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UCSF School of Nursing - UCSF - University of California, San ...

table of

2 Support Energizes Research

6 Building on International Prominence

9 Using Genomics

10 Economists Influence Policy

13 Symptom Management

14 Midwives Help Health Care

19 Nursing News

20 2001 Helen Nahm Lecture

34 Faculty Research Activities


To many people in the United States, spring

means the end of snow and cold for another

year. Storm windows get stored in the basement

and heavy coats are shifted to the back of closets.

Cherry blossoms and tulips usher in warm

weather and fantasies of backyard barbecues.

At UCSF School of Nursing, sheltered by a

California climate that yields few dramatic

changes in temperature (despite complaints to

the contrary by students braving Parnassus

Avenue’s gale force winds), the spring season

brings a different set of changes. Spring is the

season of scientific conferences. Both faculty

and students who have been hibernating with

their data for the winter are out and about,

sharing findings with colleagues and the public.

Spring is the season of podium presentations,

posters, and – more often than not – frequent

flier miles. There is no real research season

at UCSF where research is conducted all

year long, but the communication of research

does seem to be somewhat seasonal. Therefore,

it is fitting that the School’s publication about

its research activities comes to you each spring.

Much of our research is funded by the National

Institutes of Health, which is the largest

funder of health research in the nation. It recently

published its annual rankings of Schools

of Nursing. UCSF was ranked first in the nation

in numbers of grants awarded and second in

dollars awarded. These statistics are an extraordinary

testament to the intellectual talent and

hard work of our faculty and students. The NIH

funds approximately one in five proposals. The

rankings are a visible recognition of the innovative

and important research conducted in our

School. The rankings also do not reflect many

other sources of funding received by our faculty

from the state of California, private foundations,

industry, and professional associations.

The future looks even brighter. Our new

Associate Dean for Research, Dr. Geri

Padilla, is a welcome addition to the School.

She comes to us with a rich history of research

funded by NIH. Not only is Geri an

internationally recognized researcher in the

area of quality of life of chronically ill patients,

she has also spent many years facilitating

the research of colleagues both in

clinical and university settings. She has

spent her first six months at UCSF assessing

the needs of faculty and students, related to

building an even stronger infrastructure for

research activities and a mentorship program

for junior faculty.

We are in the process of interviewing for

four new faculty positions, so we have seen an

amazing array of talented candidates who

shared their research programs with UCSF

faculty and students. In addition, we have just

named Dr. Susan Janson to hold the Harms/

Alumni Chair, the School’s third endowed

chair. The funds from this chair will help support

Susan’s clinical research in asthma and

serve as an incredible tribute to both Mary

Harms and the UCSF School of Nursing

Alumni Association. In fact, this is the first

endowed chair on the UCSF campus supported

by a school’s Alumni Association.

Our alumni are extraordinary.

It is a time of change and celebration in

the school. But then, it is spring!

Kathleen Dracup, RN, FNP, DNSc, FAAN

Professor and Dean

UCSF School of Nursing

dean

message from the


support

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world-class research

“We have a vision...that includes

setting the world standard for

nursing science and scholarship

in the 21 st century.”

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The School of Nursing’s commitment to

research excellence was reaffirmed last

October when Geraldine Padilla assumed

the role of Associate Dean for

Research. In the early 1990s, the position

was eliminated for budgetary reasons.

Reinstated by Dean Kathleen

Dracup, the position includes heading

up the Office of Research. “We have a

vision for the School of Nursing that includes

setting the world standard for

nursing science and scholarship in the

21 st century,” Padilla says. “Our goal is

to facilitate the whole nursing research

enterprise, from proposal to publication

and policy development.”

Padilla says nursing researchers can

look forward to a list of new and expanded

programs and services aimed at

helping them secure funding, design

experiments and measurement tools,

analyze data and submit professionally

edited manuscripts for peer review and

publication. “We’re a service-oriented

office dedicated to addressing the needs

of our investigators.”

Padilla’s own research deals with

quality-of-life issues, focusing on culturally

diverse populations of patients with

cancer or arthritis. She has a grant from

the National Institutes of Health to study

the reliability and validity of Spanishlanguage

translations of quality-of-life

questionnaires used to assess persons

with breast and prostate cancer. To her

new role, Padilla brings experience with

national funding agencies as well as experience

as a member of editorial boards.

Associate Dean

Padilla leads new

Office of Research

Before Padilla’s appointment, the

office remained open while its small

staff provided technical and statistical

support to a growing number of the

school’s researchers. With additional

staff and Padilla’s help, many of the

office’s long-standing goals can now be

accomplished, says Rob Slaughter, the

office’s administrative director. “With

upgrades in technology, we will be able

to increase the quantity and quality of

research in the school,” explains

Slaughter, who has been with the office

for 20 years. “We’ll be better able to do

things I’ve been wanting to do.”

One of the major upgrades will take

place this spring with the launch of the

office website. Some of the office’s current

programs include working groups

wherein investigators assist each other

in the grant proposal development process.

On the website, investigators will

be able to find a growing list of templates

for various portions of grant applications.

Eventually, copies of successfully

funded grants will be found

on the site as well. In the future, the

office hopes to hire a professional editor

who will review manuscripts before

they are submitted for publication.

Having a dean also allows the office

to set and maintain policies on the

timely use of the office’s resources. For

example, faculty will be alerted to upcoming

deadlines for proposals and

encouraged to seek the office’s support

early in the grant-writing process. “The

hope is to get people into the pipeline


The office...serves

as the liaison between

the investigators and

funding agencies,

investigators and

other research support

services on campus,

and investigators

and collaborators

here, around the

country and abroad.

sooner, be able to plan better and have

the time to review grants in-house,”

Slaughter says. In the past, in-house

review led to a dramatic increase in the

rate of funding for projects, he adds.

Currently, the office provides programs

and services to all of the school’s

researchers, including faculty, staff,

postdoctoral fellows and graduate students.

The staff provides necessary consultation

that facilitates proposal preparation

and review, statistical analysis,

manuscript review and other kinds of

technical assistance. It also serves as

the liaison between the investigators

and funding agencies, investigators and

other research support services on campus,

and investigators and collaborators

here, around the country and abroad.

Many of the School’s faculty members

say they are glad to have Padilla on board

and they look forward to the expansion of

the office’s programs. The new services will

be of great value, says Marguerite Engler,

professor and vice chair of physiological

nursing, who is one of the researchers

primed to benefit from the new support.

“I’m looking forward to using the office

quite a bit with future grants.”

Engler has a five-year grant from the

National Institutes of Health to study the

effects of nutritional interventions on children

and adolescents with genetic hyperlipidemias.

These young people have inherited

a gene from their parents that results

in abnormally high cholesterol levels

and puts them at great risk for heart attacks.

Currently, the study is in its second

year and Engler is working with the Office

of Research’s Steve Paul on analyzing the

first round of results.

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Paul is also the statistician on Barbara

Drew’s grant studying a new way

to better detect heart attacks using

EKG. As the EKG celebrates its 100 th

birthday, Drew is looking at improving

the accuracy with which the test reveals

a heart attack. As it is used now,

the test misses the early signs of a

heart attack in 55 percent of the patients.

“The current problem is that we

don’t detect attacks in people who have

heart attacks on the back side of their

hearts because we don’t put electrodes

on the person’s back,” explains Drew,

who is also professor and vice chair in

physiological nursing.

Patients whose diagnoses are delayed

often do not get the benefit of early interventions

that minimize damage to the

heart, such as clot-buster drugs, stents or

angioplasty. By simply moving the electrodes,

Drew says emergency room physicians

can get a three-dimensional, more

accurate view of what’s electrically going

on in the heart. “We believe we can pick up

heart attacks that occur in places that are

usually missed by our current routine.”

It is these kinds of cutting-edge research

programs that Padilla says the

Office of Research hopes to further

enable. Current and future programs

in the office will ensure that faculty,

fellows and students can continue to

conduct and disseminate top-notch

research. “We are working toward providing

for every need for our School of

Nursing investigators so that they can

concentrate on furthering nursing science

and achieving research goals

that signify turning points in health

and health care.”

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Steve Paul, senior statistician,

facilitates and consults on

quantitative data analysis.

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Geri Padilla (top left) solicits input on community health needs from women

and provides health education at a Bay Area beauty parlor.

“We are working toward providing for every

need for our School of Nursing investigators so

that they can concentrate on furthering nursing

science and achieving research goals that signify

turning points in health and health care.”

Rob Slaughter, administrative

director, is responsible for

implementing new initiatives.

Staff rising to challenges

While Geraldine Padilla leads the Office

of Research into the 21 st century, a

growing staff works to support investigators

with administrative, editorial and

statistical tasks so that they can concentrate

on their work.

Rob Slaughter has been with the office

for 20 years. He serves as the administrative

director and is responsible for implementing

its new initiatives. Slaughter

runs and maintains the computer lab, is

head of information technology, heads

the staff responsible for desktop com-

The indispensable research support

team includes Diane Heininger (seated),

and (standing left to right) Sharon Lee,

Angelita Varela and Ken Killion.

puter support and conducts evaluations

of the school’s training grants and curriculum.

He also works with researchers

on developing and choosing instruments

for their studies. “I tend to concentrate

on psychometric elements, the measurement

of human characteristics.”

In that regard, Slaughter’s work compliments

that of Steve Paul, the office’s

senior statistician. “I work with anyone

in the school interested in quantitative

data analysis,” says Paul. He consults

with investigators on projects and proposals.

Paul is written into several

grants as the statistician.

Paul, who also teaches in the Biostatistics

department on campus, has been

with the office for 17 years. “There’s so

much more activity now,” he says. In

addition to an increase in the number of

grants being funded, the kinds of studies

being conducted by nursing faculty

members, fellows and students have

also changed. “Before, the research was

about testing models and theories,”

Paul explains. “Now, there are more

randomized clinical trials.”

As the research of the School of Nursing

continues to evolve and expand, so too

does the Office of Research. In addition to

Paul and Slaughter, Sharon Lee offers administrative

support and Angelita Varela,

Ken Killion and Diane Heininger make

up the technical support team.

With this kind of staff, Padilla says

the school will no doubt be able to increase

the quality and quantity of research.

“Our hope is that the School’s

scientific achievements will have a

significant impact.”


school builds on

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prominence

“We are formalizing

our commitment to

international training

and collaborative

research.”

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On January 1, Bill Holzemer became

Associate Dean for International Programs,

a newly created service within

the UCSF School of Nursing. “We are

formalizing our commitment to international

training and collaborative research,”

says Holzemer.

Dean Kathleen Dracup, who created

the office, says the time was right to

identify an office that would structure

and organize existing projects and initiatives,

as well as create new collaborations

and opportunities. “As a new

dean, it became clear to me that we have

a very long and unique history of research

and activity done on an international

scale,” Dracup explains.

Over the years, numerous faculty

members have conducted research in

other countries. In addition, nurses

from around the world have come to

UCSF for their graduate training. Many

of these scholars have then returned to

their home countries to become leaders

in health care and have even set up programs

in nursing education.

Holzemer has long conducted international

research, mostly in Africa and

Asia. In South Africa, he is working

with four nursing schools on a project to

improve symptom management for HIV/

AIDS patients being cared for in the

home. Holzemer has also been involved

in international efforts to improve nursing

training. He says his new job will be

to further develop and strengthen the

school’s prominence and reach on a

worldwide scale. The school’s history of

Bill Holzemer, new Associate Dean for International

Programs, is always on the move.

international research and collaboration

has resulted in many productive

relationships with individuals, schools

and government institutions around the

globe. ”The role of this position is to

nurture and facilitate these relationships,”

Holzemer says.

Holzemer, who has been at the School

since 1979, has a long history of leadership

in the academic nursing community.

He is the director of the UCSF International

Center for HIV/AIDS Research &

Clinical Training in Nursing and a visiting

professor at St. Luke’s College of

Nursing in Tokyo, Japan. He spent a year

as a Fulbright Scholar in Egypt and has

won numerous other national and international

awards for his research. He has

served on the editorial boards of various

peer-reviewed journals. He has also held

positions on the boards of various national

and international bodies responsible

for overseeing the practice of nursing,

including his current appointment to

the Commission on Graduates of Foreign

Nursing Schools.

Holzemer adds that he will be looking

to the school’s faculty for input on how to

increase faculty and student exchanges,

as well as to support research abroad. “We

will be talking with faculty about what

they want and need, what their hopes and

expectations are for this office.”

Among Holzemer’s new responsibilities

is to serve as the director of the

World Health Organization’s (WHO) Collaborating

Center for Clinical Research

and Training in Nursing at UCSF. The


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Holzemer’s souvenir photos

of his travels include these

of colleagues in Africa.

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school is designated by the WHO as one

of about 20 nursing centers in the world.

“The chaos and crisis in the world remind

us of our responsibility to world

health and training issues.”

The school will also benefit from the

existence of this position on a more local

scale. “It provides a way for the

school to have representation among

other international efforts on campus.”

For example, Holzemer is already involved

with the Global Partners for Primary

Care Innovation along with members

of the School of Medicine. The collaborative

initiative involves primary

care leaders from six countries.

Dracup says Holzemer is an innovative

researcher who will no doubt set the

standard for future appointees to his

new position. She says: “He is the ideal

person to help us to continue to grow our

international programs.”

“The chaos and crisis in the world

remind us of our responsibility to

world health and training issues.”

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1


using

to understand disease

“We need to

know the genetic

profile of

patients’ DNA so

we can design

better drugs to

better treat the

complexity of

their disease.”

We have yet to see the full impact of the

genomic revolution on the field of nursing.

But, as genetic testing and drugs

designed for genotypes increasingly

make their way into clinical settings,

nurses will have to keep pace with the

quickly evolving field. For the School of

Nursing, keeping up with medical genetics

means fostering research in the

area. And, though most of the school’s

research deals directly with patients, a

handful of faculty members are taking

their quest to further the basic science

of genetics to the lab bench.

Eva McGhee, MS, PhD, a junior faculty

member in the department of Community

Health Systems, is one such investigator.

McGhee has devoted her

training and academic career to studying

genomic instability, genetics of

complex diseases and molecular therapeutics.

“Most of my work is laboratorybased,

looking at the genetics of different

diseases and using molecular and

genomic applications to better understand

the mechanisms that promote instability

in complex diseases.”

McGhee’s research program is full

and varied and centers on the consequences

of genomic insults. Most recently,

she has investigated why resistance

to HIV drugs develops even

among patients who adhere to their

drug regimen. In analyzing HIV’s genomic

instability, which is key to its

shifting profile and ultimate success

in replicating, McGhee has found a

subset of patients whose own genomic

instability makes them particularly

vulnerable. She believes that when

anti-HIV-drug-generated mutations in

Eva McGhee conducts

research in the basic

science of genetics.

these patients are coupled with HIV’s

own penchant for change, the drugs

become incompatible with the patients’

genetic make-up. “That’s why

we are looking at the whole picture,”

says McGhee, “and why pharmacogenomics

is so important. We need to

know the genetic profile of patients’

DNA so we can design better drugs to

better treat the complexity of their

disease.” At the same time, McGhee

is studying micro-array technology to

compare gene expression between

long-term survivors and newly infected

patients following various

treatment regimens.

McGhee is also exploring the potential

long-term health consequences of a

drug therapy (AZT and 3TC) used to

halt the transmission of HIV from an

infected mother to her baby. “AZT is a

transplacental genotoxin,” McGhee explains.

“Increased mutant frequency

was shown in cord blood following treatment

with AZT plus 3TC.” Such changes

could increase the frequency of cancer

among this group, a possibility that she

will track in the years ahead. In still

other work, McGhee is using a mouse

model to identify genes that are involved

in prostate cancer progression

and to study the influence of dietary factors

on the disease. “I am trying to correlate

the laboratory findings with collaborative

studies in humans, again

with the goal of creating better clinical

treatments.” Her work has led to national

attention and international collaborations,

as well as to a book chapter

entry in the National Organization for

Rare Diseases’ 2001 yearbook.


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health care

economists

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6 8 8 10 10

policy makers

Working with state-level problems

often leads to an impact on

national and local health care

policy....California is a microcosm

of what’s going on in the country.

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When it comes to making or changing

health care policy, medical considerations

are often weighed against social,

economic and political ones. But, in the

case of economic arguments, the cost of

political inaction to the government and

to society as a whole is not always clear.

Enter the School of Nursing’s Dorothy

Pechman Rice Center for Health Economics,

a campuswide consortium of

experts in the economics of health care.

The center’s medical economists supply

lawmakers with estimated costs of illnesses,

injuries and substance abuse.

Working with state-level problems often

leads to an impact on national and local

health care policy, says Wendy Max, the

center’s director. “At 12 percent of the

U.S. population, California is a microcosm

of what’s going on in the country. Other

states look to see what we’re doing.”

Nowhere has this been more evident

than in the center’s research on the economic

burden of cigarette smoking. Its

faculty members, including the center’s

namesake, Dorothy Rice, were intimately

involved in the legal settlement

reached with the tobacco companies.

Their research on the cost of the health

effects of smoking goes back 15 years.

More recently, investigators have begun

to determine whether California’s tobacco

control program has resulted in

the promised economic savings. “We’re

going to look specifically at Prop. 99,

looking at the reduction in smoking and

how that’s saved money,” Max says.

Wendy Max and Patrick Fox are co-directors

of the Institute of Health and Aging. Max also

directs the Dorothy Pechman Rice Center for

Health Economics.

Similarly, the faculty recently published

an evaluation of the California

Motorcycle Helmet Law. Max and her

colleagues showed that the law has

saved the state over $20 million per

year in medical costs during the first

two years it was in effect.

In addition to looking at the costs of

diseases and injuries that are the result

of behavior patterns, such as smoking

and helmet use, the center’s faculty also

looks at the costs of diseases, such as osteoporosis,

Alzheimer’s and rheumatoid

arthritis. “One of the things that’s helpful

for policy makers to know about is the

particular economic burden of diseases

on the state,” says Patrick Fox, codirector

of the Institute of Health and

Aging along with Max. “Our key function

is to raise awareness of what’s going to be

happening down the road.” Based on

these predictions, lawmakers can make

strong cases for preventive health measures

and awareness campaigns.

To calculate economic impact, health

economists make estimates of both formal

costs – out-of-pocket expenses paid

for by the patient or their health insurance

– and informal costs – lost productivity

by the patient and those who must

care for them instead of work. National

data are used to extrapolate to the state

and local levels when data for California

and its counties do not exist.

California is currently interested in diseases

that will be affecting the aging Baby

Boomers. Research by Fox and other center


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In the case of

Alzheimer’s...California

can expect half a

million people to

have the disease

by 2020 at a cost

of $47.5 billion.

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Rice Center research findings have influenced

helmet-law legislation and awareness campaigns

about the health risks of tobacco. Current work

anticipates resources the state will need to care

for Californians with Alzheimer’s disease.

faculty members shows that in the case

of Alzheimer’s, for example, California

can expect half a million people to have

the disease by 2020 at a cost of $47.5

billion. Using conservative figures and

not correcting for inflation, both numbers

are expected to double by 2040.

In all cases, these sorts of numbers are

expected to guide policymakers in preparing

for an ever-changing California.

“What we try to do, making simple models

and assumptions, is give a broad estimate

of changes we can expect in the future,”

Fox says. “We provide estimates and context

that can give us an idea of what we

should be doing now to prepare.”

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Honoring a pioneer in

medical economics

Dorothy Pechman Rice is Professor

Emerita at the Institute for Health and

Aging and the Department of Social and

Behavioral Sciences at UCSF, and Director

Emerita of the center that bears her

name. She has had a long and illustrious

career, including many years of public

service in Washington, DC. In 1982, she

retired as the Director of the National

Center for Health Statistics.

Rice was one of the first researchers to

apply the human capital approach to

health care analysis. An entire literature

now exists on measuring the value of lost

productivity. Rice herself has published

more than 200 articles and book chapters

on the economics of medical care, aging,

and the costs of chronic illness and injury.

On April 25, Rice was honored for her

lifetime achievements when she received

the UCSF Medal at the Founder’s Day celebration.

The following day, the center continued

the tradition she began by hosting

its biennial Dorothy Pechman Rice Symposium

on Public Health.

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Professor Emerita Dorothy Pechman Rice was

awarded the UCSF Medal during Founders Day

celebrations in April.

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grant supports

Summer is studying

the effect of pain following

burn trauma,

hoping to show that

the alleviation of pain

helps patients to better

combat infections.

Doctoral student Gretchen Summer,

working with a post-operative dental patient,

is one of ten postgraduate students

supported by the NINR-funded Training

Program in Symptom Management.

management

innovation

As a nurse practicing in Seattle,

Gretchen Summer waged a daily battle

against the intense and excruciating pain

suffered by the burn patients under her

care. “I was taking care of these patients

and thinking ‘There has to be a better

way.’ That’s what started my interest in

nursing research.” Now a doctoral student

in the department of physiological

nursing working with Kathleen Puntillo,

Summer was recently awarded a National

Research Service Award from the National

Institute of Nursing Research (NINR). She

is studying the effect of pain following

burn trauma, hoping to show that the alleviation

of pain helps patients to better

combat infections related to the immunosuppressive

nature of their injuries.

Summer credits her success to the

three years she was a part of the School of

Nursing’s Training Program in Symptom

Management funded by the NINR. The

scholarship she received from the program

included tuition, supplies, travel

and a monthly stipend. “With San Francisco

being so expensive, that really

helped a lot,” Summer recalls. She says

the program’s seminar series – along with

her adviser’s mentoring – gave her the

rigorous preparation she needed to come

up with a competitive individual NRSA

research training proposal.

Last fall the School of Nursing received

word that its symptom management

training program had been given a

second five-year grant from the NINR.

The renewal allows the School to continue

financial support of six doctoral

students and four postdoctoral fellows

per year through June 2006. In addition

to supporting individual students such as

Summer, the grant funds research training

focused on symptoms – particularly

pain, dyspnea, fatigue and sleep disturbances

– and issues around the management

of those symptoms. The grant also

supports the symptom management

seminar series and various grant-writing

workshops organized by Kathryn Lee

and Virginia Carrieri-Kohlman, the

program’s co-directors.

Lee says that a better understanding

and treatment of symptoms can lead to

faster recovery times and improved patient

outcomes. “Medicine deals with

treatments that often attempt to cure

people of their illness or disease. Nurses

deal with people as they undergo these

treatments, and we help them and their

families to manage their symptoms,

which often include the side effects of

medical treatments. NINR recognized

that little research was available on how

nurses can help people alleviate or deal

with symptoms.” The goal of the NINRfunded

program, Lee says, is to generate

knowledge about symptom experience,

management, and outcomes to help patients

and caregivers deal with and alleviate

their symptoms.

In addition to Lee and Carrieri, researchers

Marylin Dodd, Julia Faucett,

Janice Humphreys, Susan Janson and

Sally Rankin serve as program faculty.

Peggy Taffe provides administrative

support. The program accepts applications

for student and postdoctoral positions

on an ongoing basis. Those interested

can contact Taffe at 415/476-

4018 or peggy.taffe@nursing.ucsf.edu.


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how midwives

can help the

system

science of caring

“There are philosophical issues

fundamental to the midwifery

model of care that could inform

much of health care practice.”

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Holly Kennedy coordinates the

innovative Nurse-Midwifery

Education Program.

In recent years, Americans have become

increasingly dissatisfied with the quality

and cost of health care in this country.

Faculty members at the School of Nursing

are among those looking for creative solutions

to these multifaceted issues. Holly

Kennedy, for one, believes the health care

system could learn from nurse-midwives.

“There are some philosophical issues fundamental

to the midwifery model of care

that could inform much of health care

practice,” says Kennedy who joined the

School’s faculty in August as an assistant

professor and specialty coordinator of the

Nurse-Midwifery Education Program.

Kennedy came to San Francisco from

the University of Rhode Island (URI)

where she earned her PhD. In her early

career, she served in the Army Nurse

Corps as a critical care nurse, and recently

retired after 30 years of Reserve

service. She earned her master’s degree

from the Medical College of Georgia in

Augusta as a family nurse practitioner

in 1978. The following year, while working

at the Frontier Nursing Service in

the Appalachian region of Kentucky,

she discovered the practice of midwifery,

recognizing it as her “true vocation.”

“The model of care was different

than anything I’d ever seen,” Kennedy

recalls. “I saw midwives working with

an incredibly underserved population

and achieving outstanding outcomes.”

That experience eventually led

Kennedy to seek certification as a

nurse-midwife at the Frontier School

of Midwifery & Family Nursing. She

practiced full-scope midwifery for

eight years. She then dedicated herself

to the education of midwives at

URI full-time Her continued interest

with the model of care prompted her

to turn to research as a way of providing

evidence for the effectiveness of

midwifery to health policymakers.

“Midwives have excellent outcomes

even when you control for medical

risk in the population,” Kennedy explains.

“However, they only attend 9

percent of births in this country and

frequently confront barriers to their

practice.” Kennedy says it is essential

for researchers to document the

factors in their practice that result in

specific health and social outcomes

for women and their families. “This

may provide the impetus for consumers

and policymakers to begin to

question why this type of care is not

made accessible to all women.”

Currently, Kennedy is developing a

study to examine the relationship between

providers’ beliefs about pregnancy,

labor and childbirth, and how

likely they are to intervene in a labor that

is progressing without complications.

She will also be using filmed births to

document how midwives care for women

during labor and childbirth. The video

footage will be analyzed and the data

used in the development of theory about

what makes midwifery practice work.

Kennedy hopes that describing the

basic components of midwifery care will

help to improve patient outcomes and


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satisfaction in other health care settings.

For example, showing scientifically that

better outcomes are achieved when patients

are involved in major care decisions

– which means spending time discussing

options – might influence HMOs

and other health care providers as they

develop standards of care. “The amount

of time spent with the patient may well be

related to outcomes. Midwives would

also tell you that a trusting relationship

with the patient is as important as the

time spent. This work is a way of helping

support a model that is both clinically

sound and cost-effective.”

Kennedy says the School of Nursing is

an ideal place for her to carry out this research.

“When I compared universities

and schools of nursing, I found that UCSF

had an exceptional philosophy about

blending research, teaching and practice.

In addition, it is dedicated to fostering

the novice researcher in developing

in that role. There was no question that

this was the place where I wanted to be.”

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Something stronger than

expertise to hold onto

Jennifer Averill, who completed her firstyear

intensive clinical experience in the

Master’s Entry Program in Nursing (MEPN),

and is now in the midwifery speciality, wrote

the following poem, which she read at the

MEPN graduation in June, 2001.

Before turning her attention to a career

in nursing – and going public with

her insightful and poignant poetry –

Averill completed a four-year Fulbright

scholarship in Jamaica (where she first

worked in midwifery settings), taught

eighth-grade reading for three years,

and served as a program director for

“Teach for America,” a New York program

that places college graduates in

under-resourced school districts.

Averill has pursued her poetry

avocation since college, continuously

taking workshops. She finds inspiration in

her students and patients. By sharing her

poems publicly, Averill hopes to illustrate

that nursing is both science and art.

Poet and midwifery student Jennifer Averill

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The Color of Hospital

Scrubs

By Jennifer Averill

Read at Master’s Entry Program in

Nursing (MEPN) Graduation,

June 2001

She began to be interested

in her own courage

the night she flew away

from all the ugliness she knew

to land in a city

where the ugliness

was unknown

& flowers grew

outside blue & yellow houses

the color of hospital scrubs

the kind you wear

to walk into a patient’s room

for the first time

& slice the quiet.

