health and Safety Act ......................................... 47

Medical insurance ................................................... 37

Medical records ....................................................... 35

Medical services ...................................................... 34

Mental health .................................................... 35, 38

Mental health evaluation ........................................ 35

Microbrewers ...................................................... 3, 61

Military service members .................................. 42, 45

Military War Veteran Scholarship Fund ............... 25

Military War Veteran Scholarship

Program ................................................... 25, 42, 43

Mine .................................................................... 2, 24

Minimum Wage Act ......................................... 28, 29

Mining ............................................................... 26, 47

Mining and Technology, New Mexico

Institute of ........................................................... 26

Misdemeanor ....................................3, 17, 35, 38, 41

Monuments Division, State.................................... 20

Mortgage ........................................................... 14, 15

Motor Carrier Act ................................................... 43

Motor carriers ............................................. 15, 43, 44

Motor transportation officers ................................... 9

Motor Vehicle Division .................................... 27, 45

Motor vehicles ............. 2, 3, 14, 15, 19, 27, 41, 43-45

Multistate corporations .................................... 58, 59

Multistate taxpayers ................................................ 59

Municipal incorporation review team .................... 55

Municipal services and revenue plan ..................... 55

Municipalities .............. 10, 11, 19, 21, 31, 41-43, 46,

53-55, 57, 59, 62

Museums ................................................................. 20

National Guard ....................................................... 42

National laboratories .......................................... 5, 26

Native American ............................................... 12, 38

Native American suicide prevention ...................... 38

Native American Suicide Prevention Advisory

Council ................................................................ 38

Native Americans .................................................... 38

Natural resources ..................... 14, 18, 26, 30, 32, 63

158 Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


Navajo ......................................................... 13, 32, 38

Navajo Nation ................................................... 32, 38

New Mexico Chile Advertising Act .......................... 2

New Mexico Commercial Feed Act ..................... 1, 2

New Mexico community land grant registry .......... 57

New Mexico Compilation Commission ................ 53

New Mexico Department of Agriculture ................. 1

see also "NMDA"

New Mexico Finance Authority ............................. 14

see also "NMFA"

New Mexico geographic names ................................ 2

New Mexico Health Insurance Alliance ................ 37

New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology 26

New Mexico Legislative Council ............................ 39

New Mexico Livestock Board ................................... 4

New Mexico Medical Board ................................... 47

New Mexico Poison and Drug Information

Center .................................................................. 34

New Mexico Real Estate Commission ................... 46

New Mexico Scholars Act ....................................... 25

New Mexico Subdivision Act ................................. 52

NMDA .................................................................. 1, 2

NMED ............................................................... 10, 63

NMFA ..................................................................... 14

Nominating petition ............................................... 27

Nominating petitions ............................................. 27

Nonconsensual tows ............................................... 44

Nonprofit organization ....................................... 4, 32

Nonresident disabled veterans ............................... 32

Northern New Mexico College .............................. 17

Nor-Lea General Hospital ...................................... 14

Nurseries ............................................................... 1, 2

Nurses.......................................................... 34, 38, 47

Nursing .................................................................... 47

Nursing home ......................................................... 47

Nursing Home Administrators, Board of .............. 47

Nutrition ................................................................... 9

Office of Guardianship .......................................... 38

Office of Guardianship Fund ................................. 38

Office of Superintendent of Insurance ...... 37, 39, 58

Oil ......................................................................... 4, 5

Ombudsman ........................................................... 29

Open meetings ........................................................ 54

Open Meetings Act ................................................. 54

Operating reserve .......................................... 7, 10, 25

Parks ............................................................ 13, 18, 19

Parks Division, State ......................................... 18, 19

Parole........................................................... 40, 41, 45

Patient Protection and Affordable Care

Act ........................................................... 16, 33, 36

PED ........................................................ 1, 6, 8, 21-24

Penalties ........ 2, 3, 15, 17-19, 22, 28, 29, 32, 35, 38,

42, 44, 46, 47, 56, 61, 63

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

Penalty assessment .................................................. 19

Pension solvency ................................................. 8, 48

Pensions ............................................................ 11, 48

PERA .................................................................. 48-50

Performance-affecting drugs ................................... 33

Permanent fund .................................... 11, 12, 24, 25

Personal property ................................................ 4, 60

Pharmacists ............................................................. 34

Pharmacy ................................................................. 37

Pharmacy, Board of ................................................ 37

Physical education .................................................. 26

Physicians .................................................... 17, 34, 35

Pick-ups, employee .................................................. 49

Pipelines ............................................................ 31, 62

Plant Protection Act ................................................. 1

Poison and Drug Information Center,

New Mexico ......................................................... 34

Police ......................................................................... 9

