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Centre for Health,

Medicine and Society:

Past and Present

Periodic Report 2006-2009

School of Arts and Humanities


Oxford Brookes University

Centre for Health, Medicine and Society:

Past and Present

Periodic Review 2006 – 2009


The Centre for Health, Medicine and Society: Past and Present

Tonge Building

Oxford Brookes University

Headington Campus

Oxford OX3 0BP

Tel: 01865 483489

Fax: 01865 483707

email: medhist@brookes.ac.uk

http://ah.brookes.ac.uk/historyofmedicine/


Contents

Periodic Review 2006 – 2009

1. Introduction 1

2. Centre Personnel 4

3. Individual Entries 7

4. Postgraduate Students 66

5. Visitors 74

6. Grants 75

7. Teaching 83

8. Seminars, Workshops and Conferences 84

9. Outreach 92


1. Introduction

This report for the Centre for Health, Medicine and Society: Past and Present at Oxford

Brookes University spans the period from January 2006 to August 2009, which has been

a time of significant development for the Centre. Following a Wellcome Trust

Enhancement Award in 2003, the Centre received a Wellcome Trust Strategic Award in

2007, which provides core support over a five-year period for the medical historians,

enabling them to pursue research in a number of related areas under the designated

overarching theme of the award: ‘Healthcare in Public and Private’. During the period

under review, a number of externally funded projects have been brought to successful

completion and new research projects have been launched, including projects funded by

the Strategic Award.

The research achievements of staff in terms of publications and research dissemination

are reported in section 3. While many of the core staff who were listed in the last report

for the Centre are still in post, there have been a number of important staff changes in

the Centre during the period under review. Dr Glen O’Hara, senior lecturer in Modern

History, came to Oxford Brookes in January 2005 and joined the Centre. Dr Tom Crook

joined the Centre when he came to Oxford Brookes in September 2005, initially on a

short-term contract. This was made permanent at senior lecturer level in May 2007. In

2007 Professor John Stewart, one of the founding members of the Centre, left to

become Professor of Health History at Glasgow Caledonian University and Director of

the Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare in Glasgow. Waltraud Ernst –

formerly Reader in History at the University of Southampton – joined the Centre in

December 2007 as the new Professor in the History of Medicine. In September 2007 we

were also pleased to welcome Dr Anna Maerker, who was appointed to a new post in

the History of Medicine and she is now a senior lecturer. Prior to her appointment, Dr

Maerker was a research fellow at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science in

Berlin. Dr Peter Jones was appointed to a one-year lectureship in the History of

Medicine in September 2008 and this has now been extended for a further year, with

funding from a Wellcome Trust Research Leave Award to Dr Elizabeth Hurren. Before

joining Oxford Brookes he was a Research Fellow on the Westminster Pauper

Biographies Project. Dr Elizabeth Hurren will be taking research leave for the academic

year 2009-10, but she will continue in her important role as Chair of the University

Research Ethics Committee. We are pleased to report that Dr Katherine Watson has

been appointed to a new lectureship in the History of Medicine, with effect from

September 2009. Dr Watson has been a longstanding member of the Centre, first as a

research associate while holding the post of Research Manager for the School of Arts

and Humanities, and then as Postdoctoral Research Fellow from August 2007 to August

2009, funded by a Wellcome Trust Research Leave Award. Dr Sam Sneddon replaced

Dr Watson as Research Manager for the School from September 2007 to February 2009

and during this time she was a research associate of the Centre. Dr Sneddon is now

Research Facilitator for the Division of Social Sciences of the University of Oxford.

In 2007, Drs Viviane Quirke and Marius Turda were appointed to RCUK Academic

Fellowships in Twentieth-century Biomedicine and Pharmaceuticals, and Twentiethcentury

Central and Eastern European Bio-Medicine, respectively. Dr Viviane Quirke

had previously held a Wellcome Trust Research Fellowship and Dr Turda a European

Community Marie Curie Intra-European Award, both at Oxford Brookes. In September

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2009, Drs Alysa Levene and Tim McHugh will have completed a five-year period funded

by a RCUK Academic Fellowship Award and a Wellcome Trust University Award,

respectively, and they will both assume full teaching roles as senior lecturers in the

History Department. Dr Levene was awarded a Brookes Teaching Fellowship in 2009 for

a project on using assessment to bridge the first year transition for undergraduate

students.

The Centre is grateful to the Wellcome Trust for funding a number of postdoctoral

fellowships, and doctoral and master studentships. This Centre now has an active

community of fellows and postgraduate students enrolled on the MPhil/PhD programme

in the History of Medicine. Drs Yolanda Eraso and Ina Scherder started their fellowships

in September 2007, and Dr Kim Price in 2008. Both Drs Eraso and Price had previously

held doctoral studentships in the Centre funded by the Wellcome Trust and the AHRC,

respectively. Dr Scherder joined Oxford Brookes after completing her doctorate at the

University of Trier. From September 2008 to June 2009, Dr Projit Mukharji was a

postdoctoral fellow working with Professor Ernst, funded by a Wellcome Trust grant

transferred from the University of Southampton. Dr Mukharji has now taken up a post at

McMaster University, Canada. Details of the fellowships and studentships are given in

the report.

In addition to postdoctoral research fellows, the Centre has had a number of

postgraduate researchers employed on specific, grant-funded projects. Alison Stringer

has worked as a researcher for Professor Steve King’s Wellcome Trust funded project

on the sick poor in England in the 18th and 19th centuries, and Dr Helen Sweet as a

senior researcher for Professor Anne Digby’s Wellcome Trust funded pilot project on

outreach at McCord Hospital, Durban, KwaZulu-Natal. In July 2009 Dr Tudor Georgescu,

who previously held a Wellcome Trust doctoral studentship in the Centre, commenced

work as a researcher on Dr Marius Turda’s one-year Wellcome Trust funded pilot project

on Romanian eugenics. Dr Anna von Villiez is currently the Research Officer for

Professor Paul Weindling’s three-year AHRC funded project on victims of human

experiments under National Socialism, which started in October 2007. Two AHRC

doctoral studentships are also associated with this award.

During the period under review, the Centre has been host to a number of international

visitors who have come to work on collaborative research projects with staff in the

Centre, in many cases funded by grants made available through the Centre. Professor

Estēe Dvorjetski, a Visiting Professor of Oxford Brookes University since 2004, is a

regular visitor and she will be spending the first semester of the coming academic year

in Oxford. Other international visitors have come from France, India, Japan, Norway,

Romania and the United States. In addition to the connections established with our

visitors, the Centre has a number of research associates whose collective expertise is

greatly valued.

As part of the Strategic Award, the Centre has received funding for an administrator (Dr

Carol Beadle) and a new half-time post of Outreach Officer. In October 2008 we were

pleased to appoint Jane Szele to this post. Jane has extensive experience, gained in the

United States, in academic and museum administration and development. Previous

posts held by Jane before joining the Centre include: consultant at the Harvard Museum

of Natural History; and adviser to the Patan Academy of Health Sciences, Kathmandu,

Nepal. Jane has worked energetically to raise the profile of the Centre by developing an

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outreach programme, and she has also been actively involved in recruitment for the new

History of Medicine degree.

The History Department runs a History of Medicine MA course and also offers a range of

modules in the History of Medicine for the undergraduate programme in History. An

exciting development for the Centre has been the validation in April 2008 of a combined

honours degree in the History of Medicine, and it is now open for recruitment in

September 2010. The course is innovatory in the range and specialism of the modules it

offers, and we are proud of the way that it reflects and shares the research expertise of

the Centre’s staff. We should also like to report on a new PhD training programme in the

History of Medicine, launched in October 2006 and run jointly by staff in the Centre at

Oxford Brookes and the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL, with

the support of the Wellcome Trust.

The past few years have been extremely productive for the Centre in terms of research,

publications, dissemination and outreach, as will be apparent from this report. The

Centre would like to thank the Wellcome Trust for their generous funding and support.

Acknowledgement is also due to the AHRC, the British Academy, the British Council, the

European Union and the Leverhulme Trust for funding a wide range of research projects.

As well as support from external funding bodies, the Centre has received important

funding from the University – from the Central Research Fund – and the Institute of

Historical and Cultural Research, based within the School of Arts and Humanities.

Funding and support from Oxford Brookes is gratefully acknowledged.

For most of the period under review Professor Steve King has been director of the

Centre. At a time when Professor King was also coping with an onerous workload as

Assistant Dean for Research in the School of Arts and Humanities, Professor Anne

Digby acted as co-director, taking on some of the responsibilities for the Centre, and for

a period in 2008, Professor Waltraud Ernst was also director. Staff in the Centre would

like to acknowledge Professor King’s leadership in ensuring the continuing success of

the Centre in teaching, research and outreach work. In October 2009, Professor King will

be leaving Oxford Brookes to become Professor of Economic and Social History in the

School of Historical Studies at the University of Leicester. His colleagues at Oxford

Brookes wish him well in his new post.

CAB – August 2009

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2. Centre Personnel

Academic Staff

Dr Tom Crook

Senior Lecturer in Modern British History

Professor Anne Digby

Research Professor in History

Professor Waltraud Ernst

Professor in the History of Medicine

Dr Elizabeth Hurren

Senior Lecturer in the History of Medicine

Dr Peter Jones

Lecturer in the History of Medicine

Professor Steven King

Professor of History

Dr Alysa Levene

Senior Lecturer in Early Modern History

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Administrative Staff

Dr Carol Beadle

Centre Manager

Dr Anna Maerker

Senior Lecturer in the History of Medicine

Dr Tim McHugh

Wellcome Trust Researcher/Lecturer in the History of

Medicine

Dr Glen O’Hara

Senior Lecturer in Modern History

Dr Viviane Quirke

RCUK Academic Fellow in 20th-century Biomedicine and

Pharmaceuticals

Dr Marius Turda

RCUK Academic Fellow in 20th-century Central and

Eastern European Bio-Medicine

Dr Katherine Watson

Lecturer in the History of Medicine since 1500

Professor Paul Weindling

Wellcome Trust Research Professor in the History of

Medicine

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Jane Szele

Outreach Officer


Postdoctoral Fellows

Dr Yolanda Eraso Wellcome Trust funded (3 years) – start date September 2007

Dr Projit Mukharji Wellcome Trust funded (3 years) – transferred from University

of Southampton; start date at OBU 09/08; left in 07/09 to take

up post in Canada.

Dr Veenu Pant Research Fellow from Jaipur, India – based in Centre 2008-09

Dr Kim Price Wellcome Trust funded (3 years) – start date July 2008

Dr Ina Scherder Wellcome Trust funded (3 years) – start date September 2007

Researchers

Dr Tudor Georgescu Wellcome Trust funded Researcher, start date Spring

2009

Dr Anna von Villiez AHRC funded Project Officer (3 years), start date Autumn

2007

Dr Helen Sweet Wellcome Trust funded Senior Researcher, July 2008 –

November 2008

Alison Stringer Wellcome Trust and OBU funded Researcher, 2005-2009

Professor Estēe Dvorjetski

Visiting Professor

Research Associates

Dr Mike Emanuel Dr Annie Skinner

Georgina Ferry Judy Slinn

John Perkins Dr Sam Sneddon

Dr Tapti Roy

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3. Individual Entries – Academic Staff

Dr Tom Crook

Senior Lecturer in the History of Medicine

Research

History of public health, statistics and administrative ethics, especially as these relate to

the formation of the modern liberal state.

Tom Crook’s main research interests focus on the formation and exercise of modern

liberal governance during the nineteenth century, and in particular:

• the creation and interaction of administrative authority and public sovereignty – in

short, the relations between bureaucracy and democracy;

• the generation of information and the evolution of expert ‘systems’;

• the government and privatisation of bodies and associated techniques (washing,

for instance) and spaces (cubicles);

• the government and conceptualisation of marginal (or ‘pathological’) people,

processes and places – for instance, tramps and prostitutes.

Current projects

Articles on the following: the mid-Victorian debate on the ‘centralisation’ of sanitary

government; the reform and regulation of common lodging houses; and the liberal state

and its toleration of ‘evil’, especially espionage and prostitution.

Publications

‘Craft and the dialogics of modernity: the Arts and Crafts Movement in late-Victorian and

Edwardian England’, Journal of Modern Craft, 2, 1 (2009), 17-32.

‘Accommodating the outcast: common lodging houses and the limits of urban

governance in Victorian and Edwardian London’, Urban History, 35, 3 (2008), 414-436.

‘Norms, forms and beds: spatialising sleep in Victorian Britain,’ Body and Society:

Special Edition on Sleep, 14, 4 (2008), 15-36.

‘Putting matter in its right place: dirt, time and regeneration in mid-Victorian Britain’,

Journal of Victorian Culture, 13, 2 (2008), 200-222.

‘Sanitary inspection and the public sphere in late-Victorian and Edwardian Britain: a case

study in liberal governance’, Social History, 32, 4 (2007), 369-393.

(with Malcolm Crook) ‘The advent of the secret ballot in Britain and France: from

public assembly to private compartment’, History, 92, 308 (2007), 449-471.

‘Power, privacy and pleasure: Liberalism and the modern cubicle’, Cultural Studies, 21,

4/5 (2007), 549-569.

‘“Schools for the moral training of the people”: public baths, liberalism and the promotion

of cleanliness in Victorian Britain’, European Review of History/Revue européenne

d’Histoire, 13, (2006), 21-47.

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Research Dissemination

(with Malcolm Crook) ‘Reforming voting practices in a global age: the making and

remaking of the “Australian ballot” in Britain, France and America’. Presented to the

Groupe d’Analyse Politique (GAP), séminaire de recherche ‘La construction sociale de

l’opération électorale’, 21 January 2009, University of Paris X, Nanterre.

‘Global space and the revenge of the singular: Baudrillard, globalization and violence.’

Presented to the DOSSier event, ‘Violence and Space’, 10 October 2008, Oxford

Brookes University.

‘Suspect figures: Statistics and public trust in Victorian England.’ Presented to the

conference ‘Norms, Numbers and the People: Statistics and the Public Sphere in

Modern Britain, 1750-2000’, 5-6 September 2008, Oxford Brookes University.

‘Modernity’s blind spots: Liberalism and secrecy.’ Presented to the conference

‘Provoking Questions: Patrick Joyce and the Politics of Social and Cultural History’, 27-

28 March 2008, University of Manchester.

‘Liberalism, evil, modernity: towards a research agenda.’ Presented to the workshop

‘Crime, Religion and History’ workshop, 16 January 2008, Oxford Brookes University.

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Professor Anne Digby

Research Professor in History

Research

British social history from the eighteenth century to the present; social history of

medicine and the history of African medicine.

Professor Anne Digby’s research ranges widely over the landscape of British social

history from the eighteenth to twentieth centuries: from schooling and society to the New

Poor Law, agrarian society in the nineteenth century to welfare policy in the twentieth.

However, her primary current interest is in the social history of medicine.

Areas of research include:

• South African medicine;

• medical markets and healthcare systems;

• history of British social policy and welfare;

• history of psychiatry.

Anne Digby and Professor Kay de Villers (retired

surgeon) at the book launch of ‘At the Heart of Healing:

Groote Schuur Hospital’, at the Faculty of Health

Sciences, University of Cape Town, November 2008.

9

Her main research interest is

the medical history of southern

Africa. She has been

particularly interested in

medical pluralism and

interactions between western

and indigenous medicine in

South Africa. Her book,

Diversity and Division in

Medicine: Health Care in South

Africa from the 1800s, was

published in 2006 by Peter

Lang. Professor Digby has

recently completed a project

with historians from the

University of Cape Town on the

history of Groote Schuur

Hospital, funded by a Wellcome

Trust International Collaborative

Research Initiative Award. The

resulting book, At the Heart of

Healing in Cape Town: Groote Schuur Hospital, 1938-2008 (Johannesburg, Jacana),

jointly authored with Howard Phillips, and with the assistance of Harriet Deacon and

Kirsten Thomson, was published in November 2008. Currently, she is beginning to work

on the structural imbalances in recent South African medicine and how and why these

developed historically. Questions to be examined include: Why were so many public and

private resources concentrated in urban areas? How successfully did agencies such as

mission hospitals, health centres and clinics, outreach from institutions (including some

collaboration with healers), and the activities of certain members of the medical and

nursing professions – more especially their black members – modify this in order to

provide services for rural inhabitants?


Publications

‘The global and the local: Groote Schuur Hospital

within a changing South Africa, Lancet, 374, 9692

(2009), 778-779.

At the Heart of Healing in Cape Town: Groote

Schuur Hospital, 1938-2008 (Jacana, November,

2008) Joint author, Howard Phillips. Also with the

assistance of Harriet Deacon and Kirsten

Thomson.

‘Western medicine and witchcraft in South Africa:

initiatives at Victoria Hospital, Lovedale’, in Mark

Harrison and M. Jones (eds), From Western

Medicine to Global Medicine: The Hospital

Beyond the West (Orient Longman, 2008).

‘Vision and vested interests: national health

service reform in South Africa and Britain during

the 1940s and beyond’, Social History of

Medicine, 21, 3 (2008) 485-502.

‘The medical history of South Africa: an overview’,

History Compass, 6, 5 (2008), 1194-1210.

‘Some early black doctors in South Africa’, South African Medical Journal, (2007), 252-3,

345-6, 424-8, 508-9, 577-80.

Medicine, race and the general good: the career of Thomas N. G. Te Water (1857-

1926), South African doctor and medical politician’, Medical History, 51,1 (2007), 37-58.

‘Shaping new identities: general practitioners in Britain and South Africa’, in K. Maynard

(ed.), Medical Identities (Berghahn Books, 2007), pp. 14-35.

Diversity and Division in Medicine: Health Care in South Africa from the 1800s (Peter

Lang, 2006).

‘The economic significance of the National Health Insurance Act of 1911’, in S. Sheard

and M. Gorsky (eds), Financing British Medicine, 1750-2000 (Studies in the Social

History of Medicine, Routledge, 2006).

‘Changing welfare cultures in region and state’, Twentieth Century British History, 17, 3

(2006), 297-322.

‘Self-medication and the trade in medicine with a multi-ethnic context: a case study of

South Africa from the mid-nineteenth to the mid-twentieth centuries’, Social History of

Medicine, 18 (2005), 439-457.

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Research Dissemination

Co-organiser (with Waltraud Ernst and Projit Mukharji) ‘Crossing Colonial

Historiographies: Histories of Colonial and Indigenous Medicines in Transnational

Perspective’, held at St Anne’s College, Oxford, 15-17 September 2008. [Book to be

published by Cambridge Scholars, 2010.]

Conference papers

‘The in-between world of healthcare “middles” in South Africa’. Presented at the

workshop ‘Inside/Outside: Intermediaries, Subordinates and the Practice of Public

Health in the British Empire’, Wellcome Unit for History of Medicine, University of Oxford,

5 June 2009.

‘Nursing in the writing of hospital history’. Presented at the international scientific

colloquium on ‘The History of the Hospital as a Biomedical and Social institution in

Africa’, University of Basel, 3-4 January 2008.

‘Exporting the British hospital model: the South African case’. Presented at the

conference ‘Japanese / British / American Hospitals Conference’, Tokyo, January 2007.

Seminar papers

‘Vision and vested interests: national health service reform in South Africa and Britain

during the 1940s and beyond’, All Souls College, University of Oxford, Economic and

Social History seminar, October 2008.

‘Researching the history of Groote Schuur Hospital’, (joint presentation with Howard

Phillips), University of Cape Town School of Health Sciences, March 2006.

‘Divine drudgery or practice makes perfect?: mission nursing in South Africa’, (joint

presentation with Helen Sweet), Dept of Historical Studies, University of KwaZulu-Natal,

Durban, South Africa, April 2005.

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Professor Waltraud Ernst

Professor in the History of Medicine

Research

History of western science, psychiatry and medicine; inter-relationship between modern

medicine and indigenous healing from the eighteenth to the twentieth century.

Main historical period covered: ca. 1750-2000.

• ‘the body’ and ‘the mind’ in historical, social and cultural context

• Asian medicine, tradition and modernity

• history and culture of alternative medicine in Europe

• history and culture of psychiatry and mental healing

• science, magic and religion in comparative perspective

• historical and cultural constructions of ‘normality’ and ‘abnormality’

• In Professor Ernst’s work on the social history of western medicine and science

ca. 1750 - 2000, she is particularly interested in the inter-relationship between

biomedicine and other paradigms of healing. Applying a multidisciplinary

perspective to research topics and in writing she explores the various dimensions

involved in the construction of what counts as ‘health’, ‘illness’ and

‘medicine/science’ at different times and places: the political/state perspective;

institutions; medical professions and ‘folk’ traditions; the patients’ perspective;

scientific theories and practices; myths, beliefs and representations.

Current Projects

Professor Ernst is completing her

book ‘Mental Illness and

Colonialism. Patients’ Lives and

Discourses of Power During the

Age of British Imperialism in South

Asia, 1800-1947’, which is due to

be published by Manchester

University Press in 2010. She

explores the ways in which the

lives of mentally ill people and

their families were affected by

wider social and political

circumstances during the age of

British imperialism in India and

how their stories in turn reflect the

socio-political context within which

they were set. A close reading of

patients’ cases and their individual

circumstances will be employed.

The intention is to illuminate the

Waltraud Ernst on a visit to an Ayurvedic healing shrine

in India, photographed with a healer and a translator

(August 2009).

relations between the personal, and the social and political, in regard to the main

discourses that engulfed patients and their families.

Professor Ernst is also engaged on a project on ‘Colonial Medicine and Indigenous

Health Practices in Southern and Eastern Princely States of India, ca. 1880-1960’,

funded by a Wellcome Trust International Collaborative Research Initiative grant, with

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two collaborators based in Mumbai/Mysore and Delhi/Orrisa respectively. Many

intriguing questions have been raised since the 1980s on the history and place of

western medicine in South Asia during the age of British colonialism; for example the

role of medicine as a ‘tool of empire’ or ‘water-carrier of colonialism’ has been assessed.

Yet, by focusing their analyses almost exclusively on the areas rendered ‘pink’ on the

contemporary maps of Empire on the Subcontinent, namely on ‘British India’, the derived

insights fail to consider that about two fifths of India were administered, more or less

independently, by Indian states. The existing literature on ‘Princely India’, on its part, has

tended to focus on political histories and the spectacular/decadent sides of Indian

Maharajas’ lives. The project puts medicine in the Indian States at the centre of analysis.

It will not simply add yet another set of case-studies to the historiography of colonial

medicine, or merely use unexplored source material available in India, Europe and

America. Rather, it strives to contribute a new critical dimension to current debates. By

focusing on areas in ‘Indian India’, rather than those under direct British colonial control,

the project is expected to lead to a more balanced appraisal of the role of medicine

during the colonial era.

Editorships

Member of the editorial board of History of Psychiatry (Sage).

Publications

Editor with B. Pati, India’s Princely States. People, Princes and Colonialism (London and

New York: Routledge, 2007). [To be reprinted in an Indian version by Primus Books:

Delhi, 2009.]

‘Madness and colonial spaces. British India, 1800-1947’, in Leslie Topp, James Moran

and Jonathan Andrews (eds), Madness, Architecture and the Built Environment (London

and New York: Routledge, 2007).

‘Beyond East and West. From the history of colonial medicine to a social history of

medicine(s) in South Asia’, Social History of Medicine, 20, 3 (2007), 505-524.

Editor, The Normal and the Abnormal. Historical and Cultural Perspectives on Norms

and Normativity (London and New York: Routledge, 2006).

‘The normal and the abnormal. Reflections on norms and normativity’, in Waltraud Ernst

(ed.), Histories of the Normal and the Abnormal (London and New York:

Routledge, 2006), pp. 1-39.

‘Colonial/medical power: lunatic asylums in Bengal, c. 1800-1900’, Journal of Asian

History, 40, 1 (2006), 49-79.

‘Feminising madness - Feminising the Orient: gender, madness and colonialism, c.