It’s all about waiting

when you are the one

in the bed

for the door to open

to be able to go home

or not.

It all started with washing hands

thoroughly

learning to fold clean hospital corners

in less than twenty minutes

then how to empty a bedpan

matter-of-factly

take note of its contents

how to listen to the heart

where to listen to the lungs

how long it takes the blood to

leave the heart and come back again

(one minute)

how much potassium to give through an

IV in half an hour

the difference between intramuscular &

subcutaneous & how to draw up the

medication

& how to dispose of the syringe

& when the day comes this summer that

we sit in front of a computer

& answer multiple choice questions

for the nursing board exam,

we will pass as though the answer

had been in us all along

& when we start on hospital floors

or wherever else we start as RNs

who are no longer student nurses

we will not fail our patients –

we will care for them

as though we had always known how

& that is good but

We need something stronger than expertise

to hold onto (Rachel Naomi Remen)

How about this?

UCSF

In every hospital room I enter

there is someone I knew before.

This week I met

my grandfather again twice,

the one who died asleep

in L.A. on Christmas Eve.

I washed his back,

held him up

while his legs dangled

over the side of the bed.

He made jokes,

told me how beautiful

his wife is.

We need something stronger than expertise

to hold onto

How about this?

Fundamentals of Nursing

It was only when I went to the grocery store

that I remembered to call & invite the

guests I was

buying the groceries for. My list says leeks

asparagus black

pepper & I will need the white wine I will

buy at the corner market –

just down the street

from the hospital where I

have been helping people breathe.

Today a woman took the

incentive spirometer out of her

husband’s mouth when he forgot

how to use it.

She put it in

her own mouth.

He took it back,

used it correctly, smiled.

I can’t get him to gag

this week. I try. I stick

a q-tip down his throat

and he just sits there.

When I open

the door after leaving them

alone for more than five

minutes, they are always praying.

We need something stronger than

expertise to hold onto

This year we have learned to measure,

check twice & three times,

know by touch that the blood

is moving around the body

within normal limits or not.

i am certain of many things

one is that the body

prefers to be

kept intact (Lisa Day)

but still

We need something stronger than

expertise to hold onto

How about this?

It will be a nurse who makes sure

when the world

turns upside down

because parents have just lost a child

and feel as though they are falling

through the floor

that if we cannot change the injustices of

the world

with our wishes

at least

the family can have time

in the room

with the child

to say goodbye.

At least we will offer a drink

a phone to the outside world,

even if it is not much,

and a guarantee that we will not say

i know how you feel

even if we think we might.

And after the nurse goes home that night

that’s when she will need

something stronger than expertise to hold

onto

family & friends who know by then

(partly because they know a nurse)

that life can change in a moment,

that time sometimes passes before

you realize

it has past.

& if you are the lover of a nurse

maybe you’ve noticed how

much harder we laugh now

when we laugh.

maybe you’ve noticed how we are more

comfortable

allowing for silence

than we used to be,


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knowing that what comes after silence

can be more real than any conversation

invented just to fill space.

maybe you have noticed

how acutely aware we are

of the great gashes in our world that we

love with so much pain (Muriel Rykeyser).

Maybe you have noticed the change

in each of us as we have moved through

the year

and we have

needed something stronger than expertise

to hold onto

How about this?

Twins born in an emergency c-section

lie restless in separate isolettes

until stable enough to be

in an open crib

wrapped together in a single blanket

face to face &

later back to back

a tiny hand rests on

a sister’s cheek.

How about this?

haiku for the psych ward

he tells me the curse:

that all the vets will walk through

this world without hope

All this man’s belongings sit in

his car in the

parking lot.

Later he writes poetry in a focus group,

recites Coleridge outside in the sun

We need something stronger than

expertise to hold onto

How about

the belief that each American deserves

equal access

to health care

meaning not a warm chair in an

emergency room

but the questions,

“What are your goals?”

“How do you feel?”

because Rachel Naomi Remen also tells us

We don’t serve people because they are

broken.

We serve them because they are holy.

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I knock before I enter any patient’s room,

not wanting to walk

in unannounced, wanting to give space,

ownership

back to one who surrendered it coming in.

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&

the lights in the hospital are always

on. I drive by at night, after my shift

has long been over. Inside, I know a nurse

is checking

herself before she gives meds.

We serve them because they are holy.

Yesterday I chose this patient,

the one whose chart says

she has a 30-60% chance of

survival.

Hundreds of patients

will enter her room after she leaves.

But for now it is hers

& every Thursday & Friday

I sit in the blue chair next to her bed.

I get a clean mask out of the cabinet

for each time she leaves her room.

Tomorrow she has a bone marrow

transplant.

Her words

as we walk loops around the hall are

laced with a kind of containment.

Tonight

we remember

what our patients have taught us:

that being a registered nurse is not

just something you

do on the way to something

else.

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References

Day, Lisa. Comments at Medical Surgical

Nursing Lecture, January 2001.

Remen, Rachel Naomi. Comments at

UCSF School of Nursing graduation,

June 2001.

Rukeyser, Muriel. The Life of Poetry. Paris

Press: Ashfield, Massachusetts, 1996.

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news

nursing Fontaine Appointed Associate

Dean for Academic Programs

and Student Services

As of June 1, Dorrie Fontaine, RN,

DNSc, FAAN, joined the faculty of the

UCSF School of Nursing as Associate

Dean for Academic Programs.

Fontaine is a critical care nurse with

nearly 30 years experience as a staff

nurse in trauma and critical care, a clinical

nurse specialist, and an educator.

She comes to UCSF from Georgetown

University School of Nursing and Health

Studies. As Associate Dean of Undergraduate

Studies at Georgetown, she coordinated

the Acute Care Nurse Practitioner

Program. She also taught clinical bioethics

to medical and nursing students, and

coordinated an interdisciplinary course

on palliative care at the end of life.

Fontaine has published and presented

many papers on sleep, pain, anxiety, and

family presence during resuscitation of

the critically care patient. She is the 2002

President-elect of the American Association

of Critical-Care Nurses (AACN), the

largest specialty nursing organization in

the world, representing 65,000 nurses.

She has been a member of the AACN

board of directors since 1999.

“We look forward to Dr. Fontaine’s

leadership as we debate increasing the

School of Nursing’s on-line presence

and consider revisiting the development

and implementation of core courses for

the future,” says Dean Kathy Dracup.


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Hype

18

& Potential

in Residential

Care for the Elderly

The 2001

Twenty-first Annual

Helen Nahm

Research Lecture

Robert Newcomer, PhD

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Dean Kathy Dracup introduces Robert Newcomer,

2001 Nahm lecturer.

The faculty of the School of Nursing at the

University of California, San Francisco are

pleased to honor Robert Newcomer as the

twenty-first Helen Nahm Research Lecturer.

Robert Newcomer is a professor of the

Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences,

School of Nursing, University of

California, San Francisco. He received

his bachelor’s degree in political science

from the University of California, Riverside

and both a master’s and PhD degree

in planning and urban studies at the University

of Massachusetts. He joined the

UCSF faculty in 1976 and became department

chair in 1997.

Dr. Newcomer has focused his research

in three areas: long-term care delivery systems,

integration of acute and communitycare

service delivery for the elderly, and

residential care. His work is directed to

concerns of health care financing, quality

assurance, and quality improvement.

Of particular note is Dr. Newcomer’s

evaluation of the Medicare Social Health

Maintenance Organization Demonstration

(S/HMO). This multi-site project, funded

by the Health Care Financing Administration

(HCFA), is in its 17 th year. The S/

HMO, viewed as one of the principal innovative

models for the integrated delivery of

acute and community care, currently has

75,000 beneficiaries enrolled.

Again with funding from HCFA, Dr.

Newcomer and colleagues in the School of

Nursing conducted a multi-site, randomized

project to see if expanded Medicare

coverage of community services and casemanager

assistance reduced caregiver de-

pression and burden among primary

caregivers for those with dementia. While

the findings did not support an extension of

Medicare benefits, the data helped assess

dementia as a co-morbidity factor with

other chronic health conditions in health

care expenditures and document the cost

of care at the end of life. This project was

instrumental in the development of further

demonstration projects by the Alzheimer’s

Disease and Related Disorders Association

and the Veterans Administration.

In his research on state and community

long-term care delivery systems, particularly

residential care studies, Dr. Newcomer

has examined health care use

among residents, the factors associated

with moves between levels of care, and relationships

between residential care supply

and nursing home case mix. This work

raises serious questions about the capacity

and quality of care in this component of the

long-term-care system.

Dr. Newcomer is a Fellow in both the

Gerontological Society of America and

the Association for Health Sciences Research.

He has co-authored seven books,

and published more than 980 articles

and book chapters.

Among the numerous applications of

Dr. Newcomer’s important research are

the California Department of Health Services’

statewide initiative to integrate

acute and chronic care, and the California

Association of Homes and Services for the

Aged – sponsored legislation that now

requires a residential care demonstration

program in the state.


the twenty-first

helen nahm

research

lecture

June 1, 2001

The Helen Nahm Research Lecture

Award recognizes a UCSF School of

Nursing faculty member or graduate who

has made an outstanding contribution to

nursing science and research. It honors

the late Helen Nahm, professor emerita

and Dean of the UCSF School of Nursing

from 1958 to 1969. Dr. Nahm passed

away in May 1992.

In her early retirement, Dr. Nahm organized

the directors of schools of nursing

and health care agencies in the San Francisco

area to facilitate the professional

development of the new graduate nurse

and to improve the quality of nursing

care. Her many honors and awards, including

honorary fellowship in the

American Academy of Nursing in 1978,

attest to her leadership in the profession.

Through her research findings and numerous

articles and addresses, Dr. Nahm

shared her ideas and vision with a new

generation of nurses. It is to exemplify

this excellence of scholarship and dedication

of purpose that the Helen Nahm

Research Lecture Award was instituted.

The lectureship was inaugurated in 1981.

Lecture awardees

2001 Robert Newcomer, PhD, Professor and

Chair, Department of Social andBehavioral

Sciences, School of Nursing, UCSF

2000 Christine Miaskowski, RN, PhD, FAAN,

Professor and Chair, Department of Physiological

Nursing, School of Nursing, UCSF

1999 Charlene Harrington, RN, PhD, FAAN,

Professor, Department of Social and Behavioral

Sciences, School of Nursing, UCSF

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1998 Kathleen Dracup, RN, FNP, DNSc, FAAN,

L.W. Hassenplug Endowed Professor of Nursing,

UCLA School of Nursing

1997 Jeanie Kayser-Jones, RN, PhD, FAAN, Professor,

Physiological Nursing, School of Nursing,

Professor, Medical Anthropology Program,

School of Medicine, UCSF

1996 William L. Holzemer, RN, PhD, FAAN, Professor

and Chair, Community Health Systems,

School of Nursing, UCSF

1995 Patricia E. Benner, RN, DNS, FAAN, FRCN,

Professor, Department of Physiological Nursing,

School of Nursing, UCSF

1994 Marilyn C. Savedra, RN, DNS, Professor, Department

of Family Health Care Nursing,

School of Nursing, UCSF

1993 Marylin J. Dodd, RN, PhD, FAAN, Professor,

Physiological Nursing, School of Nursing, UCSF

1992 Virginia L. Olesen, PhD, Professor, Social and

Behavioral Sciences, School of Nursing, UCSF

1991 Sandra J. Weiss, RN, PhD, DNSc, FAAN, Professor,

Mental Health, Community and Administrative

Nursing, School of Nursing, UCSF

1990 Patricia G. Archbold, RN, DNSc, FAAN, Professor

and Chairperson, Department of Family

Nursing, Oregon Health Sciences University

1989 Anne J. Davis, RN, PhD, FAAN, Professor,

Mental Health, Community and Administrative

Nursing, School of Nursing, UCSF

1988 Jane S. Norbeck, RN, DNSc, FAAN, Professor

and Chair, Mental Health, Community and

Administrative Nursing, UCSF

1987 Susan R. Gortner, MN, PhD, FAAN, Professor,

Family Health Care Nursing, School of

Nursing, UCSF

1986 Carroll L. Estes, PhD, Professor and Chair,

Social and Behavioral Sciences, School of

Nursing, UCSF

1985 Anselm L. Strauss, PhD, Professor, Social and

Behavioral Sciences, School of Nursing, UCSF

1984 Ramona T. Mercer, RN, PhD., FAAN, Professor,

Family Health Care Nursing, School of

Nursing, UCSF

1983 Jeanne Quint Benoliel, RN, DNSc, FAAN, Professor,

Community Health Care Systems,

School of Nursing, University of Washington

1982 Tamar Krulik, RN, DNS, Associate Director,

Department of Nursing, Tel Aviv University

1981 Afaf I. Meleis, RN, PhD, FAAN, Professor,

Mental Health, Community and Administrative

Nursing, School of Nursing, UCSF


Dean Kathleen Dracup presents

flowers to honoree.

Hype, Reality, and Potential in

Residential Care for the Elderly

Mentoring students today, I am often

struck by the seeming clarity of their

interests, their enthusiasm, and the optimism

that somehow they will receive

the resources that make their research

possible. It is nice to be reminded of

such idealism. My own career interests

have evolved somewhat differently,

drawing from a myriad of experiences,

and opportunities. I’ll be talking about

one of these interests: “supportive housing.”

I hope today to communicate to

you why this path has captured my interest

over now some 30 years and to tell

you that supportive housing is a largely

overlooked domain in long-term health

care but one that should be of vital interest

to the profession of nursing.

In the Beginning

The Helen Nahm lecture carries the convention

of digressing to one’s roots. The

roots for this story began during my freshman

and sophomore years in college while

I was employed as a nurse’s aid in the San

Bernardino County Hospital. This was

fresh from my experience as a Navy Hospital

Corpsman. I worked graveyard and

p.m. shifts in the hospital’s “terminal

care” ward. Being there, I was exposed to

youthful victims of motorcycle and swimming

accidents, and gunshot wounds.

However, perhaps the deepest impression

this experience had on me was the exposure

to terminal cancer, emphysema, dementia,

and a host of other conditions

more common among the aged. The

implementation of Medicaid in 1966 essentially

closed down our ward as patients

were moved into community nursing

homes. This reprieved me from this job,

but it did not erase the experience or the

feeling that many patients could have

done well in – if not benefited from – noninstitutional

settings.

As I began graduate school a few

years later for training in city planning,

I continued to reflect on my county hospital

experience. Soon thereafter, I became

poignantly aware that there was

an almost complete absence of aging

and long-term care in the city planning

literature. After all, towns are built

around work, and neighborhoods

around schools. Fortunately – or even

fatefully – my campus, the University

of Southern California, had just initiated

one of the country’s first programs

in gerontology. I was able to join the

environmental studies group there.

This centered around Lou Gelwicks

and Eric Pawley, two architects with

extensive experience in hospital, nursing

home, and retirement housing design.

Finally, I had met people who understood

my, until then, latent interests.

Lou became my first mentor.

Through him I was introduced to environmental

psychology, and the subculture

of investigators studying housing

and institutional environments. The

work of one individual in particular

stood out for me. This was M. Powell

Lawton at the Philadelphia Geriatrics

Center, with whom I eventually did my

dissertation. Both Lou and Powell (un-


Even today, there are

few public programs

available to subsidize

the construction of

supportive housing facilities,

or to subsidize

the market rents of

these settings.

til his death this year) have continued

to be advisors, friends, and sources of

support throughout my career.

While in graduate school I worked

on a number of planning and architectural

projects with Lou. These afforded

the opportunity to meet the real world –

composed of state and local officials,

boards of directors, consumer groups,

and financial institutions. Through this

work I was introduced to what it took to

get projects built and to be viable as

on-going operations. Even though we

worked almost exclusively with notfor-profit

groups, I also learned about

the sub-populations that were not financially

eligible for these developments.

Even today, there are few public

programs available to subsidize the

construction of supportive housing facilities,

or to subsidize the market

rents of these settings.

After three years in the consulting

sector, I moved to a position with the

San Diego County government as Area

Agencies on Aging and Health Systems

Agencies were beginning to develop.

Thus began my education into

local politics, and the partitioning of

acute and long-term care funding. A

three-year sojourn there solidified my

desire to return to a research career

and the study of community long-term

care programs. This led to a grant writing

collaboration with Carroll Estes –

then an upstart Associate Professor at

UCSF. Many good things have happened

to me since accepting her offer

to work here. Among these has been

the opportunity to pursue my evolving

interest in supportive housing, some of

which involved collaboration with

Philip Lee and his son Paul, and Gay

Becker. Notably among my student collaborators

have been Victor Regnier,

Robyn Stone, Steven Preston, and

Robert Maynard. It has also included a

number of studies of state and local

government interrelationships (with

Estes), studies of managed care and

state long-term care systems (with

Charlene Harrington), and dementia

care coordination (with Patrick Fox).

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So much for the evolution of my research

interests. My plan today is to,

first, provide background on the subject

area of residential care. This will

help place my work in context and

hopefully be informative as well. Second,

I review several of my studies in

this area. These provide some insight

into the effectiveness and concerns

about this industry. Finally, I briefly

review my vision of how (and why) supportive

housing can best serve various

populations. Much of the information

derived from my research may be

viewed as an argument against the hype

and as tests of the potential for supportive

housing. I am still very much an advocate

for this form of care, but merely

combining housing and services does

not assure quality nor appropriateness

of care. There is much to be learned.

Defining Residential Care

Residential care is known by a variety of

terms in federal legislation and state

regulations. Common are board and care,

residential care facilities (RCFs), assisted

living, adult congregate care, and

adult foster care. Of these, the most

widely used are residential care and assisted

living. Not all supportive housing

is licensed. Among the more common

types of unlicensed facilities are rooming

homes, single room occupancy hotels or

SROs (i.e., non-transient hotel rooms),

and even low-income housing projects.

The services typically available in licensed

housing facilities include shelter,

meals, laundering linens, supervising

medications, assisting with activities of

daily living, and help with transportation

and shopping. Beyond these basic services,

licenses and regulatory waivers

are available within California and elsewhere

that permit facilities to provide

additional assistance for residents with

special needs, such as receiving hospice

care, being non-ambulatory, or those using

oxygen or with cognitive impairments

(Mollica, 2000). In many cases, these

services will be provided by an outside

home health agency rather than the

housing provider itself.


It is important to recognize

that the population

in licensed housing is

nearly as large as that

in nursing homes.

Virtually all states permit residents to

receive short-term or intermittent skilled

nursing care from a home health agency.

Some states permit those in RCFs to receive

extended periods of skilled nursing

care, and to remain in these facilities even

if they become non-ambulatory. Other

states, such as Oregon, allow residents

with extended skilled nursing needs to

remain on a negotiated shared-risk basis

involving the resident, the facility and the

state. For many, assisted living is seen as a

substitute for nursing homes.

The Size of the RCF

Population Nationally

At least 800,000 Americans live in licensed

supportive housing. An equal

number are thought to live in unlicensed

boarding and other group homes (Hawes,

Wildfire, & Lux, 1993). Based on some

estimates, the population in licensed

housing is growing rapidly (Bedney,

Carrillo, Studer, et al., 1996). However, it

is unclear whether the so called “growth”

in this sector is coming from new construction

versus moves of existing unlicensed

housing into licensed status, or the

result of changes in state (or provider)

housing definitions, or new construction

replacing older facilities. Published estimates

of licensed RCF bed supply from

the late 1980s, for example, place the supply

of licensed housing at about one million

beds (Newcomer & Grant, 1989).

Based on these estimates the actual supply

of licensed housing may not have

changed at all over the decade. Nevertheless,

it is important to recognize that the

population in licensed housing is nearly

as large as that in nursing homes. Further,

the perception of growth, whether it is actually

occurring or not, has moved the political

discussion of “Assisted Living” into

the continuum of long-term care. Until the

mid-1990s residential care was a quiet

giant in long-term care.

Policy Transition

The residential care and nursing home

industries are in transition, attempting to

adapt to unprecedented changes in

health and long-term care. Industry

changes include shorter hospital stays,

an increased emphasis on home-based

care, and expanded definitions of the

“home.” Adaptation to these changes

has implications across and among the

various levels of care, including residential

care itself, home care, nursing

homes, primary health care, and hospitals.

Among the responses to these

changing times is that states have begun

to permit higher levels of physical and

cognitive frailty among those living in

licensed and unlicensed residential settings

(Mollica, 2000).

These policy changes and state innovations

have been largely unstudied

with respect to their effectiveness,

resident outcomes, or the effects on

access to care, staff turnover, and operational

performance. In short, the

“emerging” roles of residential care

are essentially an untested and fastevolving

social experiment. The federal

government, with the exception of

a few General Accounting Office Studies

(US GAO, 1997, 1999), and two

projects funded by the Assistant Secretary

for Planning and Evaluation

(Hawes, Mor, Wildfire, et al., 1995;

Hawes, Rose, Phillips, 1999), has had

virtually no involvement with this industry.

Even major national surveys,

such as the National Health Interview

Survey, and the American Housing

Survey, expressly exclude the population

living in group housing – including

most of the residential care facilities

in the US.

Proponents for an expanded role and

scope of services for residential settings

argue the presumed operational cost savings

of a “non-medical” approach to care,

the necessity of “normalizing” the living

situation for the disabled older person

(including many who may qualify for admission

to nursing homes), and a reduction

or replacement of time as a nursing

home resident. Critics of expanded levels

of care in RCFs raise concerns with resident

safety and the adequacy of care in

such settings. They fear that RCF settings

may become less well staffed versions of

nursing homes, with the result that health

conditions may deteriorate even further.


Our research addressed

this general

and difficult question:

Is supportive housing a

substitute for nursing

home care?

What is Known about RCF

Effectiveness?

During the past 15 years or so I have conducted

four studies attempting to investigate

such basic questions as who is

served, whether nursing home substitution

occurs, and what is the quality of care.

Supportive Housing as a

Substitute for Nursing

Home Care

The first study was conducted in 1986

with funding from the Robert Wood

Johnson Foundation, and in cooperation

with two continuing care retirement

communities (CCRC). CCRCs provide a

prototypic example of an “ideal” supportive

housing setting. These CCRCs

(as do most) provided independent

apartment living, meals, maid service,

and medication supervision. They also

had personal care housing and nursing

units on-site. The study examined nursing

home and health care use within a

single year among CCRC residents and

an age and gender matched sample of

community dwelling individuals. Individuals

in both samples used the Palo

Alto Medical Clinic for their primary

care. Data on functional ability and

community and health service use were

obtained by a combination of interviews

and billing records. Our research addressed

this general and difficult question:

Is supportive housing a substitute

for nursing home care? If we found this

to be the case, there would be support

for extending public and private longterm

care insurance coverage to include

residential care.

The findings were somewhat at variance

from expectations – and more

complex than our initial question (Newcomer

& Preston, 1994). Nursing home

placements were more, rather than less,

frequent among CCRC residents than

persons of similar age and functional

health status living in the community.

On the other hand, hospital use was

lower among CCRC residents. CCRC

residents with high levels of frailty were

more likely to be living in independent

units than were those in the community

group. Frail persons in the community

were more likely to be living with other

26

family members. Much of the nursing

home use differences occurred because

of short-term, post-acute care (including

podiatry treatments) by CCRC residents.

These findings suggested that

nursing units served infirmary and postacute

care, as well as custodial care

roles within CCRCs. All of this confounds

the answer to the original question

about substitution. Further, it

raised the additional question of

whether a freestanding assisted living

facility would have as open an access to

nursing units, and the consequences

that less access would have on the

population case mix, and health care

expenditures. At minimum, it seemed

that CCRCs might be saving Medicare

expenditures rather than long-term care

expenditures. Would this be true for

freestanding facilities?

A second study continued work in

CCRC settings, this time in collaboration

with the American Baptist Homes of the

West (ABHoW), again with Robert Wood

Johnson Foundation funding (Newcomer,

Preston & Roderick, 1995). ABHoW

gave us access to rental records of all

their current and former residents. From

these we were able to track residents

over their lifetime in these facilities, and

to record the total days spent over their

lifetime in independent apartments, assisted

living, and nursing units. Similar

work done by investigators elsewhere

had found that CCRC residents had a 1.5

times greater life-time expectancy of

nursing home placement than might be

expected for the general elderly agematched

population.

Our work attempted to refine these

and our earlier findings by examining

how nursing home use was affected by

facility design, unit mix, and especially

the use of assisted living units. About

one-third of the residents died while in

independent living units without extended

stays (i.e., more than 30 days) in

either nursing or assisted living units.

About half of the residents spent one

month or more in a nursing unit. Most of

these same individuals had also lived

for a month or more in assisted living.

The balance of residents (about 10%)

had spent time in both independent and


Access to assisted living

coverage could likely

reduce days in independent

living to a greater

extent than it reduces

days in nursing homes.

assisted living, but no time in nursing

units. These lifetime rates of nursing

home use are about comparable to ageadjusted

population studies of the lifetime

likelihood of nursing home placement

among the general aged population.

Of particular interest in the analysis was

the relationship between assisted living and

the other levels of care. Are life time days in

nursing homes reduced enough through the

use of assisted living to off-set cost of insurance

coverage for assisted living?

Each day in assisted living was associated

with .7 day reduction in independent

living and .2 day reduction in nursing

home days. High-rise facilities (as compared

to single-story campuses) generally

had 175 fewer days in assisted living. Presumably

high-rise buildings, with their

vertical transportation, made it easier for

residents to get to the dining room, and for

services to be brought to the room.

One policy implication that follows

from these findings is that access to assisted

living coverage could likely reduce

days in independent living to a greater

extent than it reduces days in nursing

homes. This is a major risk for both private

LTC insurance policies and for Medicaid,

as it is likely that folks might opt for

assisted living coverage more quickly

than they would elect to go into a nursing

home. Left open is the question of

whether there might be off-setting savings

(such as reduced hospitalizations) among

those in the assisted living settings vs. in

independent units.

Nursing Home Case Mix and

State Cost Savings

A third study extended the exploration of

substitution out of CCRCs into community

nursing homes. One basis for this

project was a published finding from the

Agency for Healthcare Quality and Research

(Spector, Reschovsky, & Cohen,

1996). Their analysis from the National

Medical Expenditure Survey estimated

that between 25% and 35% of the one

million plus nursing home residents are

there mainly due to limitations in ability

to perform personal care tasks such as

bathing, dressing, and ambulating. The

hypothesis was voiced that a subgroup of

these individuals could be served with

home care services or by residence in

supportive housing. It was this hypothesis

that we endeavored to address.

The AHQR estimate of the potentially

“relocatable” nursing home population

has some important limitations.

Importantly, these estimates are from a

national sample of nursing home patients

that is too small to adjust for local-

or community-level conditions,

such as the availability of alternative

services or state policies that affect allowable

levels of care. Nor does the

analysis address the availability of residential

care beds and the potential latent

excess demand for nursing homes

or residential care in a community.

These are potentially serious limitations.

In many states and communities,

for example, the majority of residential

care facilities are under nine beds in

size, and many have no staff beyond the

owner-operators and their families.

Such limited staffing produces a resident-to-staff

ratio that is two to three

times that found in nursing homes. Consideration

of the other tasks (e.g., meals,

laundry, and housework) that must be

performed for even a few more functionally

disabled residents raises questions

about how much personal care can be

provided without staff augmentation.