Polling places .......................................................... 27

Portable electronics devices .................................... 39

Portable Electronics Insurance Act ........................ 39

Post-secondary education .................................. 24-26

Post-secondary educational institutions ........... 25, 26

Poverty ............................................................... 22, 25

PRC ........................37, 39, 43, 44, 48, 51, 53, 54, 62

Pregnant students ................................................... 23

Pregnant women ..................................................... 16

Prescription drug coverage ..................................... 36

Prescription drug formulary ............................. 36, 40

Prescription refills ................................................... 34

Pre-kindergarten .................................. 7, 9, 17, 27, 56

Pre-Kindergarten Act .............................................. 56

Pre-kindergarten services ............................ 17, 27, 56

Prior authorization ........................................... 36, 37

Privacy ......................................................... 24, 33, 35

Probate .............................................................. 38, 52

Probation .................................................... 40, 41, 45

Procurement .................................... 31, 53, 55-57, 62

Professional licenses................................................ 42

Property Control Reserve Fund ....................... 14, 55

Property tax .................................... 26, 52, 57, 58, 61

Property Tax Division ............................................. 61

Property valuation ................................................... 52

Psychologist ............................................................. 35

Public defender ............................................. 9, 18, 19

Public defender, chief ............................................. 19

Public Defender Commission ................................ 18

Public Defender Department ............................. 9, 18

Public education .................................. 1, 7, 21-24, 26

Public Education Commission .............................. 24

Public Education Department ................................. 1

see also "PED"

Public education, secretary of ................................. 23

GENERAL INDEX

159


GENERAL INDEX

Public employees ..................................................... 48

Public Employees Retirement Association ............ 48

see also "PERA"

Public employers ..................................................... 49

Public finance ................................................... 10, 54

Public health ................................................ 33-35, 63

Public Improvement District Act ........................... 57

Public improvement districts............................ 52, 62

Public lands, commissioner of ............................... 30

Public money .................................................... 20, 21

Public officers and employees .......................... 14, 48

Public pension reform ............................................ 48

Public Project Revolving Fund ......................... 13, 14

Public projects ................................................... 13, 14

Public records ......................................................... 53

Public Regulation Commission ............................. 37

see also "PRC"

Public safety ...... 4, 5, 7, 9, 17, 19, 26, 40, 41, 48, 49

Public Safety, Department of ................................... 9

see also "DPS"

Public safety members ...................................... 48, 49

Public safety, secretary of .................................... 4, 41

Public school capital outlay .................................... 13

Public School Capital Outlay Fund ....................... 13

Public school employees ........................................... 9

Public school funding formula ............................... 21

Public schools ........................... 5, 7, 9, 13, 21-25, 49

Public utilities ................................................... 31, 42

Qualified energy conservation bonds ..................... 31

Racehorse Testing Fund ......................................... 33

Racing.................................................................. 4, 33

Racing Commission, State ..................................... 33

Rack operator .......................................................... 60

Railroad ................................................... 4, 45, 52, 61

Real estate ................................................... 45, 46, 52

Real estate appraisers .............................................. 46

Real Estate Appraisers Act ..................................... 46

Real estate broker licensure .................................... 52

Real estate broker opinions .................................... 46

Real estate brokers .................................................. 46

Real Estate Commission, New Mexico .................. 46

Real property .................................. 19, 46, 52, 58, 61

Real Property Transfer on Death Act,

Uniform ........................................................ 19, 52

Reauthorization bill ................................................ 13

Reauthorizations ..................................................... 13

Recording device ..................................................... 42

Records ................................. 2, 17, 34, 35, 41, 52, 53

Recreation ............................................................... 41

Regulation and Licensing Department .................... 3

see also "RLD"

