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The Cadet. VMI Newspaper. September 30, 1960 - New Page 1 ...

The Cadet. VMI Newspaper. September 30, 1960 - New Page 1 ...

The Cadet. VMI Newspaper. September 30, 1960 - New Page 1

Board Of Visitors Holds Fall Meeting VMI Men In Action At Summer Camps Howard Dyer at Armor Summer Camp. Dyer was one of the top marksmen at Fort Knox, Kentucky. He was among the ten top cadets in the Armor Battalion. VMI Men Make Mark At Summer Camps ; W. CUSTER Summer Gamp, although not a very appealing phrase, again this year brought recognition to the Institute ^through the endurance and skill Exhibited by this year's first classmen who attended the six-week affair. Cadets from colleges all over the country arrived at the respective camps and soon found themselves engaged in intensive training in everything from mine warfare to swimming. The groups underwent individual as well as unit training. During all the training, cadets were graded as individuals and groups. This was done in an effort to substantially increase the number of ratings obtained on each cadet. A superior performance by a cadet was scored atl; a satisfac tory performance, O; and an unsatisfactory performance -1. Camps were divided up into anywhere from 4 to 6 batteries or flights which were part of two battalions. Following were platoons and squads manned by outstanding cadets. Outstanding cadets from the V.M.I, infantry group included: Powell, W. E. (Battle Group): Miller, J. C.- (Outstanding Company); Burmeister, D. H. Phillips S. C. ,Jr. Shuba L. T. (Outstandin Platoon); Expert Rifle Scorers, Wells, I. B., Hill, W. A., and Garrison, G. H. Other outstanding cadets in their branches were: Bickford, J. v., Callander, R, D., Keech, W.H., Kot, M. R., Kurstedt, H. A., LeFon, C. A., Shuba, L. J., Woodfin, J. H., Fout, W. S., McDonald J. R. The two most outstanding cadets in armor were Grazulis, L. A., (continued on page 8) Man On The Stoop M. J. LACY This week's question is: Will there be a third World War, and Why? REX REYNOLDS: Yes, I believe the Comnumists are winning over so many smaller nations that they will soon aUempt tg come to full world domination. GEORGE.BLOOD: No, both the RusjilaQS and Americans are afraid to Ui>«) nuclear weapons and modem war is imposiiible without them. MAJOR CLARENCE HORTON: With the situation as it is now, ther« will be another world conflict if history repeats itself. BAITLE IL!VSLAM: No, because I know our nation realizeti the possible catastrophic results and Mr. Khrushchev realizes them hixaseU. DAVE GOOTEE: No, because the evoiii\>in|c destruction on both sides would be too great; the couu- tries involved would be knocked off their feet and would never recover. KIT WALZ: If the Republicans stay in there'll sure as Hell be another war. CAPTAIN STACY HARRIS: No, the Ruiisians are afraid of us. If they weren't, they would have attacked long ago. HARRY TATUM: Yes, the history of the world is such that men never profit from their mistakes. GEORGE DE^K: Yes, and it will probably begin on the parade ground in the next week. ED STRICKLER: No. I believe that world leaders know that a nuclear war means the end for everyone. FLIP KOHLHOSS: Yes, due to recent developments, war between the Soviet ynion, the United Stutei^, and . other . principal countries is inevitable. Doug Ballard is shown with his date at one of the dances given for the Artillery ROTC Cadets at summer camp. She is Konna Kay Creed, "Miss Oklahoma of 1960". Curlee and Bell Head OGA Enforcement of Rat line By MIKE CARMICHAEL Jackson Memorial Hall became an election center as the first class privates assembled to cast their ballots for the cadets they wanted the lead this year's version of the Officers of The Guard Association. When the smoke finally cleared away they had elected Harvey Corlee as their new O.G.A. president, and Jack Bell as vice-president. In electing Cadets Curlee and Bell, '61 once again demonstrated that it can repeatedly come up with the men who can get the job done. Harvey Curlee is a physics major from Yorktown, Va. He is a Distinguished Student, Distinguished Military Student, and a member of the American Institute of Physics. Hervey also plays varsity base ball, and is an active participant in company intramurals. Harvey has a fine record both academically and militarily, and should make a fine O.G.A. president. Jack Bell, the new O.G.A. vicepresident, is an Echo Company lad from Oceana, Va. Jack is majoring in Electrical EngiiNeering, which has the reputation of being one of the toughest courses at V.M.I. Jack is a memebr of the American Institute of Electrical