There is also the question of the scale

needed to have a financially viable operation

if more staff is added.

The Commonwealth Fund sponsored us

to conduct a project testing the viability of

the AHQR estimates (Newcomer, Swan,

Karon, et al., 2001). This project used patient

level nursing home case mix data

obtained from the MDS (or minimum data

set). These data included case mix information

on about 95% of the freestanding

nursing homes in five states. The MDS

data were available through David

Zimmerman at the University of Wisconsin

and covered calendar year 1995. Case

mix was compiled both for “admissions”

during the year, and for the prevailing

case mix. This was measured among the

“continuing” facility residents. Community

characteristics included factors such

as nursing home supply, residential care

facility supply, and hospital discharges.


The sample states varied somewhat on

the proportion of nursing home beds per

1000 population (ranging from 58 to 108

beds per 1000 age 65+ population), and

the proportion of residential care to nursing

beds. In three of the sample states

fewer than 20% of the counties had as

many as one residential care bed for every

five nursing home beds. In the other

two states the proportion of counties with

even this minimum ratio was 36% and

87% respectively. Maine, the state with

the highest ratio, had half of its counties

with a ratio of one residential care bed to

every two nursing home beds. States also

varied in important residential care policies.

Among these are resident eligibility

criteria and income subsidies for Assisted

Living/residential care residents.

States with more restrictive eligibility

required that residents be ambulatory,

continent, nonviolent, and not needing

on-going nursing. States with less restrictive

policies generally had no exclusions

based on the preceding criteria, although

they usually required home health care

for skilled care needs.

States also varied in the reimbursement

for residential care. Low-income persons

in all states are eligible for rent subsidies

financed by federal Supplemental Security

Income (or SSI) payments. Some states

had traditionally been willing to augment

SSI payments with State Supplemental

Payments (SSP). Within the sample states

two used SSP to provide up to $250 per

month in rental support. Two other states

used Medicaid waivers to provide up to

$150 per month for services in some

RCFs. The sample states did not vary

much in their nursing eligibility policies.

Generally, these policies require that to be

eligible for nursing home placement the

patient must have three or more limitations

in activities of daily living, require

24-hour supervision, and have other

skilled nursing needs.

The proportion of nursing home residents

with either a physical problem or a

cognitive problem at time of admission

ranged from 27% to 46% among the

states. Case mix was compiled using the

MDS resource utilization group (RUGs)

methodology. This hierarchical system

28

assigns cases to these lower level needs

categories only if they do not have other

more complex conditions. The findings

suggest that facilitative RCF reimbursement

(within the very modest payments

offered by three states) and relatively

non-restrictive RCF eligibility

criteria were not sufficient to substantially

affect nursing home resident care

needs (i.e., case mix) at admission during

the observed period. Demand was

expressed by case mix. Illustrative

findings are that when there is at least

one RCF bed to three nursing home

beds the percent of patients with physical

problems declines by a maximum of

8% within the sample, but across a

range that includes an increase of up to

7%. For cognitive condition case mix

the maximum effect is a decline of

25%, but more typically the effect

ranges from between 2% to a reduction

of 6%. These findings held regardless

of the relative supply of nursing home

beds in a community.

For continuing care the variation in

the percentage of patients with either

physical or cognitive problems was

much less. Four states had between

53% and 60% of the nursing home residents

in these RUGs categories. The

effects of residential care supply were

also less varied, ranging from an increase

of 2% to a reduction of 10% for

both cognitive and physical problems.

Simulation analyses from the same

study were used to partially overcome the

empirical limitation of having only one

year of observations and the constrained

set of state policies and other conditions

(Swan & Newcomer, 2000). The simulation

required that all nursing homes be

licensed as skilled nursing facilities and

that the supply of RCFs per 1000 population

was set to the levels present in Maine

in 1995. Simulation results suggest that

nursing facility case mix, as expressed by

the proportion of persons with physical or

cognitive impairment, could be reduced at

time of admission by adoption of policies

that restrict nursing home operations to

skilled levels of care. The magnitude of

this effect, though small in absolute terms

(i.e., 1% to 4%), suggested relatively large


proportionate reductions (i.e., 10% to 30%

combining both cognitive and physical

RUG classified cases) among the target

case mix categories. In most states the effect

was more evident in reference to the

cognitively impaired. These effects were

generally not enhanced under the assumption

of an expanded RCF supply. This was

true even for states having either facilitative

RCF reimbursement or eligibility criteria.

Among the continuing population, the

simulated SNF policy had very little effect

on either physical or cognitive problem

case mix within any of the states. The simulated

condition of expanded RCF supply,

however, did suggest a minor reduction

(about a 1% absolute change, about 10% in

relative terms) in most of the states, and for

both groups of conditions.

Together, the basic analyses and the

simulations raise caution about the optimistic

assumptions of the interplay between

RCF policy and nursing home use.

First, the upper limit of the proportion of

nursing home cases with only physical and

cognitive impairment likely to be affected

by current and emerging long-term care

policy appears to be well under 35% of the

current nursing home population – perhaps

more in the range of a 10% to 20% reduction

from among the prevailing number of

cognitively or physical problem cases. Important

too, is that cognitively or physical

problem cases may be less than half of all

nursing home residents. Further, the findings

suggest that particular attention be

given to continuing nursing home residents

and the factors influencing the retention of

cases with predominately physical or cognitive

impairments. These proportions are

more similar among states than case mix at

admission, and they do not appear to have

much association with RCF supply.

Conclusions drawn from the preceding

findings are qualified. The foremost limitation

is that reductions in nursing home supply

were simulated only by requiring them

to be licensed exclusively for skilled care.

Absolute reductions could have a very different

effect. Important too is the existing

disparity between the number of nursing

home beds per 1000 population and that of

RCF beds in most of the study states.

Within Maine, the reference case for the

simulations, the ratio was essentially 2:1

(i.e., 8.1 nursing home beds vs. 3.9 RCF

beds per 1000 population). In the other

four states the ratio of nursing beds to

RCFs was much higher: South Dakota

12:1, Kansas 9:1, Mississippi 7:1, and

Ohio 6:1. The substantial increases in

RCF supply or decreases in nursing home

supply to come close to a 2:1 or 1:1 ratio

will take some time.

A third caution is that the attainment

of a balanced supply mix is not sufficient

to explain case mix. Presently, Maine,

Ohio, and Mississippi (each with different

nursing home and RCF supply) have

similar numbers of nursing home residents

per 1000 aged population; and

similar proportions of cognitively impaired

classified cases in nursing homes.

They vary only in the proportion classified

with physical problems.

Balancing Potential

and Reality

At this point I should disclose that I have

been among the advocates of expanding

access to residential care, and that our

own findings generally have not been

helpful in building a case for substantial

changes in residential care practice –

even though such expansion has occurred.

For example, the findings from

the CCRC and the nursing home case

mix studies (even with the qualification

that the results are affected by prevailing

regulations and the allowable levels of

care permitted in assisted living units)

suggest that the mere presence of enhanced

RCFs in a community does not

automatically produce reductions in

nursing home placements or days of care.

Moreover, it is well to recognize that

CCRCs generally have closer monitoring

of residents, care quality, and access to

health care professionals, than is true in

most RCF settings. If states are going to

facilitate an expanded supply and demand

for enhanced levels of residential

care, then a comprehensive process of

assessment, placement, quality assurance,

and service financing may be essential

to ensure that the quality of life is


If states are going to facilitate

an expanded

supply and demand for

enhanced levels of residential

care, then a

comprehensive process

of assessment,

placement, quality assurance,

and service

financing may be essential

to ensure that

the quality of life is high

and the wide variety of

health care needs of

this population are met.

high and the wide variety of health care

needs of this population are met.

What kind of capacity do states have

for tracking quality of care? What are the

operational characteristics of the RCF

supply? Most of the data collected and

available about long-term care is oriented

to nursing homes. Other segments

of the delivery system are much less well

understood, and without management

information systems that facilitate the

monitoring of changes in patient populations

or other public policy concerns.

The attention given to and data available

for nursing homes is historically justified

on the basis of the number of persons

served and the high expenditures and the

vulnerability of this population. For

some reason, this logic has not extended

to residential care and unlicensed supportive

housing and, therefore, our

knowledge base is severely constrained.

Studies of RCF operators and residents

have generally relied on case studies

and convenience samples of facilities

and residents (Newcomer & Grant,

1989). Each study has been limited to

one or perhaps a handful of purposefully

selected states. Even the major “national

studies” have used samples that are often

not generalizable to either national or

state-wide populations. As a consequence,

health status, functional and

cognitive ability among residents is not

well documented across the country.

Knowledge about staffing, services, and

the fit between the capability of residents

and the facilities in which they live is

largely limited to single measurement

point studies. Statewide RCF surveys are

conducted from time to time, but not systematically

across the nation.

Within California for example, the most

recent and comprehensive data available

on the RCF population comes from a 1993

survey of residents and operators. The

survey used a statewide probability

sample of RCFs. This was a project I did

with funding from the Henry J. Kaiser

Family foundation (Newcomer, Breuer, &

Zhang, 1994). Although this information

is somewhat dated, it provides insight into

both who is currently served by RCFs, and

of the provider capacity.

30

RCF Characteristics

• Most facilities (about 75%-90%) are

licensed for non-ambulatory care.

This permits the facility to serve those

with either substantial mobility restrictions

or dementia. The actual

number of non-ambulatory beds being

used is not currently known. Special

care units within facilities, especially

for dementia, are said to be an emerging

trend within the industry nationally

and in California. As of 1997,

however, fewer than 20% of facilities

reported such units.

• Multi-occupancy rooms (i.e., two persons

per room is the regulatory maximum)

predominate the unit mix in

RCFs in California. These generally

account for between 60% to 70% of

the total rooms. Except in facilities of

more than 100 beds, shared baths are

typical. These physical characteristics

are at variance with industry

trends, especially in assisted living,

which build a higher proportion of

private rooms.

• Monthly rates for rooms tend to be

similar across all facility sizes. Single

rooms typically range from $1,200 to

$3,000 (about $50-$100 per day) with

an average unit going for $2,200. Total

costs vary across size groups depending

on the services used. Smaller facilities

(i.e., those under 50 beds) generally

include personal laundry and

assistance with eating, dressing, and

toileting in the monthly rate. Such assistance

often incurs additional

charges in the larger RCFs. Incontinence

supplies require extra charges

in most facilities.

• Between 50% and75% of RCFs report

that they will accept residents receiving

public assistance (i.e., SSI/SSP) at time

of application. Even more (i.e., 80%-

90%) will keep residents who have later

qualified for SSI/SSP. In spite of these

practices, it is important to note that the

SSI/SSP level (currently $749 per month

or $27 per day for a single individual)

generally sets the lower bound on the

monthly rate structure for that individual.

This rate is well below the market

rate for RCFs, especially RCF prices


with add-ons for personal care. In spite of

this, California regulations for SSI/SSP

and Medicaid eligibility continue to count

any family supplement to this rate as income

– thus jeopardizing eligibility for

these income supplement programs.

RCF Services

Facilities vary somewhat in the types of services

reported by operators to be available

within RCFs and whether these services are

provided by staff or outside vendors. The

following describes this variation as of

1993. Whether these patterns have

changed with an evolving case mix, or other

incentives (such as forming their own home

health programs) has not been determined.

• The core activities of personal care, medication

supervision, and transportation are

widely available and normally provided

by facility staff. Notable is that the larger

facilities are much more likely to also use

outside staff for these functions.

• Skilled care, as represented by nursing

and therapy, is not common regardless

of facility size. Even in the largest facilities,

this care is more likely to be

provided by an outside vendor than by

facility staff. Relatively few facilities

have a medical director.

• The absence of nurses suggests that

chronic condition management is being

left to the responsibility of the resident,

their families, and their health provider.

While this is typical with the kind of

support and oversight available in one’s

own home, it nevertheless leaves open

the question of whether more efficient

and effective oversight and management

might be achieved if there was

more collaboration between housing

and health care providers.

Resident Characteristics

• Regardless of RCF size, the typical

resident is female, with an average age

in the late 70s or early 80s. Whites predominate,

accounting for 90% or more

of residents in all size classes. Hispanic

and Asian residents occur in similar

proportions among all facility sizes,

while smaller facilities show a tendency

to have higher proportions of Blacks.

• Between 60% and 75% of residents had

at least a high school education, with at

least 30% having some college. The

lowest educational attainment is

among those in smaller facilities.

• Income does not vary substantially

among most facility size groups, although

the larger facilities (i.e., having

100 or more beds) do have about

twice the proportion (20%) of persons

with incomes of $25,000 or more (in

1993 dollars) as the other RCFs. Between

a third and half of the residents

are eligible for SSI/SSP and Medicaid.

Health and Functional Status

• Between 40% and 50% of residents

showed moderate to severe depression,

based on responses to the Geriatric

Depression Scale.

• More than half of RCF residents

showed at least some cognitive impairment

based on responses to the

Mini Mental Status Examination and

facility case records. Moderate to severe

cognitive impairment was reported

among more than a third of

those in the smallest RCFs.

• Rates of functional limitations were also

shown to be high and to vary among the

RCF size groupings. More than a third

of all RCF residents reported at least

two limitations in activities of daily living

(e.g., bathing, dressing, grooming,

eating, and transferring). Impairment

rates were highest in the smaller facilities.

These facilities typically have the

fewest staff per resident and fewest onsite

staff skill resources.

These rates are similar to those reported

by two major multi-state surveys

conducted within the last eight years

(Hawes et al., 1995, 1999). The California

survey, with minor modification, used

the same instruments as the first of these

surveys. Findings from these three surveys,

when compared to results from surveys

in the early 1980s, suggest that

rates of cognitive impairment, incontinence,

and ADL limitations have increased

by up to 25% over 10 years.

Such trends are consistent with presumed

public policy goals and consumer

demand, but has financing and quality

assurance kept pace with these trends?


Rates of cognitive impairment,

incontinence,

and ADL limitations

have increased by up

to 25% over 10 years.

Such trends

are consistent with

presumed public policy

goals and consumer

demand, but has

financing and quality

assurance kept pace

with these trends?

Service Use Among RCF

Residents

The only available information in California

about hospital, physician and other

health care use by RCF residents is from

self-reported estimates. These were obtained

from the 1993 RCF survey. The applicability

of this information to 2001 is

subject to error, but it is illustrative.

• About one-third of residents reported a

hospitalization in the previous 12

months; more than 20% reported at least

one emergency room visit; between 5%-

8% reported nursing visits within the previous14

days. Whether these rates are

high or avoidable, or whether they have a

consequence relative to nursing home

placement is unknown.

• Not all service rates are high. For example,

in spite of the levels of depression

in the RCF population, the percentage

of residents reporting mental

health services was much lower than

the prevalence of depression.

A more direct measure of service quality

within the RCF setting is provided by the

percentage of persons with an ADL limitation

who claim to need more assistance.

• For dressing assistance, between

24%-40% (with the range of estimates

going from large to small facilities) of

those needing assistance reported

needing more assistance than they received.

For those needing assistance

with walking or wheeling, the rates

ranged from 50%-64%.

• On the positive side, among those needing

assistance with transferring in or

out of bed or with eating, unmet need

for assistance accounted for no or few

people regardless of facility size. Assistance

with toileting was also reported as

generally meeting the resident’s needs,

with between none and 14% of the residents

sometime having to wait more

than five minutes for assistance.

• Resident satisfaction, with respect to

being treated with respect/courtesy,

safety of the environment, was uniformly

high (95% or more) among all

RCF size groups.

32

Where Do We Go From Here?

California may be initiating a demonstration

program that will finally permit Medicaid

waiver funds to cover personal care services

among RCF residents. (Thirty-eight states

already do this, although the number of persons

serviced via this financing is about

50,000 – about 6% of the total residents.) The

planning for California’s demonstration (and

those in other states) provides the opportunity

to “experiment” with alternative approaches

to staffing and disease management, and with

quality assurance processes. Clinical input

into this is essential. A second opportunity

inherent in these demonstrations is that they

can establish a data base that permits the

tracking of health care and nursing home utilization

resulting from the various delivery

models. In this research domain, as in longterm

care more generally, it is important that

effective disease management and any associated

Medicare cost reductions be identified

and that policies be modified so that some of

the savings be returned to those components

of the long-term care system that help generate

them. If nothing else, my research has

suggested that savings from residential care,

as an intervention, likely will not come from

reductions of nursing home expenditures,

but, rather, they will come from either reductions

in home care expenditures or from

health care utilization. Articulating this point

well enough to change Medicare policy is an

opportunity and a challenge.

In spite of the many obvious connections

to nursing that are suggested by the research

findings we have been talking about

this morning, it is important to emphasize

that this sector of long-term care is largely

ignored in nursing curricula and practice.

Can this change and should it? Is there not

an appropriate role for Geriatric Nurse

Practitioners or Clinical Nurse Specialists

in home visits, case management, and staff

training? Cannot disease management programs,

more generally, conceptualize and

implement the means to impanel RCF residents

for special attention? Partnerships

between schools and facilities, or between

nurse practices and facilities may (and perhaps

should) constitute an explicit challenge

for nursing practice and scholarship.


If nothing else, my research

has suggested

that savings from residential

care, as an intervention,

likely will not

come from reductions

of nursing home expenditures,

but, rather, they

will come from either

reductions in home care

expenditures or from

health care utilization.

Off and on over these past five years a

few of us in gerontology have discussed

the possibility of a long-term care administration

program in nursing curricula.

One of its functions would be to train licensed

nursing home and residential care

administrators, and mid-level executives

for long-term care corporations. In pursuing

these ideas we have had meetings with

the major trade associations in California

seeking their advice and support for such

an endeavor. The need for such a program

and nurse expertise is there. So is the interest

in collaborating.

Finally, looking back on my career, as

preparing this talk has required, I’m

struck by the metaphor of a salmon returning

to its place of origin. For me, reengagement

with residential care is returning

to my core involvement with longterm

care. I’ve been toughened and tested

by a career swimming with sharks, but

these final next few years of research I

trust will be my most challenging and rewarding.

I recognize, and hope you do too,

that consumer demand for varied forms of

assisted living is here and growing. There

remains much to learn about how to deliver

and finance appropriate levels of

care. The research, policy, and education

questions are bountiful as are the opportunities

to make a difference.

References

Bedney, B., Carrillo, H., Studer, L., Swan, J. &

Harrington, C. (1996). 1995 State Data

Book on Long Term Care Program and Market

Characteristics. Baltimore, MD: Health

Care Financing Administration.

Hawes, C., Mor, V., Wildfire, J., Iannacchione,

V., Lux, L., Green, R., Greene, A., Wilcox,

V., Spore, D. & Phillips, C. (1995). An

Analysis of the Effect of Regulation on the

Quality of Care in Board and Care Homes:

Executive Summary. Research Triangle

Park, North Carolina: Research Triangle

Institute.

Hawes, C., Rose & Phillips, C. (1999). A national

study of assisted living for the frail

elderly: Executive summary. Results of a

national survey of facilities. Washington,

DC: Office of the Assistant Secretary for

Planning and Evaluation, Department of

Health & Human Services.

Hawes, C., Wildfire, J. & Lux, L. (1993). The regulation

of board and care homes: Results of a

survey in the 50 states and the District of Columbia.

State summaries. Washington, DC:

American Association of Retired Persons.

Mollica, R. (2000). State Assisted Living Policy

2000. Portland, ME: National Academy for

State Health Policy. Newcomer, R., Breuer,

W., & Zhang, X. (1994)

Residents and the Appropriateness of Placement

in Residential Care for the Elderly: A 1993

Survey of California RCFE Operators and

Residents. San Francisco: Institute for

Health & Aging, University of California.

Newcomer, R. & Grant, L.A. (1989). Residential

Care Facilities: Understanding their Role

and Improving their Effectiveness. In D.

Tilson (Ed.) Aging in Place: Supporting the

frail elderly in residential environments

(pp. 101-124). Glenview, IL: Scott,

Foresman, and Company.

Newcomer, R., Lee, P. & Wilson, K. (1996). Residential

care for the frail elderly: State innovations

in placement, financing, and governance.

In R. Newcomer & A. Wilkinson

(Eds.), Annual Review of Gerontology and

Geriatrics, Volume 16. New York: Springer

Publishing Company, pp. 162-182.

Newcomer, R. & Preston, S. (1994). Relationship

between acute care and nursing unit use in

two continuing care retirement communities.

Research on Aging, 16(3):280-300.

Newcomer, R., Preston, S. & Roderick, S. (1995).

Assisted living and nursing unit use among

continuing care retirement community residents.

Research on Aging, 17(2): 149-167

Newcomer, R., Swan, J., Karon, S., Bigelow, W.,

Harrington, C. & Zimmerman, D. (2001).

Residential care supply and the cognitive

and physical problem case mix in nursing

homes. Journal of Aging and Health,

13(2):217-247.

Spector, W., Reschovsky, J. & Cohen, J. (1996).

Appropriate placement of nursing homes

residents in lower levels of care. Milbank

Quarterly, 74(1) :139.

Swan, J & Newcomer, R. (2000). A simulation of

the effects of nursing home licensing policy

and residential care supply on nursing

home case mix in four states. Health Care

Financing Review 21(3):203-30.

US General Accounting Office (US GAO).

(1997) Long Term Care: Consumer Protection

and Quality-of-Care Issues in Assisted

Living. Washington, DC: US General Accounting

Office (GAO/HEHS 97-593)

US General Accounting Office, (1999) Assisted

Living: Quality-of-Care and Consumer

Protection Issues for Four States.

April. GAO HEHS-99-27


esearch

faculty

The following information depicts

the nature and scope of faculty

research activity during the current

academic year in the School

of Nursing. Extramural funding

sources are identified by agency

and number. The projects are

arranged according to the following

areas of focus: Aging and

Aging Health Policy, Chronic

Illness and Long-Term Care,

Clinical Practices/Professional

Studies, Family in Health and

Illness, Health Policy, Health

Promotion/Illness Prevention,

HIV/AIDS, Research Methods,

Symptom Management, and

Women and Health Issues.

faculty

research activities

Aging/Aging Health

Policy

California Consumer

Information System for Nursing

Homes (California HealthCare

Foundation, 99-5041A)

Charlene A. Harrington, PhD,

Prof, SBS (PI)

Determining the Causes of

Nursing Home Bankruptcies

and Financial Difficulties

(California Bureau of

Research, State Library,

L-1821)

Charlene A. Harrington, PhD,

Prof, SBS (PI)

Martin J. Kitchener, PhD, Asst

Adjunct Prof, SBS (Co-PI)

Evaluation of Effectiveness of

Substance Abuse and Mental

Health Services to the Elderly

(Substance Abuse and Mental

Health Services Administration,

UD1 SM53032)

Carroll L. Estes, PhD, Prof,

IHA (PI)

Patricia Arean, PhD (Co-PI)

Karen W. Linkins, PhD, Specialist,

IHA (Co-PI)

Evaluation of the Goldman

Institute on Aging’s Elder

Abuse Counseling Program

(Mt. Zion Health Fund)

Glenna A. Dowling, PhD, Assoc

Adjunct Prof, PN (PI)

Mary Twomey, MSW (Co-PI)

Alma Dunstan-McDaniel (Co-

Investigator)

34

Evaluation of the Multi-purpose

Senior Services Program

(MSSP) of the Goldman

Institute on Aging (Mt. Zion

Health Fund)

Glenna A. Dowling, PhD, Assoc

Adjunct Prof, PN (PI)

Eva Schmitt, PhC, Director, Outcomes

Research at Institute on

Aging (Co-PI)

Long-Term Care for Older

Californians (University of

California, California Policy

Research Center)

Charlene A. Harrington, PhD,

Prof, SBS (PI)

Patrick J. Fox, PhD, Prof,

IHA (Co-PI)

Robert J. Newcomer, PhD, Prof,

SBS (Co-PI)

Nursing Home Bankruptcies,

Closures, and Financial

Difficulties (California Policy

Research Center)

Charlene A. Harrington, PhD,

Prof, SBS (PI)

Martin J. Kitchener, PhD, Asst

Adjunct Prof, SBS (Co-PI)

Technology Use and

Prolonging Dying in Older

Adults (NIH National Institute of

Nursing Research, R01

NR05109)

Sharon R. Kaufman, PhD, Prof in

Res, IHA (PI)

Chronic Illness/Long

Term Care

Biomedicalization in Theory

and Practice

Adele E. Clarke, PhD, Prof,

SBS (PI)


Barbara J. Drew’s

work focuses on improving

the accuracy

of diagnosing heart attacks,

and eliminating

the diagnostic delay

that accounts for unnecessary

damage to

cardiac tissue.

Barbara J. Drew, RN, PhD, FAAN

Chronic Care Initiatives: What

Have We Learned and

Implications for the Medicare

Program (National Academy of

Social Insurance)

Carroll L. Estes, PhD, Prof,

IHA (PI)

Marty Lynch, PhD, Director,

Over 60 Clinic (Co-PI)

Mauro Hernandez, SBS (Graduate

Student Researcher)

Disability Statistics

Rehabilitation Research and

Training Center (NIH National

Institute on Disability and

Rehabilitation Research, R01

HS07574)

Mitchell P. LaPlante, PhD, Assoc

Adjunct Prof, SBS (PI)

Joseph T. Mullan, PhD, Asst

Adjunct Prof,SBS (Co-Investigator)

Effectiveness of State Long

Term Care Ombudsman

Programs (Henry J. Kaiser

Family Foundation)

Carroll L. Estes, PhD, Prof,

IHA (PI)

The Effect of Supplemental

Fluid on Tissue Oxygenation

and Pressure Ulcer Perfusion in

Patients with Pressure Ulcers

(American Nurses Foundation,

2001 Virginia Stone Scholar)

Nancy A. Stotts, EdD, Prof,

PN (PI)

Harriet W. Hopf, MD (Co-Investigator)

Endocrine Disruptors

Pesticide Exposure and

Neurodevelopmental

Outcomes (NIH National

Institute for Occupational

Safety and Health, R01

0H07400)

Brenda Eskenazi, PhD, Prof,

UC Berkeley School of Public

Health (PI)

Abbey Alkon, PhD, PNP, Asst

Prof, FHCN (Co-Investigator)

An Ethnography of Dying in a

Long-Term Care Facility (NIH

National Institute on Aging,

National Cancer Institute, and

National Institute of Nursing

Research, AG15806)

Jeanie Kayser-Jones, PhD, Prof,

PN (PI)

Seth Landefeld, MD, Prof, Geriatrics

Division (Co-Investigator)

Gary M. McCart, PharmD, Prof

of Clin Pharm, Dept. of Clinical

Pharmacy (Co-Investigator)

Christine A. Miaskowski,

PhD, CCRN, ANP, Prof, PN

(Co-Investigator)

Steven M. Paul, PhD, Senior

Statistician, DO (Co-Investigator)

Exercise Training in Heart

Failure (American Heart

Association, NCR 133-09)

Kathleen A. Dracup, DNSc,

Dean & Prof (PI)

Marie Cowan, PhD, Dean &

Prof, UCLA (Co-PI)

Gregg Fonarow, MD, Assoc

Prof, UCLA (Co-PI)

Donna Vredevoe, PhD, Prof,

UCLA (Co-PI)

Antoine Hage, MD, UCLA (Co-

Investigator)

Michele Hamilton, MD, UCLA

(Co-Investigator)

W. Robb MacLellan, MD,

UCLA (Co-Investigator)

Holly Middlekauff, MD, UCLA

(Co-Investigator)

Jaime Moriguchi, MD, UCLA

(Co-Investigator)

Family Processes in Chronic

Illness in Latin American

Families – Integrating Cross-

National Knowledge for

Practice (University of

California, Pacific Rim Research

Program)

Catherine A. Chesla, DNSc,

Assoc Prof, FHCN (PI)

Edelmira Castillo, PhD, Prof,

University de Valle, Cali, Colombia

(Co-PI)

Martha Lucia Alzate, DPH,

Prof, National University,

Bogota, Colombia (Co-Investigator)

Carmen de la Cuesta, PhD, Prof,

Universidad de Antioguia,

Medellin, Colombia (Co-Investigator)

Luz Angelica Munoz, PhD, Director,

School of Nursing,

Universidad Andres Bello,

Santiago, Chile (Co-Investigator)

Frail Elderly Assessment and

Care Management Program

(California Healthcare

Foundation via subcontract

with the Long Term Care

Group, Inc.)