Renewable energy ............................................. 27, 31

Repeals ....................................... 1, 26, 35, 45, 47, 57

Request for proposals ............................................. 56

Restaurant ................................................................. 3

Retiree ..................................................................... 50

Retirement ........................................... 4, 8, 42, 48-50

Retirement age ........................................................ 50

Revenue neutrality .................................................. 58

Revenue Stabilization and Tax Policy

Committee .......................................................... 60

Risk Management Division .................................... 50

RLD ...................................................3, 15, 30, 31, 47

Rule of 85................................................................ 49

Rural economic development ................................ 20

Rural Universal Service Fund, State ...................... 62

Safe Drinking Water Act ........................................ 63

Safety and Fraud Division ................................ 28, 29

Scholars Act, New Mexico ...................................... 25

School boards............................................... 22-24, 27

School day ............................................................... 23

School districts ..................................1, 11, 22, 23, 27

School employees ...................................................... 9

School year .............................................................. 23

Secretary of health .................................................. 17

Secretary of public education ................................. 23

Secretary of public safety .................................... 4, 41

Secretary of state ............................ 15, 17, 53, 54, 57

Secretary of taxation and revenue .................... 58, 59

Secured interests ..................................................... 15

Secured transactions ......................................... 14, 15

Sequestration ................................................ 5, 10, 58

Service credit ...................................................... 48-50

Service members ............................................... 42, 45

Severance tax ........................................................... 13

Severance tax bonds ................................................ 13

Sex offender ...................................................... 18, 19

Sexual assault ............................................................ 9

SIC .................................................................... 50, 52

Silver alert ............................................................... 40

Single sales factor .............................................. 58, 59

Single sales factor apportionment formula ............ 58

Small Loan Act ....................................................... 15

Small winegrowers .............................................. 3, 61

Social detoxification ............................................... 61

Social networking account ......................... 26, 28, 30

Social networking web sites .............................. 26, 30

Social security .......................................................... 16

Social security numbers .......................................... 16

Solar energy ............................................................. 30

Solar energy-derived electric wiring ........................ 30

Solar-installation permitting ................................... 31

Sole community provider hospitals........................ 35

Sole source ........................................................ 31, 56

Solvency................................ 8, 12, 13, 23, 24, 48, 50

Space flight .................................................. 15, 19, 20

160 Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


Special education ............................................ 5, 6, 22

Special education maintenance of effort ....... 5, 6, 22

see also "SPED MOE"

Special fishing event permits .................................. 32

Special fuel .................................................. 31, 45, 60

Special fuel excise tax .................................. 31, 45, 60

Special schools .......................................................... 8

SPED MOE ................................................ 5-8, 14, 22

Speech Language Pathology, Audiology and

Hearing Aid Dispensing Practices Board ........... 47

Speech-Language Pathology, Audiology and

Hearing Aid Dispensing Practices Act ............... 47

Speeding violations ................................................. 44

Spontaneous fetal death ......................................... 34

Sports ...................................................................... 13

ST segment-elevation myocardial infarction .......... 34

see also "STEMI"

State Aviation Fund .......................................... 14, 45

State Board of Finance ......................... 10, 30, 31, 56

State buildings............................................. 13, 55, 56

State digital geospatial data clearinghouse ............. 26

State equalization guarantee distribution ...... 6, 7, 23

State Financial Regulation Fund ...................... 14, 15

State Historic Sites and Monuments Division ...... 20

State Investment Council ........................... 11, 15, 54

see also "SIC"

State land ................................................................ 30

State Land Office .................................................... 30

State lands ......................................................... 30, 54

State monuments .................................................... 20

State Monuments Division ..................................... 20

State parks ......................................................... 18, 19

State Parks Division .......................................... 18, 19

State police ................................................................ 9

State purchasing agent ...................................... 55, 56

State Racing Commission ...................................... 33

State Rural Universal Service Fund ....................... 62

State treasurer ..................................................... 6, 11

Statewide Human Resource, Accounting and

Management Reporting System ............................ 6

STEMI ..................................................................... 34

Still birth ................................................................. 34

Storage tanks ........................................................... 62

Students ....................................................... 22-25, 27

Subcontractor ................................................... 56, 60

Subdivision Act, New Mexico ................................ 52

Subdivisions ................. 11, 21, 46, 52, 53, 57, 58, 63

Suicide ..................................................................... 38

Sunset dates ............................................................ 45

Superintendent of insurance ...................... 37, 39, 58

Supplemental appropriation .................................... 8

Supplemental nutrition assistance program ............ 9

Surcharge ................................................................ 62

Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013

Surety insurance...................................................... 40

Surface mining ........................................................ 47

Surveys ............................................................... 13, 57

Sustainable building tax credits ........................ 31, 60

Sustainable commercial building ........................... 60

TANF ........................................................................ 8

Tangible personal property ................................. 4, 60

Tax Administration Act .................................... 58, 59

Tax benefits ............................................................. 58

Tax credits .......................................... 5, 30, 31, 58-60

Tax deduction ................................................... 31, 45

Tax refund ............................................................... 62

Taxation ......... 3, 13-15, 27, 30, 31, 45, 52, 53, 57-59

Taxation and Revenue Department ....................... 27

see also "TRD"

Taxation and revenue, secretary of .................. 58, 59

Teacher competency ............................................... 24

Teacher education .................................................. 25

Teacher Loan Repayment Act ................................ 25

Teachers ................................................ 21, 24, 25, 49

Technology ..................................... 10, 13, 15, 26, 54

Technology research collaborative ......................... 26

Telecommunications ........................................ 42, 62

Telecommunications carriers ................................. 62

Telecommunications services ................................. 42

Telemedicine ..................................................... 36, 40

Temporary assistance for needy families .................. 8

see also "TANF"