Engineers, the International Relations Club, and is also team manager of Echo Company's intramurals. Still he manages to find time for cheerleading, and for playing in every intramural sport offered by the Institute. Even though their election is still recent, Cadets Curlee and Bell, in conjunction with Col. Smith, have already started mapping out this year's O.G.A. program. The plans include a "get tough" policy towards what some laughingly re fer to as the rat line. If this policy is sucessful you may have quite a few rata ask a question similar to the following one when the school year ends next June. "Which was worse in the old corps, resurrections or the O.G.A? This question might recall some HARVEY CURI.EE fond memories for many a first classman who compared the O.G.A. trial with "Sulley's Rangers." The new group of Association officers and representatives will attempt to make the organization one that not only represents the interests of the first class private, but one that also represents the clas of '61 as Brother Rats, (as opposed to Cadet Officers and Cadet privates). At present the O.G.A. is working to obtain General Committee first class privilees for all the Brother Rats of '61, no matter what their class may be academically. The association is also attempting to change an Institute regulation which forces Cadets to attend drill with their academic class instead of their G. C. class. Provided that new Institute regulations and restrictions do not change the primary functions of this year's O.G.A., as they have some other well known Cadet organizations, it should succeed in keeping the laxest rat class in the history of V.M.I, from becoming "one year first classmen", and in keeping this year's first claiismen from having leiw freedom than they did as rats in '57. Today the Board of Visitors of the Virginia Military Institute held their annual fall meeting. Convening at 1000 hours in the Board of Visitors room in new barracks the Board considered regular business and welcomed two new Board members. The increase of board membership from thirteen to fifteen was recently authorized by the Virginia General Assembly and for the first time two out of state members were admitted to the Board. At present the following mea constitute the Board of Visitors: William M. Stokes, Jr. '21, of Lynchburg, Va.; Harry A. De- Butts, '16, of Upperville, Va.; Elmon T. Gray, '48-B, of Waverly, Va.; Giles H. Miller, Jr., '21, of Culpeper, Va.; Mills F. Neal of Richmond, Va.; Sture G. Olsson of West Point, Va.; Robert A. West, '12, of Covington, Va.; Edward M. Almond, '15, of Anniston, Ala.; Scott S. Huger, '22, of Lexinton, Va.; Charles W. Lewis, '24, of New York, N.Y.; Edward H. Ould of Roanoke, Va.; Edmund Pendleton, '26, of WythevUle, Va.; and J. Randolph Tucker, Jr., '37, of Richmond, Va. Ex-officao mem* bers of the Board are Woodro« W. Wilkerson, Virginia Superintendent of Public Instruction, and Paul M. Booth, Adjutant General of Virginia. The two new members of tbe Board, neither of whom are residents of Virginia, are Edward M. Almond and Charles W. Lewis. Lieutenant General Edward li. Almond, U.S. Army, retired in 1953 after 38 years of service. A 1915 graduate of V.M.I., he commanded the 92nd Division in World War II, both in training in this country and in combat in Europe. After the war he became chief of staff to General Mac- Arthur in Tokyo and later commanding general of the Tentli Corps in the Korean War. Follow^ ing his service in Korea, he was appointed commandant of the Army War College. Since retirement he has made his home in Anniston, Alabama. Mr. Charles W. Lewis, a native of Danville, Va., was graduated from V.M.I, in 1924 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in Liberal Arts. The following session he returned to the Institute as an instructor in English and tactical officer. He later entered Yale University School of Law and was graduated from Yale in 1927. His law firm, Townsend and Lewis, has been located in New York since its formation in 1935. A man active in alimuii affairs, he has been a past president of the New York Alumni Chapter, and since June, 1935, has been a member of the Board of Directors of the V.M.I. Foundation, Inc. In addition to his regular law practice and work with the Institute, Mr. Lewis is a director of the General American Oil Company of Texas and a director of tbe New York Cancer Research lUstitute. He has two children, one of whom, Maria, is a student at Hol> lins. This afternoon, following the meeting, the Board of VLiitors received the review of the Corps of Cadets.

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