Teresa Graves, Sharp

Healthcare (PI)

Robert J. Newcomer, PhD, Prof,

SBS (Co-PI)

Health and Function in the

Alameda County (NIH National

Institute on Aging)

George A. Kaplan, PhD, Prof and

Chair, Dept. of Epid, University of

Michigan (PI)

Margaret I. Wallhagen, PhD,

GNP, Assoc Prof, PN (Co-Investigator)

Health Care Utilization in the

End Stage of Life Among those

with Dementia (Alzheimer’s

Disease and Related

Disorders Association)

Robert J. Newcomer, PhD, Prof,

SBS (PI)


Improving Health Outcomes in

Unpartnered Cardiac Elders

(NIH National Institute of

Nursing Research/National

Institute on Aging, R01

NR05205)

Sally H. Rankin, PhD, FNP,

Assoc Prof, FHCN (PI)

Diane L. Carroll, PhD, Clinical

Specialist, Massachusetts General

Hospital (Co-PI)

Management of Chronic

Conditions Among Persons

with Dementia (Alzheimer’s

Disease and Related Disorders

Association)

Robert J. Newcomer, PhD, Prof,

SBS (PI)

Joseph T. Mullan, PhD, Asst Adjunct

Prof, SBS (Co-Investigator)

Melatonin for Sleep Disorders in

Parkinson’s Disease (NIH

National Institute of Nursing

Research, Office of Alternative

Medicine, R01 NR04774)

Glenna A. Dowling, PhD, Assoc

Adjunct Prof, PN (PI)

Julie Carter, MN, Assoc Prof of

Neurology and Asst Prof of Nursing,

Oregon Health Sciences University

(Co-PI)

Clifford Singer, MD, Assoc Prof

of Psychiatry and Director, Geriatric

Psychiatry and Co-Medical

Director of Sleep Disorders

and Mood Laboratory (Co-Investigator)

Preventing Disabilities through

Community Based Health

Coaching and Services

Enhancement (California

Healthcare Foundation via

subcontract with the Long Term

Care Group, Inc.)

Jay Greenberg, Long Term Care

Group (PI)

Robert J. Newcomer, PhD, Prof,

SBS (Co-PI)

Second Generation Social/

Health Maintenance

Organization Demonstration:

Design and Technical

Assistance (Health Care

Financing Administration via

subcontract from the University

of Minnesota)

Robert Kane, MD (PI)

Robert J. Newcomer, PhD, Prof,

SBS (Co-Investigator)

Clinical Practices/

Professional Studies

California Nursing Outcomes

Coalition Database Project

(American Nurses Association,

Kaiser Permanente, and

California Healthcare

Foundation)

Diane S. Brown, PhD, Asst

Clin Prof, Kaiser Permanente

North East Bay Service Area,

CA (Co-PI)

Nancy E. Donaldson, DNS,

Assoc Clin Prof, PN (Co-PI)

Carolyn Aydin, PhD, Cedars-

Sinai Medical Center/Burns &

Allen Research Institute, Los

Angeles, CA (Co-Investigator)

Linda B. Bolton, DrPH, Cedars-

Sinai Medical Center/Burns &

Allen Research Institute, Los

Angeles, CA (Co-Investigator)

Center for California Health

Workforce Studies (UCSF/US

Bureau of Health Professions,

U76 MB10001)

Kevin Grumbach, MD, Assoc

Prof, F&CM (PI)

Jean Ann Seago, PhD, Asst Prof,

CHS (Co-PI)

Employment Status and Role

Function of Pediatric Nurse

Practitioner: Implications for

Education and Training of

PNPs (Association of Faculties

of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners

and Associate Programs)

Patricia L. Jackson, MS, PNP,

Clin Prof, FHCN (PI)

Christine Kennedy, PhD, PNP,

Assoc Prof, FHCN (Co-PI)

Filipino Dietary Habits and

Coronary Heart Disease

(American Heart Association)

Arthur Cantos, BS (PI)

Juliene G. Lipson, Prof,

CHS (Co-PI)

FOCI: FNP Focus on Chronic

Illness (HRSA – Division of

Nursing, D24 HP00837)

Sally H. Rankin, PhD, FNP,

Assoc Prof, FHCN (PI)

Janice C. Humphreys, PhD, PNP,

Asst Prof, FHCN (Co-Investigator)

Ellen M. Scarr, MS, FNP, WHNP,

Assoc Clin Prof, FHCN (Co-

Investigator)

Functional Independence

Measure: Outcome

Measurement for Stroke

Rehabilitation Across the

Continuum (Collaborative

project with State University of

New York at Buffalo. Funded by

Kaiser Permanente Innovation

Grant Program, #970009)

Diane S. Brown, PhD, Asst Clin

Prof, Kaiser Permanente North

East Bay Service Area, CA (PI)

Identifying Quality of Life and

Psychosocial Risk Factors and

their Sociocultural Mediators in

African American, Asian,

Latino, and White Breast

Cancer Survivors (Department

of Defense, 17-99-1-9106)

Kimlin Ashing-Giwa, PhD (PI)

Geraldine V. Padilla, PhD, Prof,

PN (Co-Investigator)

Ischemia Monitoring and

Mapping in the Emergency

Department in Appropriate

Triage and Evaluation of Acute

Ischemic Myocardium (NIH

National Heart, Lung, and

Blood Institute, R01 HL69753)

Barbara J. Drew, PhD, Prof,

PN (PI)

Kirsten Fleischmann, MD, Asst

Prof of Med, UCSF (Co-Investigator)

Robert Lux, PhD, Prof of Med,

University of Utah (Co-Investigator)

Steven M. Paul, PhD, Senior

Statistician, DO (Co-Investigator)

Meeting California’s Nursing

Workforce Needs (California

HealthCare Foundation, 99-

1039)

Edward O’Neil, PhD, Director,

Center for the Health Professions

(PI)

Jean Ann Seago, PhD, Asst Prof,

CHS (Co-Investigator)

Nursing Unit Characteristics

and Quality of Care Pilot (UCSF

Academic Senate)

Jean Ann Seago, PhD, Asst Prof,

CHS (PI)

36

Outcomes of the Revised CA

Bloodborne Pathogens

Standard (NIH National

Institute for Occupational

Safety and Health, R01

0H04006)

Marion Gillen, PhD, MPH, Asst

Prof, CHS (PI)

James Cone, MD, MPH (Co-

Investigator)

Paul Leigh, PhD (Co-

Investigator)

Steven M. Paul, PhD, Senior

Statistician, DO (Co-Investigator)

Jean Ann Seago, PhD, Asst Prof,

CHS (Co-Investigator)

Psychosocial Aspects: A

Controlled Prospective Study

of Cervical Cancer in a

Multiethnic Sample (California

Cancer Research Program,

2110008)

Kimlin Ashing-Giwa, PhD (PI)

Geraldine V. Padilla, PhD, Prof,

PN (Co-Investigator)

Psychosocial Functioning of

Hospitalized Chinese Children

and their Families (University of

California, Pacific Rim

Research Program)

Christine Kennedy, PhD, PNP,

Assoc Prof, FHCN (Co-PI)

Susan E. Kools, PhD, Asst Prof,

FHCN (Co-PI)

Sarah Kong, MS (Co-Investigator)

Thomas Wong, PhD (Co-Investigator)

The UCSF/Hartford Center for

Gerontological Nursing

Excellence (The John A.

Hartford Foundation)

Jeanie Kayser-Jones, PhD, Prof,

PN (PI)

Charlene A. Harrington, PhD,

Prof, SBS (Co-PI)

Margaret I. Wallhagen, PhD,

GNP, Assoc Prof, PN (Co-PI)

UCSF Vascular Access Patient

Safety Interdisciplinary

Education Project (HRSA,

1D51 HP10004)

Nancy E. Donaldson, DNS,

Assoc Clin Prof, PN (PI)


Jeffrey M. Pearl, MD, Clin Prof, PN

(Co-Investigator)

Ann M. Williamson, PhD, Director,

Nursing Education and Administration,

UCSF (Co-Investigator)

Unit Level Nurse Workload

Impacts on Patient Safety

(Agency for Healthcare Research

and Quality, R01 HS11954)

Nancy E. Donaldson, DNS, Assoc

Clin Prof, PN (PI)

Carolyn Aydin, PhD, Cedars-Sinai

Medical Center/Burns & Allen

Research Institute, Los Angeles,

CA (Co-Investigator)

Linda B. Bolton, DrPH, Cedars-

Sinai Medical Center/Burns &

Allen Research Institute, Los Angeles,

CA (Co-Investigator)

Diane S. Brown, PhD, Asst Clin

Prof, Kaiser Permanente North

East Bay Service Area, CA (Co-

Investigator)

Steven M. Paul, PhD, Senior Statistician,

DO (Co-Investigator)

Family in Health and

Illness

Being Well Cared for: Patient and

Family Responses to the Synergy

Model (American Association of

Critical-Care Nurses)

M.A.Q. Curley, PhD, Director of

Nursing Research, Children’s Hospital,

Boston (Co-PI)

Daphne Stannard, PhD, Asst Prof,

SF State University (Co-PI)

Mary Duffy, PhD, Boston University

School of Nursing (Co-Investigator)

Carolyn Hayes, PhD (Co-Investigator)

Being Well Cared for: Patients’

and Families’ Perceptions

(American Association of Critical-

Care Nurses)

Daphne Stannard, PhD, Asst Prof,

SF State University (Co-PI)

M.A.Q. Curley, PhD, Director of

Nursing Research, Children’s Hospital,

Boston (Co-PI)

Lisa Day, PhD, Critical Care Educator,

UCSF Med Center (Co-

Investigator)

Fathers’ Experience in

Pediatric Palliative Care (UCSF

School of Nursing Research

Committee)

Betty Davies, PhD, Prof,

FHCN (PI)

Latino & Chinese Families’

Experiences in Pediatric

Palliative Care: Pilot Study

(Oncology Research Fund:

Lucile Packard Children’s

Hospital, Stanford University)

Harvey Cohen, MD, PhD, Prof

and Chair, Department of Pediatrics,

School of Medicine,

Stanford University (Co-PI)

Nancy Contro, LCSW, Director,

Pediatric Palliative Care Program

Development, Lucile

Packard Children’s Hospital,

Stanford University (Co-PI)

Betty Davies, PhD, Prof,

FHCN (Co-PI)

NIDDM in African and Chinese-

American Families (NIH

National Institute of Diabetes

and Digestive and Kidney

Diseases, R01 DK53203)

Catherine A. Chesla, DNSc,

Assoc Prof, FHCN (Co-PI)

Lawrence Fisher, PhD, Prof in

Res, F&CM and Psych (Co-PI)

Kevin Chun, PhD, Asst Prof,

USF (Co-Investigator)

Phillip Gardiner, PhD, Principal

Admin Analyst, Office of Health

Affairs (Co-Investigator)

Richard A. Kanter, MD, Assoc

Clin Prof, Med (Co-Investigator)

Joseph T. Mullan, PhD, Asst

Adjunct Prof, SBS (Co-Investigator)

Marilyn M. Skaff, PhD, Asst

Adjunct Prof, F&CM (Co-Investigator)

Pediatric Palliative Care:

Cultural Perspectives (Lucile

Packard Children’s Hospital,

Stanford University)

Betty Davies, PhD, Prof,

FHCN (PI)

Harvey Cohen, MD, PhD, Prof,

Pediatrics, Stanford University

School of Medicine (Co-Investigator)

Pediatric Palliative Care:

Experiences of Families of

Varying Cultures (Lucile

Packard Children’s Hospital,

Stanford University)

Nancy Contro, LCSW, Director,

Patient and Family Support

Services, Lucile Packard

Children’s Hospital, Stanford

University (PI)

Betty Davies, PhD, Prof,

FHCN (Co-PI)

Judith Larson, PhD, Psychologist

(Co-PI)

Stress and Work in Pregnant

Military Women

Janice Stinson, PhD, Asst Adjunct

Prof, FHCN (PI)

Health Policy

Factors Influencing Availability

of Emergency Room On-Call

Coverage (California State

Senate Office of Research,

California Policy Research

Center, and California

Program on Access to Care)

Ruth E. Malone, PhD, Asst

Adjunct Prof, SBS (PI)

Review and Analysis of

Tobacco Industry Documents

(NIH National Cancer Institute,

R01 CA87472)

Stanton Glantz, PhD, Prof, Cardiology

(PI)

Lisa A. Bero, PhD, Asst Adjunct

Prof, IHA (Co-Investigator)

Ruth E. Malone, PhD, Asst

Adjunct Prof, SBS (Co-Investigator)

Tobacco Industry Targeting of

African Americans (University

of California, Tobacco-Related

Disease Research Program,

9RT-0095)

Ruth E. Malone, PhD, Asst Adjunct

Prof, SBS (PI)

Tobacco Industry Targeting of

Gays and Lesbians (NIH

National Cancer Institute, R01

CA90789)

Ruth E. Malone, PhD, Asst Adjunct

Prof, SBS (PI)

Health Promotion/Illness

Prevention

Breast Cancer Early Detection

Evaluation Project (California

Department of Health Services,

00-90917)

Regina Otero-Sabogal, PhD,

Assoc Adjunct Prof, IHA (PI)

Patrick J. Fox, PhD, Prof, IHA

(Co-Investigator)

Jacqueline M. Golding, PhD,

Adjunct Prof, IHA (Co-Investigator)

Child Care Health Linkages

Project (California Children and

Families Commission)

Abbey Alkon, PhD, PNP, Asst

Prof, FHCN (PI)

Clinical Trial of Wellness

Training for Mentally Ill Adults

(NIH National Institute of

Nursing Research, R01

NR05350)

Linda Chafetz, DNS, Assoc Prof,

CHS (PI)

Mary C. White, PhD, Prof,

CHS (Co-PI)

Gerri M. Collins-Bride, MS, ANP,

Assoc Clin Prof, CHS (Co-Investigator)

John Nickens, PhD, Clinical Director,

Progress Foundation (Co-

Investigator)

Colorectal Cancer Screening in

High Risk Individuals (NIH

National Cancer Institute, R01

CA75367)

Roshan Bastani, PhD (PI)

Geraldine V. Padilla, PhD, Prof,

PN (Co-Investigator)

Community Based Research

Grants on Violence Prevention

(with the San Francisco Injury

Center from the Centers for

Disease Control and

Prevention)

Howard L. Pinderhughes, PhD,

Asst Prof, SBS (PI)


Marguerite M. Engler, PhD, RN, MS

Marguerite M. Engler

has studied the effects

of dietary polyunsaturated

fats (omega-3

and omega-6 fatty acids)

on cardiovascular

disease. She is currently

conducting the

EARLY (Endothelial

Assessment of Risk in

Lipids from Youth) Trial,

a 5-year randomized

primary prevention

clinical trial. She is

evaluating the effects of

nutritional interventions

including a low-fat diet

and vitamin supplements

in children and

adolescents with high

blood cholesterol.

Content Analysis of

Commentary submitted to the

Framework Convention on

Tobacco Control (World Health

Organization, Geneva)

Lisa A. Bero, PhD, Asst Adjunct

Prof, IHA (Co-PI)

Theresa Montini, MSW, PhD,

Asst Adjunct Prof, SBS (Co-PI)

Annie George, MSW, MPH

(Graduate Student Researcher)

Melissa Martin, BA (Graduate

Student Researcher)

The Cost of Smoking in

California, 1999 (California

Department of Health Services,

Tobacco Control Section, 99-

86718)

Wendy Max, PhD, Adjunct Prof,

IHA (PI)

Dorothy Rice, ScD (Hon.), Prof

Emerita, IHA (Co-Investigator)

Hai-Yen Sung, PhD, Specialist,

IHA (Co-Investigator)

Xiulan Zhang, PhD, Specialist,

IHA (Co-Investigator)

Diet, Endothelial Function, and

Pediatric Hyperlipidemia (NIH

National Institute of Nursing

Research, R01 NR04902)

Marguerite M. Engler, PhD, Prof,

PN (PI)

Mary J. Malloy, MD, Clin Prof,

Med (Co-PI)

Mary B. Engler, PhD, Prof, PN

(Co-Investigator)

Christine Kennedy, PhD, PNP,

Assoc Prof, FHCN (Co-Investigator)

Susan E. Kools, PhD, Asst Prof,

FHCN (Co-Investigator)

Michele Mietus-Snyder, MD,

Asst Adjunct Prof, PN (Co-Investigator

& Project Director)

Steven M. Paul, PhD, Senior

Statistician, DO (Co-Investigator)

A Dynamic Model of Smoking

and Healthcare Expenditures in

California (University of

California, Tobacco-Related

Disease Research Program,

9RT-0157)

Wendy Max, PhD, Adjunct Prof,

IHA (PI)

Dorothy Rice, ScD (Hon.), Prof

Emerita, IHA (Co-Investigator)

Hai-Yen Sung, PhD, Specialist,

IHA (Co-Investigator)

Xiulan Zhang, PhD, Specialist,

IHA (Co-Investigator)

Effects of Chocolate

Consumption on Oxidative

Stress and Endothelial

Function (UCSF School of

Nursing)

Mary B. Engler, PhD, Prof,

PN (PI)

Marguerite M. Engler, PhD, Prof,

PN (Co-Investigator)

Endothelial Dysfunction in

Hypertension: Possible

Ameliorative Role of

Antioxidants (UCSF School of

Nursing)

Marguerite M. Engler, PhD, Prof,

PN (PI)

Mary B. Engler, PhD, Prof, PN

(Co-Investigator)

Mary J. Malloy, MD, Clin Prof,

Med (Co-Investigator)

Michele Mietus-Snyder, MD,

Asst Adjunct Prof, PN (Co-Investigator)

Evaluating Diffusion Models to

Increase Physical Activity of

Older Adults (Robert Wood

Johnson Foundation)

Anita L. Stewart, PhD, Prof in

Res, IHA (PI)

Nathalie Bera, MD, MPH, Academic

Administrator, IHA (Co-

PI)

Martha Castrillo, BA, Staff Research

Associate, IHA (Co-Investigator)

Dawn Gillis, MS (Co-Investigator)

Melanie Grossman, PhD (Co-

Investigator)

Barbara McLellan, MPH (Co-

Investigator)

Leslie Pruitt, PhD (Co-Investigator)

Healthy Aging in Diverse

Community Settings (California

Endowment, 1998/296)

Anita L. Stewart, PhD, Prof in

Res, IHA (PI)

Martha Castrillo, BA (Co-Investigator)

Dawn Gillis, MS (Co-Investigator)

Melanie Grossman, PhD (Co-

Investigator)

Jim Kahn, PhD (Co-Investigator)

38

Barbara McLellan, MPH (Co-

Investigator)

Leslie Pruitt, PhD (Co-Investigator)

Heart PEP: Physical Activity

Enhancement Participation in

Young Low-Income African

American Women (American

Heart Association, 0160026Y)

Catherine M. Waters, PhD, Asst

Prof, CHS (PI)

Measuring Interpersonal

Processes in Diverse

Populations (Agency for

Healthcare Research and

Quality, R01 HS10599)

Anita L. Stewart, PhD, Prof in

Res, IHA (PI)

Anna Napoles-Springer, PhD,

Asst Adjunct Prof, Division of

Internal Medicine, School of

Medicine (Co-PI)

Steven Gregorich, PhD, Division

of Internal Medicine, School of

Medicine (Co-Investigator)

Eliseo Perez-Stable, MD (Co-

Investigator)

Jasmine Santoyo, BA (Co-Investigator)

A. Eugene Washington, MD (Co-

Investigator)

Minority Training Program in

Cancer Control Research

(MTPCCR) (Northern California

Cancer Center, 78583-01-1)

Rena Pasick, DrPH (PI)

Regina Otero-Sabogal, PhD,

Assoc Adjunct Prof, IHA (Co-PI)

National Network for Applied

Research on Violence

Prevention (The David & Lucile

Packard Foundation)

Jeffrey L. Edleson, PhD, Prof,

School of Social Work, University

of Minnesota (PI)

Deborah Daro, PhD, University

of Chicago (Co-Investigator)

Howard L. Pinderhughes, PhD,

Asst Prof, SBS (Co-Investigator)

Pathfinders: Access and Early

Cancer Detection for the

Underserved (NIH National

Cancer Institute/Northern

Califoria Cancer Control

Center, P01 CA55112)

Regina Otero-Sabogal, PhD,

Assoc Adjunct Prof, IHA (PI)

Rena Pasick, DrPH (Co-PI)


Phospholipid Transfer Protein

Mutations in Dyslipidemias (NIH

National Institute of Nursing

Research, K01 NR07888)

Mary B. Engler, PhD, Prof, PN (PI)

Physical Activity Enhancement

for African Americans with Type 2

Diabetes (American Diabetes

Association)

Catherine M. Waters, PhD, Asst

Prof, CHS (PI)

Prevention Interventions in

Hispanic and Anglo Children (NIH

National Institute of Nursing

Research, R01 NR04680)

Christine Kennedy, PhD, PNP,

Assoc Prof, FHCN (PI)

John Neuhaus, PhD, Assoc Prof in

Res, FHCN (Co-Investigator)

TB Education in Jail: Transferring

Research to Practice (Agency for

Healthcare Research and Quality,

R03 HS11337)

Mary C. White, PhD, Prof,

CHS (PI)

Enrique Menendez, MD, Associate

Specialist (Co-Investigator)

Jacqueline P. Tulsky, MD, Assoc

Clin Prof, Med (Co-Investigator)

HIV/AIDS

AIDS Case Management

Program/Nurse (State of

California, Department of Health

Services, Office of AIDS, 99-

86769)

William L. Holzemer, PhD, Prof,

CHS (PI)

Improving Measurement of HIV-

Risk Among Latino Adolescents

(University of California,

Universitywide AIDS Research

Program, M00-SF-056)

Regina Otero-Sabogal, PhD, Assoc

Adjunct Prof, IHA (PI)

Outpatient Nurse Managed HIV

Adherence Trial (NIH National

Institute of Nursing Research,

R01 NR04846)

William L. Holzemer, PhD, Prof,

CHS (PI)

Carmen J. Portillo, PhD, Assoc

Prof, CHS (Co-Investigator)

Self-Care Symptom

Management for Persons with

HIV Disease (Bristol-Myers

Squibb Company, RES009-01)

William L. Holzemer, PhD, Prof,

CHS (PI)

STD Risks and Latino

Adolescents Sexual Networks

(NIH National Institute of

Allergy and Infectious

Diseases, R01 AI48749)

Nancy Padian, PhD (PI)

Shana Millstein, PhD (Co-Investigator)

Regino Otero-Sabogal, PhD,

Assoc Adjunct Prof, IHA (Co-

Investigator)

Steven Shiboski, PhD (Co-Investigator)

Research Methods

Behavioral Constructs and

Culture in Cancer Screening

(NIH National Cancer Institute

via subcontract with Northern

California Cancer Center, R01

CA81816)

Rena Pasick, DrPH (PI)

Regina Otero-Sabogal, PhD,

Assoc Adjunct Prof, IHA (Co-PI)

William Rakowski, PhD (Co-PI)

Measurement Issues in U.S.

Health Disparities Research

(Agency for Healthcare

Research and Quality, R13

HS11293)

Anita L. Stewart, PhD, Prof in

Res, IHA (PI)

Anna Napoles-Springer, PhD,

Asst Adjunct Prof, Division of

Internal Medicine, School of

Medicine (Co-PI)

Steven Gregorich, PhD, Division

of Internal Medicine, School of

Medicine (Co-Investigator)

Symptom Management

Adult Asthma: Biology, Society,

and Environment (NIH National

Institute of Environmental

Health Services, R01 ESI0906)

Paul Blanc, MD (PI)

Mark Eisner, MD (Co-Investigator)

Susan Janson, DNS, ANP, Prof,

CHS (Co-Investigator)

Patricia Katz, PhD (Co-Investigator)

Patricia Quinlan, PhD (Co-Investigator)

Ed Yelin, PhD (Co-Investigator)

Aging and Illness

Management in Later Life (NIH

National Institute on Aging,

R01 AG16608)

Gaylene Becker, PhD, Prof in

Res, IHA (PI)

Susan Janson, DNS, ANP, Prof,

CHS (Co-Investigator)

Delayed Nausea & Vomiting

(Merck)

Suzanne L. Dibble, DNSc, Adjunct

Prof, IHA (PI)

Effect of Trellis Design on Risk

Factors for MSD’s in Wine

Grape Work (NIH National

Institute of Occupational

Safety and Health, R01

0H03906)

John Miles, PhD, UC Davis (PI)

Julia Faucett, PhD, Assoc Prof,

CHS (Co-Investigator)

Ira Janowitz, PT, CPE (Co-Investigator)

James Meyers, EdD, MPH (Co-

Investigator)

Ergonomic Assessment of

Harvest Systems (NIH

National Institute of

Occupational Safety and

Health, subcontract through

UC Davis)

Julia Faucett, PhD, Assoc Prof,

CHS (PI)

Ira Janowitz, PT, CPE (Co-Investigator)

Ergonomic Assessment of

Vineyard Systems (NIH

National Institute of

Occupational Safety and

Health, sub-contract through

UC Davis)

Julia Faucett, PhD, Assoc Prof,

CHS (PI)

Ira Janowitz, PT, CPE (Co-Investigator)

Exercise: An Intervention for

Fatigue in Cancer Patients

(NIH National Cancer Institute,

CA83316)

Marylin J. Dodd, PhD, Prof,

PN (PI)

Patricia L. Painter, PhD, Asst

Adjunct Prof, PN (Co-PI)

Noreen C. Facione, PhD, FNP,

Assoc Prof, PN (Co-Investigator)

Christine A. Miaskowski, PhD,

CCRN, ANP, Prof, PN (Co-Investigator)

Steven M. Paul, PhD, Senior Statistician,

DO (Co-Investigator)

Ernest H. Rosenbaum, MD, Clin

Prof, Med (Co-Investigator)

Debasish Tripathy, MD, Assoc

Clin Prof, Med (Co-Investigator)

Exercise: An Intervention for

Fatigue in Cancer Patients (NIH

National Cancer Institute, R01

NR04889)

Marylin J. Dodd, PhD, Prof,

PN (PI)

Patricia L. Painter, PhD, Asst

Adjunct Prof, PN (Co-PI)

Noreen C. Facione, PhD, FNP,

Assoc Prof, PN (Co-Investigator)

Christine A. Miaskowski, PhD,

CCRN, ANP, Prof, PN (Co-Investigator)

Barbara Piper, DNSc, University

of Nebraska (Consultant)

The Experience of Fatigue in

Children with Cancer (Canadian

Association of Nurses in

Oncology/Canadian Nurses

Foundation)

Betty Davies, PhD, Prof,

FHCN (PI)

Stanley Whitsett, PhD, Psychologist,

Oncology/Hematology,

Alberta Children’s Hospital,

Canada (Co-Investigator)

Gender Differences in

Analgesic Responses (NIH

National Institute of Nursing

Research, R01 NR03923)

Jon D. Levine, MD, PhD, Prof,

Oral & Max Surg/Med (PI)

Christine A. Miaskowski, PhD,

CCRN, ANP, Prof, PN (Co-PI)

Robert W. Gear, DDS, PhD, Asst

Clin Prof, Oral & Max Surg (Co-

Investigator)

Newton Gordon, DDS, Clin Prof

(Co-Investigator)

Steven M. Paul, PhD, Senior Statistician,

DO (Co-Investigator)

Home Care Management of

Pediatric Pain (NIH National

Institute of Nursing Research,

R01 NR04826)

Kimberly A. Sutters, PhD, Asst

Adjunct Prof, PN (PI)

Christine A. Miaskowski, PhD,

CCRN, ANP, Prof, PN (Co-PI)

Steven M. Paul, PhD, Senior Statistician,

DO (Co-Investigator)

Marilyn C. Savedra, DNS, Prof,

FHCN (Co-Investigator)


Juliene G. Lipson, PhD, FAAN

Juliene G. Lipson has

studied the health and

adjustment of immigrant

and refugees to

the U.S. from Iran, Afghanistan,

Bosnia and

the former Soviet Union

for 15 years. Since

1997, she has done

qualitative research on

disability, pregnancy,

birth and postpartum

experiences of women

with physical disabilities

and the life experiences

of people with

Multiple Chemical Sensitivity/Environmental

Illness. The MCS study

is currently focusing on

women’s work and

menstrual issues.