Therapy ....................................................... 35, 36, 47

Three-tiered licensure system ................................. 24

Tier 1 .................................................................. 48-50

Tier 2 .................................................................. 48-50

Tier 3 ....................................................................... 50

Tobacco ................................................. 11, 12, 24, 25

Tobacco Settlement Permanent

Fund .................................................. 11, 12, 24, 25

Tobacco Settlement Program Fund ................. 11, 12

Transparency ..................................................... 53, 54

Transportation .............. 2, 3, 5, 9, 14, 15, 19, 31, 33,

36, 39, 43, 44, 46

TRD ...................................................... 27, 44, 60, 61

Treasurer, state .............................................. 6, 11, 61

Tribal-State Class III Gaming Compact ................. 32

Tribes ................................................................ 38, 43

Trust ............................................... 13, 15, 16, 30, 38

Tuition ........................................................ 12, 24, 25

Unemployment ................................................. 28, 29

Unemployment benefits ......................................... 29

Unemployment compensation ......................... 28, 29

Unemployment Compensation Fund ............. 28, 29

Unemployment Compensation Law ................ 28, 29

Unfair Practices Act ................................................ 44

Uniform Child Abduction Prevention Act ..... 17, 19

GENERAL INDEX

161


GENERAL INDEX

Uniform Commercial Code ................................... 15

Uniform Interstate Enforcement of Domestic

Violence Protection Orders Act ................... 17, 41

Uniform Real Property Transfer on

Death Act ...................................................... 19, 52

Unitary corporations .............................................. 59

United States Department of Agriculture ............... 1

United States Department of Education ................. 6

see also "USDE"

Universities ............................................................. 49

University of New Mexico ........................................ 5

see also "UNM"

UNM ....................................................... 5, 12, 26, 34

USDE .............................................................. 6, 7, 22

Utilities ........................................... 30, 31, 58, 59, 62

Vehicle ............................................... 9, 15, 27, 41-45

Veterans ................................................ 25, 32, 42, 45

Veterans' affairs ..................................... 20, 42, 45, 47

Veterans' Services Department ........................... 8, 25

Volunteer firefighters ................................. 48, 50, 54

Volunteer Firefighters Retirement Fund ............... 50

Voter registration .............................................. 27, 45

Voters .....................18, 19, 27, 32, 39, 45, 51, 53, 54

Voting...................................................................... 52

Wage......................................................... 5, 28-30, 60

Wage discrimination ........................................ 28, 29

Wall leaners ............................................................ 22

Wastewater ........................................................ 13, 63

Water ......................13, 14, 30, 38, 47, 52, 58, 62, 63

Water conservation ................................................. 63

Water Project Fund ................................................ 14

Water quality .................................................... 13, 47

Water Quality Control Commission ..................... 47

Water rights .......................................... 52, 58, 62, 63

Water storage tanks ................................................ 62

Water supply agreement ......................................... 63

Watershed districts ..................................... 52, 57, 63

Wells........................................................................ 63

Wine ........................................... 3, 15, 47, 48, 58, 61

Winegrowers, small............................................. 3, 61

Women ................................................... 8, 16, 28, 29

Workers ............................................................. 29, 30

Workers' compensation ............................... 28-30, 40

Workers' Compensation Act ............................ 28, 29

Workers' Compensation Administration ........ 28, 29

162 Legislative Council Service - Highlights 2013


SESSION DATES REFERENCE GUIDE

2012

Fiftieth legislature, second session

December 15, 2011 - January 13, 2012

Legislation may be prefiled

January 17 Opening day

February 1 Deadline for introductions

February 16 Session ended

March 7 Legislation not acted upon by governor was pocket vetoed

May 16 Effective date of legislation not a general appropriation bill or a

bill carrying an emergency clause or other specified date

2013

Fifty-First legislature, first session

December 17, 2012 - January 11, 2013

Legislation may be prefiled

January 15 Opening day

February 14 Deadline for introductions

March 16 Session ended

April 5 Legislation not acted upon by governor was pocket vetoed

June 14 Effective date of legislation not a general appropriation bill or a

bill carrying an emergency clause or other specified date

2014

Fifty-First legislature, second session

December 16, 2013 - January 17, 2014

Legislation may be prefiled

January 21 Opening day

February 5 Deadline for introductions

February 20 Session ends

March 12 Legislation not acted upon by governor is pocket vetoed

May 21 Effective date of legislation not a general appropriation bill or a

bill carrying an emergency clause or other specified date

Acts carrying an emergency clause become effective immediately upon signature by the governor.

All other acts passed during a session and approved by the governor become effective 90 days after

adjournment of the legislature or at a date specified in the act.


New Mexico Legislative Council Service

Santa Fe, New Mexico

May 2013