1860-1940’, in S. Kak and B. Pati (eds), Exploring Gender: Colonial and Post-colonial

India (New Delhi: Nehru Memorial and Museum Library, 2005), pp. 57-92.

Research Dissemination

Talks at the Centre for Studies in Social Sciences at Calcutta (CSSSC), resulting in

History of Medicine resources links, teaching and research links, some of which will be

History of Medicine focused.

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Talks at the Centre of Modern Oriental Studies (ZMO), Berlin, presenting work on history

of medicine and exploring future collaboration on medical publishing/printing, March

2008.

P. B. Mukharji and W. Ernst, ‘In good health. The history of medicine in India: British

perspectives’, Biblio: a Review of Books, 12, 9/10 (2007).

Conference organisation

Co-organiser (with Anne Digby and Projit Mukharji) ‘Crossing Colonial Historiographies:

Histories of Colonial and Indigenous Medicines in Transnational Perspective’, held at St

Anne’s College, Oxford, 15-17 September 2008. [Book to be published by Cambridge

Scholars, 2010.]

Conference papers

Workshop on ‘Situating the Subaltern in South Asian Medical History’, Warwick

University; paper on ‘Artichokes, the enigma of health and the subaltern in the history of

medicine’, 7-8 May 2009.

Opening Plenary Lecture, Conference on ‘Imagining and Practising Imperial and

Colonial Medicine, 1870-1960’, St Anthony’s College, Oxford, 10-12 January 2008.

Presidential Keynote Address, 6 th International Conference on Traditional Asian

Medicine, University of Texas at Austin, 2006.

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Dr Elizabeth Hurren

Senior Lecturer in the History of Medicine and Chair of the University Ethics Committee

Research

History of anatomy and the body from antiquity to the twentieth century; history of

poverty and society in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries; history of ‘the politics

of place’ and local democracy; the history of body trafficking of pauper corpses to train

medical students under the New Poor Law, circa 1832 to 1929.

Dr Hurren’s research expertise has six interwoven-strands:

• The history of nineteenth century poverty and the experience of being poor

• The New Poor Law and public health politics in Victorian Britain

• The history of death and dying in Britain

• The history of anatomy and the body since antiquity

• Medical ethics, coroners, research and “body” debates in biomedicine

• The history of the brain and scientific breakthroughs

• Women and childbirth from Tudor England to Modern Incubator

Current Projects

Dr Hurren has six projected research activities in the period from 2008 to 2010:

1. In 2008, research was completed on how paupers became staple dissection

subjects of a 19th-century medical education. A unique database has been

compiled of the body-trafficking networks in leading provincial and London

medical schools. This is the subject of a forthcoming book contracted to Palgrave

Macmillan – Dying for Victorian Medicine: English Anatomy and its Trade in the

Dead Poor, 1832 to 1929, (September 2010). Writing-up is funded by a

Wellcome Trust Research Leave Award in 2009/10 of £45,000.

2. In semester one 2010, a new project funded by the recent Wellcome Trust

Strategic Award, of which Dr Hurren was a co-applicant, will be launched. It has

two facets: the care and use of the poor for medical research in major teaching

hospitals and the subsequent history of the Strangeways Laboratory at

Cambridge.

3. In 2009/10, academic articles have been produced on the social history of 19th

century coroners and their professional jurisdiction over the corpse.

4. In 2009/10, an academic article has also been produced on the history of

anatomists and their public engagement work in the 19th century.

5. In 2009/10, a Wellcome Trust Broadcast Award of £10,000 in conjunction with

Pier Productions Ltd was won to pitch the production of a television programme

on the ‘History of the Body’, currently under consideration with BBC’s

“Timewatch”.

6. In 2008/9, Dr Hurren won a Leverhulme Trust Study Abroad Fellowship for

£5,235 and an award of 2,500 euros from the EHESS Paris. She took up a

prestigious Overseas Scholarship to work on the comparative history of anatomy

in England and France in May 2009 and returns again in November 2009 to give

guest lectures and complete the project.

Editorships

Joint-editor of the Pickering and Chatto series, The Body, Gender and Culture: from

Early Modern Times to the Modern World.

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Publications

E. T. Hurren, A. Gestrich, S. A. King and L.

Raphael (eds), Poverty and the Development of

Health-Care in Modern Europe, (Rodopi,

forthcoming 2010).

E. T. Hurren, ‘World without welfare? The late-

Victorian Poor Law reconsidered’, in S. A. King

and R. M. Smith (eds), Poverty, Poor Relief and

Welfare in England from the 17th to the 20th

century, (Boydell and Brewer, forthcoming

2010).

E. T. Hurren, Dying for Victorian Medicine:

English Anatomy and its Trade in the Dead

Poor, 1832 to 1929, (Palgrave, Macmillan,

forthcoming September 2010).

with I. Scherder, ‘Dignity in death? The dead

body as an anatomical object in England and

Ireland, circa 1832 to 1900’, in Steven King and

Andreas Gestrich (eds), The Dignity of the Poor:

Concepts, Practices, Representations, (Oxford

University Press, forthcoming 2010), 1-52.

E. T. Hurren, Protesting About Pauperism: Poverty, Politics and Poor Relief in Late-

Victorian England, 1870-1914 (Royal Historical Society, Boydell & Brewer, 2007).

E. T. Hurren, ‘A radical historian’s pursuit of rural history: The political career and

contribution of the Rev. Dr. John Charles Cox, c. 1848 to 1919’, Rural History 19, 1

(2008), 81-103.

E. T. Hurren, ‘Whose body is it anyway? Trading the dead poor, coroners’ disputes and

the business of anatomy at Oxford University, 1885-1929’, Bulletin of the History of

Medicine, 82, 4 (2008), 775-819.

E. T. Hurren, ‘The business of anatomy and being poor: why have we failed to learn the

medical and poverty lessons of the past?’ in A. Gestrich, S. A. King, and L. Raphael

(eds), Being Poor in Modern Europe, (Peter Lang, 2006), 352-87.

E. T. Hurren, ‘Selling and buying the dead poor to train English doctors, 1870-1900’,

Journal of Social Studies, (Stein Rokkan Centre), (2006), 1-16.

E. T. Hurren and S. A. King, ‘“Begging for a burial”: form, function and conflict in

nineteenth-century pauper burial’, Social History, 30, 3 (2005), 321-341.

E. T. Hurren, ‘Poor Law versus Public Health: diphtheria and the challenge of the

crusade against outdoor relief to public health improvements in Victorian England, 1879-

1900’, Journal of the Social History of Medicine, 28, (2005), 399-414.

16


Research Dissemination

Conference papers

‘Women and Childbirth’, keynote medical history conference paper presented at Henry

VIII and the Tudor Court 1509-2009, Hampton Court Palace, 13-15 July 2009.

‘World without welfare: pauper perspectives of medical care under the late-Victorian

poor law’, presented at Narratives of Poverty: English Pauper Letters 1780-1840 in

Comparative Perspective, Hagen Conference, Germany, 4-7 October 2007.

Seminar papers

‘A Tale of Two Cities: Dying, Dissection, and Anatomy in London and Paris’, May 2009,

EHESS, Paris – invited speaker, conference paper, and seminar.

‘Whose body is it anyway? Trading the poor to train English doctors at Oxbridge, 1870-

1929’. Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, Oxford, Hilary Term, 2007.

‘Anatomy and the trade in the dead poor in the Midlands, 1832-1929’, Birmingham

University, School of Medicine and Medical History, Spring 2006.

Media impact

In 2009, Dr Hurren carried out the following public engagement activities:

• BBC ‘Making History’ on Radio 4, historical expert on the history of medicine for

the series 2008/9, produced by Nick Patrick for Pier Productions Ltd.

• Historical consultant on ‘Henry VIII: 1509-2009’ at Hampton Court – filming and

writing popular articles on the history of medicine – see web links:

http://www.hrp.org.uk/HamptonCourtPalace/stories/palacehighlights/HenryVIIIhe

adsandhearts/AllaboutHenry.aspx

http://www.hrp.org.uk/Resources/Elizabeth%20HurrenFINAL.pdf

• Historical consultant ‘Henry Week’ on BBC Radio 4 produced by Julian May –

see BBC iPlayer link – ‘Hidden Henry, Medicine and Health’, 25 th May 2009. The

programme was ‘Pick of the Week’ in the Guardian and had a platform audience

of 4.5 million (CD copy available).

• Historical consultant for a ‘Little Neck’, a play set in Henry VIII’s court and

performed by the Goat and Monkey Theatre Company, staged at Hampton Court

Palace, September and October 2009, Wellcome Trust funded (£59,400).

• Keynote speaker on the History of Medicine at the ‘Henry VIII and the Tudor

Court, 1509-2009’, 14 th July 2009 at Hampton Court.

• Historical consultant and panel expert for ‘60 Minutes of Sex’ Oxfordshire

Science Festival 2009, chaired by Judith Hann (formerly of ‘Tomorrow’s World’)

in April 2009.

• Guest speaker, A Night at the Museum Event: ‘Death and Dissection in Oxford’,

History of Science Museum, Broad Street, Oxford, May, 2009.

• Provided historical input on Apercu Productions Ltd podcasts produced for the

History of Medicine Centre at Oxford Brookes – see web link:

http://ah.brookes.ac.uk/historyofmedicine/podcasts/

17


Dr Peter Jones

Lecturer in the History of Medicine

Research

Dr Jones is currently working on a number of research strands relating to demotic history

in the eighteenth and early-nineteenth centuries, including pauper letters and other

‘narratives of the poor’, welfare and relief in kind (especially clothing and textiles),

popular protest and popular consciousness, and the experience of the poor in the

workhouse under the Old Poor Law.

Publications

P. Jones and S.A. King, ‘The particular claim of a woman and a mother’: gender,

belonging, and rights to medical relief in England 1800-1840s’, in S. A. King and A.

Gestrich (eds), Narratives of Sickness and Poverty in Europe 1780-1938 (Berghahn,

2010).

‘Finding Captain Swing: protest, parish relations and the state of the public mind in

1830’, International Review of Social History (forthcoming, 2009).

‘“I cannot keep my place without being deacent”: pauper letters, parish clothing and

pragmatism in the South of England, 1750-1830’, Rural History, 20 (1) 2009, 31-49.

‘Swing, Speenhamland and rural social relations: the ‘moral economy’ of the English

crowd in the nineteenth century’, Social History, 32 (3) 2007, 271-290.

‘Clothing the poor in early-nineteenth-century England’, Textile History, 37 (1) 2006, 7-37.

Research Dissemination

‘Finding Captain Swing: the anatomy of metonymy’, Captain Swing Reconsidered: forty

years of rural history from below (Southern History Society conference), Reading, 21

March 2009.

‘Rethinking the workhouse as a total institution’, Cultures of Institutional Welfare

Workshop, Oxford, 5 December 2008.

‘Understanding Mortality in the Eighteenth-Century City: London at street level’,

American Association for the History of Medicine Annual Conference, Rochester, New

York, 11 April 2008.

‘Protest and the Parish: Contextualising popular protest in the early-nineteenth century’,

Economic History Society Annual Conference, Nottingham, 30 March 2008.

‘Rowntree Revisited: Poverty, welfare and the life-cycle in London, 1725-1824’,

European Social Science History Conference, Lisbon, Portugal, 27 February 2008.

‘‘I cannot keep my place without being deascent’: playing by the rules of the ‘pragmatic

parish’, Narratives of Poverty: English Pauper Letters 1780-1840 in Comparative

Perspective, Hagen, Germany, 4-7 October 2007.

‘Finding Captain Swing: the mythical leader and the public mind’, Social History

Conference, Reading, 31 March-2 April 2006.

18


‘The Search for Captain Swing: populism, politics and protest in early-nineteenth-century

England’, Research Seminar, University of Birmingham, 22 March 2006.

‘Popular Culture and the Rural Rebellion of 1830’, public lecture at the Hampshire

Record Office, Winchester, November 2005.

19


Professor Steven King

Professor of History, Chair of the Wellcome Trust History of Medicine Grant Panel,

Assistant Dean for Resources in the School of Arts and Humanities. (From October

2009, Professor of Economic and Social History, School of Historical Studies, University

of Leicester.)

Research

Industrialization, urban history, historical demography; material culture, health, poverty

and consumption in the eighteenth century.

Professor King’s research interests are varied, spanning a range of periods, themes and

countries, but may be grouped under four broad headings:

• The history of European industrialisation, with a particular focus on the

demography and family and kinship characteristics of industrial populations

during the period 1650-1850.

• The history of British and European poverty and welfare, with a particular focus

on the regionality of welfare, the clothing of the poor, pauper letters, the

administration of relief and the experience of being poor in the period 1700-1920.

• History of medicine, with a particular focus on the medical history of industrial

England, the sick poor, narratives of sickness, the medical marketplace and

doctor-patient relationships in the period 1650-1850.

• Local history, with a particular focus on family and community history in the

period 1700-1900.

Current Research Projects

• The English sick poor, 1700-1850.

• Legal and contractual disputes and the definition of rights of patients and the

duties of doctors in eighteenth and nineteenth century England.

• Sickness narratives. Focussing initially on Britain and Europe (with partners in

Bergen, Trier, Galway, and Paris) but expanding over time to include

collaborative work with colleagues working on oral histories in South Africa and

India, this project will analyse the form, content, rhetoric and usage of sickness

narratives (letters, diaries etc).

• The meaning and experience of European mortality rates, focussing on the

tendency for the worst mortality risks to be concentrated in a narrow range of

families.

• The Marriage patterns and experiences of the poor 1750-1850.

• The clothing of the European poor 1750-1850.

• British and European pauper letters 1800-1920.

Editorships

Editor of Family and Community History

Member of the editorial board for International Journal of Regional and Local Studies

Publications

S. A. King, ‘The dignity of the sick poor in English pauper letters 1810-1840’, in A.

Gestrich and S. A. King (eds), The Dignity of the Poor in European Narratives 1780-

1940 (Forthcoming, Oxford University Press, 2010).

20


S. A. King, ‘“I attended him three or four times a day and sent others”: The residential

and household arrangements of the English sick poor 1800-1840’, in P. Sharpe and J.

McEwan (eds), Accommodating Poverty: The Households of the Poor in England,

C.1650-1850 (Palgrave, forthcoming 2010).

S. A. King, ‘Too poor to marry? “Inheritance”, the poor and marriage/household

formation in rural England 1800-1840s’, in Anne-Lise Head-König, Péter Pozsgai and

Jürgen Schlumbohm (eds), Inheritance Practices, Marriage Strategies and Household

Formation in European Rural Societies (Brepols, 2008), pp. 23-54.

S. A. King and J. W. Stewart (eds), Welfare Peripheries (Peter Lang, 2007)

S. A. King, ‘Friendship, kinship and belonging in the letters of urban paupers 1800-1840’,

Historical Social Research, 33 (2008), 249-77.

R. Dyson and S. A. King, ‘“The streets are paved with idle beggars”: Experiences and

perceptions of beggars in nineteenth century Oxford’, in B. Althammer (ed.), Bettler in

Der Modernen Stadt (Peter Lang, 2007), pp. 71-102.

S. A. King and J. W. Stewart, ‘Introduction: Making and unmaking the welfare

peripheries’, in S. A. King and J. W. Stewart (eds), Welfare Peripheries (Peter Lang,

2007), pp. 1-42.

S. A. King, ‘Regional patterns in the experiences and treatment of the sick poor, 1800-

40: Rights, obligations and duties in the rhetoric of paupers’, Family and Community

History, 10 (2007), 61-75.

S. A. King, ‘Accessing drugs in the eighteenth-century regions’, in L. Curth (ed.), From

Physick to Pharmacology: Five Centuries of British Drug Retailing (Ashgate, 2006), pp.

49-78.

S. A. King, T. Nutt and A. Tomkins, Voices of the Poor: Poor Law Depositions and

Letters, as Volume 1 of Narratives of the Poor in Eighteenth-Century Britain (Pickering

and Chatto, 2006)

A. Gestrich, S. A. King and L. Raphael (eds) Being Poor in Modern Europe (Peter Lang,

2006)

S. A.King, ‘Pauvreté et assistance. La politique locale de la mortalité dans l’Angleterre

des XVIII e et XIX e siècles’, Annales Histoire, Sciences Sociales, 61, 1 (2006), 31-62.

E. T. Hurren and S. A.King, ‘“Begging for a burial”: form, function and conflict in

nineteenth-century pauper burial’, Social History, 30, 3 (2005), 321-341.

Research Dissemination

Professor King has presented his research at numerous conferences and

meetings both nationally and internationally. Recent destinations have

included Bergen, Hagen, Trier, Salzburg, Glasgow, London, Leicester,

Dublin, Bologna, Budapest, Paris, Amsterdam and Vienna.

21


Dr Alysa Levene

Senior Lecturer in Early Modern History

Research

• Child health, welfare and mortality

• Poverty and illegitimacy in the eighteenth century

• Pauper apprenticeship

• Child abandonment in early modern Europe

Dr Levene’s research focuses on the health and welfare of poor children in early modern

Europe. Her monograph, Childcare, health and mortality at the London Foundling

Hospital, 1741-1800: ‘Left to the mercy of the world’ (Manchester University Press,

2007) is an examination of the survival prospects and rearing of infants abandoned to an

institution in eighteenth-century London. She is currently working on a project analysing

the different ways poor children and their families could access welfare support in early

modern London. Her interests cover wet-nursing, medicine and hospital care,

workhouses, the structure of poor families, and the way that children were treated by

charity and poor law officials.

She has also published on the mortality implications of poverty and illegitimacy among

poor infants in London, on pauper apprenticeship, and on the history of poverty in the

eighteenth century.

Editorships

Member of Local Population Studies editorial board, and book reviews editor since

January 2008.

Publications

‘Between less eligibility and the NHS: the changing

place of poor law hospitals in England and Wales,

1929-1939’, Twentieth Century British History, 20

(2009), 322-345.

‘Honesty, sobriety and diligence’: master-apprentice

relations in eighteenth- and nineteenth-century

England’, Social History, 33, 2 (2008), 183-200.

‘Children, childhood and the workhouse: St

Marylebone, 1769-81’, London Journal 33, 1 (2008),

37-55.

Levene, Childcare, Health and Mortality at the

London Foundling Hospital, 1741-1800: ‘Left to the

Mercy of the World’ (Manchester University Press,

2007).

‘Can you catch smallpox from hospital records?

Avoiding the plague in archives on health’, Society

of Archivists newsletter, (June 2007).

22


‘Saving the innocents: nursing foundlings in Florence and London in the eighteenth

century’, in J. Henderson, P. Horden and A. Pastore, (eds), The Impact of Hospitals,

300-2000 (Peter Lang, 2007), 375-94.

‘The survival prospects of European foundlings in the eighteenth century: the London

Foundling Hospital and the Spedale degli Innocenti of Florence’, Popolazione e Storia, 2

(2006) 61-83.

‘William Cadogan: an eighteenth-century common-sense guide to childcare’, History

Today (November 2006), 30-36.

Levene (general editor), Narratives of the poor in eighteenth century Britain, (Pickering

and Chatto, April 2006), and editor of Volume 3, Institutional responses: the London

Foundling Hospital.

‘Family breakdown and the ‘welfare child’ in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Britain’,

History of the Family 11 (2006), 67-79.

‘What can Dade registers tell us about infant mortality in the later eighteenth century?’,

Local Population Studies, 76 (Spring 2006), 31-42.

Research Dissemination

Organiser: symposium ‘Health and Philanthropy in Early Modern Europe’, Oxford

Brookes University, 18 May 2009.

Conference papers

‘“Excluded for their own good?” Children and workhouses in eighteenth-century London’,

Social History Annual Conference, University of Warwick, 3-5 April 2009.

‘Nurture versus the law: poor children, their families and the laws of settlement in late

Old Poor Law London’, Urban History Group Annual Conference, 2-3 April 2009.

‘Medical care for children in London workhouses’, Symposium on Medicine and the

Workhouse, University of Birmingham, November 2008.

‘The Scientific study of childcare at the London Foundling Hospital in the eighteenth

century’, ‘Sick of London’ conference, organised by the Society of Archivists, London

Metropolitan Archive, October 2008.

‘Medical charity, family and the locus of care in eighteenth-century England’, Annual

Conference of the Voluntary Action History Society, University of Liverpool, July 2008.

Healthcare for poor children in eighteenth-century London’, Child Health in its Historical

Context, Centre for the History of Medicine in Ireland, University of Ulster, May 2008.

‘Religion, health and welfare: abandoned babies in eighteenth-century Europe’. Seminar

paper, Glasgow Caledonian University, November 2007.

‘Pauper apprenticeship and the Old Poor Law in eighteenth-century London’, North

American Conference on British Studies, Nov 2007, San Francisco.

23


‘Feeding and childcare in foundling hospitals’, Rank Prize Fund Symposium on infant

nutrition, October 2007, Windermere.

‘Child fostering and the London Foundling Hospital in eighteenth century England’,

Network for Early European Research Conference, July 2007, University of Western

Australia, Perth.

‘Children as out-patients in the eighteenth century’ (and panel convenor, ‘Child health

and medicine before paediatrics’), “In the Name of the Child”, The Social and Cultural

History of Children and Youth, June 2007, Linköping University, Norrköping, Sweden.

‘Pauper apprenticeship, the industrial economy, and the Old Poor Law in London’,

Economic History Society annual conference, March/April 2007, University of Exeter.

‘Civic pride, urban networks and poor children: the foundling hospitals in London and

Florence in the later eighteenth century’, European Association of Urban History’s

International Conference on Urban History, Institute of Urban History, Stockholm, August

2006.

‘The Foundling Hospital of London and the Innocenti of Florence: Some Comparisons’,

Social Science History Association conference, Amsterdam, March 2006.

‘Foundling children and their health in town and country in the eighteenth century’, Local

Population Studies Society annual conference, University of Hertfordshire, April 2006.

‘Fostering, feeding and foundlings in four eighteenth-century English parishes’,

Economic History Society annual conference, University of Reading, March 2006.

‘William Cadogan: an eighteenth-century common-sense guide to childcare’, Royal

College of Paediatrics and Child Health annual conference, University of York, March

2006.

24


Dr Anna Maerker

Senior Lecturer in the History of Medicine

Research

Material culture of medicine and

science in the eighteenth and

nineteenth centuries; anatomical

models; collections and museums; the

history of expertise.

Dr Maerker’s research focus is on the

material and visual culture of medicine

and science in the eighteenth and

nineteenth centuries. In particular, she

is interested in the role of collections,

museums, and models, for the

circulation of knowledge and for the

articulation of scientific and medical

expertise.

Auzoux factory painting workshop, 1897

Current Projects

• The commercial production and circulation of anatomical models, ca. 1800-1914.

• A book on anatomical models and expertise around 1800; articles on models and

popular culture in Enlightenment Vienna, on expertise and welfare reform in lateeighteenth-century

Bavaria, and on the global marketing and circulation of

anatomical models in the nineteenth century.

Publications

‘“Turpentine hides everything”: Autonomy and organization in anatomical model

production for the state in late eighteenth-century Florence’, History of Science, 45, 3

(2007), 257-286.

‘The anatomical models of La Specola: Production, uses, and reception’, Nuncius:

Journal of the History of Science, 21, 2 (2006), 295-321.

‘The tale of the hermaphrodite monkey: The “taxonomist’s regress”, state interests and

natural historical expertise between museum and court in late-eighteenth-century

Tuscany’, British Journal for the History of Science, 39, 1 (2006), 29-47.

‘Uses and publics of the anatomical model collections of La Specola, Florence, and the

Josephinum, Vienna, around 1800’, in Marco Beretta (ed.), From Private to Public.

Natural Collections and Museums (Nantucket: Science History Publications 2005), pp.

81-96.

‘Mechanistische Konzepte, ‘virtual witnessing’ und die Funktion von Öffentlichkeit in der

Wohlfahrtsmaschine Rumfords’, in Volker Hess, Eric Engstrom, Ulrike Thoms (eds),

Figurationen des Experten: Ambivalenzen der wissenschaftlichen Expertise im

ausgehenden 18. und frühen 19. Jahrhundert (Frankfurt: Peter Lang, 2005), pp. 191-

208.