Improving Symptom Assessment

and Management During

Palliative Care of Dying

Patients in Intensive Care Units

(Soros Project on Death in

America)

Kathleen A. Puntillo, DNSc,

Prof, PN (PI)

Improving Symptom

Assessment and Management

in Patients at High Risk of

Dying in Intensive Care Units

(UCSF Academic Senate

Research Committee)

Kathleen A. Puntillo, DNSc,

Prof, PN (PI)

Daphne Stannard, PhD, Asst

Prof, SF State University (Co-

Investigator)

Individualized Asthma

Education, Symptoms, and

Airway Inflammation (NIH

National Heart, Lung, and

Blood Institute, R01 8L64586)

Susan Janson, DNS, ANP, Prof,

CHS (PI)

Management of Sleep-Activity

Disruption in Alzheimer’s (NIH

National Institute of Nursing

Research, R01 NR02968)

Glenna A. Dowling, PhD, Assoc

Adjunct Prof, PN (PI)

Jay Luxenberg, MD, Assoc Clin

Prof, Medicine (Co-PI)

Theresa Berta, MD, Asst Clin

Prof, PN (Co-Investigator)

Objective Correlates of Fatigue

in Children with Cancer (UCSF

Academic Senate Committee

on Research)

Betty Davies, PhD, Prof,

FHCN (PI)

Stanley Whitsett, PhD, Psychologist,

Oncology/Hematology,

Alberta Children’s Hospital,

Canada (Co-PI)

Pain, Fatigue, and Sleep

Disturbances During Radiation

Therapy (NIH National Institute

of Nursing Research/National

Cancer Institute, R01 NR04835)

Kathryn A. Lee, PhD, Prof,

FHCN (Co-PI)

Christine A. Miaskowski, PhD,

CCRN, ANP, Prof, PN (Co-PI)

Marylin J. Dodd, PhD, Prof, PN

(Co-Investigator)

Melissa Elder, MD (Co-Investigator)

Steven M. Paul, PhD, Senior

Statistician, DO (Co-Investigator)

William Wara, MD (Co-Investigator)

Claudia West, MS, Assoc Clin

Prof, PN (Co-Investigator)

Policies and Strategies to Help

Injured Workers Return to

Sustained Employment

(University of California,

#59369030)

Robert Spear,PhD (PI)

Julia Faucett, PhD, Assoc Prof,

CHS (Co-Investigator)

John Frank, MD, PhD (Co-

Investigator)

Reducing Prehospital Delay in

Acute Myocardial Infarction

(NIH National Institute of

Nursing Research, R01

NR05323)

Kathleen A. Dracup, DNSc,

Dean & Prof (PI)

Lynn V. Doering, DNSc, UCLA

(Co-Investigator)

Mickey Stewart Eisenberg, MD,

PhD, University of Washington

(Co-Investigator)

Sharon McKinley, PhD, University

of Technology, Sydney, Australia

(Co-Investigator)

Hendrika W.J. Meischke, PhD,

University of Washington (Co-

Investigator)

Debra K. Moser, DNSc, University

of Kentucky (Co-Investigator)

Steven M. Paul, PhD, Senior

Statistician, DO (Co-Investigator)

Barbara J. Riegel, DNSc, San

Diego State University (Co-Investigator)

Self-Care and Symptom

Management Project (Procter

and Gamble Co.)

Diana L. Taylor, PhD, OB/

GYNNP, Assoc Prof, FHCN (PI)

40

Self-Care Clinical Trial (Procter

and Gamble Co.)

Diana L. Taylor, PhD, OB/

GYNNP, Assoc Prof, FHCN (Co-

Investigator)

Sleep Disruption in New

Parents: An Intervention Trial

(NIH National Institute of

Nursing Research, R01

NR05345)

Kathryn A. Lee, PhD, Prof,

FHCN (PI)

Symptom Assessment and

Management of Patients with

Chronic Renal Insufficiency

(Amgen Pharmaceuticals,

20006901)

Patricia L. Painter, PhD, Asst

Adjunct Prof, PN (PI)

Marylin J. Dodd, PhD, Prof, PN

(Co-Investigator)

Noreen C. Facione, PhD, FNP,

Assoc Prof, PN (Co-Investigator)

Christine A. Miaskowski, PhD,

CCRN, ANP, Prof, PN (Co-Investigator)

Mary B. Scott, PhD, Asst Clin

Prof, PN (Co-Investigator)

Vineyard Harvest Ergonomics

Intervention Project (NIH

National Institute of

Occupational Safety and

Health, U06-CCU917555)

James Meyers, EdD, MPH (Co-

PI)

John Miles, PhD, UC Davis (Co-

PI)

Julia Faucett, PhD, Assoc Prof,

CHS (Co-Investigator)

Ira Janowitz, PT, CPE (Co-Investigator)


Women and Health Issues

Beliefs and Risks of Breast

Cancer Among African

Immigrants (University of

California, Breast Cancer

Research Program, 5PB-0027)

Yewoubdar Beyene, PhD, Adjunct

Prof, IHA (PI)

Noreen C. Facione, PhD, FNP,

Assoc Prof, PN (Co-Investigator)

Breast Cancer Early Detection

Program – West Bay Partnership

(California Department of Health

Services)

Suzanne L. Dibble, DNSc, Adjunct

Prof, IHA (PI)

Breast Cancer Screening

Evaluation Project (California

Department of Health Services)

Jacqueline M. Golding, PhD, Adjunct

Prof, IHA (Co-Investigator)

Cancer Prevention in Lesbians

Over 60 (BACW’s A Fund of Our

Own administered by Horizons

Foundation)

Suzanne L. Dibble, DNSc, Adjunct

Prof, IHA (PI)

Stephanie Roberts, MD (Co-PI)

Cardiovascular Disease Risk

Factors in a Cohort of Latina

Women (NIH National Heart,

Lung, and Blood Institute, R29

HL59947)

Teresa C. Juarbe, PhD, Asst Prof,

FHCN (PI)

Ethnic Differences in Abnormal

Mammography: The Pathfinders

Project (NIH National Cancer

Institute, through the Northern

California Cancer Center, P01

CA5511112)

Eliseo J. Perez-Stable, MD (PI)

Celia Kaplan, DrPH (Co-Investigator)

Teresa C. Juarbe, PhD, Asst Prof,

FHCN (Co-Investigator and Project

Director)

Marion Lee, PhD (Co-Investigator)

Living with Lung Cancer: The

Women’s Perspective (Bristol-

Myers Squibb Foundation –

Oncology Nursing Foundation)

Linda Sarna, DNSc (PI)

Geraldine V. Padilla, PhD, Prof,

PN (Co-Investigator)

Sleep Patterns of Battered

Women in Transition (American

Nurses Foundation)

Janice C. Humphreys, PhD, CS,

NP, Asst Prof, FHCN (PI)

Kathryn A. Lee, PhD, Prof,

FHCN (Co-Investigator)

Treating Chemotherapy-

Induced Nausea (NIH National

Cancer Institute, R01 CA84014)

Suzanne L. Dibble, DNSc, Adjunct

Prof, IHA (PI)

Misha Cohen, OMD, LAC (Co-

Investigator)

Judith Luce, MD (Co-Investigator)

Steven M. Paul, PhD, Senior

Statistician, DO (Co-Investigator)

Women with Multiple Chemical

Sensitivities: Work Issues and

Menstrual Cycle Symptoms

(UCSF School of Nursing

Department of Community

Health Systems)

Juliene G. Lipson, PhD, Prof,

CHS (PI)

Diana L. Taylor, PhD, OB/

GYNNP, Assoc Prof, FHCN (Co-

PI)

Women’s Responses to

Angina: A Comparative Study

in Five Countries (University of

California, Pacific Rim

Research Program)

Afaf I. Meleis, PhD, Prof,

CHS (PI)

Marilyn Douglas, DNSc, CCRN,

Asst Clin Prof, PN (Co-PI)

Kathleen A. Dracup, DNSc,

Dean & Prof (Co-PI)

faculty

publications

Abbey Alkon

Alkon, A., Tschann, J.M., Ruane,

S.H., Wolff, M., & Hittner, A.

(2001). A violence prevention

and evaluation project with ethnically

diverse populations.

American Journal of Preventive

Medicine, 20(1S), 48-55.

Boyce, W.T., Quas, J., Alkon, A.,

Smider, N.A., Essex, M.J., &

Kupfer, D.J. (2001). Autonomic

reactivity and psychopathology

in middle childhood. British

Journal of Psychiatry, 179, 144-

150.

Boyce, W.T., Essex, M.J., Alkon,

A., Smider, N.A., Pickering, T., &

Kagan, J. (In press). Temperament,

tympanum, and temperature:

Four provisional studies of

the biobehavioral correlates of

tympanic membrane temperature

asymmetries. Child Development.

Alkon, A., Sokal-Gutierrez, K.,

& Wolff, M. (In press). Child care

health consultation improves

health knowledge and compliance.

Pediatric Nursing.

Alkon, A., Goldstein, L.H.,

Smider, N., Essex, M., Kupfer,

D., & Boyce, W.T. (In press).

Developmental trends in autonomic

reactivity in three to eight

year old children. Developmental

Psychobiology.

Patricia Benner

Benner, P. (2001). From novice to

expert. New Jersey: Prentice-

Hall. [Won American Journal of

Nursing Book of the Year Award

in 2001.]

Benner, P. (2001). The phenomenon

of care. In S.K.

Toombs (Ed.), Handbook of

phenomenology and medicine

(Vol. 68, pp. 351-369).

Dordrecht, The Netherlands:

Kluwer Academic Publishers.

Benner, P. (2001). Curing, caring,

and healing in medicine:

Symbiosis and synergy or syncretism?

Park Ridge Center Bulletin,

23, 11-12.

Benner, P. (2001). Breathing new

life into practice communities.

American Journal of Critical

Care, 10(3), 188-190.

Benner, P. (2001). Creating a

culture of safety and improvement:

A key to reducing medical

error. American Journal of Critical

Care, 10(4), 281-284.

Fowler, M. & Benner, P. (2001).

The new code of ethics for

nurses: A dialogue with Marsha

Fowler. American Journal of

Critical Care, 10(4), 281-284.

Benner, P., Stannard, D., &

Hooper-Kyriakidis, P. (2001).

Clinical wisdom and interventions

in critical care: A thinkingin-action

approach [CDROM].

Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders.

[Won American Journal of Nursing

Media of the Year Award in

2001.]

Benner, P. (2001). Death as a

human passage: Compassionate

care for persons dying in critical

care units. American Journal of

Critical Care, 10(5), 355-359.

Benner, P. (2002). Developing

clinical expertise in undergraduate

education [in Japanese]. Expert

Nurse, 12(15), 107-113.

Day, L. & Benner, P. (2002). Ethics,

ethical comportment, and

etiquette. American Journal of

Critical Care, 11(1), 76-79.

Benner, P. (In press). Creating

compassionate institutions that

foster agency and respect. American

Journal of Critical Care.

Benner, P. (In press). Book review

for: From detached concern

to empathy: Humanizing medical

practice. By Jodi Halpern.

The Cambridge Quarterly for

Health Care Ethics.

Benner, P. (In press). Finding

the good behind the right: A

dialogue between nursing and

bioethics. In J. Humber (Ed.),

The contributions of ethics to

the professions. Totowa, NJ:

Humana Press.

Benner, P. (In press). Clinical

reasoning articulating experiential

learning in nursing practice.

In O. Slevin & L. Basford (Eds.),

Theory and practice of nursing

(2 nd Ed.). London, United Kingdom:

Nelson Thornes Ltd.


Anita L. Stewart, PhD

Anita L. Stewart and

her colleagues are

implementing a lifestyle

program encouraging

seniors to design a

safe, effective, and enjoyable

exercise regimen

within their life

context. They have established

the program

in diverse community

settings serving a

range of underserved

seniors, adapting it to

be culturally appropriate

and viable within

these settings’ practical

constraints.

Puntillo, K.A., Benner, P.,

Drought, T., Drew, B., Stotts, N.,

Stannard, D., Rushton, C.,

Scanlon, C., & White, C. (In

press). End-of-life issues in intensive

care units: A national

random survey of nurses’ knowledge

and beliefs. American Journal

of Critical Care, 10(4), 216-

229.

Jill A. Bennett

Bennett, J.A. (2000). Mediator

and moderator variables in nursing

research: Conceptual and

statistical differences. Research

in Nursing and Health, 23(5),

415-420.

Kayser-Jones, J. & Bennett, J.A.

(2001). An interdisciplinary

approach to doctoral education.

Reflections on Nursing Leadership,

27(3), 25-26, 43.

Bennett, J.A. (In press). Maintaining

and improving physical

function in elders. In P. Archbold

& B. Stewart (Eds.), Annual review

of nursing research (Vol. 20).

New York: Springer Publishing.

Diane S. Brown

Bolton, L.B., Jones, D., Aydin,

C.E., Donaldson, N., Brown,

D.S., Lowe, M., McFarland,

P.L., & Harms, D. (2001). A

response to California’s mandated

nursing ratios. Journal of

Nursing Scholarship, 33(2),

179-184.

Donaldson, N.E., Brown, D.S.,

Aydin, C.E., Burnes Bolton,

M.L., et al. (2001). Staffing in

California hospitals, 1998-2000:

The CalNOC ratios report.

Policy, Politics & Nursing Practice,

2(1), 19-28.

Brown, D.S., Donaldson, N.E.,

Aydin, C.E., Burnes Bolton,

M.L., et al. (2001). Building a

statewide nursing quality data

respository: The evolution of

CalNOC. Journal Healthcare

Quality, 23(4), 22-27.

Brown, D.S. (2001). Linking

quality measurement & evidence-based

practice research

for hospitals and long-term care:

The California Nursing Outcomes

Coalition experience.

California Association for

Healthcare Quality Forum,

24(2), 4-6.

Brown, D.S. & Donaldson, N.E.

(In press). Teaching quality concepts

to an international audience.

Journal for Healthcare

Quality.

Bolton, L.B., Aydin, C.E.,

Donaldson, N.E., Brown, D.S.,

Nelson, M., & Harms, D. (In

press). Patient satisfaction with

nursing: An analysis from a statewide

nursing quality database.

Journal of Nursing Scholarship.

Virginia Carrieri-Kohlman

Carrieri-Kohlman, V. & Stulbarg,

M. (In press). Dyspnea: Symptom

assessment and management. In

J. Hodgkin, G. Connors, & B.

Celli (Eds.), Pulmonary rehabilitation

(3 rd Ed., Chapter 5). Philadelphia:

Lippincott, Williams &

Wilkins.

Linda Chafetz

Rungreangkulkij, S., Chafetz, L.,

Chesla, C., & Gilliss, C. (2002).

Psychological morbidity of Thai

families of a person with schizophrenia.

International Journal of

Nursing Studies, 39(1), 35-50.

Hampton, M. & Chafetz, L. (In

press). Factors related to placement

and level of independence

in the community. Issues in Mental

Health Nursing.

Catherine A. Chesla

Fisher, L., Chesla, C.A., Mullan,

J.T., Skaff, M.M., & Kanter, R.A.

(2001). Contributors to depression

in Latino and European-

American patients with type 2

diabetes. Diabetes Care, 24(10),

1751-1757.

Chesla, C. & Rungreangkulkij,

S. (2001). Nursing research on

family processes in chronic illness

in ethnically diverse families:

A decade review. Journal of

Family Nursing, 7(3), 230-243.

Rungreangkulkij, S., Chafetz, L.,

Chesla, C., & Gilliss, C. (2002).

Psychological morbidity of Thai

families of a person with schizophrenia.

International Journal of

Nursing Studies, 39(1), 35-50.

Rungreangkulkij, S. & Chesla,

C.A. (In press). Smooth a heart

with water: Thai mother’s care of

a child with schizophrenia. Archives

of Psychiatric Nursing.

42

Fisher, L., Chesla, C.A., Mullan,

J.T., Skaff, M.M., & Kanter, R.

(In press). Depression in spouses

of patients with type 2 diabetes in

a European American and Latino

sample. Diabetes Care.

Adele E. Clarke

Clarke, A.E. (2000). Reproductive

physiology. In C. Kramarae

& D. Spender (Eds.), Routledge

international encyclopedia of

women: Global women’s issues

and knowledge. New York:

Routledge.

Moore, L.J. & Clarke, A.E.

(2001). The traffic in

cyberanatomies: Sex/gender/

sexuality in local and global formations.

Body and Society, 7(1),

57-96.

Clarke, A.E. & Star, S.L. (In

press). Symbolic interactionist

studies of science, technology,

and medicine. In L. Reynolds &

N. Herman (Eds.), Handbook of

symbolic interactionism. Walnut

Creek, CA: Alta Mira Press.

Clarke, A.E. (In press). New

directions in qualitative methods

and grounded theory analysis [in

German]. In D. Schaeffer (Ed.),

New directions in qualitative

health research. Bern: Hans

Huber.

Clarke, A.E. (In press). The more

things change, the more they

(also) remain the same. [To appear

as part of a reappraisal of D.

Scully & P. Bart’s 1973 article “A

funny thing happened on the way

to the orifice: Women in gynecology

textbooks.” ] Feminism and

Psychology.

Clarke, A.E. & Olesen, V.L. (In

press). Revising, diffracting,

acting [in German]. In R. Lorenz-

Krauss (Ed.), Women’s health

issues in nursing. Bern: Hans

Huber.

Clarke, A.E. (In press). Contraception

[in French]. In D.

Lecourt (Ed.), Dictionnaire

d’histoire et philosophie de la

medecine. Paris: Presses

Universitaires de France (PUF).


Teresa C. Juarbe continues

to do research in

areas that reduce risk

for women of ethnic

and culturally diverse

populations. She is

working with Mexican-

American and Central

American women at risk

for heart disease, as

well as with diverse

populations of women

with abnormal mammography

results.

Teresa C. Juarbe, RN, PhD

Clarke, A.E. (In press). Reproductive

physiological research

at the Department of Embryology.

In 100 years of the Department

of Embryology of the

Carnegie Institution of Washington.

New York: Cambridge

University Press.

Elizabeth Davies

Davies, B., Orloff, S., &

Sumner, L. (2000). Psychosocial

and spiritual care. In

Children’s International Project

on Palliative/Hospice Service

(CHiPPS), Compendium of pediatric

palliative care (Section

4, pp. 1-30). Alexandria, VA:

National Hospice and Palliative

Care Organization.

Davies, B. (2001). After a

child dies: Helping the siblings.

In S. Goltzer & A.

Armstrong-Daily (Eds.), Hospice

care for children (2 nd Ed.,

pp. 157-171). New York: Oxford

University Press.

Davies, B. (2001). Families in

palliative care. In B. Ferrell &

N. Coyle (Eds.), Textbook of

palliative care nursing (pp.

363-373). New York: Oxford

University Press.

Davies, B. (2001). Weaving for

the future of oncology nursing:

Using rulers and roses. Canadian

Journal of Oncology

Nursing, 11(3), 118-119.

Davies, B. [Consulting Editor.]

(2001). In G. Howarth & D.

Leaman (Eds.), Encyclopedia

of death and dying. London:

Taylor and Francis.

Davies, B. (2001). Siblings of

dying children. In G.

Howarth & D. Leaman (Eds.),

Encyclopedia of death and

dying (pp. 410-411). London:

Taylor and Francis.

Kalischuk, R. & Davies, B.

(2001). A theory of healing in the

aftermath of youth suicide: Implications

for holistic nursing

practice. Journal of Holistic

Nursing, 19(2), 163-186.

Davies, B. & Connaughty, S.

(2002). Pediatric end-of-life

care: Lessons learned from parents.

Journal of Nursing Administration,

32(1), 5-6.

Davies, B., Brenner, P., Orloff, S.,

Sumner, L., & Worden, W. (In

press). Addressing spirituality in

pediatric hospice and palliative

care. Journal of Palliative Care.

Davies, B., Whitsett, S., Bruce,

A., & McCarthy, P. (In press). A

typology of fatigue in children

with cancer. Journal of Pediatric

Oncology Nursing.

Davies, B., Steele, R., Stajduhar,

K., & Bruce, A. (In press). Research

in pediatric palliative

care. In R. Portnoy & E. Bruera

(Eds.), Research in palliative

care. New York: Oxford University

Press.

Davies, B. (In press). The grief of

siblings. In N.B. Webb (Ed.),

Helping bereaved children. New

York: Guilford Press.

Davies, B. (In press). The evolution

of sibling bereavement research.

In I. Corless, B. Germino,

& M. Pittman (Eds.), A challenge

for living, dying, death and bereavement.

New York: Springer.

Suzanne L. Dibble

Van Dam, M.A., Koh, A.S., &

Dibble, S.L. (2001). Lesbian

disclosure to health care providers

and delay of care. Journal of

the Gay and Lesbian Medical

Association, 5(1), 11-19.

Dodd, M.J., Dibble, S.,

Miaskowski, C., Paul, S., Cho,

M., MacPhail, L., Greenspan, D.,

& Shiba, G. (2001). A comparison

of the affective state and

quality of life of chemotherapy

patients who do and do not develop

chemotherapy-induced

oral mucositis. Journal of Pain

and Symptom Management,

21(6), 498-505.

Marylin J. Dodd

Dodd, M.J., Dibble, S.,

Miaskowski, C., Paul, S., Cho,

M., MacPhail, L., Greenspan, D.,

& Shiba, G. (2001). A comparison

of the affective state and

quality of life of chemotherapy

patients who do and do not develop

chemotherapy-induced

oral mucositis. Journal of Pain

and Symptom Management,

21(6), 498-505.

Melnick, M.E., Dowling, G.A., &

Dodd, M.J. (2001). The Pro-Self

Program: Exercise for

Parkinson’s disease. The Gerontologist,

41, pg. 282.

Dodd, M., Janson, S., Facione,

N., Faucett, J., Froelicher,

E.S., Humphreys, J., Lee, K.,

Miaskowski, C., Puntillo, K.,

Rankin, S., & Taylor, D.

(2001). Advancing the science

of symptom management.

Journal of Advanced Nursing,

33(5), 668-676.

Dodd, M.J., Miaskowski, C., &

Paul, S.M. (2001). Symptom

clusters and their effect on the

functional status of patients with

cancer. Oncology Nursing Forum,

28(3), 465-470.

Miaskowski, C., Dodd, M.J.,

West, C., Paul, S.M., Tripathy,

D., Koo, P., & Schumacher, K.

(2001). Lack of adherence with

the analgesic regimen: A significant

barrier to effective

cancer pain management. Journal

of Clinical Oncology,

19(23), 4275-4279.

Miaskowski, C., Mack, A.,

Dodd, M.J., West, C., Paul,

S.M., Tripathy, D., Koo, P.,

Schumacher, K., & Facione,

N. (2002). Differences in pain

outcome measures between

oncology outpatients who took

pain medicine on an aroundthe-clock

basis versus on an

as-needed basis. Journal of

Pain, 3(1), 12-20.

Dodd, M.J., Miaskowski, C.,

Greenspan, D., MacPhail, L.,

Shih, A., Shiba, G., Facione,

N., & Paul, S.M. (In press).

Radiation-induced mucositis:

A randomized clinical trial of

micronized sucralfate versus

salt and soda mouthwashes.

Cancer Investigation.


Facione, N.C., Miaskowski, C.,

Dodd, M.J., & . Paul, S. (In press).

The self-reported likelihood of

patient delay in breast cancer: New

thoughts for early detection. Preventive

Medicine.

Schumacher, K.L., Karesawa, S.,

West, C., Hawkins, C., Johnson, C.,

Wais, E., Dodd, M., Paul, S.M.,

Tripathy, D., Koo, P., &

Miaskowski, C. (In press). Putting

cancer pain management regimens

into practice at home. Journal of

Pain and Symptom Management.

Shih, A., Miaskowski, C., Dodd,

M.J., Stotts, N., & MacPhail, L. (In

press). A research review of the

current treatments for radiationinduced

oral mucositis. Oncology

Nursing Forum.

Schumacher, K.L., West, C., Dodd,

M., Paul, S.M., Tripathy, D., Koo,

P., & Miaskowski, C. (In press).

Pain management autobiographies

and reluctance to use opioids for

cancer pain management. Cancer

Nursing.

Katapodi, M.C., Facione, N.C.,

Miaskowski, C., Dodd, M.J., &

Waters, C.M. (In press). The influence

of social support on

breast cancer screening in

multiethnic and multicultural

women. Oncology Nursing Forum.

Nancy E. Donaldson

Pravikoff, D.S. & Donaldson, N.E.

(2001). The online journal of clinical

innovations. Online Journal of

Issues in Nursing, March 2001,

http://www.nursingworld.org/ojin/

topic11/tpc11_6c.htm

Pravikoff, D.S. & Donaldson, N.E.

(2001). Online journals: Access

and support for evidence-based

practice. AACN Clinical Issues:

Advanced Practice in Acute and

Critical Care, 12(4), 588-597.

Bolton, L.B., Jones, D., Aydin,

C.E., Donaldson, N., Brown, D.S.,

Lowe, M., McFarland, P.L., &

Harms, D. (2001). A response to

California’s mandated nursing ratios.

Journal of Nursing Scholarship,

33(2), 179-184.

Donaldson, N.E., Brown, D.S.,

Aydin, C.E., & Bolton, L.B.

