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THE GOD–MAN - eTheses Repository - University of Birmingham

THE GOD–MAN - eTheses Repository - University of Birmingham

THE GOD–MAN - eTheses Repository - University of

THE GOD–MAN AN ENGAGEMENT WITH THE THEOLOGY OF ATHANASIUS OF ALEXANDRIA, ITS GENESIS AND IMPACT by ANDREW ROBERT TEAL A thesis submitted to The University of Birmingham for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Department of Theology School of Historical Studies The University of Birmingham Ash Wednesday, 1 st March 2006

  • Page 2 and 3: University of Birmingham Research A
  • Page 4 and 5: Dedicated in gratitude to Frances Y
  • Page 6 and 7: Teaching has proved to be an invalu
  • Page 8 and 9: TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION.....
  • Page 10 and 11: 5.4.3 Athanasius in Cyril’s Again
  • Page 12 and 13: LXX Septuagint. Editio minor: duo v
  • Page 14 and 15: INTRODUCTION a. The subject of this
  • Page 16 and 17: enormity of the contrast between th
  • Page 18 and 19: Frances Young’s challenging 1997
  • Page 20 and 21: miahypostatic Christology - especia
  • Page 22 and 23: By focusing upon Athanasius’s imp
  • Page 24 and 25: presented with many variations in s
  • Page 26 and 27: CHAPTER ONE: A CONSTRUCT AND ITS OR
  • Page 28 and 29: Three figures from the history of e
  • Page 30 and 31: (Anatolios, 2001:463, 465, 469). A
  • Page 32 and 33: The quasi-materialistic description
  • Page 34 and 35: in an example from Irenaeus which,
  • Page 36 and 37: through which Plato was read in lat
  • Page 38 and 39: In Timaeus, time is a function of c
  • Page 40 and 41: eing conducive to Christian self-ex
  • Page 42 and 43: gulf, which Gnostic theology exploi
  • Page 44 and 45: In this schema, the symbol between
  • Page 46 and 47: above. 14 Plato’s argument refuse
  • Page 48 and 49: ontologically, not in terms of a br
  • Page 50 and 51: soul’s plumage nourished and fost
  • Page 52 and 53:

    juxtaposed with an assertion that t

  • Page 54 and 55:

    practice) of Tertullian, 41 Justin

  • Page 56 and 57:

    Descriptions of the philosophical w

  • Page 58 and 59:

    ack to God by the Son. 50 It is, al

  • Page 60 and 61:

    with descriptions of the Logos whic

  • Page 62 and 63:

    personally or regarding the particu

  • Page 64 and 65:

    Justin’s very different view of t

  • Page 66 and 67:

    the issue of creatio ex nihilo Just

  • Page 68 and 69:

    Justin’s Christocentric methodolo

  • Page 70 and 71:

    new beginning. The restoration of a

  • Page 72 and 73:

    econnecting anthropology and cosmol

  • Page 74 and 75:

    signifies that the graceful and com

  • Page 76 and 77:

    adical freedom of God to love creat

  • Page 78 and 79:

    of the doctrine of LÒgoj spšrmati

  • Page 80 and 81:

    dimensions of Justin’s descriptio

  • Page 82 and 83:

    to the Hebrew prophets, 150 and to

  • Page 84 and 85:

    those of an artist or sculptor. 157

  • Page 86 and 87:

    there is evidence of ecclesiologica

  • Page 88 and 89:

    Zizioulas’s description might ben

  • Page 90 and 91:

    to Christ in some detail. There is

  • Page 92 and 93:

    from obedience is cast in Aristotel

  • Page 94 and 95:

    Irenaean connection. Citing a text

  • Page 96 and 97:

    emergence of creatio ex nihilo as a

  • Page 98 and 99:

    good-pleasure of the Father, the So

  • Page 100 and 101:

    true God. He refines desciption of

  • Page 102 and 103:

    The diverse and speculative thought

  • Page 104 and 105:

    detractors. 201 Celsus’s choice o

  • Page 106 and 107:

    estricted merely to his later, Leva

  • Page 108 and 109:

    ignorance should not be taken for C

  • Page 110 and 111:

    is most devoid of stable and determ

  • Page 112 and 113:

    arrogantly confident “natural”

  • Page 114 and 115:

    as unhindered, active care, if not

  • Page 116 and 117:

    Traces of that Holy Spirit who appe

  • Page 118 and 119:

    experiment and exploration, and for

  • Page 120 and 121:

    We now ask God to assist us through

  • Page 122 and 123:

    Then they desire to collect materia

  • Page 124 and 125:

    The embodied experience of creature

  • Page 126 and 127:

    Despite accusations of subordinatio

  • Page 128 and 129:

    nearer to aspects of primitive Chri

  • Page 130 and 131:

    1:6 Conclusions: Arguments, Assumpt

  • Page 132 and 133:

    and created nature being held in Ch

  • Page 134 and 135:

    PART TWO THE CHRISTOCENTRIC RELATIO

  • Page 136 and 137:

    Athanasius shares with Irenaeus a c

  • Page 138 and 139:

    Moreover, Dräseke's remains a lone

  • Page 140 and 141:

    By itself this remains a somewhat i

  • Page 142 and 143:

    later works. A Sitz im Leben in the

  • Page 144 and 145:

    a shared substance. It is to that n

  • Page 146 and 147:

    “figurative” (tropikîj) paradi

  • Page 148 and 149:

    to communion with God as creation's

  • Page 150 and 151:

    The process of pagan apotheosis is

  • Page 152 and 153:

    change. In a passage which is as po

  • Page 154 and 155:

    This discussion of CG celebrates th

  • Page 156 and 157:

    their worship and deification (qeop

  • Page 158 and 159:

    contemplate (qewre‹) as in a mirr

  • Page 160 and 161:

    For Athanasius, the nature of God a

  • Page 162 and 163:

    The cosmology of CG is the means wh

  • Page 164 and 165:

    participant, but remains transcende

  • Page 166 and 167:

    which might still allow the Logos t

  • Page 168 and 169:

    2.4: The Incarnate Logos and Mediat

  • Page 170 and 171:

    our realm (e„j t¾n ¹metšran c

  • Page 172 and 173:

    healing of the diseased) are epipha

  • Page 174 and 175:

    subject to the passions of the body

  • Page 176 and 177:

    CHAPTER THREE ARIAN READINGS OF “

  • Page 178 and 179:

    The battles between Arius and his o

  • Page 180 and 181:

    discerned in Arius’s emphasis upo

  • Page 182 and 183:

    “necessary,” he did provoke his

  • Page 184 and 185:

    of bridging this ontological gulf,

  • Page 186 and 187:

    targeted refutation of dyohypostati

  • Page 188 and 189:

    New Testament terms in the defence

  • Page 190 and 191:

    the divine which is without beginni

  • Page 192 and 193:

    genuine goodness. The Son is worthy

  • Page 194 and 195:

    divine reconstitution of all things

  • Page 196 and 197:

    to pursue his reading of Scripture

  • Page 198 and 199:

    and anthropology remain ultimately

  • Page 200 and 201:

    the incarnation, so humans - as cre

  • Page 202 and 203:

    way into us as presence-of-the-Othe

  • Page 204 and 205:

    Hen. Som. claims to preserve Christ

  • Page 206 and 207:

    what was to become that Council’s

  • Page 208 and 209:

    application of creatio ex nihilo in

  • Page 210 and 211:

    is a greater folly than the miahypo

  • Page 212 and 213:

    divine nature, imparts holy underst

  • Page 214 and 215:

    epresentation of traditional pre-Ni

  • Page 216 and 217:

    Father’s whole being and power is

  • Page 218 and 219:

    unbridgeable gulf and the impossibi

  • Page 220 and 221:

    as a Greek de-personalization of Go

  • Page 222 and 223:

    the cwrismÒj or hermeneutical gap,

  • Page 224 and 225:

    human beings are clothed in flesh i

  • Page 226 and 227:

    This would not be possible were the

  • Page 228 and 229:

    There is no room for any subjective

  • Page 230 and 231:

    the Son or Logos is brought in as a

  • Page 232 and 233:

    Though not couched in such contempo

  • Page 234 and 235:

    But it was dyohypostatic theologica

  • Page 236 and 237:

    PART THREE Reception & Resistance:

  • Page 238 and 239:

    assumptions with Apollinarius: Atha

  • Page 240 and 241:

    A Trinitarian Christological readin

  • Page 242 and 243:

    CHAPTER FOUR APOLLINARIUS OF LAODIC

  • Page 244 and 245:

    4.2 Trinitarian theology, mononoeti

  • Page 246 and 247:

    connections by defining more precis

  • Page 248 and 249:

    third exile. But it would seem stra

  • Page 250 and 251:

    construed requires that the Trinity

  • Page 252 and 253:

    construed as referring to the enliv

  • Page 254 and 255:

    and not Trinity - or... impiously b

  • Page 256 and 257:

    connected with the divine nature af

  • Page 258 and 259:

    Christology, e.g., “Neither confo

  • Page 260 and 261:

    change created nature, but in no wa

  • Page 262 and 263:

    moribund identity of undivinized me

  • Page 264 and 265:

    Created by the Father’s will thro

  • Page 266 and 267:

    created existence, because the divi

  • Page 268 and 269:

    Apollinarius provides another résu

  • Page 270 and 271:

    together reckoned to be salvific: t

  • Page 272 and 273:

    Logos, developing Athanasius’s on

  • Page 274 and 275:

    motives. His use of ÐmooÚsioj non

  • Page 276 and 277:

    thoroughly Trinitarian model, clari

  • Page 278 and 279:

    KMP. Apollinarius argues that this

  • Page 280 and 281:

    creatio ex nihilo, he urges an onto

  • Page 282 and 283:

    Raven’s exploration of Apollinari

  • Page 284 and 285:

    neither simply and entirely a whole

  • Page 286 and 287:

    By the seventh century, Cyril was c

  • Page 288 and 289:

    The connections between Athanasius

  • Page 290 and 291:

    This chapter traces Athanasius’s

  • Page 292 and 293:

    defence of Cyril, the collection fa

  • Page 294 and 295:

    impassible in himself as God, never

  • Page 296 and 297:

    ignoring central Christological tex

  • Page 298 and 299:

    the Syriac for tÒmoj 648 or pragma

  • Page 300 and 301:

    5.4.2: Athanasius in Cyril’s De I

  • Page 302 and 303:

    was convinced that he continued Ath

  • Page 304 and 305:

    (ibid., 9f), and offering definitio

  • Page 306 and 307:

    There is no union in the Son and th

  • Page 308 and 309:

    Apollinarian error. For Nestorius,

  • Page 310 and 311:

    God suffered by means of the incarn

  • Page 312 and 313:

    OÙs…a and fÚsij have to be whol

  • Page 314 and 315:

    FÚsij mostly approximates to “na

  • Page 316 and 317:

    ut one PrÒswpon, Jesus Christ. Gra

  • Page 318 and 319:

    though no-where in the Athanasian c

  • Page 320 and 321:

    Language that implied that Mary is

  • Page 322 and 323:

    Transformative as Cyril’s imagery

  • Page 324 and 325:

    Divine immutability, and the issue

  • Page 326 and 327:

    more, and the single living being i

  • Page 328 and 329:

    Athanasius’s use of sun£feia (as

  • Page 330 and 331:

    In CA I & II, it has been observed

  • Page 332 and 333:

    Theodoret of Cyrus will provide a y

  • Page 334 and 335:

    upon the theological achievements o

  • Page 336 and 337:

    (representing the Alexandrian tradi

  • Page 338 and 339:

    Christology is not simply cramming

  • Page 340 and 341:

    6.3 Christology in Theodoret’s Er

  • Page 342 and 343:

    Antiochene qeolog…a prompts Theod

  • Page 344 and 345:

    Marcion. Those who derive from parq

  • Page 346 and 347:

    `O lÒgoj s¦rx gšneto does not th

  • Page 348 and 349:

    Dioscorus). Christian theology expl

  • Page 350 and 351:

    Theodoret accepts the union, but fu

  • Page 352 and 353:

    communication idiomatum with the re

  • Page 354 and 355:

    understanding of the person of Chri

  • Page 356 and 357:

    Melchizedek was dissimilar in many

  • Page 358 and 359:

    Athanasius had done both by applyin

  • Page 360 and 361:

    incarnation, from annunciation to a

  • Page 362 and 363:

    Sun£feia directly links to argumen

  • Page 364 and 365:

    Theodoret’s Christology does not

  • Page 366 and 367:

    grasp the significance of the ultim

  • Page 368 and 369:

    Theodoret’s stress on both nature

  • Page 370 and 371:

    in Athanasius’s own concerns. Mos

  • Page 372 and 373:

    the Christological pericèrhsij by

  • Page 374 and 375:

    thought. In terms of particular con

  • Page 376 and 377:

    soteriological concern (Gregg & Gro

  • Page 378 and 379:

    explicate issues from Athanasius’

  • Page 380 and 381:

    nature. Redemption is constructed a

  • Page 382 and 383:

    8:1 PRIMARY MATERIAL GENERAL 8: Bib

  • Page 384 and 385:

    OPITZ, H.-G., 1938. Athanasius Werk

  • Page 386 and 387:

    SCHWARZ, E., & RIEDINGER, R., (eds)

  • Page 388 and 389:

    NESTORIUS DRIVER, G. R., & HODGSON,

  • Page 390 and 391:

    2004. Christus bei den Vätern: For

  • Page 392 and 393:

    1999. Origeniana Septima. Leuven: P

  • Page 394 and 395:

    CRANMER, T., (ed.), 1969. The Book

  • Page 396 and 397:

    FORD, D. F., 1986. “The Nature of

  • Page 398 and 399:

    HERON, A., 1981. “Homoousios with

  • Page 400 and 401:

    LANE FOX, R., 1986. Pagans and Chri

  • Page 402 and 403:

    2004. The Westminster Handbook to O

  • Page 404 and 405:

    NORRIS, T. J., 1996. Only Life Give

  • Page 406 and 407:

    RUSSELL, N., 1988. “The Concept o

  • Page 408 and 409:

    THOMAS, S. C., 2004. “Anthropolog

  • Page 410 and 411:

    WILLIAMS, R. D., 2000. On Christian

  • Page 412 and 413:

    Post script on the parallel to the

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