25


Research Dissemination

Congress ‘The Body: Simulacra and Simulation – models, prosthetics and interventions’,

European Association of Museums of the History of Medical Sciences, Edinburgh:

‘Circulating anatomies: the production and distribution of anatomical models in

comparative perspective’ (September 2008).

European Society for the History of Science, biannual meeting, Vienna: ‘Artistic or

accurate? Anatomical models between craft and mass production’ (September 2008).

Three Societies Meeting: Joint meeting of BSHS, CSHPS, HSS, Oxford: ‘Consumption

as participation? The commercial production and uses of anatomical models in

comparative perspective’ (July 2008).

Workshop ‘Anatomy and Wax’, Medical University of Vienna: ‘Trouble in Monkeyland:

models, satire, and professional identity at the Josephinum’ (June 2007).

Annual meeting of the HSS, Minneapolis: ‘The wrong toy for the job: Anatomical models

between education and entertainment in late-eighteenth-century Vienna’, (November

2005).

26


Dr Timothy J. McHugh

Wellcome Trust Researcher/Lecturer in the History of Medicine

Research

History of early modern France; French medicine and rural peasants.

Dr McHugh has researched the social and administrative history of hospitals for both the

sick and able-bodied poor in Early Modern France. His research on such institutions has

focussed on three themes:

• the relationship between elites and the poor in urban institutions;

• the medicalisation of hospitals for the sick poor during the sixteenth and

seventeenth centuries; and

• re-evaluating the role played by the state in the creation of institutions of social

welfare.

Dr McHugh is undertaking research into the social value of medicine and of medical

practitioners in rural society in France during the Ancien Régime, using the province of

Brittany as a region of study. His research addresses how both learned and popular

forms of medicine were perceived by all levels of rural society from aristocratic landlords

to the poor. The study assesses the relationship between medicine, social welfare,

religion and popular culture in a rural context. A fundamental aim of the project is to

assess the importance placed on the provisioning of medical charity by those who held

seigneurial authority over villages as part of their efforts to fulfil their religious obligations

and to exert social control on their estates. The early part of the research has revealed

the significant role played by charity in the provisioning of medical services to rural

communities in Brittany between 1598 and 1789, furthering our knowledge of the degree

of medicalisation of society during the period.

Publications

Charity and Medicine in Rural Brittany, 1532-1789

(Ashgate Press, forthcoming 2010/2011).

‘State, seigneurs and sickness’, English Historical

Review, (forthcoming 2010).

‘Parish priests as medical agents in 18th Century

Brittany’, Bulletin of the History of Medicine

(forthcoming 2010).

‘Women’s rural medical work in Early Modern Brittany’,

Journal of the History of Medicine, (forthcoming 2010).

‘Creating charitable networks in rural Brittany, 1600-

1789’, French Historical Studies, (Special Issue,

forthcoming 2010).

Hospital Politics in Seventeenth-Century France (Ashgate Press, History of Medicine in

Context Series, 2007)

‘Establishing medical Men at the Paris Hôtel-Dieu, 1500-1715’, Social History of

Medicine, 19, 2 (2006), 209-224.

27


Dr Glen O’Hara

Senior Lecturer in Modern History

Research

Modern economic and social history since the First World War, with particular regard to

British governments’ policies in those policy areas. Britons’ engagement with the

maritime world.

Dr O’Hara is primarily interested in British central governments’ economic and social

policies, focusing especially on the period since the First World War. In 2007 he

released a book about British economic and social planning in the 1960s; an edited

collection about the Wilson governments of those years was published by Routledge in

2006. His next book will be a study of Britons and the maritime world. It is entitled ‘A Star

to Steer By’: Britain and the Sea since 1600, and will be published late in 2009.

Current projects

International policy and research networks in the post-Second War era; British views of

other countries’ economic and social policies; ‘Britain and the sea since 1600’.

Articles on statistics and statistical reform; public opinion polling; the creation of the

‘Ombudsman’ or Parliamentary Commissioner; a broader, synthetic, study of maritime

Britain since 1600.

Editorships

History Editor for Reinvention, an online, peer-reviewed journal published through the

Reinvention Centre for Undergraduate Research, a collaborative Centre for Excellence

in Teaching and Learning based at the University of Warwick and Oxford Brookes

University.

Publications

‘Attempts to “modernise”: nationalisation and the nationalised industries in post-war

Britain’, in F. Amatori, R. Millward and P. A. Toninelli (eds), Re-Appraising State-Owned

Enterprise: A Comparison (London: Routledge, forthcoming, 2011).

“This is what growth does”: British views of the European economies in the prosperous

“Golden Age” of 1951-1973’, Journal of Contemporary History, 44 (2009), forthcoming.

‘“The sea is swinging into view”: modern British maritime history in a globalised world’,

English Historical Review CXXIV (2009), forthcoming.

‘“What the electorate can be expected to swallow”: nationalisation, transnationalism and the

shifting boundaries of the state in post-war Britain’, Business History, 51, 4 (2009), 1-28.

(With Niall Ferguson, Harvard University), ‘Do Not Count on the Tories Winning Just

Yet’, Financial Times, 29 June 2009.

‘The Anglo-American loan agreement of 1945’, MSN Online Encyclopedia 2009.

‘The intellectuals’ ideal: British views of Scandinavia in the 1950s and 1960s’, in Jan

Eivind Myhre (ed.), Intellectuals and the Public Sphere: Britain and Scandinavia since

the Second World War (Oslo: Oslo University Press, 2008), pp. 91-122.

28


‘“Applied socialism of a fairly moderate kind”: Scandinavia, British policymakers and the

post-war housing market’, Scandinavian Journal of History 33, 1 (2008), 1-25.

From Dreams to Disillusionment: Economic and Social Planning in 1960s Britain

(Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2007).

‘Towards a new Bradshaw: economic statistics and the British state in the 1950s and

1960s’, Economic History Review 60, 1 (2007), 1-34.

(With Dr. Helen Parr, Keele University), The Modernisation of Britain? Harold Wilson and

the British Labour Governments of 1964-1970 (London: Routledge, 2006). This volume

has also been published as a special issue of Contemporary British History 20, 3

(September 2006).

‘Social democratic space: the politics of building in “Golden Age” Britain, c.1950-1973’,

Architectural Research Quarterly 10, 3/4 (2006), 285-90.

‘“Dynamic, exciting, thrilling change”: the Wilson Government’s economic policy 1964-

1970’, Contemporary British History 20, 3 (2006), 383-402.

‘Living with the neighbours?: The New Cambridge Economic History of Britain and the

renovation of economic history’, English Historical Review 121, 490 (2006), 183-89.

‘A journey without maps: the regional policies of the British Labour Government of 1964-

1970’, Regional Studies 39, 9 (2005), 1183-96.

Research Dissemination

Organiser. ‘Health Care and the People’, Glasgow Caledonian University, January 2009.

‘From Planning to Participation: Envisioning the NHS, c.1962-c.1974’, Glasgow

Caledonian Centre for the History of Medicine Seminar Series, ‘Healthcare in Theory

and Practice in Twentieth Century Britain’, Glasgow, November 2008.

Organiser. ‘Numbers, Norms and the People: Statistics and the Public Sphere in Modern

Britain’, Oxford Brookes University, September 2008.

‘Attempts to Reform and Modernise Britain’s State-Owned Enterprises and

Manufacturing Industries, 1951-1979’, Fondazione Instituto per la Riconstruzione

Industriale Conference on State-Owned Enterprise, Rome, May 2008.

‘Numbers, Experts and Ideas: International Organisations, International Surveys and

Perceptions of the Outside World in Britain, c.1950-1970’, Economic History Society

Annual Conference, Exeter, March 2007.

‘Britain Loses Confidence in Itself: Turning Towards the Scandinavian Example in the

1950s and 1960s’, University of Oslo Forum for Contemporary History Seminar, Oslo,

November 2006.

29


‘Social Democratic Space: The Politics of Building in “Golden Age” Britain, c.1950c.1973’,

Architectural Humanities Research Association International Conference on the

Politics of Making, Oxford, November 2006.

‘The Intellectuals’ Ideal: British Views of Scandinavia in the 1950s and 1960s’, University

of Oxford Modern European History Research Centre/ University of Oslo Forum for

Contemporary History Workshop, Oxford, May 2006.

Consultancy

Member, Advisory Committee, UK National Archives Cabinet papers Digitisation Project

30


Dr Viviane Quirke

RCUK Academic Fellow in Twentieth-Century Biomedicine

Research

History of science, technology and medicine in Britain and France in the twentieth

century, with a special focus on the history of drug discovery and the pharmaceutical

industry.

Current Projects

• As part of her RCUK Fellowship Dr Quirke is currently working on the history of

company-hospital relations in Britain, France and the US, with particular interest

in the development of cancer chemotherapy.

• She is engaged in a British Council/Alliance Française Partnership Programme

with Jonathan Simon and Floriane Blanc in the University of Lyon 1 to study the

history of diphtheria antitoxin in Britain and France.

• She is a member of the ESF ‘Drugs’ Research Networking Programme, and cochair

of the working group on ‘Cardiovascular Diseases and Cancer’ with Carsten

Timmermann (CHSTM, Manchester).

• She is also working on a number of books and articles, based on her recent

Wellcome-Trust funded project (see below).

Recent Research

• In 2006-7 Dr Quirke carried out research on the archives of the Burroughs

Wellcome Co. with Professor Roy Church for a project funded by the Wellcome

Fund.

• Between 2003 and 2006 she was engaged in a post-doctoral research project

funded by the Wellcome Trust. This was on the history of the development of

drug treatments for chronic diseases in Britain and France, focussing mainly on

the post-war research programmes of two pharmaceutical companies: ICI

Pharmaceuticals in Britain, and Rhône-Poulenc in France.

Editorships

Editor of the Newsletter of the Historical Group of the Royal Society of Chemistry since

2006.

Publications

‘The standardisation of pharmaceutical R&D in the second half of the twentieth century:

ICI’s Nolvadex Development Programme in historical and comparative perspective’, in

C. Bonah and A. Rasmussen (eds), Drug Standards, Standard Drugs (Paris: Glyphe,

forthcoming 2009).

V .M. Quirke and Judy Slinn (eds), Perspectives on 20th-century Pharmaceuticals (Peter

Lang, forthcoming 2009).

‘Les relations franco-britanniques et l’industrie pharmaceutique: une perspective

internationale sur l’histoire de Rhône-Poulenc’, Cahiers d’histoire et de philosophie des

sciences (forthcoming 2009).

31


‘Drug discovery’, in Akira Irive and Pierre Yves

Saunier (eds) Dictionary of Transnational History

(Palgrave, 2009).

‘Anglo-American relations and the co-production

of American “hegemony” in pharmaceuticals’, in

H. Bonin and F. de Goey (eds), American Firms in

Europe (Geneva, Droz, 2009), pp. 363-84.

‘The material culture of British pharmaceutical

laboratories in the golden age of drug discovery’,

International Journal for the History of Engineering

and Technology, 72 (2009), 298-317.

V. Quirke and J. P. Gaudillière, ‘The Era of

biomedicine: science, medicine and public health

in Britain and France after World War Two’,

special issue of Medical History, 52, 4 (2008),

441-452.

Collaboration in the Pharmaceutical Industry:

changing relationships in Britain and France,

1935-1965 (London/New York, Routledge,

October 2007).

‘From chemistry to pharmaceuticals, and from pharmaceuticals to biotechnology: the

many transformations of ICI in the twentieth century’, in I. Malaquias, E, Hombrurg and

M. E. Callapez (eds), Chemistry, Technology and Society, (Lisbon: Sociedade

Portuguesa de Quìmica, 2006).

‘Putting theory into practice: James Black, receptor theory, and the development of the

beta-blockers at ICI’, Medical History, 50, 1 (2006), 69-92.

‘Chemistry and the pharmaceutical industry’, Ambix, 53 (2006), 167-171.

Research Dissemination

Organiser.’Treating the heart, treating cancer: medicines and the standardization of

chronic disease’, ESF-funded workshop to be held at Manchester University, Nov.-Dec.

2009.

‘Developing penicillin, patenting cephalosporin, and transforming biomedical research in

Britain: the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology at Oxford, 1930s-1970s’ (‘Living

Properties’ Workshop, Max Planck Institute Preprint, Berlin, in press).

‘From antibiotics to cancer chemotherapy: the transformation of Rhône-Poulenc in the

era of biomedicine’ (ESF Antibiotics workshop preprint, Madrid, 16-18 June 2009).

Organised. Joint Oxford University, Maison Française d’Oxford, and Oxford Brookes

University History of Chemistry Seminar Series: ‘Mastering Nature? Chemistry in History’

(Trinity 2008, Trinity 2009).

32


Organised workshop, ‘Cancer and innovation. How to deal with cancer? Cancer,

innovation and politics’, Maison Française d’Oxford, 4 Feb. 2009.

‘The impact of Thalidomide on the British pharmaceutical industry: the case of Imperial

Chemical Industries’, in J.-P. Gaudillière and V. Hess (eds), Ways of Regulating:

therapeutic agents between plants, shops, and consulting rooms (Max Planck Institute

Preprint 363, Berlin, 2009), pp. 125-41.

‘Foreign influences, and the creation of a modern pharmaceutical industry in Britain and

France in the first half of the twentieth century’ (proceedings of the 3rd conference of the

European Society for the History of Science, Vienna, Austria, September 2008,

forthcoming in 2009).

Organiser: ‘Pharmaceutical styles of thinking and doing: French and British spheres of

influence in the nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries’, session for 3 rd Conference of

the European Society for the History of Science, Vienna, Austria, 9-13 Sept. 2008.

Organiser: ‘The Importance of Place: connecting disciplines in and around Oxford’,

session for Three Societies meeting (Joint meeting of BSHS, CSHPS, HSS), Oxford

University, 4-6 July 2008.

33


Dr Marius Turda

RCUK Academic Fellow in 20th Century Central and Eastern European Bio-Medicine

Research

History of eugenics, racism and biopolitics from around 1800 to 1945, with a particular

emphasis on Central and Southeastern Europe.

Dr. Turda’s main research interests can be summarised in three interrelated groups:

1. Bio-Medicine and Political Ideologies (comparative history of race, social

Darwinism and nationalism; comparative history of eugenics and racial

anthropology).

2. Modernist Projects of Racial Regeneration (theories of ethnic specificity and

national character; ethnic utopias).

3. Historiography and Theories of History in Eastern and Central Europe

Current projects

Founder and member of the international ‘Working Group on the History of Racial

Sciences and Biomedicine in Central and Southeast Europe (19th and 20th Centuries)’

based at Oxford Brookes University.

Editorships

Member of the Editorial Board (Political Religions) of Religion Compass (see,

http://www.religion-compass.com)

Publications

Modernism and Eugenics (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, forthcoming).

A Healthy Nation: Eugenics, Race and Biopolitics in Hungary, 1904-1944 (Budapest:

Central European University Press, forthcoming).

(with Robert Pyrah) Minority, Marginality, Periphery: Culture and Identity in East and

Central Europe (Oxford: Legenda, forthcoming).

(with Christian Promitzer and Sevasti Trubeta) Hygiene, Health and Eugenics in

Southeastern Europe to 1945 (Budapest: Central European University Press,

forthcoming).

(with Diana Mishkova) Anti-Modernism: Radical Revisions of Collective Identity

(forthcoming).

‘History of medicine in Eastern Europe, including Russia’, in Mark Jackson (ed.), The

Oxford Handbook of the History of Medicine (Oxford: Oxford University Press,

forthcoming 2010).

‘Academic history writing in the Balkans to 1945’, in Juan Maiguaschca, Stuart Macintyre

and Attila Pok (eds), vol. IV, The Oxford History of Historical Writing (forthcoming).

‘Controlling the national body: ideas of racial purification in interwar Romania’, in

Christian Promitzer, Sevasti Trubeta and Marius Turda, (eds), Hygiene, Health and

Eugenics in Southeastern Europe to 1945 (forthcoming).

34


‘Rasse, Eugenik und Nationalismus in Rumänien während der 1940er Jahre’, in Brigitte

Mihok (ed.), Völkermord in Transnistrien, 1941-1944. Deportation, Rettung und

Erinnerung (forthcoming).

‘Race, science and eugenics in the twentieth century’, in Alison Bashford and Phillipa

Levine (eds), The Handbook of the History of Eugenics (forthcoming).

‘“To end the degeneration of a nation”: debates on eugenic sterilization in interwar

Romania’, Medical History, 53, 1 (2009), 77-104.

‘The biology of war: eugenics in Hungary, 1914-1918’, Austrian History Yearbook, XL

(2009).

‘National Historiographies in the Balkans, 1830-1989’, in Stefan Berger and Chris Lorenz

(eds), The Contested Nation: Ethnicity, Class, Religion and Gender in National Histories

(Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2008), pp. 463-489.

‘Conservative palingenesis and cultural modernism in early twentieth-century Romania’,

in M. Feldman and M. Turda (eds) Clerical Fascism’ in Interwar Europe (Oxford:

Routledge, 2008).

Eugenism si antropologia rasiala in Romania, 1874-1944 (2008).

‘Recent scholarship on race and eugenics’, The Historical Journal, 51, 4 (2008), 1115-

1114.

‘Politics, religion, gender and historiography: Eastern European perspectives’,

Totalitarian Movements and Political Religions, 9, 1 (2008), 129-136.

‘Focus on social history of medicine in Central and Eastern Europe’, Social History of

Medicine, 21, 2 (2008), 395-401.

(with Paul Weindling) ‘Blood and Homeland’:

Eugenics and Racial Nationalism in Central and

Southeast Europe, 1900-1940 (Budapest:

Central European University Press, 2007).

‘Eugenics, race and nation in Central and

Southeast Europe, 1900-1940: a historiographic

overview’, in Marius Turda and Paul Weindling

(eds), ‘Blood and Homeland’: Eugenics and

Racial Nationalism in Central and Southeast

Europe, 1900-1940 (Central European University

Press, 2007), pp. 1-22.

‘The first debates on eugenics in Hungary,

1910-1918’, in Marius Turda and Paul Weindling

(eds), ‘Blood and Homeland’: Eugenics and

Racial Nationalism in Central and Southeast

Europe, 1900-1940 (Central European University

Press, 2007), pp. 185-221.

35


‘Victor Babeş’, ‘Ioan Cantacuzino’, ‘Gheorghe Marinescu’, ‘Mihai Ciucă’, in W. F. and

Helen Bynum (eds), Dictionary of Medical Biography, vol. 1 (A-B), vol. 2 (C-G), vol. 4 (M-

R) (Westport: Greenwood Press, 2007), pp. 141-142; 303-304; 349-350; and 848-849.

‘From craniology to serology: racial anthropology in interwar Hungary and Romania’,

Journal of the History of Behavioral Sciences, 43, 3 (Fall 2007), 361-377.

‘Race, politics and nationalist Darwinism in Hungary, 1880-1918’, ‘Ab Imperio’ Quarterly:

Studies of New Imperial History and Nationalism in the Post-Soviet Space, 1 (2007),

139-164.

‘The nation as object: race, blood and biopolitics in interwar Romania’, Slavic Review,

66, 3 (Fall 2007), 413-441.

‘Craniometry and racial identity in interwar Transylvania’, Anuarul Institutului de Istorie

‘George Barit’, Cluj Napoca, XLV (2006), 161-172.

‘Heredity and eugenic thought in early twentieth-century Hungary’, Orvostörténeti

Közleméney. Communicationes de Historia Artis Medicinae, 52,1-2 (2006), 101-118.

‘“A New Religion”: eugenics and racial scientism in pre-World War I Hungary’,

Totalitarian Movements and Political Religions, 7, 3 (2006), 303-325.

‘New Perspectives on Romanian Fascism: Themes and Options’, Totalitarian

Movements and Political Religions, 6, 1 (2005), 143-150.

Reviews have been published in: Social History of Medicine, Totalitarian Movements

and Political Religions, Patterns of Prejudice, Bulletin of the History of Medicine,

American Historical Review, Historical Journal, and Journal of the History of Medicine

and Allied Sciences.

Research Dissemination

Keynote paper on ‘Ethnic Modernism and Scientific Nationalism: Reflections on

Biopolitics in Interwar Romania’, Romanian Studies Graduate Student Conference,4

March 2008, Indiana University, Bloomington.

XVIth International Conference, Council for European Studies at Columbia University, 6-

8 March 2008, Chicago. Paper presented ‘Anthropology in Contested Territories:

Transylvania, 1918-1944’.

Organiser together with Sonia Horn of the international conference ‘Medicine within and

between the Empires (Habsburg and Ottoman)’, Medical University of Vienna,

Josephinum, 20-2 November 2008.

Organiser together with Magdalena Gawin of the international conference, ‘Eugenics,

Modernisation and Biopolitics’, the Institute of History of the Polish Academy of Science

Warsaw, 18-19 April 2008. Paper presented: ‘Eugenic Sterilisation in Hungary, 1904-

1914’.

Organiser together with Tudor Georgescu and Chris Davis of the international

conference, ‘Greater Romania’s National Projects: Ideological Dilemmas, Ethnic

36


Classification, and Political Instrumentalisation of Ethnic Identities’, Oxford Brookes

University, 10-13 April 2008.

Organiser together with Christos Papadopoulos of the international symposium

Medicine in the Balkans: Ideas and Practice to 1945’, The Wellcome Trust Centre for

the History of Medicine at UCL, 24-25 January 2008.

‘Hygiene-Health Politics-Eugenics: Engineering Society in Twentieth Century

Southeastern Europe’, 31 May-2 June 2007, Freie Universität Berlin. Paper presented

‘Eugenic Sterilisation in Romania, 1914-1937’.

‘Crises as Opportunities in Interwar Health?’, University of Granda, 27-28 April 2007.

Paper presented ‘Eugenics and Public Health in Interwar Romania’.

Organiser together with Sevati Trubeta (Osteuropa Institut der Freien Universität Berlin)

and Christian Promitzer (Karl-Franzens Universität Graz, Institut für

Geschichte/Abteilung für Südosteuropäische Geschichte) of the international conference

on ‘Hygiene - Health Politics- Eugenics: Engineering Society in Twentieth-century

Southeastern Europe’, Osteuropa Institut der Freien Universität Berlin, 31 May - 2 June

2007.

‘Social Medicine, Medical Geography and Health Care for Indigenous Peoples: “Ethnic

Pathology” (Max Kuczynski, 1925) in Germany, Russia, Latin America and beyond’,

Justus-Liebig-Universität Gießen, 24-26 November 2006. Paper presented ‘Rural

Biology in Interwar Romania: A Peripheral Case in Ethnic Pathology?’.

Organiser together with Matt Feldman of the conference, ‘Clerical Fascism in Interwar

Europe’, Oxford Brookes University, 7-9 April 2006.

Co-founder and convenor of a new seminar series on Central Europe held at the

University of Oxford.

37


Dr Katherine Watson

Lecturer in the History of Medicine since 1500

Research

History of crime in Britain; Western forensic

medicine and science in the post-medieval

period.

Katherine D. (Cassie) Watson was awarded her

DPhil in 1994 for a thesis which investigated the

role of scientific expertise in the late Victorian

period. The theme of ‘expertise’ recurs in her

current work, which focuses on topics where

medicine, crime and the law intersect. Her main

areas of research are:

• The history of crime in Britain since the

early 18th century (especially a) criminal

poisoning and related offences and, b)

child murder), with a particular emphasis

on the gender and social background of

victims and perpetrators, the responses

of the legal system, investigative

practices, and regional variations in

these trends.

• The history of medicine in post-1700

Britain, particularly the development of

forensic medicine and the careers of its

practitioners.

• The history of chemistry post-1750,

especially in relation to toxicology and

forensic techniques.