(2001). Nurse staffing in California

hospitals 1998-2000: Findings

from the California Nursing

Outcomes Coalition database

project. Policy, Politics & Nursing

Practice, 2(1), 19-28.

Brown, D.S., Donaldson, N.E.,

Aydin, C.E., & Carlson, N.

(2001). Hospital nursing benchmarks:

The California Nursing

Outcomes Coalition project.

Journal for Healthcare Quality,

23(4), 22-27.

Donaldson, N. (2001). Editorial:

Navigating the quality chasm.

The Online Journal of Clinical

Innovations, 4(1), pg. 2.

Rutledge, D.N., Donaldson,

N.E., & Pravikoff, D.S. (2001).

Patient education in disease

and symptom management:

Congestive heart failure. The

Online Journal of Clinical

Innovations, 4(2), 1-52 (91

ref).

Brown, D.S. & Donaldson, N.E.

(In press). Teaching quality concepts

to an international audience.

Journal Healthcare Quality.

Bolton, L.B., Aydin, C.E.,

Donaldson, N.E., Brown, D.S.,

Nelson, M., & Harms, D. (In

press). Patient satisfaction with

nursing: An analysis from a

statewide nursing quality database.

Journal of Nursing Scholarship.

Glenna A. Dowling

Dowling, G.A. & Mastick, J.M.

(2001). Melatonin secretion in

Parkinson’s disease: A 2.5 year

follow-up. Sleep, 24, A368.

Colling, E., Mastick, J.,

Schmedlen, L., Dowling, G.,

Carter, J., Singer, C., & DeJongh,

E. (2001). Wrist actigraphy as a

method of sleep detection in

Parkinson’s disease. Sleep (abstract

supplement), 24, pg.

A413.

Dowling, G.A. & Schmitt, E.M.

(2001). Assessing outcomes in a

case management program for

community-dwelling frail older

adults. Gerontology, 47, pg. 153.

Melnick, M.E., Dowling, G.A.,

& Dodd, M.J. (2001). The Pro-

Self Program: Exercise for

Parkinson’s disease. The Gerontologist,

41, pg. 282.

Aminoff, M.J. & Dowling, G.A.

(2001). Parkinson’s disease: Living

with a chronic illness. San

Bruno, CA: Krames Communications.

Trygstad, L., Buccheri, R.,

Dowling, G., Zind, R., White, K.,

Griffin, J.J., Henderson, S.,

Suciu, L., Hippe, S., Kaas, M.,

Covert, C., & Hebert, P. (In

press). Behavioral management

of persistent auditory hallucinations

in schizophrenia: Outcomes

from a ten-week course. Journal

of the American Psychiatric

Nurses Association.

Kathleen A. Dracup

Jaarsma, T., Dracup, K., Halfens,

R., & Huijer Abu-Saad, H.

(2000). Sexual function in patients

with advanced heart failure.

European Journal of Heart

Failure, 2(2), 61-62.

Riedinger, M.S., Dracup, K.A.,

Brecht, M.L., Padilla, G., Sarna,

L., & Ganz, P.A. (2001). Quality

of life in patients with heart failure:

Do gender differences exist?

Heart & Lung, 30(2), 105-116.

Evangelista, L., Kagawa-

Singer, M., & Dracup, K.

(2001). Gender differences in

health perceptions and meaning

in persons with heart failure.

Heart & Lung, 30(3), 167-

176.

King, M.L., Dracup, K., & Woo,

M.A. (2001). Predictors of isotonic

exercise in patients with

heart failure. Medicine & Science

in Sports & Exercise, July,

1090-1095.

Evangelista, L., Berg, J., &

Dracup, K. (2001). Relationship

between psychosocial variables

and compliance in patients with

heart failure. Heart & Lung,

30(4), 294-301.

Caldwell, M. & Dracup, K.

(2001). Team management of

heart failure, the emerging role of

exercise, and implications for

cardiac rehabilitation. Journal of

Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation,

21, 273-279.

44

Walden, J.A., Dracup, K.,

Westlake, C., Erickson, V.,

Hamilton, M., & Fonarow, G.

(2001). Educational needs of

patients with advanced heart

failure and their caregivers. Journal

of Heart and Lung Transplantation,

20(7), 766-769.

Martensson, J. & Dracup, K.

(2001). Decisive situations influencing

spouses’ support of patients

with heart failure: A critical

incident technique analysis.

Heart & Lung, 30(5), 341-350.

Smith, S., Blair, S., Bornow, R.,

Brass, L., Cerqueira, M., Dracup,

K., Fuster, V., et al. (In press).

AHA concensus statement on

preventing heart attack and

death in patients with atherosclerotic

cardiovascular disease:

2001 update. Circulation.

Reidinger, M.S., Dracup, K., &

Brecht, M.L. (In press). A comparative

study of quality of life:

Women with heart failure versus

normative groups and patients

with other chronic conditions.

American Journal of

Critical Care.

Barbara J. Drew

Wung, S.F., Lux, R.L., & Drew,

B.J. (2000). Thoracic location of

the lead with maximal ST segment

deviation during posterior

and right ventricular ischemia:

Comparison of 18-lead ECG with

192 estimated body surface

leads. Journal of

Electrocardiology, Supplement,

33, 167-174.

Adams, M.G., Pelter, M.M.,

Wung, S.F., Lux, R.L., & Drew,

B.J. (2000). Is there more information

about acute ischemia in

body surface potential maps

estimated from standard leads

than in the standard 12-lead

ECG alone? Journal of

Electrocardiology, 33 (Supplement),

pg. 81.

Wung, S.F. & Drew, B.J. (2001).

New electrocardiographic criteria

for posterior wall acute myocardial

ischemia validated by a

percutaneous transluminal coronary

angioplasty model of acute

myocardial infarction. American

Journal of Cardiology, 87(8),

970-974.


Mary B. Engler, PhD, RN, MS, FAHA

Dr. Engler’s area of research

involves nutritional

interventions in

the prevention and

treatment of cardiovascular

disease. She has

focused on the vascular

effects of omega-3

polyunsaturated fatty

acids (fish oils) in the

presence of cardiovascular

risk factors. She

is currently engaged in

the EARLY (Endothelial

Assessment of Risk in

Lipids from Youth) trial,

where the effects of nutrients

such as, vitamins

C and E, omega-3

fatty acids, are being

studied in children and

adolescents with high

blood cholesterol.

Drew, B.J. & Adams, M.G.

(2001). Clinical consequences

of ST segment changes due to

body position mimicking transient

myocardial ischemia:

Hazards of ST segment monitoring?

Journal of

Electrocardiology, 34, 261-264.

Pelter, M.M. & Drew, B.J. (2001).

The frequency and adverse outcomes

of transient myocardial

ischemia in patients recently

treated in the telemetry unit are

equivalent to those of patients

treated for the same diagnosis in

the CCU from an earlier time

period. Circulation, Supplement

II, 104(17), pg. 340.

Wung, S.F., Engler, M.B., &

Drew, B.J. (2001). Posterior ECG

leads in patients with cardiac

symptoms but free of coronary

artery disease.Circulation,

Supplement II, 104(17), pg. 640.

Puntillo, K.A., Benner, P.,

Drought, T., Drew, B., Stotts, N.,

Stannard, D., Rushton, C.,

Scanlon, C., & White, C. (2001).

End-of-life issues in intensive

care units: A national random

survey of nurses’ knowledge and

beliefs. American Journal of

Critical Care, 10(4), 216-229.

Booker, K.J., Holm, K., Drew,

B.J., Lanuza, D., Hicks, F., &

Moran, J. (2001). Frequency

and clinical outcomes of transient

myocardial ischemia in

noncardiac critically ill adults.

Circulation, Supplement II,

104(17), pg. 768.

Drew, B.J., Pelter, M.M., &

Adams, M.G. (In press). Frequency,

characteristics, and

clinical significance of transient

ST segment elevation in patients

with acute coronary syndromes.

European Heart Journal.

Adams, M.G., Galen, P., & Drew,

B.J. (In press). A novel approach

to reduce false positives due to

body position changes during ST

segment monitoring. Journal of

Electrocardiology.

Pelter, M.M. & Drew, B.J. (In

press). Frequency and consequences

of transient myocardial

ischemia in the setting of a telemetry

unit detected with continuous

12-lead ST monitoring. Journal

of Electrocardiology.

Booker, K.J., Drew, B.J., &

Holm, K. (In press). Challenges

associated with continuous 12lead

ECG monitoring in critically

ill patients admitted for noncardiac

conditions. Journal of

Electrocardiology.

Adams, M.G., Dempsey, E.D., &

Drew, B.J. (In press). Evaluation

of a website electrocardiogram

training program. Journal of

Electrocardiology.

Tung, P.P., Kopelnik, A., Banki,

N.M., Ong, K.C., Ko, N.U.,

Lawton, M.T., Gress, D.R., Drew,

B.J., Foster, E., Parmley, W.W., &

Zaroff, J.G. (In press). The severity

of brain injury and female

gender predict myocardial necrosis

after subarachnoid hemorrhage.

Journal of the American

College of Cardiology.

Sommargren, C.E., Zaroff, J.G.,

& Drew, B.J. (In press). Electrocardiographic

abnormalities in

subarachnoid hemorrhage. Journal

of Electrocardiology.

Pelter, M.M., Dempel, D.L.,

Adams, M.G., Brodnick, D.,

Yadav, A., & Drew, B.J. (In

press). Comparison of a 12-lead

ECG constructed from two frontal

and two chest leads with the

standard ECG for diagnosing

arrhythmias & ischemia. Journal

of Electrocardiology.

Olson, C.W., Drew, B.J., &

Adams, M.G. (In press). New

methods to distinguish positional

from ischemic ECG changes

using vector changes in magnitude

and angle over segments of

the QRS, ST, and the T wave.

Journal of Electrocardiology.

Adams, M.G. & Drew, B.J. (In

press). Efficacy of two strategies

to detect body position ST segment

changes during continuous

12-lead electrocardiographic

monitoring. Journal of

Electrocardiology.

Pelter, M.M., Adams, M.G., &

Drew, B.J. (In press). Transient

myocardial ischemia is associated

with adverse in-hospital

outcomes whether patients are

treated in a telemetry unit or a

coronary care unit. American

Journal of Critical Care.

Marguerite M. Engler

Kris-Etherton, P., Daniels, S.R.,

Eckel, R.H., Engler, M.M.,

Howard, B.V., et al. (2001). Summary

of the scientific conference

on dietary fatty acids and cardiovascular

health. Conference

summary from the Nutrition

Committee of the American

Heart Association. Circulation,

103, 1034-1039.

Engler, M.M. (2001). Bridging

the gap between information

technology and cardiovascular

nursing. Progress in Cardiovascular

Nursing, 16(1), pg. 4.

Kris-Etherton, P., Daniels, S.R.,

Eckel, R.H., Engler, M.M.,

Howard, B.V., Krauss, R.M., et

al. (2001). AHA scientific statement:

Summary of the scientific

conference on dietary fatty acids

and cardiovascular health. Conference

summary from the Nutrition

Committee of the American

Heart Association. Journal of

Nutrition, 131(4), 1322-1326.

Engler, M.M. (2001). The hypotensive

effect of dietary-linolenic

acid and associated alterations

in tissue fatty acid composition

and the renin-angiotensin

system. In Y.S. Huang & V.A.

Ziboh (Eds.), Gamma-linolenic

acid: Recent advances in biotechnology

and clinical applications

(pp. 157-168). Champaign, IL:

AOCS Press.

Engler, M.M., Engler, M.B.,

Malloy, M.J., Schloetter, M.C.,

Stuehlinger, M., Cooke, J.P., &

Mietus-Snyder, M. (2001). The

effects of nutritional counseling

and antioxidants on asymmetric

dimethylarginine levels

in hyperlipidemic children:

Endothelial Assessment of

Risk from Lipids in Youth

(EARLY) study. Circulation,

Supplement II, 104(17), II-

470.


Engler, M.M., Engler, M.B.,

Malloy, M.J., Schloetter, M.C.,

Morrow, J.D., & Mietus-Snyder, M.

(2001). The effects of nutritional

counseling and vitamin C and E on

endothelial function, lipids and

isoprostane levels in hyperlipidemia:

Endothelial Assessment of

Risk from Lipids in Youth

(EARLY) study. Circulation,

Supplement II, 104(17), II-470.

Mary B. Engler

Wung, S.F., Engler, M.B., & Drew,

B.J. (2001). Posterior ECG leads in

patients with cardiac symptoms but

free of coronary artery disease. Journal

of the American Heart Association,

Supplement II, 104(17), pg. 640.

Engler, M.M., Engler, M.B.,

Malloy, M.J., Schloetter, M.C.,

Stuehlinger, M., Cooke, J.P., &

Mietus-Snyder, M. (2001). The

effects of nutritional counseling

and antioxidants on asymmetric

dimethylarginine levels in hyperlipidemic

children: Endothelial

Assessment of Risk from Lipids in

Youth (EARLY) study. Circulation,

Supplement II, 104(17), II-470.

Engler, M.M., Engler, M.B., Malloy,

M.J., Schloetter, M.C., Morrow,

J.D., & Mietus-Snyder, M. (2001).

The effects of nutritional counseling

and vitamin C and E on endothelial

function, lipids and

isoprostane levels in hyperlipidemia:

Endothelial Assessment of

Risk from Lipids in Youth (EARLY)

study. Circulation, Supplement II,

104(17), II-470.

Carroll L. Estes

Estes, C.L. & Associates. (2001).

Social policy and aging: A critical

perspective. Thousand Oaks, CA:

Sage Publications.

Wiener, J.M., Estes, C.L.,

Goldenson, S.M., & Goldberg, S.C.

(2001). What happened to long

term care in the health reform debate

of 1993-1994? Lesssons for

the future. Milbank Quarterly,

79(2), 207-248.

Estes, C.L., Seymour, R.B., &

Yue, M.C. (2001). California collaborative

center for substance

abuse policy research: A history

and update. Journal of Psychoactive

Drugs, 33(4), 339-342.

Estes, C.L. (2001). From gender to

the political economy of ageing.

The European Journal of Social

Quality, 2(1), 28-46.

Weitz, T. & Estes, C.L.

(2001). Adding aging and

gender to the women’s health

agenda. Journal of Women

and Aging, 13(2), 3-20.

Estes, C.L., Ogawa, D., &

Weitz, T. (2001). Health policy

and aging. In. G. Maddox (Ed.),

Encyclopedia of aging (pp.

472-476). New York: Springer

Publications.

Schunk, M.V. & Estes, C.L.

(2001). Is German long-term

care insurance a model for the

United States? International

Journal of Health Services,

31(3), 617-634.

Beard, R. & Estes, C.L. (In

press). Medicalization of

aging. MacMillan encyclopedia

of aging . New York:

MacMillan Publishing.

Estes, C.L. & Kaskie, B. (In

press). Mental health services

policy and the aging. Journal of

Gerontological Social Work.

Estes, C.L. & Phillipson, C. (In

press). Globalization, the welfare

state and aging. International

Journal of Health Services.

Noreen C. Facione

Facione, N.C. & Facione, P.A.

(2001). Analyzing explanations

for seemingly irrational choices:

Linking argument analysis and

cognitive science. International

Journal of Applied Philosophy,

15(2), 267-286.

Dodd, M., Janson, S., Facione,

N., Faucett, J., Froelicher,

E.S., Humphreys, J., Lee, K.,

Miaskowski, C., Puntillo, K.,

Rankin, S., & Taylor, D.

(2001). Advancing the science

of symptom management.

Journal of Advanced Nursing,

33(5), 668-676.

Miaskowski, C., Mack, A.,

Dodd, M.J., West, C., Paul,

S.M., Tripathy, D., Koo, P.,

Schumacher, K., & Facione,

N. (2002). Differences in pain

outcome measures between

oncology outpatients who took

pain medicine on an aroundthe-clock

basis versus on an

as-needed basis. Journal of

Pain, 3(1), 12-20.

Facione, N.C. (In press). The Jdelay

scale: A measure of the

likelihood of patient delay in

breast cancer. Research and

Theory for Nursing Practice: An

International Journal.

Dodd, M.J., Miaskowski, C.,

Greenspan, D., MacPhail, L.,

Shih, A., Shiba, G., Facione,

N., & Paul, S.M. (In press).

Radiation-induced mucositis:

A randomized clinical trial of

micronized sucralfate versus

salt and soda mouthwashes.

Cancer Investigation.

Facione, N.C., Miaskowski, C.,

Dodd, M.J., & Paul, S. (In press).

The self-reported likelihood of

patient delay in breast cancer:

New thoughts for early detection.

Preventive Medicine.

Facione, N.C. (In press). Perceived

risk for breast cancer: An

application of research in human

cognition. Cancer Practice.

Katapodi, M.C., Facione,

N.C., Miaskowski, C., Dodd,

M.J., & Waters, C.M. (In

press). The influence of social

support on breast cancer

screening in multiethnic and

multicultural women. Oncology

Nursing Forum.

Julia Faucett

Dodd, M., Janson, S., Facione,

N., Faucett, J., Froelicher,

E.S., Humphreys, J., Lee, K.,

Miaskowski, C., Puntillo, K.,

Rankin, S., & Taylor, D.

(2001). Advancing the science

of symptom management.

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Faucett, J., Meyers, J., Tejeda,

D., Janowitz, I., Miles, J., &

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management. Journal of Advanced

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Wipke-Tevis, D.D., Stotts, N.A.,

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Marion Gillen

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cognitive and physical problem

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LeBlanc, A.J., Tonner, M.C., &

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LaPlante, M.P., Harrington, C., &

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Sharon R. Kaufman is

completing a study on

the experience and

understanding of death

in the hospital. It includes

the impact of

biomedical technologies

on moral practice,

the ways in which the

bureaucracy of health

care delivery creates

forms of dying, and

changing knowledge

about medical progress

and the category

of “the person.”

Sharon R. Kaufman, PhD

Patricia L. Jackson

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people 2010: The pediatric

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Hawkins-Walsh, E. (2001). Professional

practice of pediatric

nurse practitioners: Implications

for education and training of

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Susan Janson

Dodd, M., Janson, S., Facione,

N., Faucett, J., Froelicher, E.S.,

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Miaskowski, C., Puntillo, K.,

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Journal of Neuroscience

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Woodruff, P.G., Khashayar, R.,

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Jackson, P.L., Kennedy, C., Sadler,

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Kools, S. & Kennedy, C. (In press).

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Kathryn A. Lee

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Lee, K.A. (2001). Sleep and

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Lee, K.A., Zaffke, M.E., &

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Malone, R.E., Wenger, L.D., &

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Malone, R.E. & Dohan, D.

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Malone, R.E. (2000). Research,

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26(6), 189-192.

Rice, D.P. (2001). Health statistics:

Past, present, and future.

In National Research

council. In E.B. Perrin, W.D.

Kalsbeek, & T.M. Scanlon

(Eds.), Toward a health statistics

system for the 21 st century:

Summary of a workshop. Committee

on National Statistics.

Washington, DC: National

Academy Press.

Dupont, R.L. DuPont, C.M., &

Rice, D.P. (2001). The economic

costs of anxiety disorders. In D.J.

Stein & E. Hollander (Eds.),

Textbook of anxiety disorders (pp.

475-483). Washington, DC:

American Psychiatric Press.

Max, W., Sinnott, P., Kao, C.,

Sung, H-Y., & Rice, D.P. (In

press) The burden of osteoposis

in California, 1998. Osteoporosis

International.

Max, W., Rice, D.P., Sung, H-Y.,

Michel, M., Breuer, W., & Zhang,

X. (In press). The economic burden

of prostate cancer in California,

1998. Cancer.

Jean Ann Seago

Christensen, M.A., Janson, S., &

Seago, J.A. (2001). Alcohol, head

injury, and pulmonary complications.

Journal of Neuroscience

Nursing, 33(4), 184-189.

Seago, J.A., Ash, M.,

Grumbach, K., Coffman, J., &

Spetz, J. (2001). Hospital registered

nurse shortage: Environmental,

patient, and institutional

predictors. Health Services

Research, 36(5), 833-854.

Grumbach, K., Ash, M., Seago,

J.A., Spetz, J., & Coffman, J.

(2001). Measuring shortages of

hospital nurses: How do you

know a hospital with a nursing

shortage when you see one?

Medical Care Research and Review,

58(4), 387-403.

Seago, J.A. (2001). Nurse staffing,

models of care, and interventions.

In K.G. Shojania, B.W.

Duncan, K.M. McDonald, &

R.M. Wachter (Eds.), Making

health care safer: A critical

analysis of patient safety practices.Evidence/technology/assessment

no. 43, AHRQ, Publication

#01-E058.

Coffman, J., Spetz, J., Seago,

J.A., Rosenoff, E., & O’Neil, E.

(2001). Nursing in California: A

workforce crisis. San Francisco,

CA: California Workforce Initiative

and the UCSF Center for the

Health Professions.

Seago, J.A. (2002). The California

experiment: Alternatives for

minimum nurse-to-patient ratios.

Journal of Nursing Administration,

32(1), 48-58.

Mitchell, S., Spetz, J., & Seago,

J.A. (In press). Errors in data

on hospital ownership and the

growth of multi-hospital firms.

Inquiry.

Seago, J.A. & Ash, M. (In

press). RN unions and patient

outcomes. Journal of Nursing

Administration. Seago, J.A. (In

press). A comparison of patient

classification systems in an

acute care hospital. Journal of

Nursing Administration.

Seago, J.A. & Spetz, J. (In

press). Registered nurse prelicensure

education in California.

Nursing Economics.

Coffman, J., Spetz, J., Seago,

J.A., Rosenoff, E., & O’Neil, E.

(In press). Meeting California’s

nursing workforce needs in the

21 st century. San Francisco,

CA: UCSF Center for the Health

Professions Press.


Diana L. Taylor, RN, PhD, FAAN

Diana L. Taylor has

focused much of her

research work on the

understanding of the

biopsychosocial and

life span factors that

affect the health and

illness of women

within the context of

their daily lives. She

has recently finished a

science-based consumer

health book for

women to assist them

in managing their

symptoms and promoting

their health,

which will be published

this summer.

Spetz, J., Seago, J.A., Coffman,

J., Rosenoff, E., & O’Neil, E.

(In press). Minimum nurse

staffing ratios in California

acute care hospitals. San Francisco,

CA: California

Healthcare Foundations Press.

Daphne Stannard

Puntillo, K.A., Benner, P.,

Drought, T., Drew, B., Stotts, N.,

Stannard, D., Rushton, C.,

Scanlon, C., & White, C. (2001).

End-of-life issues in intensive

care units: A national random

survey of nurses’ knowledge and

beliefs. American Journal of

Critical Care, 10(4), 216-229.

Stannard, D. (2001). Family

care. In H. Schell & K. Puntillo

(Eds.), Critical care nursing secrets

(pp. 382-385). Philadelphia,

PA: Hanley & Belfus.

Puntillo, K. & Stannard, D.

(2001). Intensive care. In B.

Ferrell & N. Coyle (Eds.), The

Oxford textbook of palliative

nursing care (pp. 609-621). New

York: Oxford University.

Benner, P., Stannard, D., &

Hooper-Kyriakidis, P. (2001).

Clinical wisdom and interventions

in critical care: A thinking-in-action

approach

[CDROM]. Philadelphia: W.B.

Saunders. [Won American

Journal of Nursing Media of the

Year Award in 2001.]

Anita L. Stewart

Verboncoeur, C.J., Stewart, A.L.,

King, A.C., Rush, S., McLellan,

B.Y., & Mills, K. (2000). The use

of refusal postcards in recruiting

older adults. Annals of Behavioral

Medicine, 22(4), 330-333.

Harada, N., Meredith, L., Liu,

H., Stewart, A., Makinodan, T., &

Kahn, K. (2000). Does acculturation

influence physical activity in

Japanese American older adults?

Asian American and Pacific Islander

Journal of Health, 8(2),

130-137.

Ritter, P.L., Stewart, A.L.,

Kaymaz, H., Sobel, D.S., Bloch,

D.A., & Lorig, K.R. (2001). Selfreports

of health care utilization

compared to provider records.

Journal of Clinical Epidemiology,

54, 136-141.

Stewart, A.L. (2001). Community-based

physical activity

programs for adults aged 50

and older. Journal of Aging and

Physical Activity, 9 (Supplement),

S71-S91.

Napoles-Springer, A.M. &

Stewart, A.L. (2001). Use of

health-related quality of life

measures in older and ethnically

diverse U.S. populations. Journal

of Mental Health and Aging,

7(1), 173-179.

Stewart, A.L., Mills, K.M., King,

A.C., Haskell, W.L., Gillis, D., &

Ritter, P.L. (2001). CHAMPS

physical activity questionnaire

for older adults: Outcomes for

interventions. Medicine and Science

in Sports and Exercise,

33(7), 1126-1141.

Harada, N.D., Chiu, V., &

Stewart, A.L. (2001). An evaluation

of three self-report physical

activity instruments for

older adults. Medicine and Science

in Sports and Exercise,

33(6), 962-970.

Posner, S.F., Stewart, A.L.,

Marin, G., & Perez-Stable, E.J.

(2001). Factor variability of the

Center for Epidemiological Studies

Depression Scale (CES-D)

among urban Latinos. Ethnicity

and Health, 6(2), 137-144.

Lorig, K.R., Ritter, P., Stewart,

A.L, Sobel, D.S., Brown, B.W. Jr.,

Bandura, A., Gonzalez, V.M.,

Laurent, D.D., & Holman, H.R.

(2001). Chronic disease selfmanagement

program: 2-year

health status and health care

utilization outcomes. Medical

Care, 39(11), 1217-1223.

Stewart, A.L., Verboncoeur, C.J.,

McLellan, B.Y., Gillis, D.E.,

Rush, S., Mills, K., King, A.C.,

Ritter, P., Brown, B., & Bortz,

W.M. (2001). Physical activity

outcomes of CHAMPS II: A

physical activity promotion program

for older adults. Journal of

Gerontology: A Biological Sciences

and Medical Sciences, 56,

465-470.

54

Mills, K.M., Stewart, A.L.,

McLellan, B.Y., Verboncoeur,

C.J., King, A.C., & Brown, B.W.

(2001). Evaluation of enrollment

bias in a physical activity

promotion program for seniors.

Journal of Aging and Physical

Activity, 9(4), 398-413.

Wasserman, D.A., Stewart,

A.L., & Delucchi, K.L. (2001).

Social support and abstinence

from opiates and cocaine during

opioid maintenance treatment.

Drug and Alcohol Dependence,

65(1), 65-75.

Gillis, D.E., Grossman, M.D.,

McLellan, B.Y., King, A.C., &

Stewart, A.L. (In press). Participants’

evaluations of program

components of a physical activity

promotion program for seniors

(CHAMPS II). Journal of Aging

and Physical Activity.

Nancy A. Stotts

Wipke-Tevis, D.D., Stotts, N.A.,

Williams, D.A., Froelicher, E.S.,

& Hunt, T.K. (2001). Tissue oxygenation,

perfusion, and position

in patients with venous leg ulcers.

Nursing Research, 50(1),

24-32.