Dr Watson is continuing her work on poisoning crimes in the form of a series of detailed

case studies, and is developing a major comparative project (jointly with Anne-Marie

Kilday, Principal Lecturer in History) on child murder in Britain circa 1700-1914. She is

currently working on a new project, funded by the Wellcome Trust: ‘Medicine and

Justice: medico-legal practice in England and Wales 1700-1914’. She organised an

international conference on the history of violence, which took place in Oxford in July

2005: ‘“Assaulting the Past”: Placing Violence in Historical Context’.

Editorships

Managing Editor & Editorial Board Member, Crimes and Misdemeanours; Deviance and

the law in historical perspective (e-journal).

Publications

K. D. Watson and Philip Wexler, ‘History of toxicology’, in P. Wexler (ed.), Information

Resources in Toxicology, 4th ed. (Sandiego and London: Elsevier, 2009), pp. 11-29.

38

Inquest at Tilehurst, Berkshire, 1817:

diagram by surgeon Widdows Golding


K. D. Watson, ‘Is a burn a wound? Medico-legal aspects of the crime of vitriol throwing’,

in I. Goold and C. Kelly (eds), Lawyer’s Medicine: The Legislature, the Courts and

Medical Practice, 1760-200 (Oxford: Hart Publishing, 2009), pp. 61-78.

R. J. Flanagan and K. D. Watson, ‘A petition to Mr. Peel: Gideon Mantell and the trial of

Hannah Russell’, Medicine, Science and Law, 49/3 (2009), 1-17.

K. D. Watson, ‘Religion, community and the infanticidal mother: evidence from 1840s

rural Wiltshire’, Family and Community History, 11 (2008), 116-33. This article appears

in a special issue of the journal, co-edited by A-M. Kilday and K. D. Watson, on the

theme of ‘Infanticide, Religion and Community in the British Isles, 1720-1920’ - see the

Introduction pp.84-99.

M. C. Usselman, D. G. Leaist and K. D. Watson, ‘Dalton’s disputed nitric oxide

experiments and the origins of his atomic theory’, ChemPhysChem, 9 (2008), 106-10.

K. D. Watson, ‘Introduction’ and ‘Serial homicide and civilization’ in Assaulting the Past:

Violence and Civilization in Historical Context (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2007),

pp. 1-17, 286-303.

K. D. Watson, ‘Response – “Moral Pestilence”: same-sex criminal cases in mid-Victorian

England’, in George S. Rousseau (ed.), Children and Sexuality: the Greeks to the Great

War (Palgrave Macmillan, 2007), pp. 200-05.

K. D. Watson (ed.), Assaulting the Past: Violence and Civilization in Historical Context

(Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2007).

K. D. Watson, Crime Archive: Dr Crippen (The National Archives, 2007).

K. D. Watson, ‘Criminal poisoning in England and the origins of the Marsh test for

arsenic’, in J. R. Bertomeu-Sanchez and A. Nieto-Galan (eds), Chemistry, Medicine and

Crime: Mateu J. B. Orfila and His Times (Science History Publications, 2006), pp. 183-

206.

K. D. Watson, ‘Medical and chemical expertise in English trials for criminal poisoning,

1750-1914’, Medical History, 50 (2006), 373-90.

Research Dissemination

Consultant on ‘Thomas Nash and infanticide’ for Crime Secrets, ITV Wales, October

2008.

Organiser of a session on ‘Women and Violence in the British Isles’ for an international

conference on Women and Crime in Britain and North America since 1500, Lyon, 12-13

September 2008.

‘Women, violence and the criminal law in Wales, 1730-1900’, Women and Crime in

Britain and North America Conference, Lyon, 12-13 September 2008.

Consultant on ‘Seddon’ andforensic medicine’ for Forensic Casebook, ITV London, July

2008.

39


‘Serial Homicide in Twentieth Century Britain’, The Bishopsgate Institute, 5 April, 2008.

‘Losing face: vitriol throwing, shame and stigma in Britain, 1820-1900’, European Social

Science History Conference, Lisbon, February 2008.

Consultant on ‘Crippen’ and ‘Seddon’ for The Crime Museum, Brighter Pictures,

Endemol UK, January 2008.

‘Before CSI: Crime, Medicine and Science in History’, Cherwell School, Oxford, 12

March 2008; Newcastle Science Festival, 17 March 2007; Reading University Café

Scientifique, 27 February 2007.

Medicine and justice: medico-legal practice in 18th and 19th century England and

Wales’, British Society of Criminology Conference, September 2007.

Consultant on poisons and poisoners for Scarlet Television series in preparation for the

History Channel, August 2006.

Organiser of a session on ‘Child Murder in North-Atlantic Europe, 1700-1900’ for the

European Social Science History Conference, Amsterdam, 22-25 March 2006.

‘Crimes of the blackest dye? Judicial responses to child murder in England and Wales,

1700-1900’, European Social Science History Conference, Amsterdam, 22-25 March

2006.

40


Professor Paul Weindling

Wellcome Trust Research Professor in the History of Medicine

Research

History of eugenics; public health organization; twentieth century disease patterns.

Professor Paul Weindling’s research covers evolution and society, public health, and

human experimentation post-1800. He has especial interests in eugenics, human

experiments, corporate philanthropies like the Rockefeller Foundation, and medical

refugees. Research in progress is as follows:

1. Arising from research on Nazi medical war crimes and the origins of informed

consent, he is trying to establish how many victims of Nazi human experiments

there were, and who they were. The aim is to establish a comprehensive analysis

for reference purposes.

2. European Medical Refugees in Great Britain, 1930s to 50s. This research is

based on a database of nearly 4,800 medical refugees, as well as textual

archives held in the Centre. The aim is to evaluate the place of the refugees in

the overall context of the modernisation of British medicine. The records cover

medical researchers, medical practitioners, dental surgeons, psychoanalysts,

psychologists, nurses, and all other health-related occupations. Children are

included who came as refugees to the UK.

3. International Health in the Twentieth Century. This project examines the shift

from international sanitary agreements to major organisations for international

health. The Rockefeller Foundation played a key role in the interwar period, and

raises controversies concerning imperialism and the social implications of

professionalisation. A crucial issue is the extent that international organisations

were expected to be subservient to governments or whether they could take

autonomous initiatives.

4. Eugenics as an International Movement. This study considers the origins of

eugenics as an organised movement on an international basis. Particular

attention is paid to the spread of eugenics societies and their membership, and to

the support for eugenics of philanthropists and foundations.

5. “Sage of Anxiety”. This is a biographical project on the remarkable life of John

West Thompson. This confronts the issue of medical science in the post-

Holocaust era.

Publications

(with Volker Roelcke and Louise Westwood, eds), Psychiatry in Transition: German,

British and United States Psychiatry in Comparative Perspective (Rochester NY:

Rochester University Press, forthcoming 2010).

‘Alien psychiatrists. Britain and its psychiatric refugees 1933-45’, in Louise Westwood,

Paul Weindling and Volker Roelcke (eds), Psychiatry in Transition: German, British and

United States Psychiatry in Comparative Perspective (Rochester, NY: Rochester

University Press, forthcoming 2010).

John W. Thompson, Psychiatrist in the Shadow of the Holocaust (Rochester, NY:

Rochester University Press, forthcoming 2009).

41


‘German eugenics and the wider world’, in Alison Bashford and Philippa Levine (eds), The

Oxford Handbook of the History of Eugenics (New York: Oxford University Press,

forthcoming).

‘A city regenerated: eugenics, race and welfare in interwar Vienna’, in Deborah Holmes

and Lisa Silverman (eds), Interwar Vienna: Culture between Tradition and Modernity

(New York: Camden House, forthcoming 2009).

‘Regenerating Mitteleuropa: methodological and theoretical reflections on eugenics,

hygiene and health politics in Central and Southeast Europe’, in Christian Promitzer,

Marius Turda, Sevasti Trubeta (eds), Hygiene – Health Politics / Eugenics: Engineering

Society in Twentieth-century Southeastern Europe (Budapest: Central European

University Press, forthcoming).

‘The extraordinary career of the virologist Eugen Haagen’, in Marion Hulverscheidt and

Anja Laukotter (eds), Infektion und Institution: Zur Wissenschaftsgeschichte des Robert

Koch-Instituts im Nationalsozialismus (Göttingen: Wallstein, 2009).

‘Genetics, eugenics and the Holocaust’, in Ron Numbers (ed.), Biology and Ideology

(Chicago University Press, 2009)

‘Migration, race et génocide: l’émergence d’un nouveau discours sur les droits de

l’homme’, in Pilar Gonzale-Bernaldo, Manuela Martini and Marie-Louise Pelus-Kaplan

(eds), Étrangers et Sociétés: contacts et regards croisés (Rennes: Presse Universitaire

de Rennes, 2009), pp. 265-70.

‘Medical refugees in Britain and the wider world’, Social History of Medicine, 22, 3 (2009).

‘Medical refugees and the modernisation of twentieth-century British medicine’, Social

History of Medicine, 22, 3 (2009).

‘The fractured crucible: images of the scientific survival. The defence of Ludwik Fleck’, in

Johannes Fehr, Nathalie Jas and Ilana Löwy (eds), Penser avec Ludwik Fleck –

Investigating a Life Studying Life Sciences (Zurich: Ludwik Fleck Centre, Collegium

Helveticum, 2009), pp. 47-62.

(with Olga Amsterdamska, Christian Bonah, Cornelius Borck, Johannes Fehr, Michael

Hagner, Marcus Klingberg, Ilana Löwy, Marina Schundler, Florian Schmaltz, Thomas

Scnelle, Antke Tammen, and Claus Zittel), ‘Medical science in the light of a flawed study

of the Holocaust: A comment on Eva Hedford’s paper on Ludwik Fleck’, Social Studies

of Science, 38 (2008), 937-944.

Die Wirkung des Nürnberger Ärzteprozesses auf die Medizin- und Pflegeethik

(Frankfurt/M: Mabuse, 2008).

‘The League of Nations, the Rockefeller Foundation, and public health in Europe in the

interwar period’, in Giannis Kyriopolous (ed., Dimosia ygeia kai koinonike politiki: O

Eleftherios Nenizilos kai I epohi tou (Athens: Papazisi, 2008), pp.79-94.

42


‘Human experiments and Nazi genocide: a problematic legacy’, Review of Bioethics

http://www.bioethicsreview.uoc.gr/en/Vol1Issue1.html

‘The Nazi medical experiments’, in Ezekiel J. Emanuel (ed.), Oxford Textbook of Clinical

Research Ethics (Oxford: OUP, 2008), pp. 18-30.

‘Alice Ricciardi von Platen’, The Guardian (13 March, 2008).

‘Deadly Medicine. Creating the Master Race’. Exhibition at the United States Holocaust

Memorial Museum, 2004 to October 2005 (essay review), Social History of Medicine, 21,

1 (2008), 208-212.

‘Foreword’ to Michal Simunek and Dietmar Schultze (eds), Die Nationalsozialistische

‘Euthanasie’ im Reichsgau Sudetenland und Protektorat Böhmen und Mähren 1939-

1945 (Prague: Institute of Contemporary History of the Academy of Sciences, 2008).

‘The origins of the hospice in the shadow of the Holocaust’, Giving, 2 (2008), 157-162.

‘Entschädigung der Sterilisierungs- und Euthanasie-Opfer nach 1945’, in Klaus-Dietmar

Henke (ed.), Tödliche Medizin im Nationalsozialismus. Von der Rassenhygiene zum

Massenmord (Cologne: Böhlau, 2008), pp. 31-46.

‘Medical refugees as practitioners and patients: public, private and practice records’,

Yearbook of the Research Centre for German and Austrian Exile Studies. Refugee

Archives: Theory and Practice, 9 (2008), 141-156.

‘Foreword: Volk and Forschung: A Science for the Nation’, in Michael Fahlbusch and

Ingo Haar (eds), Handbuch der völkischen Wissenschaften (Munich: Saur, 2008), pp. 3-

18.

‘“For the Love of Christ”. The French Vatican Mission to Germany’, Journal of

Contemporary History, vol. 43, 3 (2008) – Special issue ‘Relief and Rehabilitation’,

Guest Editor Jessica Reinisch.

‘Un internationaliste visionnaire confronté aux réalités de la guerre froide: John W.

Thompson et le programme de l’UNESCO pour l’Allemagne, 1945-1955’, 60 ans

d’histoire de l’UNESCO. Actes du colloque international 16-18 Novembre 2005 (Paris:

UNESCO, 2007), 253-262.

‘Zwischen Forschung und Genozid. Der Nürnberger Ärzteprozess 1946/47: Raphael

Lemkins Standpunkt über Menschenversuche und Genozid’, Acta Historica Leopoldina,

48 (2007), 79-87.

‘Blood’, ‘Demographic Policy’, ‘Eugenics’, ‘Euthanasia’, ‘H.F.K. Gunther’, ‘Health’,

Medicine’ in Cyprian Blamires (ed.), Historical Encyclopaedia of World Fascism (ABC,

Clio, 2007).

(Editor with M. Turda ) ‘Blood and Homeland’: Eugenics and Racial Nationalism in

Central and Southeast Europe, 1900-1940 (Budapest: Central European University

Press, 2006).

43


‘Ansteckungsherde. Die deutsche Bakteriologie als wissenschaftlicher Rassissmus,

1890-1920’, in Philipp Sarasin et al. (eds), Bakteriologie und Moderne. Studien zur

Biopolitik des Unsichtbaren 1870-1920 (Frankfurt am Main: Suhrkamp, 2006), pp. 354-

374.

‘German overtures to Russia, 1919-1925. Between racial expansion and national

coexistence’, in Susan Solomon (ed.), Doing Medicine Together. Germany and Russia

between the Wars (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2006), pp. 35-60.

‘Medical refugees in Wales 1930s-50s’, in Pamela Michael and Charles Webster (eds),

Health and Society in Twentieth-Century Wales (Cardiff: University of Wales Press,

2006), pp. 183-200.

‘Central Europe confronts German racial hygiene: Friedrich Hertz, Hugo Iltis and Ignaz

Zollschan as critics of German racial hygiene’, in M. Turda and P. Weindling (eds),

‘Blood and Homeland’: Eugenics and Racial Nationalism in Central and Southeast

Europe, 1900-1940 (Budapest: Central European University Press, 2006).

‘The evolution of Jewish identity: Ignaz Zollschan between Jewish and Aryan race

theories, 1910-1945’, in Geoffrey Cantor and Marc Swetlitz (eds), Jewish Tradition and

the Challenge of Darwinism (Chicago University Press, 2006), pp. 116-136.

‘From medical war crimes to compensation: the plight of victims of human experiments’,

in Wolfgang Eckart (ed.), Man, Medicine and the State (Stuttgart: Steiner Verlag, 2006),

pp. 237-249.

‘“Belsenitis”. Liberating Belsen, its hospitals, and selection for re-emigration, 1945-1948’,

Science in Context, 19, 3 (2006), 401-418. (Special issue on Medical Borders: Historical,

Political and Cultural Analyses).

‘As origenes da participação da América Latina na Organizaçãao da Saúde da Liga das

Nações, 1920-40 [The League of Nations Health Organisation and Latin America]’,

História, Ciências, Saúde – Manguinhos, 13, 3 (2006), 555-570.

‘Leo Alexander’, in W.U. Eckart and C. Gradmann (eds), Ärztelexikon - Von der Antike bis

zum zwanzigsten Jahrhundert (Berlin: Springer Verlag, 3 edn, 2006), pp. 6-7.

Research Dissemination

2009

Keynote Opening Address: ‘Historicising Bioethics: Informed Consent, Context and

Physician-Patient Relations’, 11th Biennial Conference, Australian and New Zealand

History of Medicine Society, Perth, 29 September 2009.

‘Wounding Victims and the Nazi Human Experiments’, War Wounds conference.

Australian National War Memorial, Canberra, 24 September 2009.

Contributor to the programme ‘Mendelssohn, the Nazis and me’, broadcast on BBC

Four, 26 June 2009.

44


‘Race, Eugenics and National Identity: from Racial Surveys to Racial States’, Opening

Lecture for Baltic Eugenics conference, Riga, 7 May 2009.

‘The Nuremberg Medical Trial: Origins, Aims, Legacies’, Nuremberg Trials Conference,

Frankfurt an der Oder, 23 April 2009.

‘Compensation, Care and Communion: Contrasting Views of Victims of Nazi Medical

Experiments’, Scolion inter-disciplinary conference on Pain, Jerusalem, 24 March 2009.

‘Nazi Human Experiments: From Medical War Crimes to Informed Consent’, Hebrew

University Medical School, 23 March 2009.

‘German Racial Research in Comparative Perspective’, Wroclaw University Medical

Faculty, 20 January 2009.

‘Reliving the Trauma: Compensating Victims of Nazi Human Experiments 1950-70’,

Beyond Camps and Slave Labour conference, Imperial War Museum, 8 January 2009.

2008

‘The Royal Society and Refugee Medical Scientists: the Contribution of A.V. Hill,

In Defence of Free Learning: the Past and the Present’. Council for Assisting Refugee

Academics 75 th Anniversary Conference [conference co-organiser], British Academy,

London, 5 December 2008.

‘Confronting Nazi Eugenics and the Racial State’ Pybus Seminar, Newcastle University,

1 November 2008.

‘German Racial Research in Comparative Perspective’.

‘Science, Planning, Expulsion: The National Socialist General Plan for the East’,

University of Toronto European Studies Conference, 15 October 2008.

‘From the “Nameless Dead” to Naming Victims: Research Methods and Problems’.

Oxford Brookes (Organiser), 25 September 2008.

‘Czechoslovak Medical Refugees in the UK, 1938-45’

‘Exile in and from Czechoslovakia during the 1930’s and 1940’s’, Centre for German

Exile Studies, University of London, 19 September, 2008.

‘From Prosecution to Historiography’: Summer Workshop on the Nuremberg Trials,

United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Washington DC – invited participant

1 August: Public lecture: ‘Victims, Witnesses and the Legacy of the Nuremberg Medical

Trial’, USHMM, 20-30 July 2008.

‘Fighting Tuberculosis: William Osler’s Engagement with Public Health in Oxfordshire’,

British Society for the History of Science/ History of Science Society/ Canadian Society

for the History of Science Joint Conference, Oxford, 4 July 2008.

‘Doctors and Nurses: Contrasting Responses to the Refugee Crisis of the 1930s’

‘Reconstituting a Traumatized Community. The German-Speaking Refugees of the

1930s and their Legacy to Britain’, BARGE (=‘British Archival Resources Relating to

45


German-Speaking Refugees, 1933-1950’), Closing Conference, British Academy,

London, 24 June, 2008.

‘A Terminal Case? Cold War Politics and the 1951 Closure of the International Health

Division of the Rockefeller Foundation’. WHO Global Health History Seminar, Geneva,

12 June, 2008.

‘Austrian Medical Refugees and the Modernisation of British Medicine, 1930s-50s’,

Vienna, ‘Vortrag im Josephinum’, 28 May 2008.

‘ “Artfremd” or Complementarity in Eugenic Collaborations: Siegfried Wellisch and His

Contribution to Sero-Anthropology’. Conference to mark the opening of the exhibition

‘Eugenics – the Fight against the Degeneration of the Race’, Warsaw University Library.

18 April 2008.

‘Races et Racisme: Mobilizing Science Against the Racial State’. Council for European

studies. Sixteenth International conference, Chicago, 7 March 2008.

‘Auden, Anxiety and Poetic Doctoring’, Medical Humanities Lecture, Durham University,

18 February 2008.

‘The International Career of the Virologist, Eugen Haagen’, Robert Koch Institute under

National Socialism, Berlin, 19 January 2008.

‘Anxiety, Social Adjustment and Maternal Attachment, 1930-1960: A Biographical

Thread in Anglo-American Psychiatry’. University of Warwick, History of Medicine series,

5 February 2008.

2007

‘Nazi Medicine and its Ethical Legacy’, University of Crete Symposium, ‘Experimentation

with Human Subjects: The Moral Limits of Biomedical Research’, Heraklion, 17

December 2007.

‘Nazi Eugenics’, Mémorial de la Shoah, Paris, panel ‘Nazi medicine, from 1933 to 1939’,

9 December 2007.

‘Anxiety, Stress and Social Adaptation, 1930s – 1950s: Physiological Testing and

Psychological Disorders’, Exeter, 6 December 2007.

‘The League of Nations, Rockefeller Foundation and Public Health in Europe in the

Interwar Period’. Public Health and Social Policy: Eleftherios Venizelos and his Time,

Athens. Keynote address. 8 November 2007.

BBC Television: See Hear! Contributor to programme on the ‘Deaf Holocaust’

(7 November 2007).

‘From “Medical War Crimes” to “Enlightened Consent”: the Origins of the Nuremberg

Code’, University of Bristol, Medical Humanities Seminar, 31 October 2007.

46


‘How Fit Are You? What Race Are You? The inception of eugenics in XIX century and

the application of racist theories to science’. Festival Storia, Saluzzo/ Turin: Meeting on

history of race theory, 14 October 2007.

‘Reframing German Eugenics’. The Social and Political Transformations of Biology, The

Faraday Institute, St Edward’s College, Cambridge University, 17-19 September 2007.

‘Contesting Race: International anti-racist networks of biomedical scientists in the 1930s

and 40s. Ernst Rüdin and the Congrès international de la population, Paris 1937.’

Establishing Medical Genetics. Programs, Practices, Political Contexts, ca 1910-1960,

University of Giessen, 29 June 2007.

‘Regenerating Mitteleuropa: Methodological and Theoretical Reflections’, Hygiene-

Health Politics – Eugenics: Engineering Society in Twentieth-century South-eastern

Europe, Free University Berlin, 31 May 2007.

‘European Medical Refugees and the Modernisation of British Medicine, 1930s-50’,

History of Medical Migration Symposium, University of Ulster/ Centre for the History of

Medicine in Ireland, 2 May 2007.

‘Medical Refugees in the UK and the Crisis of Medical Provision in the 1930s’. Crisis as

Opportunities in Interwar Health, Granada, 28 April 2007.

‘Problems of Documenting Medical Refugees: Public, Private and Practice Records’.

Refugee Archives: Theory and Practice, Centre for German Jewish Studies, University

of Sussex, 11-13 April 2007.

‘ “Our Racial Friends”: Disease, Degeneration and Social Darwinism, 1860-1940’. The

Legacies of Charles Darwin, Public Lecture Series, Institute of Advanced Study, Durham

University, 29 January 2007.

‘The Holocaust, Medicine and Medical Ethics’. International Conference in Memory of

Dr. Tomi Spencer. ‘Human Experimentation and its Victims’, 24 January 2007.

‘Fleckfieberforschung am RKI im Spannungsfeld von medizinischer und militärischer

Forschungsinteressen’. Das Robert Koch-Institut im Nationalsozialismus – eine

wissenschaftliche Bestandsaufnahme, Berlin, 20 January 2007.

2006

‘Blood and Homeland’, Lecture and Book Launch: Semmelweis Library, Budapest and

Institut f d Wissenschaft des Menschens, Vienna, 30 November – 1 December 2006.

‘Forging an International Coalition against Racism 1918-40’. Social medicine, medical

geography and health care for indigenous peoples: “Ethnic Pathology” (Max Kuczynski,

1925) in Germany, Russia, Latin America and beyond, 24-26 November 2006.

‘ “For the Love of Christ”: the Politics of Catholic Post-war Relief in Germany under Allied

Occupation’, 2 Balzan Workshop: Relief and Rehabilitation in the Immediate Aftermath

of War, Birkbeck College London, 16 June 2006.

47


‘Migration, Race and Genocide: The Emergence of a Human Rights Discourse’.

Etrangers. Colloque, Université Paris VII, 1 June 2006.

‘The International Coalition for Combating Nazi Racism’. EHESS Seminar, Paris, 22

March 2006.

‘The Rockefeller Foundation’s International Health Division and the Cold War’, EHESS

seminar, 14 March 2006.

‘Child Victims of the Nazi Medical Experiments’, Imperial War Museum/ Wiener Library

Workshop, 24 February 2006.

‘Informed or Enlightened Consent? Ethics at the Nuremberg Trials’, Harvard Population

Ethics Lecture, 2 February 2006.

‘Historicizing Research Ethics: The Harvard Grant Study on Social Adjustment, and

Clinical Research in the 1930s”. Harvard History of Science Seminar, 1 February 2006.

‘The Nuremberg Medical Trial and the Origins of Informed Consent’, Penn State University

[Invited Lecture], 30 January 2006.

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3. Individual Entries – Postdoctoral Fellows

Dr Yolanda Eraso

Wellcome Trust Research Fellow

Research

Argentine and Latin-American medical discourse in the twentieth century: psychiatry,

cancer, eugenic ideas; gender and welfare; social representations of motherhood

(narratives and visual images).

Current Projects

As part of a Wellcome Trust Fellowship Dr Eraso is currently working on public and

philanthropic initiatives in the fight against female cancer in Argentina, 1920-1960. She

investigates how gender variables have operated on the perception of cancer as a

‘female disease’, the development of state and philanthropic cancer care policies, and

the nature of medical treatments and medical specialisms.

Dr Eraso is also editing a book on ‘Gender and Welfare in Latin America’, which

analyses the provision of welfare before the emergence of the welfare state, with

particular emphasis on female charities/beneficent organisations. In addition, she is in

the process of writing a monograph that deals with the way in which medical

representations of maternity have been implicated, echoed and/or contested in certain

areas of the social and cultural field, in particular, literature, press and visual images.

Editorships

Member of the Editorial Board: Clinical Medicine: Case Reports (see: http://www.lapress.com/Clinical-Medicine-Case-Reports-j91)

Publications

Y. Eraso (ed.), Mujeres y Asistencia Social en Latinoamérica, siglos XIX y XX.

Argentina, Colombia, México, Perú y Uruguay, (forthcoming Alción Editora, 2009).

[Women and Welfare in Latin America, XIX-XX centuries]. Chapter 1: ‘Introducción:

Mujeres y asistencia social, problemáticas y perspectivas históricas’, and Chapter 7:

‘Maternalismo, religión y asistencia: La Sociedad de Señoras de San Vicente de Paul en

Córdoba, Argentina’.

Y. Eraso, ‘A burden to the state’. The reception of the German “active therapy” in an

Argentinian colony-asylum’, in Waltraud Ernst and Thomas Mueller (eds), Transnational

Psychiatries. Social and Cultural Histories of Psychiatry in Comparative Perspective, c.

1800-2000 (Cambridge Scholars Publishing, forthcoming 2009).

Y. Eraso, ‘Migrating Techniques, Multiplying Diagnoses: The Contribution of Argentina

and Brazil to Cervical Cancer “early detection” Policy’, História, Ciências, Saúde –

Manguinhos, [Bilingual publication: English and Portuguese] (forthcoming 2009).

Y. Eraso, ‘Género y Eugenesia: Hacia una taxonomía médico-social de las mujeresmadres

en la década del treinta’, in Historias de Luchas, Resistencias y

Representaciones. Mujeres en la Argentina, siglos XIX y XX (Universidad Nacional de

Tucumán, 2007), pp. 267-89.

49


Y. Eraso, ‘Biotypology, endocrinology and sterilisation: the practice of eugenics in the

treatment of Argentinian women during the 1930s’, Bulletin of the History of Medicine,

81, 4 (2007), 793-822.

Research Dissemination

Presented paper ‘Sex hormones and breast cancer: therapeutic practices in peripheral

places’, and organised panel session ‘Sites, Contexts and Contingencies in Cancer

Research and Therapies’ for the Annual Conference of the British Society for the History

of Science, University of Leicester, 2-5-July 2009.

In July 2009 Dr Eraso participated with a group of health professionals, researchers and

consumers to set up a ‘Consumer Research Partnership (CRP)’ within the Thames

Valley Cancer Network (NHS). The purpose of the CRP is ‘to ensure active involvement

of consumers in cancer research based partly or fully in Thames Valley, in order to

improve its quality and value.’ The group will help to shape the design and conduct

of future research into any aspect of cancer.

‘Transferring diagnostic techniques: the trajectories of colposcopy and Pap test in

Argentina and Brazil 1934-1960’. Presented at workshop ‘How cancer changed:

expanding the boundaries of medical interventions’, CERMES & Institut National du

Cancer - Paris, April 2009.

‘“Accustoming The Eye To See What Is Observed”. Politics, specialisms and tensions in

the use of diagnostic methods for the detection of cervical cancer in Argentina’.

Presented at workshop ‘How to deal with cancer? Research, Innovation and Politics’,

Maison Françasie d’ Oxford, Oxford University, 4 February 2009.

‘Medical styles, diverging spaces: The detection and treatment of gynaecological cancer

in Argentinian women, 1920-1960’, Gender, Health and Medicine in Historical

Perspective, Centre for Medical History, University of Exeter, July 2008.

‘“A mother is needed!” The newspaper as welfare provider in Córdoba (Argentina) in the

twenties’, annual conference of the Society for Latin American Studies (SLAS),

University of Nottingham, April, 2006.

50


Dr Projit B. Mukharji

Wellcome Trust Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes 2008-2009.

(From July 2009, Assistant Professor of History, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario,

Canada)

Research

Histories of ‘indigenous’ South Asian healing cultures; vernacularizations of biomedicine;

South Asian modernities; dynamics of subalternity; South Asia in the eyes of the British

subalterns; histories of sport and leisure in South Asia; histories and memories.

• Main historical period covered: c. 1707-1947

• ‘Indigenous’ Healing in South Asia

• Vernacular forms of ‘western’/ biomedicine

• Perceptions of British India on the streets of Imperial Britain

• Histories versus memories

• Microhistories of cricket and football in South Asia

Dr Mukharji’s forthcoming book Nationalizing the Body (Anthem) revisits some of the

best known episodes of colonial South Asian medical history through the vernacular

writings of South Asians who practised ‘western’ medicine. The book interrogates how

through their writings and practice, these doctors actually produced the bodies, spaces,

objects, sites etc. that constituted the ‘nation’. The book looks therefore at the productive

aspects of power, rather than – as is more common in the extant studies – at the

repressive aspects. In so doing it also de-centres and de-idealizes the nation, seeing it

instead as being constituted by the material realities of ‘national bodies’, ‘national

spaces’, ‘national objects’ etc., rather than as abstract ideas and ideologies. The book

thereby simultaneously argues that ‘western’ medicine (and modernity) is neither a

uniform nor homogenous entity. There are instead many vernacular ‘western’ medicines

(and many modernities). Moreover not all these ‘western’ medicines could have been

described as ‘state medicine’. Indeed the most robust strains of vernacular ‘western’

medicine in colonial Bengal were constituted in the medical market. Yet the market and

state were not here oppositionally positioned. Instead they were often mutually

constitutive, intersecting and relational. In short the book explores how South Asian

doctors working at the intersection of the state and the market, through their practices

and writings, appropriated and adopted ‘western’ medicine and deployed it to produce

the material realities of the nation.

Dr. Mukharji is currently working on a second book, A Social History of Healing in South

Asia (Routledge). This book seeks to go beyond the predominant framework of

understanding South Asian ‘indigenous’ healing through the study of various ‘medical

systems’, i.e. Ayurveda, Unani Tibb, Siddha etc. Borrowing liberally from medical

anthropology, this book challenges the discrete, homogenised images of distinct

‘medical systems’. Instead it recounts a plural and heterogeneous field of ‘indigenous’

healing and documents and analyses the diverse impacts of ‘modernity’. It also reinserts

‘indigenous’ healing into the social fabric of South Asian societies by using the

concept of ‘articulations’ developed by actor network theoreticians to trace the

constitutive links that each of these healing praxes had with ‘non-medical’ actors, forces,

movements.

51


Publications

Nationalizing the Body: The Medical Market, Print and Daktari Medicine, (London and

New Delhi: Anthem Press, forthcoming 2009).

A Social History of Healing [Title t.b.c.] (London and New Delhi: Routledge, forthcoming

2009).

‘Ambiguous imperialisms: British subaltern attitudes towards the “Indian War” of 1857’, in

Crispin Bates and Andrea Major (eds), [Title t.b.c.] (New Delhi: Sage, forthcoming 2009).

(Co-editor with Dolores Martinez) Football: From England to the World (London:

Routledge, 2008).

‘Pharmacology, “indigenous knowledge”, nationalism-few words from the epitaph of

subaltern science’, in Mark Harrison and Biswamoy Pati (eds), Society, Medicine and

Politics: Colonial India, 1850-1940s (London: Routledge, 2008).

‘“Feeble Bengalis” and “Big Africans”: African players in Bengali club football’, in Dolores

Martinez and Projit Mukharji (eds), Football: From England to the World, (London:

Routledge, 2008).

‘Jessie’s dream at Lucknow: Popular memorializations of dissent, ambiguity and class in

the heart of the Empire’, Studies In History, 24,1 (2008).

‘Dilemmas of modernity: Ayurvedic education in twentieth century Bengal’, Wellcome

History, 38 (2008) 12-13.

‘Bangali Ayurbed: Shastriyo Chikitsha-r Nimnoborgiyo Itihaash’ (Bengali Ayurveda:

Subaltern histories of a classical medical tradition) [in Bengali], Special issue on History

of Medicine, Ababhaas (Bengali Journal), Calcutta, 2008. [Forthcoming in Bengali].

‘“Ekti Prachin Jati-r Obokkhoy”: Uponibeshik Bharot-e Malaria o Jati-Tottvo, 1860-1930’,

Translation into Bengali of David Arnold, ‘“An Ancient Race Outworn’: Malaria and Race

in Colonial India, 1860-1930’, Special issue on History of Medicine, Ababhaas (Bengali

Journal), Calcutta, 2008. [Forthcoming in Bengali].

‘Can the subaltern sing? The “Indian War” in nineteenth-century British broadsides’, in

Sharmistha Gooptu and Boria Majumdar (eds), Revisiting 1857: Myth, Memory, History

(New Delhi: Roli Books, 2007).

‘Structuring plurality: Locality, caste, class and ethnicity in nineteenth-century Bengali

dispensaries’, Health and History 9, 1 (2007).

‘Going beyond elite medical traditions: the Case of Chandshi’, Asian Medicine: Tradition

and Modernity, 2, 2 (2006).

52


Research Dissemination

Co-organiser (with Anne Digby and Waltraud Ernst) ‘Crossing Colonial Historiographies:

Histories of Colonial and Indigenous Medicines in Transnational Perspective’, held at St

Anne’s College, Oxford, 15-17 September 2008. [Book to be published by Cambridge

Scholars, 2010.]

(Editor with W. Ernst), ‘In good health. The history of medicine in India: British

perspectives’, Biblio: a Review of Books, 12, 9/10 (2007).

53


Dr Veenu Pant

Research Fellow at Oxford Brookes 2008-09

Research

The development of indigenous medicine in Rajasthan and its role in public health,

1870-1919.

Dr Pant’s research is concerned with issues of colonial hegemony and paramountcy in

relation to medicine in the Princely States of Rajasthan during the late nineteenth and

early twentieth centuries. She is particularly interested in the impact of British proximity

and surveillance on different rulers and the development of Princely state policies.

Current Projects

Dr Pant is currently writing a monograph on ‘Ayurveda and Public Health in the Princely

States of Rajasthan’. She is also working on a comparative study of Ayurveda in the

Princely States of Jaipur and Bikaner during the rules of Maharaja Sawai Ram Singh Ji

and Sawai Madho Singh Ji of Jaipur and Maharaja Sir Ganga Singh Ji of Bikaner.

Research Dissemination

‘State Policies and Indigenous Medicinal System in Erstwhile Bikaner State of

Rajasthan’, paper presented at the conference ‘Crossing Colonial Historiographies:

Histories of Colonial and Indigenous Medicines in Transnational Perspective’, Oxford,

September 2008.

‘Indigenous Medicine and Empire: India under British Rule’, Gettysburg College,

Gettysburg, USA, 2007.

54


Dr Kim Price

Wellcome Trust Research Fellow

Research

Dr Price is interested in the relationship between medical practitioner and patient,

particularly, expectations, rights and duties and how this affects the – constantly shifting

– idea of a ‘standard of care’. His research began with public health and welfare in

nineteenth-century England, before focusing on the poor-law medical officers, who

straddled the oft-conflicting spheres of private and public medical practice. Despite the

bias, if carefully handled, medical conflicts are an excellent resource for ‘dissecting’ the

contact point of doctor and patient. Far from misleading, isolated events, conflicts can

reveal a great deal about the expectations and rights of both patient and doctor – a

snapshot of ‘frontline’ medical practice and its fault lines. In turn, this focus has led to a

current, Wellcome-funded, research on medical negligence and the perspective of the

patient under the New Poor Law. At present, this means that Dr Price is researching

medico-legal issues and British judiciary practice, bioethics, poverty and sickness and

the relationship of welfare to public and private medicine. In time, he will expand this

research, comparatively, into the private medicine of the US and the public medicine of

the UK’s NHS, offering a more complete history of medical negligence, malpractice and

conflict than has hitherto been available for those two countries. The research will be of

use to medical historians, but it will also serve medico-legal practitioners and health

professionals because it will add historical context to present-day debates on private and

public medicine, and the perceived ‘culture of litigation’.

Dr Price is currently in the process of publishing three articles from his PhD thesis and

will be publishing a book on pre-NHS medical negligence from research conducted

during the Wellcome Trust fellowship at Oxford Brookes University.

Publications

Price, K., ‘Towards a history of medical negligence’, Lancet, (forthcoming, Autumn 2009)

Research Dissemination

Presentation offering practical advice on how to get through the PhD viva process at

‘Viva Survivor’, workshop (led by Steve King), at the Institute of Historical Research,

London, 4 December 2008.

Advisor to the Action against Medical Accidents (AvMA)

Advisor to the National Patient Safety Agency (NPSA, NHS) report on the UK’s World

Health Organisation Patient Safety Champions scheme

55


Dr Ina Scherder

Wellcome Trust Research Fellow

Research

Irish medical history; history of anatomy and poverty in the nineteenth century; body

supply, medical education and professionalisation in Ireland.

Dr Ina Scherder’s research focuses on the history of anatomy in Ireland in the nineteenth

and early twentieth centuries. Dr Scherder is particularly interested in how extensive the

supply of and demand for corpses was and how supply routes were organised amongst

competing Irish medical schools. She reconstructs the ebbs and flows in body supply to

the Schools and explores the relationship between body supply and the medical

curriculum, and the importance of anatomical training for professional status, locating the

Anatomy Act, body supply and anatomical practice in the specific religious, political and

socio-cultural context of Ireland.

Current Projects

The impact of the Anatomy Act in Ireland: Body supply, medical education and

professionalisation in Ireland: 1832 to 1921. From August to October 2009, Dr Scherder

will be a stipendiary visiting fellow in the Department of Archeology, History, Cultural

Studies and Religion at the University of Bergen, funded by the Research Council of

Norway.

Publications

I. Scherder and E. T. Hurren, ‘Dignity in death? The dead body as an anatomical object

in England and Ireland, circa 1832 to 1900’, in Steven King and Andreas Gestrich (eds),

The Dignity of the Poor: Concepts, Practices, Representations, (Oxford University Press,

forthcoming 2010), pp. 1-52.

I. Scherder, ‘Galway workhouse scandals: pauper bodies and the Galway School of

Anatomy’, in E. T. Hurren, S. A. King and A. Gestrich (eds), Narratives of Poverty and

Sickness in Europe (Berghahn, forthcoming 2010).

I. Scherder, ‘The impact of the 1832 Anatomy Act in Ireland – central anatomy returns

1832 to 1921’, in C. Breathnach (ed.), Visual, Material and Print Culture in Nineteenth-

Century Ireland (Four Courts Press, forthcoming 2009).

I. Scherder, ‘Die Kommunale Armenfürsorge in Galway. Eine Studie zum

Zusammenhang der Entwicklung von Armenadministration und lokaler Verwaltung in

Irland, 1838-1921’, Trier ediss (2008). [The Galway Workhouses. Poor relief and local

government in Ireland, 1838-1921]

I. Scherder, review of K.D.M. Snell: Parish and Belonging. Community, Identity and

Welfare in England and Wales, 1700-1950 [Cambridge University Press, 2006], in:

sehepunkte 7 (2007), No 7/8.

I. Scherder, ‘Galway workhouses in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries: function and

strategy’, in A. Gestrich, S. A. King and L. Raphael (eds), Being Poor in Modern Europe.

Historical Perspectives 1800-1940 Bern [et al.] 2006, pp. 181-198.

56


Research Dissemination

Academic consultant for BBC Northern Ireland TV documentary on Burke and Hare.

‘The impact of the 1832 Anatomy Act in Ireland – central anatomy returns 1832 to 1921’,

paper given at the SSNCI annual conference ‘Visual, Material and Print Culture in

Nineteenth-Century Ireland’, at University of Limerick, 26-27 June 2008.

‘The Impact of the Anatomy Act in Ireland, 1832: Pauper bodies and the Galway School

of Anatomy’, paper given at the ESHSI annual conference ‘Medicine, Science and

Society in Ireland’, at Queen’s University Belfast, November, 17-18 2006.

57


3. Individual Entries – Researchers

The Centre has a number of researchers associated with specific grant-funded projects.

Dr Tudor Georgescu

Tudor Georgescu was awarded his PhD from Oxford Brookes in 2008. In 2009 he

started work on two projects: a Wellcome Trust funded pilot project ‘Romanian Eugenics

in its International Context, 1918-1944’, (Principal Investigator, Marius Turda); and, an

AHRC funded project ‘Victims of Human Experiments under National Socialism: Victims,

Perpetrators and Post-war Trials’, (Principal Investigator, Paul Weindling and Co-

Investigator Marius Turda).

Dr Anna von Villiez

Anna von Villiez was awarded her doctorate from the University of Hamburg. She is a

research officer for an AHRC funded project ‘Victims of Human Experiments under

National Socialism: Victims, Perpetrators and Post-war Trials’, (Principal Investigator,

Paul Weindling and Co-Investigator Marius Turda).

Alison Stringer

Alison Stringer studied for an MA in History of Medicine at Oxford Brookes. She has

worked as a researcher on the Wellcome Trust funded project ‘Sickness, Poverty and

Medical Relief in England, 1750-1851’, (Principal Investigator, Steve King), and has

continued to work with Professor Steve King on the sick poor.

Dr Helen Sweet

After the award of her PhD from Oxford Brookes in 2003, Helen Sweet was a research

officer at the Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, University of Oxford, from March

2003 to December 2006. She has continued her connection with the Unit as a research

associate. From July to November 2008, Helen was a researcher in the Centre at Oxford

Brookes for the Wellcome Trust funded pilot project ‘Outreach at McCord Hospital,

Durban, KwaZulu-Natal, circa 1950-2000’, (Principal Investigator, Professor Anne

Digby). Helen Sweet and Anne Digby have plans for future collaborative research on

South African medicine.

58


3. Individual Entry – Visiting Professor

Professor Estēe Dvorjetski

Ancient History and Archaeology, University of Haifa, Israel

The title of Visiting Professor of Oxford Brookes University was conferred upon Estēe

Dvorjetski in September 2004. Since then she has been a regular visitor to the Centre.

Professor Dvorjetski’s research ranges widely over the eastern Mediterranean basin

during the Biblical era throughout the Persian, Hellenistic, Roman, Byzantine and early

Moslem periods focusing on historical, medicinal and archaeological aspects. Her

interests are varied and her most immediate research is in the ancient history of

medicine. She is currently working on a monograph Public Health and Preventive

Medicine in the Holy Land: Historical-Archaeological Analysis.

Professor Dvorjetski has published more than 70 articles and chapters in books on daily

life, thermo-mineral baths, history of medicine, leisure-time activities, ecology, historical

geography, numismatics, and history of art. Her recent book, entitled Leisure, Pleasure

and Healing: Spa Culture and Medicine in Ancient Eastern Mediterranean (Brill, 2007)

focuses on daily life, healing cults, medical recommendations and treatments at the

curative spas during the Hellenistic, Roman, Byzantine, and early Moslem periods and

examines the social history of medicine at the therapeutic baths. It is based on Hebrew,

Aramaic, Syriac, Greek, Latin, and Arabic texts, Rabbinic documents, pilgrims travelbooks,

the Genizah fragments, cartographic evidence, and archaeological findings.

Publications

E. Dvorjetski and A. Berman, ‘Geva-Gaba: The Numismatic Finds from Khirbet el-

Hârithîyye and Tel Abu-Shusha as Historical Source’, Israel Numismatic Research,

5 (2010).

E. Dvorjetski and K. Abu-Much, ‘From Maioumas-Shuni to Al-Burg-Miamis: The

Historical Geography of the Suburb of Caesarea’, in K. Abu-Much (ed.), Maioumas-

Shuni throughout the Ages (Jerusalem: Israel Exploration Society and National Fund of

Israel, 2010).

E. Dvorjetski, ‘Maioumas-Shuni and the Maioumas Festivals and their Affinity to

Maioumases and Theatres in the Eastern Mediterranean Basin’, in K. Abu-Much (ed.),

Maioumas-Shuni throughout the Ages (Jerusalem: Israel Exploration Society and

National Fund of Israel, 2010).

E. Dvorjetski, ‘The Historical Geography of Sussita-Hippos in the Decapolis’, in A. Segal

(ed.), Tenth Season of Excavations at Sussita-Hippos (University of Haifa: Zinman

Institute of Archaeology, 2010).

E. Dvorjetski, ‘Public Health in Ancient Palestine: Lavatories – Historical and

Archaeological Aspects’, in A.E. Killebrew and A. Segal (eds), Art and Archaeology

during The Second Temple, The Mishna and The Talmud. Festschrift in Honour of Prof.

Rachel Hachlili (Leiden-Boston: Brill, 2010).

59


E. Dvorjetski, ‘Hammei-Tiberias and the Tormented Patients of Tiberias in Light of the

Cairo Genizah Fragments and Medieval Arabic Sources’ (Sent for publication).

E. Dvorjetski, ‘Between the Valley of Zebulun and the Valley of Jezreel: The Historical

Geography of Geva-Geba-Gaba-Jaba’, in A. Segal, J. Mlynarczyk and

M. Burdajewicz (eds), Sha’ar Ha’Amakim (Gaba): Excavations of the Hellenistic Site in

Kibbutz Sha’ar Ha’Amakim (Gaba) 1984-1998 – Final Report, Chapter 1, (Haifa: Zinman

Institute of Archaeology, University of Haifa, 2009), pp. 8-30 (Hebrew); pp. 6-34 (English

version).

E. Dvorjetski, ‘“Once Happened to be in A Certain Inn”: Aims and Deeds of Our Sages at

Hammat-Gader’, in Z. Safrai (ed.), Galilee Studies (Bar-Ilan University: Zehut Makom

Press, 2009), pp. 56-77 (Hebrew).

E. Dvorjetski, ‘Medical Properties of the Thermo-Mineral Waters in the Levant’, in A.N.

Angelakis, R. Drusiani and P. Laureano (eds), International Water Association, 2nd

International Symposium on Water and Wastewater Technologies in Ancient

Civilizations, Bari, Italy, 2009, pp. 1-15.

E. Dvorjetski, Leisure, Pleasure and Healing: Spa Culture and Medicine in Ancient

Eastern Mediterranean (Leiden-Boston: Brill, 2007).

E. Dvorjetski, ‘Leisure-Time Activities in Roman Palestine and Provincia Arabia:

Historical-Archaeological Analysis’, in K.E. Hendrickson and N.C.J. Pappas (eds),

Interpreting the Past: Essays from the 4th International Conference on European

History, Part II: Society and Culture in Antiquity (Athens: ATINER, Athens Institute

for Education and Research, 2007), pp. 37-48.