Stotts, N.A., Rodeheaver, G.T.,

Thomas, D.R., Frantz, R.A.,

Bartolucci, A.A., Sussman, C.,

Ferrell, B.A., Cuddigan, J., &

Maklebust, J. (2001). An instrument

to measure healing in pressure

ulcers: Development and

validation of the Pressure Ulcer

Scale for Healing (PUSH). Journal

in Gerontology: Medical Sciences,

56(12), M795-799.

Day, L., Stotts, N.A., Frankfurt,

A., Stralovich-Romani, A., Volz,

M., Muwaswes, M., Fukuoka, Y.,

& O’Leary-Kelley, C. (2001).

Gastric versus duodenal feeding

in patients with neurological

disease: A pilot study. Journal of

Neuroscience Nursing, 33(3),

148-149, 155-159.

Stotts, N.A. & Hopf, H.W.

(2001). The effect of supplemental

fluid on tissue oxygenation in

persons with pressure ulcers: A

pilot study. Advances in Wound

Care, 14(5), 269.


Puntillo, K.A., Benner, P., Drought,

T., Drew, B., Stotts, N., Stannard,

D., Rushton, C., Scanlon, C., &

White, C. (2001). End-of-life issues

in intensive care units: A national

random survey of nurses’ knowledge

and beliefs. American Journal

of Critical Care, 10(4), 216-229.

Stotts, N.A. (2001). Nurse researchers:

Who are they, what do

they do, and what challenges do

they face? In J. McCloskey

Dochterman & H.K. Grace (Eds.),

Current issues in nursing (6 th Ed.,

pp. 36-40). St. Louis: Mosby.

Stotts, N.A. (In press). Wound

infection: Diagnosis and management.

In M. Morison (Ed.),

Wound care: A problem-based

approach. Edinborough, Scotland:

Harcourt Brace.

Stotts, N.A. (In press). Impaired

wound healing. In V.K. Carrieri-

Kohlman, A.M. Lindsey, & C.M.

West (Eds.), Pathophysiological

phenomena in nursing: Human

responses to illness (2 nd Ed.). Philadelphia:

W.B. Saunders.

Shih, A., Miaskowski, C., Dodd,

M.J., Stotts, N., & MacPhail, L.

(In press). A research review of

the current treatments for radiation-induced

oral mucositis. Oncology

Nursing Forum.

Diana L. Taylor

Taylor, D., Woods, N., &

Fitzpatrick, J. (Eds). (2001). Annual

review of nursing research:

Women’s health research (Vol. 19).

New York: Springer. [Received the

American Journal of Nursing Book

of the Year Award.]

Taylor, D. & Woods, N. (2001).

What we know and how we know it:

Contributions from nursing to

women’s health research and scholarship.

In D. Taylor, N. Woods, & J.

Fitzpatrick (Eds.), Annual review of

nursing research: Women’s health

research (Vol. 19, pp 3-28). New

York: Springer.

Taylor, D. & Wade, E. (2002). Primary

care education and training at

UCSF: An inventory. San Francisco,

CA: UCSF Publications.

Collins-Sharp, B. & Taylor, D. (In

press). Cyclic pelvic pain: The state

of the science for nursing practice.

Journal of Gynecologic, Obstetric, &

Neonatal Nursing.

Taylor, D. & Colino, S. (In

press). Taking back the month:

A personalized solution for managing

PMS and enhancing your

health. New York: Perigee.

Margaret I. Wallhagen

Wallhagen, M., Strawbridge, W.,

Shema, S., Kurata, J., & Kaplan,

G. (2001). Comparative impact of

hearing and vision impairment

on subsequent functioning. Journal

of the American Geriatrics

Society, 49(8), 1086-1092.

Wallhagen, M., Strawbridge,

W., & Kaplan, G. (2001). Fiveyear

impact of hearing impairment

on physical functioning,

mental health, and social relationships.

British Society of

Audiology News, 32, 9-11.

Wallhagen, M.I. (In press). Hearing

impairment: An understudied

problem in nursing. Annual

Review of Nursing Research.

Yamamoto, N. & Wallhagen, M.

(In press). Pursuit of psychological

well-being (Ikigai) and

the evolution of self-understanding

in the context of

caregiving in Japan. Culture,

Medicine, and Psychiatry.

Phinney, A., Wallhagen, M., &

Sands, L. (In press). Exploring

the meaning of symptom awareness

in dementia. Journal of

Neuroscience Nursing.

Shaibu, S. & Wallhagen, M.I. (In

press). Family caregiving of the

elderly in Botswana: Boundaries

of culturally acceptable options

and resources. Journal of Cross-

Cultural Gerontology.

Strawbridge, W.J. & Wallhagen,

M.I. (In press). Self-reported

successful aging: Correlates

and predictors. In L.W. Poon,

S.H. Gueldner, & B. Sprouse

(Eds.), Successful aging and

adaptation with chronic disease

in older adulthood.

Catherine M. Waters

Waters, C.M. (2001). Understanding

and supporting African-

Americans’ perspectives of endof-life

care planning and decision-making.

Qualitative Health

Research, 11(3), 385-399.

Waters, C.M., Times, R.,

Morton, A.R., Crear, M., &

Wey, M. (2002). Perception of

health status and participation

in present and future healthpromotion

behaviors in African

American women. Journal of

Prevention and Intervention in

the Community, 22(2), 81-96.

Katapodi, M.C., Facione,

N.C., Miaskowski, C., Dodd,

M.J., & Waters, C.M. (In

press). The influence of social

support on breast cancer

screening in multiethnic and

multicultural women. Oncology

Nursing Forum.

Claudia M. West

Miaskowski, C., Dodd, M.J.,

West, C., Paul, S.M., Tripathy, D.,

Koo, P., & Schumacher, K.

(2001). Lack of adherence with

analgesic regimen: A significant

barrier to effective cancer pain

management. Journal of Clinical

Oncology, 19(23), 4275-4279.

Miaskowski, C., Mack, A.,

Dodd, M.J., West, C., Paul,

S.M., Tripathy, D., Koo, P.,

Schumacher, K., & Facione, N.

(2002). Differences in pain

outcome measures between

oncology outpatients who took

pain medicine on an aroundthe-clock

basis versus on an asneeded

basis. Journal of Pain,

3(1), 12-20.

Schumacher, K.L., Karesawa, S.,

West, C., Dodd, M., Paul, S.M.,

Tripathy, D., Koo, P., &

Miaskowski, C. (In press). The

usefulness of a daily pain management

diary for oncology outpatients

with cancer. Oncology

Nursing Forum.

Schumacher, K.L., Karesawa,

S., West, C., Hawkins, C.,

Johnson, C., Wais, E., Dodd, M.,

Paul, S.M., Tripathy, D., Koo, P.,

& Miaskowski, C. (In press).

Putting cancer pain management

regimens into practice at

home. Journal of Pain and

Symptom Management.

Schumacher, K.L., West, C.,

Dodd, M., Paul, S.M., Tripathy,

D., Koo, P., & Miaskowski, C.

(In press). Pain management

autobiographies and reluctance

to use opioids for cancer pain

management. Cancer Nursing.

Mary C. White

White, M.C., Mehrotra, A.,

Menendez, E., Estes, M.,

Goldenson, J., & Tulsky, J.P.

(2001). Jail inmates and HIV

care: Provision of antiretroviral

therapy and Pneumocystis

carinii pneumonia prophylaxis.

International Journal of STD &

AIDS, 112, 380-385.

White, M.C., Tulsky, J.P.,

Portillo, C.J., Menendez, E.M.,

Cruz, E., & Goldenson, J.

(2001). Tuberculosis prevalence

in an urban jail: 1994 and

1998. International Journal of

Tuberculosis and Lung Disease,

5(5), 400-404.

Menendez, E., White, M.C., &

Tulsky, J.P. (2001). Locating

study subjects: Predictors and

successful strategies in inmates

released from a U.S.

county jail. Controlled Clinical

Trials, 22, 238-247.

White, M.C., Tulsky, J.P.,

Goldenson, J., Portillo, C.J.,

Kawamura, L.M., & Menendez,

E. (In press). Randomized controlled

trial of interventions to

improve follow-up for latent

tuberculosis infection after

release from jail. Archives of

Internal Medicine.


national

review panels

In addition to directing and

publishing their own research,

many faculty members at UCSF

serve as reviewers for colleagues

nationally and worldwide.

Listed below is a sampling of this

service as it is reflected in current

membership on editorial boards

and review panels for journals,

grant proposal study sections,

and expert panels or committees.

Editorial and Review

Boards

Alkon, Abbey (FHCN)

Reviewer, Social Development,

2001

Benner, Patricia (PN)

Editorial Board member and reviewer,

Journal of Clinical Nursing,

1991-; Editorial Board member

and reviewer, Nursing Inquiry,

1993-; Editorial Board

member and reviewer, Nursing

Philosophy, 2000-; Editorial

Board member and reviewer,

Interpretive Studies in Health Care

and the Human Sciences, 2002-

Bennett, Jill A. (PN)

Reviewer, Age and Ageing, 2000-

; Review Panel member, Journal

of Gerontological Nursing, 2001-;

reviewer, Journal of the American

Geriatrics Society, 2001-; guest

editor, Journal of Cardiovascular

Nursing, 2003

Brown, Diane S. (CHS)

Editorial Board member, Journal

for Healthcare Quality, 2000-

Chafetz, Linda (CHS)

Editorial Board member, Issues in

Mental Health Nursing, 1995-;

reviewer, Psychiatric Services,

1996-

Chesla, Catherine A. (FHCN)

Editorial Board member, Journal

of Family Nursing, 1994-; reviewer,

Qualitative Health Research,

1997-; reviewer, Family

Systems and Health, 1999-

Clarke, Adele E. (SBS)

Editorial advisor, Social Studies

of Science, 1993-

Davies, Elizabeth (FHCN)

Editorial Board member, Cancer

Nursing, 1985-; Review Board

member, Canadian Journal of

Nursing Research, 1985-; Review

Board member, Canadian

Oncology Nursing Journal,

1990-; Review Board member,

Death Studies, 1991-; Review

Board member, Qualitative

Health Research, 1991-; Review

Board member, Journal of Palliative

Care, 1992-; Editorial

Board member, International

Journal of Palliative Care Nursing,

1994-; Advisory Editorial

Board member, Journeys – a

newsletter to help bereavement,

Hospice Foundation of America,

1997-2001; Review Board member,

OMEGA, Journal of Death &

Dying, 2001-; ad hoc reviewer,

Oxford University Press (Oxford),

2001-; ad hoc reviewer,

Brunner Routledge (New York),

2001-

Dibble, Suzanne L. (IHA)

Manuscript reviewer, Medical/

Surgical Nursing, 1994-; peer

reviewer, Women’s Health Issues,

1997-; peer reviewer,

Quality of Life Research, 1998-;

reviewer, Journal of the Gay &

Lesbian Medical Association,

1999-; reviewer, Women’s

Health International, 2000-

Dodd, Marylin J. (PN)

Reviewer, Western Journal of

Nursing Research, 1981-; reviewer,

Research in Nursing and

Health, 1983-; Editorial Board

member, Cancer Nursing, 1987-;

ad hoc reviewer, Journal of

Patient Education and Counseling,

1989-; reviewer, Cancer

Investigation, 1998-

Donaldson, Nancy E. (PN)

Founding co-editor, The Online

Journal of Clinical Innovations,

1996-; reviewer, Medical Care,

2001-; reviewer, Qualitative

Health Research, 2001-2002;

invited letter to the Editor, Medical

Care – Journal of the Medical

Care Section, American Public

Health Association, 2002

Dowling, Glenna A. (PN)

Manuscript Review Board member,

Journal of Neuroscience

Nursing, 1991-

Dracup, Kathleen (DO)

Reviewer, Critical Care Medicine,

1990-; Editorial Board

member, Journal of Cardiovascular

Nursing, 1990-; Editor,

American Journal of Critical

Care, 1992-; reviewer, Psychosomatic

Medicine, 1995-; reviewer,

American Journal of

Cardiology, 1996-; reviewer,

Journal of the American Medical

Association, 1996-; reviewer,

Journal of the American

College of Cardiology, 1997-;

associate editor, Journal of

Cardiac Failure, 2001-; Editorial

Board member, European

Journal of Cardiovascular

Nursing, 2001-

Drew, Barbara J. (PN)

Manuscript reviewer, Heart &

Lung, 1983-; Editorial Board

member, Progress in Cardiovascular

Nursing, 1986-; Editorial

Board member and manuscript

reviewer, American Journal of

Critical Care, 1992-; reviewer,

Journal of the American College

of Cardiology, 1994-; reviewer,

Journal of Electrocardiology,

1996-; reviewer, American Heart

Journal, 1997-; reviewer, Pacing

& Clinical Electrophysiology,

1999-; reviewer, Medical & Biological

Engineering & Computing,

2000-; manuscript reviewer,

Circulation, 2001-

Engler, Marguerite M. (PN)

Editor-in-Chief, Progress in Cardiovascular

Nursing, 1993-;

reviewer, Journal of Nutritional

Biochemistry, 1999-; reviewer,

Journal of Applied Nutrition,

1999-; reviewer, Biological Research

for Nursing, 1999-; reviewer,

Journal of Nutrition,

2000-; reviewer, Journal of Cardiac

Failure, 2001-

Engler, Mary B. (PN)

Editorial Board member, Progress

in Cardiovascular Nursing,

1993-; reviewer, American

Journal of Critical Care, 1997-;

reviewer, Biological Research

in Nursing, 1998-; reviewer,

Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry,

1999-; reviewer,

Journal of Women’s Health,

1999-; reviewer, Life Sciences,

2000-; reviewer, American

Journal of Physiology, 2000-

56

Estes, Carroll L. (SBS/IHA)

Editorial Board member, Ageing

and Society (United Kingdom),

1983-; Editorial Board

member, Journal of Women and

Aging, 1987-; Editorial Board

member, Journal of Aging and

Social Policy, 1988-

Facione, Noreen C. (PN)

Reviewer, Preventive Medicine,

1993-; reviewer, Journal of the

National Cancer Institute,

1999-; Editorial Board member,

Cancer Nursing, 2001-;

reviewer, Research in Nursing

and Health, 2001-

Faucett, Julia (CHS)

Editorial Board member, Journal

of Occupational Rehabilitation,

1994-; Editorial Review

Board member, American Association

of Occupational Health

Nurses’ (AAOHN) Journal,

1997-; Editorial Board member,

Pain Medicine, 1999-

Fox, Patrick (IHA)

Reviewer, Brain Research, 2001

Froelicher, Erika S. (PN)

Editorial Board member, Journal

of Cardiac Rehabilitation, 1979-;

Editorial Board member, Heart

and Lung, 1980-; Editorial

Board member, Human Kinetics,

1991-; Editorial Board member,

Cardiovascular Nursing, 1991-;

Editorial Board member, American

Journal of Critical Care,

1992-; reviewer, American Journal

for College of Cardiology,

1994-; reviewer, Journal of

Women’s Health & Gender-Based

Medicine, 2001; reviewer, Patient

Education & Counseling,

2001; Editorial Board member,

European Journal of Cardiovascular

Nursing, 2001

Gillen, Marion (CHS)

Manuscript reviewer, AIDS Education:

An Interdisciplinary Journal,

1990-; Editorial Board

member, American Association of

Occupational Health Nurses’

(AAOHN) Journal, 2000-; manuscript

reviewer, American Journal

of Infection Control, 2000-


Golding, Jacqueline M.

(IHA/SBS)

Ad hoc reviewer, Archives of General

Psychiatry, 1988-; ad hoc reviewer,

Journal of Nervous and

Mental Disease, 1989-; ad hoc reviewer,

Psychiatric Services, 1989-;

ad hoc reviewer, Psychological

Reports, 2000-; ad hoc reviewer,

Violence & Victims, 2000-; Editorial/Advisory

Board member, Prevention

Researcher, 2001-

Harrington, Charlene (SBS)

Editorial Board member, Journal

of Applied Gerontology, 1988-;

Editorial Board member, The Gerontologist,

1989-; Editorial Board

member, Medical Care Research

and Review, 1995-

Humphreys, Janice (FHCN)

Manuscript reviewer, Journal of

Family Nursing, 1996-; manuscript

reviewer, Canadian Journal

of Nursing Research, 2000-;

reviewer, Journal of Midwifery &

Women’s Health, 2001-

Jackson, Patricia (FHCN)

Reviewer, Pediatric Nursing,

1996-; reviewer, Journal of Developmental

and Behavioral Pediatrics,

1996-; editor, Primary Care

Section, 2001; Editorial Board

member, Journal of Child Health

Care, 2001

Janson, Susan (CHS)

Ad hoc reviewer, Research in

Nursing and Health, 1986-; Executive

Editorial Board member,

Heart and Lung, 1990-; ad hoc

reviewer, American Journal of

Respiratory and Critical Care

Medicine, 1995-; ad hoc reviewer,

Pediatric Pulmonary, 1995-; ad

hoc reviewer, Journal of Asthma,

1999-; ad hoc reviewer, American

Journal of Medicine, 2000-

Juarbe, Teresa C. (FHCN)

Manuscript reviewer, Western

Journal of Nursing Research,

1998-; manuscript reviewer, The

Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing,

2000-; guest reviewer, Journal

of Health Care for the Poor

and Underserved, 2001

Kaufman, Sharon R. (SBS/IHA)

Editorial Board member, Journal

of Aging Studies, 1986-; Editorial

Board member, Cambridge University

Press, 1996-

Kayser-Jones, Jeanie (PN)

Advisory Board member,

Springer Series on Geriatric

Nursing, 1991-; National Advisory

Board member, Series on

Issues in Gerontological Nursing,

Springer Publishing Company,

1993-; Editorial Board

member, Reviews in Clinical

Gerontology, Cambridge University

Press, 1994-; ad hoc

reviewer, The Gerontologist,

1994-; ad hoc reviewer, Qualitative

Health Research, 1995-;

Editorial Board member, The

Southwest Journal on Aging,

1995-; reviewer, Age and Ageing,

1996-; ad hoc reviewer,

Cross Cultural Gerontology,

1996-; Editorial Board member,

Journal of Applied Gerontology,

1996-; Editorial Board

member, Journal of Gerontology:

Medical Sciences, 2000-

Kennedy, Christine (FHCN)

Reviewer, Pediatric Nursing,

1995-; reviewer, Nursing Research,

2000-; Editorial Board

member, Pediatric Annals, 2001

Kennedy, Holly P. (FHCN)

Associate editor, Journal of Midwifery

& Women’s Health, 2000-

Lee, Kathryn A. (FHCN)

Reviewer, Nursing Research,

2000-; reviewer, Research in

Nursing and Health, 2001; Editorial

Board member, Behavioral

Sleep Medicine, 2001-

Lipson, Juliene G. (CHS)

Ad hoc referee, Western Journal

of Nursing Research, 1985-; Editorial

Board member, Qualitative

Health Research, 1990-; ad hoc

referee, Health Care for Women

International, 1993-; ad hoc

referee, Image, 1994-; Editorial

Board member, Journal of

Transcultural Nursing, 1998-

Malone, Ruth E. (SBS)

Manuscript reviewer, Journal of

the American Medical Association,

1996-; contributing editor,

Journal of Emergency Nursing,

1998-; manuscript reviewer,

Sage Publications, 1999-; manuscript

reviewer, Health Services

Research, 1999-;

manuscript reviewer, Social

Science and Medicine, 1999-;

manuscript reviewer, Tobacco

Control, 2000-; manuscript

reviewer, American Journal of

Public Health, 2000-; manuscript

reviewer, Journal of

Health Politics, Policy & Law,

2000-; manuscript reviewer,

Ethics, Place, and Environment,

2001; manuscript reviewer,

Social Studies of Science,

2001-

Martinson, Ida M. (FHCN)

Reviewer, The Journal of Palliative

Care, 1988-; manuscript

reviewer, Journal of Family

Nursing, 1995-; Editorial Board

member, Hong Kong Journal of

Nursing, 1996- ; Editorial

Board member, Journal of Community

Nursing, 1996-

Max, Wendy (SBS)

Reviewer, Inquiry, 1991-; reviewer,

Journal of the American

Medical Association (JAMA),

1991-; reviewer, Health Affairs,

1993-; reviewer, Medical Care,

1995-; reviewer,

PharmacoEconomics, 1998-;

reviewer, Value in Health, Journal

of the International Society

for Pharmacoeconomics and

Outcomes, 1999-; Editorial

Board member, Medical Care

Research and Review, 1999-;

reviewer, Nicotine & Tobacco

Research, 2000-

Meleis, Afaf I. (CHS)

Reviewer, Social Science and

Medicine, 1979-; reviewer,

Western Journal of Nursing

Research, 1979-; Editorial

Board member, Advances in

Nursing Science, 1982-; Editorial

Board member, Health

Care for Women International,

1985-; Editorial Board member,

Scholarly Inquiry for Nursing

Practice, 1986-; reviewer,

Scandinavian Journal of Caring

Sciences, 1988-; reviewer,

Nursing Outlook, 1989-; reviewer,

Journal of Professional

Nursing, 1996-; Editorial

Board member, Transcultural

Nursing Journal, 1997-; reviewer,

Research in Nursing

and Health, 1997-; Editorial

Board member, Clinical Inquiry,

1997-; reviewer, Women

and Health, 1998-; Editorial

Board member, Latin American

Journal of Nursing, 2000-

Miaskowski, Christine A. (PN)

Associate Editor, Journal of Pain

and Sympton Management,

1995-; reviewer, Image, 1995-;

Associate Editor, Cancer Nursing,

1996-; Editor, Pain Management

Nursing, 1999-; Associate

Editor, The Journal of Pain,

1999-; Associate Editor, Clinical

Journal of Pain, 1999- Associate

Editor, Nursing Research, 1999-

Mietus-Snyder, Michele L. (PN)

Reviewer, Lipids, 1997-; reviewer,

Journal of Lipid Research,

1998-; reviewer, Atherosclerosis,

Thrombosis, and Vascular

Biology, 1999-

Montini, Theresa (SBS)

Peer reviewer, Social Studies of

Science, 1991-; peer reviewer,

Sociological Perspectives, 1991-;

peer reviewer, Teaching Sociology,

1991-; peer reviewer, Social

Process in Hawaii, 1994-; peer

reviewer, Qualitative Sociology,

1994-; peer reviewer, Gender &

Society, 1996-; peer reviewer,

Social Problems, 1996-; peer

reviewer, American Sociological

Review, 2001-; peer reviewer,

Journal of General Internal

Medicine, 2001-

Mullan, Joseph T. (SBS)

Reviewer, Research on Aging,

2001

Newcomer, Robert (SBS/IHA)

Ad hoc referee, Journals of

Gerontology, 1973-; ad hoc

referee, The Gerontologist,

1984-; ad hoc referee, Health

Care Financing Review, 1985-;

ad hoc referee, Health Services

Research, 1985-; ad hoc referee,

Journal of Applied Gerontology,

1986-; ad hoc referee,

Research on Aging, 1992-; ad

hoc referee, Journal of Aging

and Social Policy, 1997-; ad

hoc referee, International Journal

of Health Services, 1997-;

ad hoc referee, American Journal

of Managed Care, 1997-;

ad hoc referee, Medical Care,

2000-; ad hoc referee, Health

Affairs, 2000-


Norbeck, Jane S. (CHS)

Editorial Board member, Research

in Nursing and Health, 1987-; Advisory

Board member, Annual Review

of Nursing Research, 1992-

2002; Editorial counsel, Revista da

Escola de Enfermagem, 1997-;

Associate Editor, Nursing and

Health Sciences (Yamaguchi University,

Ube, Japan), 1998-2002

Padilla, Geraldine V. (PN)

Editorial Board member, Journal

of Nursing Measurement, 1992-;

Editorial Board member, Arthritis

Care and Research, 1995-; Associate

Editor, Quality of Life Research,

1998-

Portillo, Carmen J. (CHS)

Reviewer, International Journal of

Nursing Studies, 1994-; reviewer,

Families, Systems & Health: The

Journal of Collaborative Family

Health Care, 1996-; Editorial

Board member, Journal of

Transcultural Nursing, 1998-; reviewer,

Journal of the Association of

Nurses in AIDS Care, 1999-

Puntillo, Kathleen A. (PN)

Editorial Board member, Heart &

Lung, 1993-; Editorial Board

member, American Journal of

Critical Care, 1996-; manuscript

reviewer, Research in Nursing

and Health, 2001-

Rankin, Sally H. (FHCN)

Review Board member, Western

Journal of Nursing Research, 1995-

; Editorial Board member, Clinical

Excellence for Nurse Practitioners,

1995-; Review Board member,

Heart and Lung: The Journal of

Critical Care, 1996-; Review Board

member, Family Systems and

Health, 1996-; Review Board member,

Progress in Cardiovascular

Nursing, 1997-

Scott, Mary B. (PN)

Peer reviewer, ANNA Journal,

1999-

Seago, Jean Ann (CHS)

Reviewer, International Journal of

Nursing Studies, 1997-; reviewer,

Drug and Alcohol Dependence,

1998-; manuscript reviewer, HSR:

Health Services Research, 2001-;

manuscript reviewer, Journal of

Clinical Anesthesia, 2001-; textbook

reviewer, Lippincott, 2001-

Stannard, Daphne E. (PN)

Manuscript reviewer, Critical

Care Nurse, 1993-; contributing

Editor for Family Care, Critical

Care Nurse, 2001-; book reviewer/manuscript

reviewer,

American Journal of Critical

Care, 1995-; manuscript reviewer,

Journal of Cardiovascular

Nursing, 1995-; manuscript

reviewer, Heart & Lung, 2001-

Stewart, Anita L. (IHA)

Reviewer, Journal of the American

Medical Association, 1994-

2001; reviewer, Annals of Behavioral

Medicine, 1996-2001; reviewer,

Age and Ageing, 2001,

reviewer, American Heart Journal,

2001; reviewer, Preventive

Medicine, 2001; reviewer, Psychosomatic

Medicine, 2001;

guest Editor, Journal of Mental

Health and Aging, 2000-2001

Stotts, Nancy A. (PN)

Manuscript reviewer, American

Journal of Critical Care, 1992-;

expert reviewer, Journal of

Wound, Ostomy, and Continence

Nursing, 1995-; Editorial Board

member, Advances in Skin and

Wound Care, 2000-; manuscript

reviewer, Journal of Korean

Academy of Nursing, 2000-

Taylor, Diana L. (FHCN)

Editorial Review Board member,

The American Journal of Obstetrics

& Gynecology, 1991-; Editorial

Board member, Clinical Excellence

for Nurse Practitioners:

International Journal, 1996-;

manuscript reviewer, Journal of

Women’s Health Care International,

1996-; manuscript reviewer,

Journal of Women’s

Health, 1999-

Wallhagen, Margaret I. (PN)

Reviewer, Age and Ageing,

1997-; reviewer, Heart and

Lung, 2000-

Waters, Catherine M. (CHS)

Manuscript reviewer, Western

Journal of Nursing Research,

1997-; manuscript reviewer,

Clinical Nursing Research: An

International Journal, 1997-

Study Sections

Chesla, Catherine A. (FHCN)

Reviewer, Nursing Research

Study Section, NIH Center for

Scientific Review, 2001

Dibble, Suzanne L. (IHA)

Reviewer, National Center for

Complementary & Alternative

Medicine, 2001

Estes, Carroll L. (SBS/IHA)

Reviewer, National Science

Foundation, 2000-2001

Facione, Noreen C. (PN)

Proposal reviewer, The Cancer

Research Campaign Psychosocial

Research Committee, London,

2001; proposal reviewer,

Cooperative agreement RFA:

Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer,

Centers for Disease Control,

2001; grant reviewer, Cooperative

agreement Interdisciplinary

Faculty Development in Genetics,

Health Resources Services

Administration (HRSA), Bureau

of Health Professions, Division of

Nursing, PHS, 2001

Faucett, Julia (CHS)

Reviewer, Ad hoc Study Section,

Agricultural Center Health and

Safety Center, 2001

Fox, Patrick (IHA)

Proposal reviewer, California

Department of Health Services,

Chronic Disease Control Branch,

Alzheimer’s Disease Program

Research Review Panel, 2001

Holzemer, William L. (CHS)

Ad hoc reviewer, NIH-ZRG1

RPHB-4 02R, Adherence RFA

Study Section, 2001; member,

Scientific Advisory Committee,

Center for Vulnerable Populations,

UCLA, 2000-2005; non-

UK adviser, Research Assessment

Exercise, Higher Education

Funding Council for England,

2001; member, Objective

Review Committee, SPNS 2001

Outreach Initiative, HIV/AIDS

Ryan White, 2001-2006; member,

Scientific Advisory Committee,

Center for Evidence Based

Nursing Practice for the

Underserved, Columbia University,

NY, 2001-2006; reviewer,

2002-2003 U.S. Fulbright Applications,

Council for International

Exchange of Scholars, 2001

58

Kaufman, Sharon R. (SBS/IHA)

Ad hoc reviewer, NIH Human

Development and Aging, 1998-

Kennedy, Christine (FHCN)

Reviewer, Children and Families

First Commissioned

Grants, 1999-

Kennedy, Holly P. (FHCN)

Member, Nursing Study Section,

NIH National Center for Nursing

Research, CSR, 2001; member,

Special Emphasis Panel, NIH

National Institute of Nursing

Research, CSR, 2001

Lee, Kathryn A. (FHCN)

Study Section member, NIH

National Institute of Nursing

Research Initial Review Group,

1998-

Malone, Ruth E. (SBS)

Member, Scientific Review

Panel, Emergency Nurses Association

Foundation Grants

Program and ENAF/ACEP

Grants, 1998-

Miaskowski, Christine A. (PN)

Ad hoc reviewer, Study Section,

NIH National Institute of Nursing

Research, 2000-

Mullan, Joseph T. (SBS)

Reviewer, Alzheimer’s Association

(National), 2001; reviewer,

Alzheimer’s Association

(Oregon Small Research

Grants Program), 2001

Newcomer, Robert (SBS/IHA)

Member, Special Emphasis

Panel, Agency for Healthcare

Research & Quality, 2001

Padilla, Geraldine V. (PN)

Member, Ovarian Cancer Research

Program Integration

Panel, U.S. Department of Defense

charged with advising on

awards subsequent to scientific

review and developing research

priorities for the DOD Ovarian

Cancer Research Program,

1997-2002

Pinderhughes, Howard L.