E. Dvorjetski, ‘Animals as Coin-Type in the Land of Israel in the Roman Period: Art and

Propaganda’, in B. Arbel, J. Terkel and S. Menashe (eds), Human Beings and Other

Animals in Historical Perspective (Jerusalem: Carmel Publishing House, 2007), pp. 99-

131 (Hebrew).

E. Dvorjetski, ‘Christians at the Thermo-Mineral Baths in Roman-Byzantine Palestine’,

ARAM Periodical, 18-19 (2006-2007), 13-32.

Research Dissemination

‘Medical Properties of the Thermo-Mineral Waters in the Levant in Antiquity’,

International Symposium on ‘Water and Wastewater Technologies in Ancient

Civilizations’, Bari, Italy, 28-30 May 2009.

‘Military and Medical History of Gadara as reflected by the City-Coins’, ARAM 25 th

International Conference on The Decapolis: History and Archaeology, The Oriental

Institute, University of Oxford, UK, 7-10 July, 2008.

‘Physicians-Patients Relationship in the Graeco-Roman World: An Introductory Session’,

Centre for Health, Medicine and Society, Oxford Brookes University, UK, 4 November,

2007.

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‘The Coins of Gadara as Historical Documents and their Affinity to the Thermo-Mineral

Baths of Hammat-Gader’, Israel Numismatic Society, Maritime Museum, Haifa, Israel, 29

May, 2007.

‘Leisure-Time Activities in Roman Palestine and Provincia Arabia: Historical-

Archaeological Analysis’, The 4 th International Conference on History: From Ancient to

Modern, Athens Institute for Education and Research, Athens, Greece, 28-31

December, 2006.

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3. Individual Entries – Research Associates

Dr Mike Emanuel

Dr Mike Emanuel worked for over thirty years in the pharmaceutical industry and was

Regional Head of Clinical Operations at Johnson and Johnson (formerly Janssen) with

responsibility for clinical trials in Europe, Africa and the Middle East. As part of this role

he worked and taught extensively on clinical trial design, trial implementation and ethics.

He is currently Deputy Director of the UK Clinical Research Network within the NHS. He

is a Fellow of The Royal Society of Medicine and an Honorary Fellow of the Institute of

Clinical Research. For 10 years he held a post as Research Associate at the Wellcome

Institute for the History of Medicine where he published mainly on the history of, and the

rise in, allergic disease.

Georgina Ferry

Georgina Ferry is a well respected science writer and broadcaster. After she studied

experimental psychology at Oxford she worked briefly for a science publisher before

joining New Scientist magazine as a section editor, writing regularly on biomedical

science and women in science. Soon afterwards she began to present science

programmes on BBC Radio 4 and researched, wrote and presented radio

documentaries and series such as ‘No Science Please – We’re British’. Since then she

has worked mostly as a freelance writer, editor and broadcaster. From 2000 to 2007 she

edited the Oxford University alumni magazine, Oxford Today, and since 1998 has written

four scholarly books for a non-specialist audience: Dorothy Hodgkin: A Life (Granta

Books,1998); (with John Sulston), The Common Thread: A Story of Science, Politics,

Ethics and the Human Genome (Bantam Books, 2002); A Computer called LEO: Lyons

Teashops and the World’s First Office Computer (Fourth Estate, 2004), Max Perutz and

the Secret of Life (Chatto & Windus, 2007).

Georgina Ferry is on the board of Oxford Inspires, the cultural development agency for

Oxfordshire, which explicitly includes scientific activities and arts-science collaborations

in the events it promotes. She has also run courses for scientists on engaging with the

media in an effort to increase their understanding of the constraints under which

journalists work.

John Perkins

John Perkins, who retired as Dean of Arts and Humanities at Oxford Brookes in 2004, is

a historian of science who works on chemistry in France, 1750-1810. He is interested in

the wider cultural, political and economic contexts in which chemistry was practiced and

in which the chemical revolution occurred, as well as the relations between chemistry,

pharmacy and medicine and the role of apothecaries in the development of chemistry.

His most recent publication is ‘Chemistry courses, the Parisian chemical world and the

Chemical Revolution, 1770-90’, Ambix 57 (March 2010). He is one of the convenors of

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the Oxford History of Chemistry Seminar Series and Treasurer of the Society for the

History of Alchemy and Chemistry.

Dr Tapti Roy

Research

History of the politics of rebellion in central India and of the culture of print and

performance in Bengal; modernity in relation to persisting conventions from ‘pre-modern’

times.

Main historical periods covered: nineteenth century, and the present

Dr Roy’s current work concerns the culture of printing in Bengal in the first 50 years of

the introduction of this new technology of book production. She examines the initiative

and enterprise of members of the local Bengali community in transmuting manuscripts

into print. One of the aims of her project is to re-examine the categories of ‘popular’ and

‘elite’ in the domain of literature and the spaces that were shared and claimed by both

while negotiating the imperatives of the colonial state and its officials. ‘Popular’ books in

nineteenth-century Bengal are often simplistically posited in opposition to those written

by the literati, however, Dr Roy believes the relationship between high and lowbrow was

much more nuanced. This is best mapped out if one looks at the uses that literary

writings were put to, particularly for reading and performance. Another aspect of this

project deals with the history of one particular bookseller and a publishing house that

traces itself back to the 1870s. By scrutinizing the books that it continues to produce, the

production process and costing, its writers and standards of writing, its customers and

users, it is possible to engage with the scope and meaning of ‘popular literature’ in the

present day. ‘Popular culture’, by its very nature, beckons different sections of people to

participate and therefore is bound to include both the elite and the popular. The nature of

participation and the conditions of inclusion need to be teased out. Dr Roy intends to

turn this current project into a larger, collaborative one that covers also regions outside

Bengal and employs a comparative perspective in order to test her argument on the

nature and dynamics of the ‘popular’ in literary culture.

Publications

‘Uprising in Bundelkhand’, in R. Llewellyn Jones (ed.), 1857 Revolt and Resistance

(Mapin Publications, forthcoming)

‘Rereading the Texts. Rebel Writings in 1857-58’, in Sabyasachi Bhattacharya (ed.),

Rethinking 1857 (Orient Longman, 2007)

Judy Slinn

Reader, Business School, Oxford Brookes University.

Research

Judy Slinn’s research interests combine the perspectives of a business historian with an

interest in corporate strategy issues. She has a particular focus on the pharmaceutical

and biotechnology industries and on professional service firms.

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Relevant Publications

V .M. Quirke and Judy Slinn (eds), Perspectives on 20th-century Pharmaceuticals (Peter

Lang, forthcoming 2009).

J. Slinn, ‘Patents and the UK pharmaceutical industry between 1945 and the 1970s’,

History and Technology, 24, 2 (2008), 191-205

J. Slinn, ‘A Cascade of medicine: the marketing and consumption of prescription drugs in

the UK 1948-2000’, in .L. F. Curth (ed.) From Physick to Pharmacology (Ashgate, 2008),

pp. 143-169.

J. Slinn, ‘Patents and the UK pharmaceutical industry between 1945 and the 1970s’,

History and Technology, (Special Issue) 24, 2 (June 2008), 191-205.

Research Dissemination

‘Dynamic capabilities in the UK pharmaceutical industry’. Paper presented at the

Management History Research Conference, Oxford Brookes University, July 2007.

‘Globalization and the pharmaceutical industry’. Paper presented at the Association of

Business Historians, June 2006.

Dr Annie Skinner

Dr Skinner worked in health and social care research before she was awarded her PhD

‘Growing Old in Oxford, 1930-1960’ from Oxford Brookes University in 2003. Within the

context of national legislative changes the thesis discovers how Oxford City responded

to these, and juxtaposes how families cared for their older relatives during the transition

from the poor law to the welfare state. A key focus of the thesis examined how one of

the pioneers of geriatric medicine, Dr Lionel Cosin, made significant contributions to

improve health and welfare for old people in post-war Oxford. By using oral histories,

alongside documentary sources, the thesis examined changing professional attitudes to

older people’s care; and explored how caring for old people at a time of great social

change was influenced by the local workhouse.

Since completion of her PhD she has worked on a variety of local history projects.

These included a Young Roots oral history project on childhood, funded by the Heritage

Lottery Fund (HLF), and an educational graveyard trail, also funded by the HLF. The

educational graveyard trail was carried out in Ss Mary and John Churchyard,

(constructed in 1876), in east Oxford. Through researching memorials and graves in the

churchyard and the lives of people and organizations they were associated with, she has

built a picture of the history of the community (see, http://www.ssmjchurchyard.org.uk/)

Dr Skinner’s research interests include history of ageing, oral history and local history.

She is currently researching the development of the suburb in east Oxford and has

written a book on the area, Cowley Road, A History, published by Signal Books, Oxford.

She has given various presentations on her work at conferences and to local residents

associations, carers’ centres and other groups.

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Dr Sam Sneddon

Dr Sam Sneddon held the post of Research Manager in the School of Arts and

Humanities from September 2007 to February 2009, replacing Dr Cassie Watson while

on Wellcome Trust funded research leave. During that time Dr Sneddon was a research

associate of the Centre and that association has been continued. Her research interests

are in: the social history of disease; historical epidemiology and historical demography;

and, infant mortality.

Dr Sneddon currently holds the post of Research Facilitator in the Social Sciences

Division of the University of Oxford.

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4. Postgraduate Students

At Oxford Brookes there is a thriving postgraduate community in the History of Medicine.

The History Department offers a taught Masters programme in the History of Medicine

(see section 6) and many of our MA students go on to pursue a PhD at Oxford Brookes.

The Centre offers a range of PhD topics that reflect the specific research interests of its

staff. Staff in the Centre are always willing to discuss any research proposal with

potential applicants to the MPhil/PhD programme, provided that it is in a relevant area

and there is supervisory capacity. The Centre has a good record in obtaining funding for

postgraduate students and helping them pursue an academic career in the History of

Medicine. Two current postdoctoral fellows in the Centre recently completed their

doctorates at Oxford Brookes.

MA Awards

The following students have successfully completed the MA in the History of Medicine:

2004/2005

Richard Biddle* (Funded by an AHRC Master’s Award)

Charlene Dekens* (Part-time 2003/2005)

Emily Yeats* (Funded by a Wellcome Trust Master’s Award)

2005/2006

Derek McMillan*

Bruce Balmer* (Funded by a Wellcome Trust Master’s Award)

2006/2007

Graham Baker* (Funded by a Wellcome Trust Master’s Award)

George Campbell Gosling* (Funded by a Wellcome Trust Master’s Award)

Marnie Moran

Tashia Scott

2007/2008

Lynsey Cullen* (Funded by a bursary from the Wellcome Trust Strategic Award)

Fraser Joyce (Funded by a Wellcome Trust Master’s Award)

John O’Brien (Part-time 2006/2008)

Lauren Paice (Funded by a bursary from the Wellcome Trust Strategic Award)

Rosemary Smith (Part-time 2006/2008)

Daniel Wrapson

[* passed with distinction]

The following students will complete the MA in the History of Medicine in 2009:

John Hall (Part-time 2007/2009)

Carol Flynn (Part-time 2007/2009)

Natalie Hanson (Funded by a bursary from the Wellcome Trust Strategic Award)

Paula Bowles (Part-time 2007/2009)

Emily Rootham (Funded by a bursary from the Wellcome Trust Strategic Award)

Elizabeth Sparrow (Funded by a Wellcome Trust Master’s Award)

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PhD awards

Postgraduate students in History of Medicine awarded the degree of Doctor of

Philosophy during the review period are listed below, with the thesis title, director of

studies (DoS) and funding source:

2006

Yolanda Eraso, ‘Medical discourse and social representations of motherhood in the city

of Cordoba (Argentina), 1900-1946’. DoS: Professor Anne Digby. (Funded by a

studentship as part of the Wellcome Trust Enhancement Award, 2003, and an Overseas

Research Student award.)

2007

Richard Dyson, ‘The nature of urban poverty: an Oxford case study c. 1760-1835’. DoS:

Professor Steven King.

Fiona Hutton, ‘Medical education and the Anatomy Act in nineteenth-century England’.

DoS: Professor Steven King.

John Zamet, ‘The German and Austrian refugee dentists: the response of the British

authorities 1933-45’. DoS: Professor Paul Weindling.

2008

Lynn Sorge-English, ‘Staymakers of London: production, consumption, and body

transformation, 1680-1810’. DoS: Professor Steve King.

Kim Price, ‘A regional, quantitative and qualitative study of the employment, disciplining

and discharging of workhouse medical officers of the New Poor Law throughout

nineteenth-century England and Wales’. DoS: Professor Steven King. (Funded by an

AHRC doctoral studentship, 2004.)

Tudor Georgescu, ‘The eugenic fortress: the Transylvanian Saxon Experiment with

‘national renewal’ in interwar Romania’. DoS: Professor Paul Weindling. (Funded by a

Wellcome Trust doctoral studentship, 2005.)

2009

Elaine Bevan, ‘“It was our place to bow and to be at their bidding.” Servants and servant

keepers in 19th-century Lancashire’. DoS: Professor Steven King.

The following students will be submitting doctoral theses for examination in 2009/2010:

Richard Biddle, ‘Dissecting the medical marketplace: The development of medicine in

Portsmouth ca. 1780-1900’. DoS: Professor Steven King. (Funded by a Wellcome Trust

doctoral studentship, 2005.)

Tim Philipson, ‘The sick poor and the quest for medical relief in Oxfordshire ca. 1750-

1850’. DoS: Professor Steven King. (Funded by a Wellcome Trust doctoral studentship,

2004)

Martin Ramsbottom, ‘Poor Relief in Three Lancashire Townships - 1800 to 1860’.

DoS: Professor Steven King.

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Anne Shepherd, ‘The public and private institutionalisation of the insane in late

nineteenth-century Surrey. Gender and class at Brookwood Asylum and Holloway

Sanatorium’. DoS: Professor Anne Digby.

Other students currently registered on the MPhil/PhD History of Medicine programme

are listed below.

Full-time students:

Bruce Balmer, ‘Health provision for the sick poor of South-East Leicestershire between

1750 and 1834’. DoS: Professor Steven King. (Funded by a Wellcome Trust doctoral

studentship, 2006.)

Lynsey Cullen, ‘Patient case records of the Royal Free Hospital’. DoS: Professor Steven

King. (Funded by a Wellcome Trust doctoral studentship, 2008.)

George Campbell Gosling, ‘Co-ordinating diversity: The mixed economy of healthcare in

Bristol, 1918-1948’. DoS: Dr Glen O’Hara. (Funded by a Wellcome Trust doctoral

studentship, 2007.)

Nichola Hunt, ‘Nameless victims? – The Soviet experience of Nazi medicine: statistics

stories and stereotypes’. DoS: Professor Paul Weindling. (Funded by an AHRC doctoral

studentship, 2007.)

Fraser Joyce, ‘Naming the dead: establishing the identity of the unknown body in Britain,

1800-1936’. DoS: Dr Katherine Watson. (Funded by a Wellcome Trust doctoral

studentship, 2008.)

Aleksandra Loewenau, ‘The Impact of concentration camp experiences on Polish

inmates: the aftermath of the Nazi medical experiments’. DoS: Professor Paul

Weindling. (Funded by an AHRC doctoral studentship, 2007.)

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Part-time students:

Michael James, ‘The effect on family life during the late Georgian period of indisposition,

medication, treatments and the resultant physical and psychological outcomes’. DoS:

Professor Steven King.

Alison Stringer, ‘“For his assiduous attention in a very sickly year. . .”: The role of

parochial practice in the professionalisation of medicine in 18th- and 19th- century

England’. DoS: Professor Steven King.

Sylvia Whitmarsh, ‘The working-class suffragette: Annie Kenney, and her role within the

Women’s Social and Political Union. A critical biographical analysis’. DoS: Professor

Steven King.

The following students have enrolled as part-time students but are not yet registered on

the MPhil/PhD programme:

Beryl Loughran, DoS: Professor Steven King.

Julia Smethurst, provisional title: ‘The Transmission of trauma: a study of Mengele’s

twins and generational trauma.’ DoS: Professor Paul Weindling.

Jenny Wright, provisional title: ‘Recruitment of medical women in the 1960s and 1970s’.

DoS: Professor Anne Digby.

History of Medicine PhD training programme

In addition to the theoretical and practical training provided by the University, PhD

students have the opportunity to attend a national training course. For the past three

years, the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL and the Centre for

Health, Medicine and Society: Past and Present at Oxford Brookes have been running a

course for History of Medicine PhD students in the UK, with the support of the Wellcome

Trust. The sessions, which are held on Saturdays at UCL, have covered such useful

topics as presentation skills, publication, funding, the job market and the PhD viva. The

course has also provided an excellent opportunity for meeting other students in the field.

Staff from the Centre have contributed sessions to the programme.

Postgraduate symposia

Each year students in the School of Arts and Humanities organise postgraduate

symposia where students from across the School contribute papers.

The following History of Medicine postgraduate students gave presentations in 2008-09:

Winter Symposium, 6 December 2008

Nichola Hunt, ‘Nameless victims: Nazi human experiments on Russians in World War II:

statistics, stories and stereotypes’.

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Spring Symposium, 9 May 2009

Fraser Joyce: ‘Transitions in medico-legal practice and their influence on the role of the

community in the identification process’.

Michael James: ‘Mistress of a Georgian household – dominant as carer but compliant as

sufferer’.

Lynsey Cullen: ‘The Royal Free Hospital: from out-patient dispensary to pioneering

voluntary institution’.

History of Medicine research student conference

A History of Medicine Research Student Conference was held at the Wellcome Trust

Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL on the 19th and 20th June 2008. The

conference was jointly organised by the Centre for Health, Medicine and Society: Past

and Present at Oxford Brookes and the Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of

Medicine at UCL, with support from the Wellcome Trust, the AHRC, the Royal Historical

Society and the Merton Trust. George Campbell Gosling played a key role in the

organisation of the conference. The keynote address was given by Professor Anne

Hardy from UCL, and staff from the Centres at Oxford Brookes and UCL chaired

individual themed sessions. The following students from Oxford Brookes presented

papers:

Nichola Hunt, ‘Nameless victims? Nazi human experiments on Russians in World War II:

statistics, stories and stereotypes’.

Aleksandra Loewenau, ‘The complexity of the Dr Wladislaw Dering case’.

Richard Biddle, ‘Health and the naval dockyards, Portsmouth c.1823-1869’.

Alison Stringer, ‘Conflict and negotiation: Poor Law medical contracts and the balance of

power, 1750-1834’.

Bruce Balmer, ‘The age of mentalities and the knell of the Old Poor Law’.

George Campbell Gosling, ‘‘‘Open the other eye”: Civic duty and hospital contributory

schemes in Bristol, c.1927-1948’.

Other conferences

George Campbell Gosling presented a paper “‘Social ownership consumerism and the

NHS: Foundation Trusts in intellectual context’ at the workshop ‘Health Care and the

People’, held at Glasgow Caledonian University from 13 to 14 January 2009.

Tudor Georgescu has presented a number of conference papers and a selection is listed

below:

‘Alfred Csallner and Saxon Dysgenic Crises in Interwar Transylvania.’ Presented at the

conference ‘Hygiene – Health Politics – Eugenics: Engineering Society in Twentiethcentury

Southeast Europe.’ Freie Universität Berlin, 31 May 31-2 June 2007.

70


‘Interwar Transylvanian Saxon “National Biology” and Visions of Racial Regeneration:

The Eugenic Attempt to Refashion and Rejuvenate the Saxon “Nation” in Romania.’

Presented at the symposium ‘Medicine in the Balkans: Evolution of Ideas and Practice to

1945.’ Royal Asiatic Society London, 24-25 January 2008.

‘Of Politics and Eugenics: The Transylvanian Saxon fascist “Self-Help” movement and

its embrace of eugenic visions of national regeneration in interwar Romania.’ Presented

at the ‘Sixteenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies.’

University of Chicago, 6-8 March 2008.

‘Transylvanian Saxon Visions of Racial Regeneration in Interwar Romania.’ Presented at

the conference ‘Eugenics – Modernisation and Biopolitics.’ Institute of History of the

Polish Academy of Science Warsaw, 17-19 April 2008.

The Voluntary Action History Society

PhD students and staff in the Centre have participated in events organised by the

Voluntary Action History Society (VAHS), which was formed in 1991 to advance the

historical study and understanding of voluntary action and of charitable and voluntary

organisations. The VAHS is based in the UK but has an international membership. The

Society carries out a number of activities including: monthly seminars held at the

Institute of Historical Research (IHR), London; postgraduate workshops and training

events; biennial research conferences; and occasional conferences and symposia.

George Campbell Gosling is an active committee member of the VAHS. He is the

seminar convenor for the VAHS and is a founding member of the postgraduate and

early-career sub-committee. On 27 April 2009, he presented a paper at the IHR entitled,

‘“Towards unification”? The hospital contributory scheme problem in Bristol before 1948’.

Lynsey Cullen will be giving a paper at the IHR on 28 September, entitled ‘The first lady

almoner: the appointment, position and findings of Miss Mary Stewart at the Royal Free

Hospital, 1895-1899’. The VAHS seminar series is to be included in the IHR’s 2009-10

pilot project of podcasting seminars, and Lynsey Cullen will have the distinction of being

the first seminar speaker to be podcast.

A VAHS workshop for postgraduates and early-career researchers on the theme

Medicine and Charity in History’ was held at Oxford Brookes on 21 February 2009. The

workshop featured papers on a range of subjects – such as voluntary hospitals in

modern Britain, medical charity in medieval Europe, American public health campaigns,

abortion, and philanthropy in cancer research – followed by a roundtable discussion led

by Professor Anne Digby and Professor Steven King. George Campbell Gosling has

been successful in obtaining a grant of £1,830 from the Economic History Society to

support a planned series of quarterly workshops modelled on the February 2009 event.

The next workshop, to be held at the University of Birmingham on 13 November 2009,

will be on the theme of ‘Campaigning in Contemporary History’.

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Postgraduate students’ selected publications

[Publications for Yolanda Eraso and Kim Price are listed in the section on Research

Fellows]

R. Biddle, ‘From optimism to anger: Reading and the local consequences arising from

the hospital plan for England and Wales 1962’, Family and Community History, 10, 1

(2007), 5-18.

R. Biddle, ‘Naval shipbuilding and the health of dockworkers c. 1815-1871’,

(Forthcoming, Family and Community History, 12, 2009). [Part of a special edition of the

journal, emanating from the Wellcome Trust History of Medicine Research Student

Conference, June 2008.]

R. Dyson, ‘Who were the poor of Oxford in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth

centuries?’, in A. Gestrich, S. King and L. Raphael (eds), Being Poor in Modern

Europe. Historical Perspectives 1800-1940 (Oxford: Peter Lang, 2006), pp. 43-68.

M. Feldman, M. Turda and T. Georgescu (eds), Clerical Fascism in Interwar Europe.

(Abingdon: Routledge, 2008).

T. Georgescu, ‘Discursul eugenic Sasesc Transilvanean, 1885-1944 (‘Transylvanian

Saxon eugenic discourse, 1885-1944’ [in Romanian]), Cuvantul, 3 (2008), 6-8.

T. Georgescu, ‘Fortareata eugenica: comunitatile sasesti din Transilvania in anii 1933-

1940’ (‘The eugenic fortress: The Transylvanian Saxons 1933-40’ [in Romanian]), in

Sorin Antohi (ed.), România Mare Revisited: Imaginar, Istorie, Memorie (Greater

Romania Revisited: Imagination, History, Memory) (Bucharest: Polirom, forthcoming

2009).

T. Georgescu, ‘The eugenic fortress: Alfred Csallner and the Transylvanian Saxon

eugenic discourse in interwar Romania’, in Marius Turda, Sevasti Trubeta, and Christian

Promitzer (eds), Hygiene, Health and Eugenics in Southeast Europe to 1945 (Budapest:

Central European University Press, forthcoming 2010).

T. Georgescu, ‘Pursuing the Fascist promise: the Transylvanian Saxon “self-help” from

genesis to empowerment, 1922-1935’, in Robert Pyrah and Marius Turda (eds), Culture

and Identity in Central Europe (Oxford: Legenda, forthcoming 2010).

T. Georgescu and M. Turda (eds), ‘Race and anthropology in interwar Central and

Eastern Europe’, (special issue) Focaal (forthcoming, 2010).

T. Georgescu, The Eugenic Fortress: The Transylvanian Saxon Experiment with

‘National Renewal’ in Interwar Romania. Budapest: Central European University Press,

forthcoming (2010).

G. C. Gosling and S. Soanes, ‘Healthcare and the Community in Modern Britain: An

Introduction’, focus issue of Family and Community History, 12, 2 (forthcoming

November 2009).

G. C. Gosling, ‘“Co-operate! Co-ordinate! Unify!” The 1920 proposal to amalgamate the

medical charities of Bristol’, Southern History, vol. 29 (2007), 83-106.

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G. C. Gosling, ‘The patient contract in Bristol’s voluntary hospitals, c.1918-1929’,

University of Sussex Journal of Contemporary History, 11 (2007). Available from

http://www.sussex.ac.uk/history/documents/gosling_final_word11.pdf

F. Hutton, ‘The working of the 1832 Anatomy Act in Oxford and Manchester’, Family and

Community History, 9, 2 (2006), 125-139.

M. James, ‘A Georgian gentleman: child care and the case of Harry Tremayne, 1814-

23’, Family and Community History, 9, 2 (2006), 79-90.

A. Shepherd, ‘Mental Health Care and Charity for the Middling Sort: Holloway

Sanatorium 1885-1900’, in A. Borsay, and P. Shapely (eds), Medicine, Charity and

Mutual Aid. The Consumption of Health and Welfare in Britain, c1550-1950 (Aldershot:

Ashgate, 2007), pp. 163-182.

A. Stringer, ‘Depth and diversity in parochial healthcare: Northamptonshire 1750-1830’,

Family and Community History, 9, 1 (2006), 43-54.

S. King and A. Stringer, ‘The dignity of the sick poor in English pauper letters, 1810-

1840’, in A. Gestrich and S. A. King (eds) The Dignity of the Poor: Concepts, Practices,

Representations (Oxford University Press, forthcoming 2010).

S. King and A. Stringer, ‘“I have once more taken the leberty to say as you well know”:

The development of rhetoric in the letters of the English sick poor 1780s-1830s’, in S.A.

King (ed.), Narratives of Poverty and Sickness in Europe 1780-1938 (Berghahn,

forthcoming 2010).

S. King and A. Stringer, ‘Sickness and its relief in rural Midland and East Anglian

communities 1730-1820’, in S. A. King and R. M. Smith (eds), Medicine and Institutional

Cultures of the Poor (Oxford University, forthcoming 2010).

Awards

Nichola Hunt and Aleksandra Loewenau were awarded AHRC Library of Congress

Scholarships in 2009, enabling them to visit Washington DC to access the research

collections held at the Library of Congress.

Aleksandra Loewenau also received an award from the Immigration History Research

Center at Minnesota University to fund a research visit in Minneapolis from 17-25 August

2009.

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5. Visitors

The Centre is keen to develop collaborative research networks and it regularly attracts

scholars from all over the world. Visitors based in the Centre during the review period

include:

2005/06

Shuhei Ikai, an associate professor in the Faculty of Economics at Saga University,

Japan, first visited the Centre at the beginning of 2005 and made a second visit in 2006

from January to July. He worked with Professor Anne Digby and other staff in the Centre

on a collaborative research project on a comparative history of health care in Japan, the

UK and US. In June, he presented a paper entitled ‘The Growth of Hospital Practice in

the First Half of the 20th Century in Japan’ for the History of Medicine seminar

programme. In January 2007, Professor Digby was an invited speaker at an international

conference organised by Professor Ikai on comparative hospital history, held in Tokyo.

The Centre has established a collaborative research partnership with the Stein Rokkan

Centre for Social Studies at the University of Bergen in Norway. At the beginning of

2006, the Centre hosted visits from two scholars from the Stein Rokkan Centre.

Dr Temu Ryman, a post-doctoral fellow, made a three-week visit in January and

February to work on his project on the anti-tuberculosis campaign in northern Norway

circa 1900-1960, in comparative perspective. Elisabeth Koren was based in the Centre

from February to April, conducting research in the UK for her doctoral dissertation

dealing with the Norwegian health policy towards seamen 1890-1970. In March

Elisabeth gave a seminar paper entitled ‘The Norwegian Beriberi Commission 1902 and

Seamen’s Health’.

2006/07

Professor Estēe Dvorjetski, a Visiting Professor of Oxford Brookes University from the

University of Haifa, Israel, visited the Centre from mid-January until the end of March

2007. This was Professor Dvorjetski’s second visit to the Centre; she had previously

spent a sabbatical year at Oxford Brookes from August 2004 to September 2005

carrying out research for her monograph ‘Leisure, Pleasure and Healing: Spa Culture

and Medicine in Ancient Eastern Mediterranean’, which was published by Brill in Spring

2007.

Professor Paul-André Rosental, Directeur d’études à l’École des Hautes Études en

Sciences Sociales (EHESS, Paris), was a Visiting Professor in the Centre during April

and May, funded by the Centre’s visiting scholar programme. His visit aimed to further

joint work on studies of populations, and social protection and health. He contributed a

paper on the distinctive qualities of French eugenics at a workshop on ‘Eugenics,

Population and French Politics in the Twentieth Century’, convened by Professor Paul

Weindling on 1 May.

2007/08

Professor Gail Savage, from St Mary’s College of Maryland, spent a sabbatical year

from August 2007 to July 2008 in the History Department as part of the Department’s

Visiting Scholar Programme. Professor Savage shares research interests with both staff

in the Centre and the wider History Department. During her visit she completed her book

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on the history of divorce. She organised a workshop on 3 April 2008 for historians on the

problems of data collection, quantitative analysis and presentation.

Professor Estēe Dvorjetski visited the Centre from mid-September until the end of

December. During her stay she contributed to the teaching programme; for example, she

taught an introductory session on ‘Physicians-Patients Relationship in the Graeco-

Roman World’ for the History of Medicine MA module ‘Patients and Practitioners’.

Professor Dvorjetski was also involved in developing a first-stage module ‘The Genesis

of Medicinefor the new History of Medicine combined honours degree. She worked

with Professor Steven King on a joint application for a research grant, with the aim of

producing a monograph on ‘Public Health and Preventive Medicine in the Holy Land:

Historical-Archaeological Analysis’.

Professor Paul-André Rosental, Directeur d’études à l’EHESS, Paris, received a

stipendiary fellowship from the School of Arts and Humanities to spend time in April and

May 2008 working with Professor Steve King on a research project on the history of

migration.

Dr Olga Bright, from California State University, Chico, was a visitor in the Centre from

April to June 2008. Her research interests in health care insurance and public and

private health care systems have obvious fit with the research theme of the Centre’s

Strategic Award on public and private care.

Professor Gautum Bhadra, a senior member of the Centre for Studies in Social

Sciences Calcutta (CSSC), visited the UK in June and July 2008, funded by an Oxford

Brookes University Visiting Fellowship, sponsored by Professor Waltraud Ernst.

Professors Bhadra and Ernst worked on a project on the history of alcohol consumption

and advertising in India during the colonial period. At a meeting held on 18 June

Professor Bhadra gave a presentation on his research and the potential for future

collaborative research involving staff in the School of Arts and Humanities.

Dr Valentin-Veron Toma, from the ‘Francisc Rainer’ Institute of Anthropology,

Bucharest, was awarded an Oxford Brookes University Visiting Fellowship, sponsored

by Dr Marius Turda, enabling him to spend June and July 2008 in Oxford. Drs Toma and

Turda are involved in collaborative research on heredity, psychiatry and eugenics in

modern Romania in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.

Dr Thozhukkatt V Sekherr (International Institute for Population Studies), Dr

Biswamoy Pati (University of Delhi), Ms Shilpi Rajpal and Mr Naveen Thomas visited

the UK in June and July to work with Professor Waltraud Ernst on the Wellcome Trust

International Collaborative Research Initiative Grant (CRIG): ‘Colonial Medicine and

Indigenous Health Practices in Southern and Eastern Princely States of India, c. 1880-

1960’.

2008/09

Dr IIana Löwy, a senior researcher at INSERM, Villejuif, France, spent four months in

the Centre from October 2008 to February 2009, funded by an Oxford Brookes

University Visiting Fellowship, sponsored by Viviane Quirke. Dr Löwy worked on a

project on the detection and prevention of women’s cancers in historical and

comparative perspective, in collaboration with Drs Viviane Quirke and Yolanda Eraso.

She participated at meetings of the Oxford Brookes Cancer Care Network and gave a

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seminar to this group in November, entitled ‘Testing for genetic susceptibility for breast

and ovarian cancer’. In February 2009, she presented a paper ‘“The right tool for the

job”, But what is the job?’ at a workshop ‘How to Deal with Cancer? Research,

Innovation and Politics’, held at Maison Françasie d’ Oxford, University of Oxford. Dr

Löwy also taught a session on technology in the hospital for the History of Medicine MA

module ‘The Hospital in History.’

Dr Bodhisattwa Kar, a postdoctoral fellow at the Centre for Studies in Social Sciences

at Calcutta (CSSSC), spent one month in the UK from 1 May to 30 June 2009, funded by

a British Academy (BA) Visiting Fellowship sponsored by Professor Waltraud Ernst. The

purpose of his visit was to work on a collaborative research project ‘The cultural and

political economies of opium in British Assam, c. 1800-1942’, with Professor Ernst. Dr

Kar presented a paper ‘Addicts and elites: Political and cultural economies of opium in

British Assam’ at a one-day symposium on South Asia research at Oxford Brookes

University, held on 5 May.

In the academic year 2009-10, the Centre will be host to the following visiting scholars:

Professor Estēe Dvorjetski will be visiting the Centre from September to December

2009. Her principal aim is to conduct further research and write chapters for a

monograph in preparation entitled ‘Public Health and Preventive Medicine in the Holy

Land: Historical-Archaeological Analysis’.

Professor Octavian Buda, Professor in History of Medicine at the ‘Carol Davila’

Medical University in Bucharest, will be spending three months in the Centre – the dates

have yet to be confirmed. His visit will be funded by an Oxford Brookes University

Visiting Fellowship, sponsored by Professor Steven King. Professor Buda’s research

interests in the history of medicine include forensic psychiatry.

Dr Markku Hokkanen, a Postdoctoral Research Fellow of the Academy of Finland and

docent in general history in the Faculty of Humanities at the University of Jyväskylä,

Finland, has been awarded an Oxford Brookes Visiting Fellowship, sponsored by

Professor Anne Digby. The dates for the three-month visit have yet to be confirmed but

Dr Hokkanen is expected to come to Oxford in January 2010. Dr Hokkanen has

previously made short visits to the Centre, on one occasion as an invited seminar

speaker. Collaboration between Anne Digby, who works on South Africa, and Marrku

Hokkanen, whose research is on Malawi, will contribute to an international strand in the

Centre’s Wellcome Trust Strategic Award on public and private health care.

Dr Biswamoy Pati, Reader in History at Univesity of Delhi, has been awarded an

Oxford Brookes Visiting Fellowship, sponsored by Professor Waltraud Ernst. The dates

for the two-month visit have yet to be confirmed. Dr Pati will be carrying out research for

a project, ‘Leprosy in Colonial and Postcolonial Orissa (India), c. 1860-1960’, and will be

involved in writing joint publications with Waltraud Ernst, including a jointly edited book

for part of an OUP series ‘Themes in Indian History’.

Dr Indrani Sen, from the Department of English at the University of Delhi, will be visiting

the Centre in 2009-2010 (dates to be confirmed). The purpose of the visit is for Dr Sen

and Professor Waltraud Ernst to finalise the work schedule and chapter structure of a

jointly written research monograph on ‘Mad-dogs and Englishwomen. Mentally ill

Memsahibs during the British Raj, c. 1800-1890’, for submission to Cambridge Scholars

Publishing.

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6. Grants

The medical historians at Oxford Brookes have been successful in obtaining grants from

a number of external funding bodies. In addition to grants awarded to individual

members of staff, the Centre has received core funding from the Wellcome Trust with

the award of an Enhancement Award in 2003 and a Strategic Award in 2007. Grants

held by staff in the Centre during the review period are listed below. Dates for the

duration of the award are given and also the date of the award.

Grants to the Centre:

o Centre for Health, Medicine and Society: Wellcome Trust Enhancement Award

(£250,000).

1 October 2003 – 30 September 2008. (May 2003)

o Centre for Health, Medicine and Society (Steven King, Anne Digby, Elizabeth

Hurren, Alysa Levene, Tim McHugh, Glen O’Hara, Viviane Quirke, Marius Turda,

Katherine Watson, Paul Weindling): Wellcome Trust Strategic Award (£646,626).

1 October 2007 – 30 September 2012.

Theme: Health Care in Public and Private. (August 2007)

Project Grants:

o Anne Digby (with Professor Howard Phillips, University of Cape Town):

Wellcome Trust International Collaborative Award (£154,189).

1 January 2005 – 30 April 2008.

Project title: Biomedicine and Society in a South African Context: Groote Schuur

Hospital, Cape Town, 1938 -2003. (November 2004)

o Steven King: Wellcome Trust Project Grant (£166,595).

1 May 2005 – 30 September 2008.

Project title: Sickness, Poverty and Medical Relief in England, 1750-1851. (March

2005)

o Paul Weindling (Principal Applicant) and Marius Turda (Co-applicant): AHRC

Project Grant (£406,000).

1 October 2007 – 30 September 2010.

Project title: Victims of Human Experiments under National Socialism: Victims,

Perpetrators and Post-War Trials. (December 2006)

o Waltraud Ernst (with Dr Thozhukkatt V Secker, International Institute for

Population Studies, and Dr Biswamoy Pati, University of Delhi): Wellcome Trust

International Collaborative Award (transfer of award from Southampton

University - £33,331).

1 September 2007 – 31 August 2010.

Project title: Colonial Medicine and Indigenous Health Practices in Southern and

Eastern Princely States of India, c. 1880-1960. (January 2008)

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o Anne Digby: Wellcome Trust Pilot Project (£20,953)

1 July 2008 – 30 November 2008.

Project title: Outreach at McCord Hospital, Durban, KwaZulu-Natal, circa 1950-

2000. (July 2008)

o Marius Turda: Wellcome Trust Pilot Project Grant (£24,443).

1 May 2009 – 30 April 2010.

Project title: Romanian Eugenics in its International Context, 1918-1944. (March

2009)

University Award

o Tim McHugh: Wellcome Trust University Award (£174,699).

1 October 2004 – 30 September 2009.

Project title: Rural Medical Charity and Society in Brittany, 1598-1789. (July

2004)

Research Fellowships

o Marius Turda: European Community Marie Curie Intra-European Award

(£103,715).

1 March 2005 – 28 February 2007.

Project title: The Biologisation of National Belonging: Medical Doctors, Eugenics

and Racial Anti-Semitism in Hungary and Romania, 1918-1940. (2004)

o Yolanda Eraso: Wellcome Trust Research Fellowship (£128,727).

1 September 2007 – 31 August 2010.

Project title: Public and Philanthropic Initiatives in the Fight Against Female

Cancer in Argentina, 1920-1960. (July 2007)

o Ina Scherder: Wellcome Trust Research Fellowship (£128,650).

1 September 2007 – 31 August 2010.

Project title: The Impact of the Anatomy Act in Ireland: Trainee Doctors, Body

Supply Networks, and the Nature of Medical Professionalisation in Ireland, 1832-

1921. (July 2007)

o Kim Price: Wellcome Trust Research Fellowship (£123,045).

1 July 2008 – 30 June 2011.

Project title: Voices of the Sick Poor: the Patients’ Experience of Medical

Negligence under the New Poor Law. (April 2008)

o Projit Mukharji: Wellcome Trust Research Fellowship (£81,423)

1 October 2008 – 30 September 2010.

[Dr Mukharji spent one year of fellowship (2006-07) at University of

Southampton]

Project title: Negotiating ‘Science’ in ‘Traditional’ Indian Medicine in the Twentieth

Century: The Case of Bengali Ayurbed. (April 2008)

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Research Leave Awards

o Katherine Watson: Wellcome Trust Research Leave (£85,245).

1 August 2007 – 30 September 2009.

Project title: Medicine and Justice: Medico-legal Practice in England and Wales,

1700-1914. (March 2007)

o Elizabeth Hurren: Wellcome Trust Research Leave Award (£44,255).

1 September 2009 – 31 August 2010.

Project title: Dying for English Medicine: Anatomy and its Trade in the Dead

Poor, circa 1832 to 1929. (November 2008)

Visiting Fellowship Awards

o Elizabeth Hurren: Leverhulme Trust Study Abroad Fellowship (£5,235).

2008.

Project title: Dying for Victorian Medicine (April 2008)

o Elizabeth Hurren: L’École Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales Stipendiary

Fellowship (€2,500) (2008)

o Waltraud Ernst: British Academy Visiting Fellowship for Dr Bodhisattwa Kar

(£7,142).

1 May 2009 – 30 June 2009.

Project title: The Cultural and Political Economies of Opium in British Assam, c.

1800-1942. (March 2009)

o Ina Scherder: The Research Council of Norway – Stipendiary Visiting Fellowship

at the University of Bergen. Mid-August – mid-October 2009.

Public Engagement Awards

o Elizabeth Hurren: Wellcome Trust Broadcast Award (£9,950).

1 September 2008 – 30 April 2009.

Project: Production of a DVD as a pilot for a History of Medicine TV series.

(August 2008)

o Tom Betteridge (Professor in English, Principal Applicant) and Steve King (Coapplicant):

Wellcome Trust Public Engagement Award (£59,400).

1 January 2009 – 31 August 2009.

Project title: Medicine, Birth and Death at the Tudor Court. (December 2008)

Grants for Conferences, Symposia and Seminars

o Katherine Watson: British Academy Overseas Conference Grant (£200) to attend

the ESSHC in Amsterdam in March 2006. (January 2006)

o Steven King: Royal Historical Society Conference Grant (£200).

Conference: The Clothing of the Poor. (May 2006)

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o Steven King: Economic History Society Conference Grant (£380).

Conference: The Clothing of the Poor. (July 2006).

o Steve King: Wellcome Trust Expenses Grant (£3,600).

October 2006 – June 2007.

PhD Training Programme in the History of Medicine (held at UCL).

(August 2006)

o Viviane Quirke: British Academy Overseas Conference Grant (£500) to attend

American Association for the History of Medicine (AAHM) annual conference,

Montreal, 3-6 May 2007. (March 2007). [Also received an award ($325) from

AAHM (May 2007)]

o Steven King: Wellcome Trust Conference Grant (£3,000).

Conference: Medicine for the Humble (May 2007)

o Steven King (with Professor Anne Hardy, UCL): Wellcome Trust Expenses Grant

(£5,400).

October 2007 – June 2008.

PhD Training Programme in the History of Medicine (held at UCL).

(October 2007)

o Glen O’Hara and Tom Crook: Economic History Society Initiatives and

Conference Fund Award (£1,120).

Conference: Norms, Numbers and the People: Statistics and the Public Sphere

in Modern Britain, 1750-2000, 5-6 September 2008, Oxford Brookes University.

(March 2008)

o Waltraud Ernst: Wellcome Trust Conference Grant (£3,650).

Conference: Crossing Colonial Historiographies. Histories of Colonial and

Indigenous Medicines in Transnational Perspectives. 15-17 September,

organised by Oxford Brookes, held at St Anne’s College, Oxford. (March 2008)

o Marius Turda: Wellcome Trust Conference Grant (£2,395)

Conference: Greater Romania’s National Projects: Ideological Dilemma, Ethnic

Classification and the Medicalisation of Ethnic Identities, 11-13 April 2008,

Oxford Brookes University. (March 2008)

o Tom Crook: British Academy Small Research Grant (£785).

Workshop: Barbarism and Civilization:The Politics of Evil in Britain and France,

1860-1939, 27 June 2008, University of Manchester. (March 2008)

o Waltraud Ernst: Society for Social History Conference Grant (£500)

Conference: Crossing Colonial Historiographies. Histories of Colonial and

Indigenous Medicines in Transnational Perspectives. 15-17 September,

organised by Oxford Brookes, held at St Anne’s College, Oxford. (May 2008)

o Katherine Watson: British Academy Overseas Conference Grant (£200) to attend

‘Women and Crime in Britain and North America since 1500’, Lyon, September

2008 (June 2008)

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o Ina Scherder: British Academy Overseas Conference Grant (£400) to attend

American Historical Association 123rd Annual Meeting 2009. (June 2008)

o Steven King: Wellcome Trust Expenses Grant (£3,000).

2008-2009.

Project: For a series of meetings entitled ‘Reflecting on 60 years of the NHS’, to

be held in Lancashire. (October 2008)

o Viviane Quirke: Royal Economics Society Conference Support Grant (£336) to

present paper at ‘Modern Medicines: New Perspectives in Pharmaceutical

History’, organised by American Institute for the History of Pharmacy, Madison

WI, 17-18 October 2008 (October 2008)

o Katherine Watson: Society of Antiquaries of Scotland Travel Grant (£680).

May 2009-May 2010

Project title: Wounding: From Mayhem to Offences Against the Person. (March

2009)

Small Research Grants

o Steve King: Pasold Trust Project Grant (£1,842).

1 May 2006 – 1 August 2006

Project title: Clothing of the Poor 1700-1840 (March 2005)

o Steven King: Marc Fitch Fund Award (£1,100)

2006.

Project title: Poverty and Relief in England 1500-1850. (April 2006)

o Steven King: British Academy Research Grant (£2,060).

Project title: The Economics of Overseeing, 1750-1834. (June 2006)

o Alysa Levene: Wellcome Trust Research Grant (£1,990).

1 October 2006 – 28 February 2007.

Project title: Children and Hospitals in Eighteenth-century Provincial English and

Scottish Towns. (August 2006)

o Danny Dawson (Research Affiliate): Wellcome Trust Research Expenses Grant

(£2,770).

1 September 2006 – 31 December 2006.

Project title: The Socio-medical Impact of the First World War. (September 2006)

o Alysa Levene: British Academy Small Research Grant (£4,037).

1 March 2007 – 31 March 2008

Project title: Healthcare, Welfare and Ideologies of Childhood Among the Young

Poor in Eighteenth-century London. (December 2006)

o Glen O’Hara: British Academy Small Research Grant (£880).

1 January 2007 – 1 January 2008.

Project title: The Scandinavian Example: Nordic Influences on British Policy

Making in the 1950s and 1960s. (December 2006).

81


o Steven King (with Sylvia Hahn, the University of Salzburg): British Council

Research Collaboration Grant (£2,000).

2007-2008.

Project title: Poor Relief and Migration in Austria and England, Eighteenth

to Twentieth Centuries. (June 2007)

o Elizabeth Hurren: Scouloudi Publication Grant (£667).

2007.

Project title: Protesting about Pauperism: Poverty, Politics and Poor Relief in

Late-Victorian England, 1870-1914. (June 2007)

o Alysa Levene: Scouloudi Historical Award, Institute of Historical Research

(£500).

1 July 2008 – 30 April 2009.

Project title: Religion, Family and Welfare in Industrial Britain. (June 2008)

o Anna Maerker: Scouloudi Foundation (£800).

June 2008 – May 2009.

Project title: The Circulation and Commodification of Anatomical Models. (June

2008)

o Sam Sneddon: Scouloudi Foundation (£750).

2008 – 2010.

Project title: Looking at Infant Mortality Records in Birmingham. (June 2008)

o Steve King: Scouloudi Foundation (£700).

2008

Project title: The Experience of Being Poor in the Long Eighteenth Century. (June

2008)

o Viviane Quirke: Wellcome Trust Research Expenses Grant (£3,000).