(SBS)

Member, National Network for

Applied Research on Violence

Prevention, 2001; member, Advisory

Panel on Research on

Urban High Schools, Spencer

Foundation, 2001


Rankin, Sally H. (FHCN)

Reviewer, Alberta Heritage Foundation

for Medical Research, 2000-

2002

Stewart, Anita L. (IHA)

Site visit reviewer, Special Emphasis

Panel, NIH National Institute on

Aging, 2001

Waters, Catherine M. (CHS)

Grant reviewer, Health Research

Services Administration, Bureau of

Health Professions, Basic & Advanced

Nursing Education, 1998-;

grant reviewer, American Association

of Diabetes Educators, 2001

Panels/Expert

Committees

Benner, Patricia (PN)

Chair, American Academy of Nursing,

1997-

Clarke, Adele E. (SBS)

Member, UC Systemwide Humanities

Commission, 2000-

2001; member, UC Systemwide

Humanities Advisory Committee,

1998-2001

Davies, Elizabeth (FHCN)

Ad hoc reviewer, National Cancer

Institute of Canada, 1996-; Steering

Committee member,

Children’s International Project

on Palliative/Hospice Services

(ChiPPS), National Hospice and

Palliative Care Organization,

1996-; ad hoc reviewer, Medical

Research Council of Canada,

1997-; Chair, Subcommittee on

Psychosocial/Spiritual/Bereavement

Issues in Pediatric Palliative

Care, National Hospice and

Palliative Care Organization,

1998-; panel member, End of Life

Nursing Education Consortium –

Pediatric Version, 2001-; Chair,

Palliative Care for Children Subcommittee,

International Work

Group on Death, Dying & Bereavement,

2001-; member, California

Hospice & Palliative Care

Association, Pediatric Palliative

Care Task Force, 2001-; Expert

Panel member, American Academy

of Nursing End-of-Life Issues,

2001-; Expert Panel member,

American Academy of Nursing

Maternal-Child Health, 2001-

Dibble, Suzanne L. (IHA)

Consultant, Missoula Demonstration

Project – The Quality

of Life’s End, 1996-

Dodd, Marylin J. (PN)

Member, Expert Panel – Neutropenia,

Oncology Nursing

Society, 2000-2002; member,

Scientific Subgroup Research

Advisory Panel, Oncology

Nursing Society, 2001-2003;

proposal reviewer for small

grants program, Sigma Theta

Tau, Alpha Eta, 2001; reviewer

of research abstracts and small

grants, International Society of

Nurses in Cancer Care, 2000-

Dowling, Glenna A. (PN)

Member, Parkinson Disease

Agenda Implementation Review,

2002

Dracup, Kathleen (DO)

Member, Task Force on Strategic

Research Direction: Population/

Epidemiology/Outcomes/Behavioral

Science Subgroup, American

Heart Association, 2001

Drew, Barbara J. (PN)

Member, Board of Directors,

Western States Affiliate, American

Heart Association, 2000-

2003; member, Professional

Education Committee, Western

States Affiliate, American Heart

Association, 2000-2003; member,

Strategic Planning Committee,

Western States Affiliate,

American Heart Association,

2000-2003; member, Board of

Directors, The International

Society for Computerized

Electrocardiology, 2000-2003;

member, Nominations Committee,

The International Society for

Computerized Electrocardiology,

2001-2003; member, Budget,

Finance, and Awards Committee,

The International Society for

Computerized Electrocardiology,

2001-2003

Duderstadt, Karen (FHCN)

Member, Program Review Committee,

National Certification

Board of Pediatric Nurse Practitioners

& Nurses, 1998-2003

Engler, Marguerite M. (PN)

Member, American Heart Association

Scientific Sessions,

Council on Cardiovascular

Nursing Program Committee,

2000-2003

Engler, Mary B. (PN)

Member, Expert Panel on Translational

Genomics, American

Heart Association, 2001-

Estes, Carroll L. (SBS/IHA)

Member, Geriatric Interdisciplinary

Team Training, National

Advisory Board, 1998-;

member, NASI Medicare

Panel, 2001-2002

Fox, Patrick (IHA)

Social research member,

Alzheimer’s Disease and Related

Disorders Advisory Committee,

State of California Health and

Human Services Agency, 2001;

member, California Arthritis

Partnership Program Advisory

Committee, California Department

of Health Services, 2001;

member, Executive Committee,

California Work Group on

Guidelines for Alzheimer Disease

Management, 2001; member,

California Alzheimer Disease

Guideline Revision

Workgroup, 2001; member, California

Health and Human Services

Agency, Long-Term Care

Council, Assessment and Transition

Workgroup, 2001; reviewer,

California Health Care Foundation,

Program for Elders in External

Managed Care, UCLA – San

Diego Alzheimer’s Disease Collaborative

Site Visit Care Initiative,

2001; member, Advisory

Council of the California Heart

Disease and Stroke Prevention

Program, California Department

of Health Services, 2001; member,

Advisory Committee for

Improving Access to Mental

Health Services for People with

Alzheimer’s Disease, California

Health and Human Services

Agency, 2001; invited testimony,

California Legislature, Assembly

Select Committee on Aging, Senate

Subcommittee on Aging and

Long-Term Care, “Long-Term

Care and Residential Care in

California,” 2001

Froelicher, Erika S. (PN)

Elected member, Executive

Committee, Council on Cardiovascular

Nursing, American

Heart Association, 2001

Gillen, Marion (CHS)

Grant reviewer, Special Emphasis

Panel, National Institute for

Occupational Safety and Health,

Centers for Disease Control and

Prevention, 2001

Humphreys, Janice (FHCN)

Member, Expert Advisory Board,

“Intimate Partner Violence

among Pregnant Latinas,”

AHRQ funded project, 2000-

Juarbe, Teresa C. (FHCN)

Member, National/International

Basic Life Support Education

Subcommittee, American Heart

Association, 1998-

Kayser-Jones, Jeanie (PN)

Senior Advisor, The John Hartford

Foundation Institute for

Geriatric Nursing, 1999-; member,

Council on Nutritional Clinical

Strategies, 2000; program

faculty, “Scholars and Fellows

Program,” The John A. Hartford

Foundation for Geriatric Nursing,

2000; member, American

Academy of Nursing, Expert

Panel on Palliative Care, 2000-;

member, National Advisory

Committee, Redevelopment of

Laguna Honda Hospital, 2000-;

Advisory Committee, John A.

Hartford Foundation, American

Academy of Nursing, Building

Academic Geriatric Capacity,

2001-2005

Kennedy, Christine (FHCN)

Chair, Children and Families

First Commission, 2001-

Kennedy, Holly P. (FHCN)

USA representative, Standing

Committee on Research, International

Confederation of Midwives,

2000-; Vice Chair, Division

of Nursing, American College

of Nurse-Midwives, 2000-


Kools, Susan (FHCN)

Board member, California Partnership

for Children, 1994-;

Board member, California

Children’s Mental Health Policy

Board, 1986-

Malone, Ruth E. (SBS)

Member, Nursing and Tobacco

Group, Robert Wood Johnson

Foundation, 2001

Meleis, Afaf I. (CHS)

Member, Expert Panel on International

Health, American Academy

of Nursing, 1993-; Secretary, International

Network on Doctoral Education

Conference, 1999-; President,

International Council on

Women’s Health Issues, 2000-

Miaskowski, Christine A. (PN)

Counselor, International Association

for the Study of Pain, 1996-

2002; President-Elect, American

Pain Society, 1999-2002; member,

Board of Scientific Advisors,

National Cancer Institute, 1999-

2004; President, American Pain

Society, 2002-2003

Mietus-Snyder, Michele L. (PN)

Physician consultant, Northern

California Consortium of High

Schools Dedicated to Substance

Abuse Prevention, 2001-

Montini, Theresa (SBS)

Grant reviewer, Society, Culture,

and Health of Canadians, Social

Sciences and Humanities Research

Council of Canada, 2002-;

grant reviewer, Barbara

Rosenblum Fellowship for Studies

of Women and Cancer, Sociologists

for Women in Society, 2002-; grant

reviewer, Wayne F. Placek Award

for Studies of Sexuality, American

Psychological Association, 2002-;

grant reviewer, Social Conscience

Award, Pacific Sociological Association,

2002-

Newcomer, Robert (SBS/IHA)

Member, Work Group on Assisted

Living, California State

Department of Health Services

Demonstration Development,

2001

Padilla, Geraldine V. (PN)

Consultant, Health and Education

Communication Consultants,

Ovarian Cancer Social Marketing

Project Advisory Panel,

2000-2001; Co-chair, Quality of

Life subgroup for National Cancer

Institute’s Kidney/Bladder

Cancer Progress Review Group

charged with writing a report on

quality of life research priorities

for kidney/bladder cancer, 2001;

member, Nursing Publications

Advisory Board-Neutropenia,

Oncology Nursing Society, 2001

Portillo, Carmen J. (CHS)

Member, Advisory Council,

NIH National Advisory Council

for Nursing Research, 1999-

2003; chair, Selection Committee,

American Academy of

Nursing, 2001-2003

Puntillo, Kathleen A. (PN)

Chairperson, Thunder II Project

Task Force, Study of Procedural

Pain, American Association of

Critical-Care Nurses, 1994-;

member, Robert Wood Johnson

ICU End-of-Life Peer

Workgroup, 1999-

Rankin, Sally H. (FHCN)

Advisory Board member, Duke

University, School of Nursing,

2000-; International Advisory

Board member, Global AIDS

Interfaith Alliance, 2001-; external

reviewer, University of

California-Davis Medical Center,

2001

Seago, Jean Ann (CHS)

Advisory Board member,

CINAHL Information Systems,

1993-

Stewart, Anita L. (IHA)

Member, Expert Advisory

Panel, Centers for Disease Control

funded special interest

project, “Evidence-based outcomes

of exercise in older

adults,” 2001; member, Advisory

Board, Centers for Disease

Control funded project, “Physical

activity as a vital sign for

older adults,” 2001; member,

Expert Panel, Robert Wood

Johnson Foundation, “Physical

activity and the age 50 and older

population,” 2001; member,

Expert Panel, The California

Endowment, “Healthy aging

communities of color,” 2002

Stinson, Janice C. (FHCN)

Navy Reserve, Tri-Service Nursing

Advisory Panel, 2001-

Stotts, Nancy A. (PN)

Board member and Chair of Research

Abstract Review, Association

for the Advancement of

Wound Care, 2001

Taylor, Diana L. (FHCN)

Member, Board of Directors,

Society for Menstrual Cycle Research,

1997-2002; member,

Women’s Health Advisory Board,

Pfizer Co., 1998-; member, Scientific

Panel, Clinical Guidelines

for Cyclic Pelvic Pain, Association

of Women’s Health,

Obstetrics and Neonatal Nursing,

1998-; member, Board of

Directors, Society for Women’s

Health Research, 1999-2003

Wallhagen, Margaret I. (PN)

Appointed member,

Ethnogeriatrics Committee,

American Geriatrics Society and

Committee representative to

Clinical Practice Committee,

1999-; appointed member, Advisory

Board, National Center on

Caregiving, 2001

Waters, Catherine M. (CHS)

Commission member, African

American Community Outreach

Commission, American

Heart Association, Western

States, 2001-

60


Non-NRSA Student Awards

2001-2002

Student Program Funding Agency

Lisa Adamek MS Mary Opal Wolanin

Lynette Apen MS American Cancer Society

Susan Ault MS American Cancer Society

Karen Ayers MS American Association of Critical Care Nurses

Nicole Barr MS Osher Family Foundation

Ann Bispo MS Comm. Hospital of the Monterey Peninsula

Kristin Cates MEPN Kaiser Permanente, Sumasil Foundation

Joyce Chan PhD John A. Hartford Foundation

Shawna Chrisman MS Ronald McDonald House Charities

Jaqueline Da Silva PhD Institute of International Education

Ana Delgado MS Kaiser Permanente

Janet Edrington PhD American Cancer Society

Shari Fisher MS Osher Family Foundation

Victoria Floriani MEPN Lindberg Scholarship

Jennifer Galgano MS U.S. Airforce

Christopher Ganchoff PhD(Soc) Citizens Scholarship Foundation

Joanna Hauser MEPN Tempkin Scholarship

Anne Hughes PhD American Cancer Society

Ji-Soo Huong MS Department of Veterans Affairs

Gina Jamero MS American Association of Critical Care Nurses

Kathryn Johnson MS American Association of Critical Care Nurses

Apinya Jumpamool PhD Thai Government

Petrice Kam MEPN Dean’s Scholarship

Maria Katapodi PhD Raises Scholarship

Kathleen Kunis MS American Association of Critical Care Nurses

Lynette Landry PhD AAOHN Foundation Research Award

Thomas Lata MS American Association of Critical Care Nurses

Joanna Leonard MEPN Dean’s Scholarship

Jean Luong MS Osher Family Foundation

Sherry McGillis MS Lanctot Fund

Theresa Mallick MS Sequoia Hospital

Janice Mandac-Dy MEPN Dean’s Scholarship

Shirley Manly-Lampkin PhD National Cancer Institute (U.S. Department of H&HS)

Suthida Masuthon PhD Thai Government

Lisa Mihaly MEPN Kirsch Scholarship

Jill Nierman MS Osher Family Foundation

Colleen O’Leary-Kelley PhD Department of Veterans Affairs

Mary Owen MS AAOHN Foundation Academic Scholarship Award

Natalia Rabovsky MEPN Lindberg Scholarship

Deborah Roy MS U.S. Navy

Katherine Rhodes MS Scholarship Foundation of Santa Barbara

Elizabeth Ruben MS Health Professions Education Foundation

Dana Schwartz MS Osher Family Foundation

Ai-Shan Shih PhD Leone Scholarship

Sandra Staveski MS American Association of Critical Care Nurses

Margaret Sullivan MEPN Lindberg Scholarship

Xiomara Turok MEPN Dean’s Scholarship

Mary-Ann Van Dam PhD HSCIN: Health Sciences GR

Laura Warren MS Osher Family Foundation

Piera Wong MS Murphy Scholarship

nrsa and other awards

2001-2002

Predoctoral

Ellen Butensky

Altered Iron Metabolism in

Children with HIV

*(Christine Miaskowski)

Leslie Cragin

Nurse-Midwifery Care to Women

at Risk of Low Birthweight

(Afaf Meleis)

Dawn Dailey

Stress, Coping, and Birth Outcomes

Among Black Women

(Jane Norbeck)

Huong Nguyen

Internet Support for Dyspnea

Self-Management

(Virginia Carrieri-Kohlman)

Deborah Norton

Parental Modeling and Health

Behavior in Preadolescents

(Catherine Waters)

Colleen O’Leary-Kelley

Nutritional Adequacy in Mechanically

Ventilated Patients

(Kathleen Puntillo)

Sara Shostak

Disciplinary Emergence in the

Environmental Health Sciences,

1940-2000

(Adele Clarke)

Claire Sommargren

The Electrocardiogram in Subarachnoid

Hemorrhage

(Barbara Drew)

Gretchen Summer

The Management of Burn Pain

and Related Stress Responses

(Kathleen Puntillo)

*Faculty sponsor listed in parentheses


SPECIAL STUDIES &

POSTDOCTORAL

SCHOLARS

2001-2002

Usa Chuahorm

Faculty of Nursing, Burapha University,

Thailand

Area of study: Research in childbirth

education

*(Holly Kennedy)

Hui-Min Chuang

Nurse Manager, Tri Service General

Hospital, Taiwan

Area of study: Complementary approaches

within the scope of nursing

practice

(Susan Janson)

Evelyn Crouch-Ruiz

Associate Professor, University of

Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico

Area of study: HIV/AIDS training

grant

(William Holzemer)

Diane Drake

Los Altos, California

Area of study: Symptom management

training grant

(Kathryn Lee)

Vivian Gedaly-Duff

Portland, Oregon

Area of study: Symptom management

training grant

(Kathryn Lee)

Celine Gelinas

PhD(c), Quebec, Canada

Area of study: Critical care

(Kathleen Puntillo)

Francesca Grousis

Fresno, California

Area of study: Leadership education

in adolescent health

training program

(Erica Monasterio)

Diane Hughes

Portola Valley, California

Area of study: Oncology nursing

(Noreen Facione)

Bruncelia Hynson

San Francisco, California

Area of study: Occupational

and environmental health nursing

(Barbara Burgel)

Luanne Linnard-Palmer

San Rafael, California

Area of study: Symptom management

training grant

(Kathryn Lee)

Jeannette McHugh

Reno, Nevada

Area of study: Symptom management

training grant

(Kathryn Lee)

Leslie Mofrad

Richmond, California

Area of study: Contraceptives

and teenager gynecological

needs

(Lisa Lommel)

Maria Otura

San Francisco, California

Area of study: Critical care/

trauma nursing

(Kathleen Puntillo)

Paulina Patterson

San Leandro, California

Area of study: Symptom management

training grant

(Kathryn Lee)

Barbara Prainsack

PhD(c), University of Vienna,

Austria

Area of study: American bioethics

(Adele Clarke)

Michele Pritchard

Cordova, Tennessee

Area of study: Pediatric oncology

(Betty Davies)

Susan Robinson

Sausalito, California

Area of study: Nursing

informatics

(Charles Mead)

Maria Rosa

Dean and Graduate Department

Nursing Professor, University of

Puerto Rico, Puerto Rico

Area of study: HIV/AIDS training

grant

(William Holzemer)

Gyeong Ae Seomun

Research Faculty, Korea University,

Korea

62

Area of study: Nursing administration

(Jean Ann Seago)

Jaratsri Theerakulchai

Assistant Professor, Mahidol

University, Chiang Mai, Thailand

Area of study: Women’s health

(Kathryn Lee)

Rosie Valdez

Spokane, Washington

Area of study: HIV/AIDS training

grant

(William Holzemer)

Shiao-pei Wang

Nurse, Nephrology Ward, National

Taiwan University, Taiwan

Area of study: Gerontological

nursing

(Margaret Wallhagen)

*Faculty sponsor listed in parentheses


nursing

alumni association

scholarship awardees

2001-2002

Jennifer Jo Averill

MS/Midwifery

Neelam Chandra

PhD Program

Diana Dukhovny

MS/Family Nurse Practitioner

Yoshimi Fukuoka

PhD Program

Saleema Hashwani

PhD Program

Hsin-Tien Hsu

PhD Program

Min Sohn

PhD Program

Nimaljeet Kavr Tarango

MS/Gerontology Nurse Practitioner

Leigh Thurmond

MS/Family Nurse Practitioner

Joachim Voss

PhD Program

Lai Har Wu

PhD Program

Akemi Yamazaki

PhD Program

doctoral

dissertations

2001-2002

Mary G. Adams

Effect of Body Position on the

12-lead Electrocardiogram

(Barbara Drew)

Pratima Bhuttarowas

Symptom Experience and Behavioral

Responses to Symptoms

among First Generation

Thai Immigrant Midlife Women

(Kathryn Lee)

Janet Elizabeth Boller

The Ecology of Exercise: An

Interpretive Phenomenological

Account of Exercise in the

Lifeworld of Persons on Maintenance

Hemodialysis

(Patricia Benner)

Aeran Cho

Understanding the Lived Experience

of Heart Transplant Recipients

in North America and

South Korea, An Interpretive

Phenomenological Cross-Cultural

Study

(Patricia Benner)

Peggy Walsh Goebel

Fathers’ Touch in Low

Birthweight Infants

(Sandra Weiss)

Helen R. Higby

The Characterization of Frailty

in the Elderly: Perceptions of

Older Adults and their Primary

Caregivers

(Laura Reif)

Eufemia Jacob

Pain in Children with Sickle

Cell Anemia

(Christine Miaskowski)

Martha Anne Jessup

Extrinsic Barriers to Substance

Abuse Treatment among Pregnant

Drug Dependent Women

(Kathryn Lee)

Akiko Kobayashi

A Robust Mucosal Immune

Response is Present in the Cervix

with High-Grade Dysplasia

and is Altered in the HIV-positive

Population

(Christine Miaskowski)

Autchareeya Patoomwan

Living with Childhood Cancer

in Thai Families: Stories of

Struggling with Uncertainty

(Susan Kools)

Michele M. Pelter

What are the Frequency and

Consequences of Transient

Myocardial Ischemia in the

Telemetry Unit Setting Detected

with Continuous 12-

Lead Electrocardiographic

Monitoring?

(Barbara Drew)

Rosemary K. Plank

Successful Aging, Desire to

Change the Past,

Counterfactual Thought

(Margaret Wallhagen)

Teresa Scherzer

Division of Labor, or Labor

Divided?: Health Care Workers,

Health Care Work, and

Labor-Management Relations

(Howard Pinderhughes)


Master’s

Theses

2001-2002

Janet M. Edrington

Evidence for a Gender Bias in

the Treatment of Cancer Pain

*(Christine Miaskowski)

Deborah Ann Frederick

The Weaning Continuum Model

Applied to a Sample of Long-

Term Mechanically Ventilated

Patients

(Virginia Carrieri-Kohlman)

Gail L. McGlothlen

Does the Severity of Cancer

Pain Affect Patient Outcomes?

(Christine Miaskowski)

Jeanne Marguerite Sears

The Relationship between

Health Locus of Control and

Mammography Intentions in

Older Low-Income Latinas

Overdue for Rescreening

(Mary White)

Susan Union

The Effect of Dyspnea Education

and Three Doses of Exercise

on the Attainment of the

“Minimal Clinical Important

Difference” on the Chronic Respiratory

Disease Questionnaire

(Virginia Carrieri-Kohlman)

t32

Scholars

HIV/AIDS Nursing Care

and Prevention,

T32NR07081

William L. Holzemer (PI)

Predoctoral Fellows

Fang-Yu Chou

Margaret Cashen

Steve Rush

Maureen Shannon

Dean Wantland

Postdoctoral Fellows

Rosie Valdez

t32 Nursing Research

Training in

Symptom

Management,

T32NR07088

Kathryn A. Lee (PI)

Predoctoral Fellows

Kathleen Beebe

Harvey Davis

DorAnne Donesky Cuenco

Alison Kris

Denise Li

Julie Roberts

Postdoctoral Fellows

Diane Drake

Vivian Gedaly-Duff

Luanne Linnard-Palmer

Jeannette McHugh

Occupational &

Environmental

Health

Nursing Program,

T42CCT910427

Julia Faucett (SF PI)

Masters Fellows

Charlotte Andreason

Edith Barnica

Dorit Bertschart

Irina Foxman

Diantha Lee Fullmer

Kelly April Gelenter

Elaina Huong

Bruncelia Hynson

Jason Libby

Janheen Pascual

Be Thi Ashley Pham

Claudia Praglin

Cathrine Prosser

Rosanna Segovia-Bain

Evelyn Wong

Doctoral Fellow

Lynette Landry

R01 Supplement

William L. Holzemer (PI)

Postdoctoral Fellows

Evelyn Crouch

Maria Rosa

64

The John A. Hartford

Center of Geriatric

Nursing

Excellence at UCSF

Jeanie Kayser-Jones (PI)

Predoctoral Fellows

Joyce Chan

Diane Norcio

Postdoctoral Fellows

Alison Kris

Charon Pierson

Nancy Stotts

*Faculty sponsor listed in parentheses


Board of

Overseers

Members

Dianne Fukami

Chair

Eunice Azzani

Ernest Bates

Lydia Cameron

Kathleen Dracup

Jessica Galloway

Joseph Iacocca

Jay Jackson

Robert Kenneth

Pat Kessler

Brenda Lauer

Science of Caring

is published twice a year for students,

alumni, and friends of the UCSF School of

Nursing and Nursing Alumni Association

and is supported by non-state funds.

©2002 UC Regents

University Publications #4928 6/02

Editor Jeff Miller

Contributors Jeff Miller

Camille Mojica Rey

Design Andrew Boettcher

Photography Chris T. Anderson

Bruce Cook

Robert Foothorap

Kaz Tsuruta

San Francisco Convention

& Visitors Bureau

Advertisements reproduced

on pages 10-12 courtesy of

California Department of

Health Services

Project Coordinator Pat Newman

Editorial Board Dean’s Council

Nursing Alumni Association

Zina Mirsky

Maridel Moulton

Mary Piper

Paul Stewart

Margaret Thorburn

Dale Tillery

David Wallace

Charter members

Shirley Chater

James Livingston

Helen Ripple

School of Nursing

University of California, San Francisco

San Francisco, CA 94143

415/476-1805

Website: http://nurseweb.ucsf.edu

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