1 September 2008 – 31 August 2009.

Project title: The History of Cancer Chemotherapy in Industrial Context: Imperial

Chemical Industries and Rhône-Poulenc. (August 2008)

o Viviane Quirke (with Jonathan Simon, University of Lyon) British Council/Alliance

Française Research Partnership Programme Grant (£2,450). 2009-2010.

Project title: Serum Therapy, the Pharmaceutical Industry and Public Health in

Britain and France in the Late-nineteenth and Early-twentieth Centuries

(December 2008)

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7. Teaching

Staff from the Centre are currently involved in teaching on a variety of basic and second

stage history of medicine modules for the undergraduate History programme. The very

popular basic module ‘Medicine and Society’ provides students with an introduction to

the history of medicine and health from the mid-seventeenth to the mid-nineteenth

centuries, offering them the opportunity to develop a specialised interest in health

history, and make connections between medicine and its wider social relations.

In addition to our own students, members of the Centre also teach pre-clinical medical

students from Oxford University.

In 2010 we will offer a new combined honours degree in History of Medicine. In this

programme students will be able to study history of medicine with a variety of other

fields. These include any other field within the School of Arts and Humanities; History,

French, English, History of Art and Publishing being just a few examples. Further

combinations will include Anthropology, Sociology and Psychology in Social Sciences,

and Biology, Biological Sciences and Human Biology in Life Sciences.

The History Department also runs a History of Medicine Masters course, for which a

number of staff from the Centre teach modules. Students on the course take a

compulsory core module, ‘Key Concepts and Methods in Historical Research’, two

elective modules and a dissertation module. The elective modules offered in the

academic year 2009-10 are listed below.

• Patients and Practitioners

• Medical Experience in the Countryside, 1500-1800

• Eugenics and Biopolitics in Europe

• The Hospital in History

• Ethics and Ideas

• Body Politics: Health and Modernity in Britain 1830-1914

• Pills and Potions

• Science, Magic and Religion

• Independent Study Module

The dissertation module is a programme of independent research supported by

workshops and tutorial supervision, leading to the production of a 12-15,000 word

research dissertation on an approved topic of the student’s choice.

The Centre offers a range of PhD topics that reflect the specific research interests of its

staff. Information on postgraduate students and some of the topics covered in the Centre

is given in section 4.

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8. Seminars, Workshops and Conferences

Seminars

During the period under review, the Centre continued to run a successful History of

Medicine seminar programme. Details are given below.

2008/2009

Semester 1 – Theme: ‘Rights, Duties and Professional Standing’. Convenor

Professor Waltraud Ernst.

14 October David Hardiman (University of Warwick)

‘Christian therapies for tribal Gujarat: from professional healing to spiritual cures’

28 October Thomas Rutten (University of Newcastle)

‘The Hippocratic Oath in the context of the Nuremberg medical trials’

9 December Matthew Thomson (University of Warwick)

‘Sexual danger, rights, and the landscape of the child in twentieth-century Britain’

Semester 2 – Theme: ‘Healthcare in Public and Private’. Convenor Professor Steven

King.

3 February Glen O’Hara (Oxford Brookes University)

People, doctors, politics: towards a more representative and a more sensitive NHS,

1967-1974

17 February Viviane Quirke (Oxford Brookes University)

Clusters of therapeutic innovation: hospitals and drug companies in Britain, France and

the US post WWII

17 March Anne Digby (Oxford Brookes University)

Expertise, equity and ethnicity: healthcare in South Africa, 1940s-90s

28 April Tim McHugh (Oxford Brookes University)

Rural medicine in eighteenth-century France

Free-standing seminar:

31 March Tania Kausmally (Institute of Archaeology, UCL)

Craven Street Anatomy School (1774-1778): 18th-century anatomical teaching seen

from an archaeological perspective

84


2007/2008

Semester 1 – Theme: ‘Perspectives on Rural and Folk Medicine’. Convenor Dr Tim

McHugh.

2 October Hannah Newton (University of Exeter)

Caring for Sick Children in England, c. 1550-1700

16 October Tim McHugh (Oxford Brookes University)

Seigneurs, Sickness and the State in Eighteenth-century Brittany

13 November David Gentilcore (University of Leicester)

‘Strange and Horrible Things’: the Tomato in Early Modern Italy from Curiosity to

Condiment

20 November Owen Davies (University of Hertfordshire)

European Grimoires in American and Caribbean Folk Medical/Magical Practices

27 November Alisha Rankin (Tufts University, USA)

The Housewife’s Apothecary in Early Modern Germany

Semester 2 – Theme: ‘The Marginal and their Practitioners’. Convenor Professor

Steven King.

5 February Markku Hokkanen (University of Jyväskylä, Finland)

Marginal Healers, Marginal Patients? Perspectives on Missionary Medicine in Colonial

South-Central Africa, c. 1875-1930

19 February Astri Andresen (University of Bergen)

Redefining Marginality: Ethnic Minorities and Health Services in Norway c. 1945-2000

4 March Alannah Tomkins (Keele University)

‘Such partiality in a public concern is beneath a Gentleman’: Parish Medicine and

Professional Rivalry in 1790s Shropshire

18 March Anna Lundberg (Umeå University, Sweden)

Care and coercion – the Swedish Way of Dealing with Venereal Disease and its

Consequences for Individual Sufferers in the Nineteenth Century

Free-standing seminar:

29 January Muriel Le Roux (Maison Française d’Oxford)

Patenting in a competitive world: research and its assessment in France, 1972-2000

85


2006/07

Semester 1 – Theme: ‘International Perspectives on Health, Welfare and the

Medical Sciences’. Convenor Professor Paul Weindling.

22 September Anne-Emanuelle Birn (University of Toronto)

Old Milk, New Breasts: Uruguay’s Infant Mortality Stagnation and the International

Circulation of Child Health Policies, 1890-1940

10 October Pietro Corsi (University of Oxford)

Lamarck: Biology and Politics around 1800

31 October Patrice Bourdelais (EHESS Paris)

A First Public Health Network in France: the Fight against Tuberculosis, 1917-1939

14 November Marius Turda (Oxford Brookes University)

Eugenics in Central Europe: New Directions of Research

28 November Jessica Reinisch (Birkbeck, University of London)

Displaced Persons and the Public Health Problem in Europe in the Aftermath of WWII

12 December Howard Phillips (University of Cape Town)

The Gaze from Below: Writing the History of Patients at Groote Schuur Hospital, Cape

Town, 1938-2000

Semester 2 – Theme: ‘The Coroner and his Inquest’. Convenor Dr Katherine Watson.

30 January Roy Hunnisett (formerly of the Public Record Office)

Coroners before 1837 and the Reliability of their Records

13 February Pam Fisher (Centre for English Local History, University of Leicester)

The Changing Face of the Inquest, 1725-1860

13 March Katherine Watson (Oxford Brookes University)

Forensic Medicine in the 18th- and 19th-Century Coroner’s Court

27 March Tony Ward (University of Hull)

Reflections on Experts and Democracy in the Coroners’ Courts

24 April Ian Burney (Centre for the History of Science, Technology & Medicine,

University of Manchester)

Of Bodies and Poison: Themes in 19th-Century Medico-legal History

Free-standing seminar

20 March Linda Bryder (University of Auckland)

The ‘Unfortunate Experiment’ Revisited. The 1987 Inquiry into the Treatment of Cervical

Cancer at New Zealand’s National Women’s Hospital

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2005/2006

Semester 1 – Theme: ‘Anatomy and Rethinking the Body’. Convenor Dr Elizabeth

Hurren.

18 October Michael Sappol (National Library of Medicine, History of Medicine

Division, Bethesda)

The Fruits of Anatomy: Anatomical Storytelling and the Performance of Medical Authority

in 19th-century America – The case of Charles Knowlton (1800-1850), an ‘odd’, body

snatching, ‘atheistical’ physician of antebellum New England

1 November Tatjana Buklijas (University of Cambridge)

Transforming the Body: Dissection, Contagion and the Visual Appearance of the

Anatomical Cadaver in Vienna, 1850-1900

15 November James Hodkinson (Oxford Brookes University)

‘. . . an endless chain of individuation’. Re-inventing the Female Anatomy in German

Romantic Medicine

29 November Fiona Hutton (Oxford Brookes University)

The Medical Education of Anatomy Students in Oxford and Manchester: A Comparative

Analysis.

6 December Andrew Williams (Consultant Paediatrics, Northampton General

Hospital) Thomas Willis’ Practice of Paediatric Neurology and Neurodisability.

Semester 2 – Theme: ‘Life-cycle, Health and Sickness’. Convenor Professor Steven

King.

7 February John Stewart (Oxford Brookes University)

Mental Hygiene and Child Welfare: Child guidance in Inter-war Britain.

21 February Steven King and Alison Stringer (Oxford Brookes University)

‘I suffer from the conditions that someone of my age ought to expect’: Ageing and

Sickness Amongst the English Poor, 1800-1840.

21 March Elisabeth Koren (University of Bergen)

The Norwegian Beriberi Commisssion 1902 and Seamen’s Health

7 March Alysa Levene (Oxford Brookes University)

Pathways to Health: How Unique Were Abandoned Children in Eighteenth-century

England?

Free-standing seminar:

6 June Shuhei Ikai (Saga University, Japan)

The Growth of Hospital Practice in the First Half of the 20th Century in Japan

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Oxford History of Chemistry Seminar Programme 2009

In addition to the History of Medicine seminar programme, the Centre also supported the

Oxford History of Chemistry seminar programme in 2009, ‘Mastering Nature? Chemistry

in History’, which was organised jointly by the University of Oxford, Maison Française

d’Oxford, the Society for the History of Alchemy and Chemistry, and Oxford Brookes

University. The convenors were: Pietro Corsi, John Christie, Robert Fox, Muriel Le Roux,

John Perkins and Viviane Quirke. Details of the seminar programme are given below:

26 February ‘Travelling chymistry in the 16th-17th centuries’

Maison Française, Norham Road

Stephen Clucas (Birkbeck College, London)

The European itinerary of John Dee’s Monas Hieroglyphica

Bernard Joly (Université de Lille III)

Cosmopolitisme et encyclopédisme dans la philosophie chimique de Pierre-Jean Fabre

(1588-1658): voyages dans l’espace, dans le temps et dans la pensée

12 March ‘The chemical apothecary in the 18th century’

Centre for Health Medicine and Society: Past and Present, Oxford Brookes University,

Headington

Hjalmar Fors (Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm)

Fame and fortune on the periphery: C.W. Scheele’s career as an apothecary-chemist

Jonathan Simon (Université de Lyon I)

Chemistry and pharmacy in eighteenth-century France

30 April ‘Chemistry, pollution and the environment in the 19th century’

Maison Française, Norham Road

Peter Reed (independent scholar)

The ‘Monster Nuisance’ where even the birds cough: Pollution control in Britain 1840-

1874

Laurence Lestel (Conservatoire Nationale des Arts et Metiers, Paris)

Lead (mis)uses in 19th-century France

14 May ‘Chemical Philosophy in the 19th century’

University of Oxford History Faculty, Old Boy’s High School, George Street

Robert Bud (Science Museum, London)

Using Kant, Comte and chemistry: making sense of industrial revolution and the origins

of the applied science dream

Hasok Chang (University College, London)

Nineteenth-century electrochemistry: selective inattention in historiography

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28 May ‘The German chemical industry in the 20th century’

Maison Française, Norham Road

Peter Morris (Science Museum, London)

Making Buna: process development in the Third Reich

Michel Dupuy (École Normale Supérieure, Paris)

Chemists against air pollution in the GDR: between acknowledgement and impotence

Conferences and Workshops

Staff in the Centre have been involved in the organisation of a number of conferences

and workshops on the History of Medicine, many of which were held at the University.

Details are given below.

18 May 2009

Symposium ‘Health and Philanthropy in Early Modern Europe’ – held at Oxford

Brookes University. Convenor, Alysa Levene. Speakers: Ole Peter Grell (Open

University); Alannah Tomkins (Keele University); Marco H. D. van Leeuwen

(IISH/Utrecht U); Julie Marfany (University of Cambridge); Elena Taddia; Paul-André

Rosental (EHESS, Paris).

5 May 2009

Symposium ‘South Asia Research at Oxford Brookes’ (on themes: addiction, printing

and visual resources – held at Oxford Brookes University. Convenor, Waltraud Ernst.

Speakers: Dr Bodhisattwa Kar (Centre for Studies in Social Sciences at Calcutta,

CSSS); Waltraud Ernst and Projit Mukharji (Oxford Brookes University); Tapti Roy

(Research Associate of Oxford Brookes University).

22 April 2009

Workshop ‘Child Welfare, Prostitution and Sexual Politics: International

Perspectives’ – held at Oxford Brookes University. Convenor Marius Turda. Speakers:

Despina Karakatsani (University of Peloponnese); Dr Kamila Uzarczyk (Medical

University of Wroclaw); Dr Herwig Czech (Documentation Centre of Austrian Resistance,

Vienna).

4 February 2009

Workshop ‘How to deal with cancer? Research, Innovation and Politics’ – held at

Maison Française d’Oxford. Convenors, Muriel Le Roux (MFO-CNRS) and Viviane

Quirke (Oxford Brookes University). Speakers: Yolanda Eraso (Oxford Brookes

University); Ilana Löwy (Cermes-CNRS-Inserm, France); Elizabeth Toon (CHSTM,

University of Manchester).

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13-14 January 2009

Workshop ‘Health Care and the People’ – held at Glasgow Caledonian University.

Convenors Glen O’Hara (Centre for Health, Medicine and Society, Oxford Brookes

University) and John Stewart (Centre for the Social History of Health and Healthcare – a

research collaboration between Glasgow Caledonian and Strathclyde Universities).

Speakers: Glen O’Hara (Oxford Brookes University); Martin Powell (University of

Birmingham); Alex Mold (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, LSHTM);

Martin Gorsky (LSHTM); Alison Britton (Glasgow Caledonian University); Dr Chris

Nottingham (Glasgow Caledonian University); Christine Hogg; George Gosling (Oxford

Brookes University); John Welshman (Lancaster University); John Stewart (Glasgow

Caledonian University); Marguerite Dupree (University of Glasgow); Sally Sheard

(University of Liverpool).

17 November 2008

Inaugural Meeting of ‘South Asia Postgraduate Network’ – held at Oxford Brookes

University. Members of network include: Waltraud Ernst and Projit Mukharji (Oxford

Brookes University; Mark Harrison (Wellcome Unit for the History of Medicine, University

of Oxford); Sarah Hodges and David Hardiman (University of Warwick); Guy Attewell,

(The Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at UCL).

25 September 2008

Conference ‘Comparing Victims: Research into the Life Histories of Victim

Groups’ – held at Oxford Brookes University. Convenors Anna von Villiez and Paul

Weindling. Speakers: Paul Weindling (Centre for Health, Medicine and Society, Oxford

Brookes University); Margit Berner (Department of Anthropology, The Natural History

Museum, Vienna); Gabriele Czarnowski (Institute for Social Medicine and Epidemiology,

Medical University, Graz); Katherine Venables (Department of Public Health, University

of Oxford); Oliver von Mengersen (Documentation and Cultural Centre of German Sinti

and Roma); Rakefet Zalashik (New York University); Dieter Steinert (Department of

History, University of Wolverhampton); Michal Šimůnek (Charles University, Institute of

History, Prague).

15-17 September 2008

Conference ‘Crossing Colonial Historiographies’ – held at St Anne’s College,

Oxford. Convenors Waltraud Ernst, Anne Digby and Projit Mukharji (Centre for Health,

Medicine and Society, Oxford Brookes University). Speakers: Carla Nappi (History and

Philosophy, Montana State University, USA); Guy Attewell (Wellcome Trust Centre for

History of Medicine at UCL); Philip J Havik (Instituto de Investigação Científica Tropical,

Lisbon, Portugal); John Bottomley (History, North-West University, South Africa); Veenu

Pant (History, Oxford Brookes/Jaipur, India); Walter Bruchhausen (History of Medicine,

Bonn University, Germany); Maarit Forde and Diana Paton (History, Newcastle

University); Sanjoy Bhattacharya (Wellcome Trust Centre for the History of Medicine at

UCL); Markku Hokkanen (History and Ethnology, University of Jyväskylä, Finland);

David Sowell (History, Juniata College Huntingdon, USA); Christiana Bastos (Social

Anthropology, Institute of Social Sciences Lisbon, Portugal); Rachel Berger (History,

Concordia University); Burton Cleetus (History, Institut Français de Pondichéry,

Pondicherry, India); Liesbeth Hesselink (Independent Researcher, Leiden, The

Netherlands); Jorge Varanda (Social Anthropology Research Centre, Centre for Malaria

and Tropical Diseases, Lisbon, Portugal); Anna Afanasyeva (History, Yaroslavl State

Pedagogical University, Russia); Michael Knipper (History of Medicine, Institute of

History of Medicine, University of Giessen, Germany).

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(Edited volume of selected conference papers in preparation for publication by

Cambridge Scholars Publishing.)

19-20 June 2008

‘History of Medicine Research Student Conference’ – held at Wellcome Trust Centre

for the History of Medicine at UCL. Co-organised by the Wellcome Trust Centre for the

History of Medicine at UCL and the Centre for Health, Medicine and Society at Oxford

Brookes University.

(For further details, see section 4. on Postgraduate Students)

1 April 2008

Workshop ‘Criminal Anthropology and Psychiatry in Modern Romania, 1860-1945’

– held at Oxford Brookes University. Convenor Marius Turda. Speakers: Octavian Buda

(National Institute of Legal Medicine ‘Mina Minovici’ Bucharest); Valentin-Veron Toma

(Institute of Anthropology ‘Fr. Rainer’, Bucharest).

4-7 October 2007

Conference ‘Narratives of Poverty: English Pauper Letters 1780-1840 in

Comparative Perspective’ – held at the University of Hagen, Germany. Jointly

organised by the University of Hagen and the Centre for Health, Medicine and Society,

Oxford Brookes University.

Speakers: Steve King (Centre for Health, Medicine and Society, Oxford Brookes

University); Keith Snell (University of Leicester); Tim Hitchcock (University of

Hertfordshire); Thomas Sokoll (FernUniversität Hagen); Georg Fertig (WWU Münster);

Sylvia Hahn (Universität Salzburg); Anne Winter (Vrije Universiteit Brussel); Elizabeth

Hurren (Centre for Health, Medicine and Society, Oxford Brookes University); Peter King

(Open University); Leonard Schwarz (University of Birmingham); Jane Humphries

(University of Oxford); Felicita Schmieder (FernUniversität Hagen); Tony Faiamn

(independent scholar); Peter Hintzen (Universität Trier); Stefan Elspass (Universität

Augsberg); Wim Vandenbussche (Vrije Universiteit Brussel); Peter Jones (University of

Birmingham); Sigrid Wadauer (Universität Salzburg).

1 May 2007

Workshop ‘Eugenics, Population and French Politics in the Twentieth Century’ –

held at Oxford Brookes University. Convenor Paul Weindling.

Speakers: Paul-André Rosental (EHESS, Paris); Lara Lee Downs (EHESS, Paris); Paul

Weindling (Centre for Health, Medicine and Society, Oxford Brookes University).

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9. Outreach and Public Engagement

The goals of our public outreach strategy are to engage diverse constituencies including

schools and families, local residents, researchers and the medical community in

exploration of issues and events in history of medicine and their relevance in

contemporary contexts. By inspiring dialogue between experts and the wider public we

aim to raise awareness and understanding of the field in general and to make

connections with other disciplines.

To best achieve these goals many of our staff members have participated in the

Wellcome Trust Researcher Engagement Support programme and in October 2008 we

engaged an Outreach Officer, Jane Szele, whose position is made possible by funding

from the Wellcome Trust Strategic Award.

The following are highlights of outreach activities recently undertaken and planned for

the near future.

Popular Media

In the past year alone the Centre has used the popular media with great effect to reach

millions of people around the world. Through television, radio, the internet and

newspapers members have informed and inspired diverse audiences about history of

medicine and its pertinence to a varied range of current issues.

Dr Elizabeth Hurren received a Wellcome Trust Broadcast Development Award to create

(in conjunction with Pier Productions Ltd.) a new themed series for television on the

History of the Body exploring current ethical, philosophical and scientific debates by

focusing on human nature and the limits of medical intervention. The pilot was submitted

for review in June 2009. Dr Hurren is also the expert on history of medicine for BBC

Radio 4’s ‘Making History’ series reaching a weekly audience of 4 million. Two of her

contributions were included in the series’ Pick of the Year 2008. In addition Dr Hurren

served as a consultant to BBC Radio 4’s ‘Henry Week’ during which her segment

‘Hidden Henry, Medicine and Health’ was chosen Pick of the Week by the Guardian in

May 2009 and captured a platform audience of 4.5 million listeners. Professor Steve

King is another regular participant on ‘Making History’ and has been featured in

programmes on cholera and pauper burials. Tune in to Radio 4’s ‘Tracing Your Roots’

this coming October to hear Dr Tim McHugh advising listeners on how to trace one’s

ancestors through French hospital and civil records. And, in South Africa, SAFM

broadcast an interview with Professor Anne Digby in January about the history of the

Groote Schuur hospital where the first heart transplant was performed.

Television programmes that members have been featured on or contributed to recently

include Professor Steve King on ‘The One Show’ (BBC1) – reaching approximately 5

million viewers each evening – and Dr Cassie Watson on ‘Forensic Casebook’ (ITV

London), ‘Crime Secrets’ (ITV Wales) and ‘The Crime Museum’ (Endemol UK).

Professor Paul Weindling was featured in the documentary film ‘Mendelssohn, the Nazis

and Me’ (BBC Four). Future appearances are planned on a BBC Two mini-series about

pandemics and epidemics.

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In May the Centre launched a pilot programme of eight weekly podcasts entitled

‘Moments in Medicine’ (see: http://ah.brookes.ac.uk/historyofmedicine/podcasts). The

series was carried by the Independent on-line and brought the expertise and experience

of historians, scientists, health practitioners, educators, students and those directly

affected by illness and disease to the public in an accessible and portable format. The

partnership with the Independent online made ‘Moments in Medicine’ available to the

more than 14 million people who visited their site over the project period. Topics covered

included an examination of the role ethnicity plays in research funding and treatment for

sickle cell anaemia and an exploration of the ramifications of the jet age on the future of

epidemics and pandemics.

In print, Dr Glen O’Hara co-authored an article with Professor Niall Ferguson (Harvard

University) published in the Financial Times in June and circulated to a global readership

estimated at over 1.4 million in more than 140 countries.

In March the Jerusalem Post, Israel’s best-selling English Daily and most read English

web-site with a visitorship of 190 thousand a day featured an article about Professor

Paul Weindling’s research on identifying survivors of human experimentation by the

Nazis and the victims’ right to compensation.

Theatrical Productions and Museum Collaborations

Through collaborative ventures with arts organisations and museums we are exploring

more creative approaches to engaging with audiences to communicate concepts and

ideas core to research at the Centre.

Professors Steve King and Tom Betteridge with Dr Elizabeth Hurren received a Public

Engagement Award from the Wellcome Trust for Medicine, Birth and Death at the Tudor

Court, an innovative combination of expert-led research into Tudor medicine with drama.

Designed to engage a series of audiences both with the medical history of the Tudor

period and a range of current issues in biomedical science, the project centred on an

original site-specific immersive theatrical experience entitled A Little Neck. Produced in

collaboration with the Goat and Monkey Theatre Company and the Historic Royal

Palaces, the play was enacted in the precincts of Hampton Court in September as part

of a year-long celebration of the 500th anniversary of Henry VIII’s accession. All fifteen

performances were sold out involving 2,100 participants in the drama.

At the Museum of the History of Science (MHS), Oxford, department members

periodically engage with audiences face-to-face discussing objects from the collections

in an ongoing Table Talk series. In collaboration with the MHS and the Wellcome Unit at

Oxford University Dr Anna Maerker is developing an object-based learning session for

the first GCSE History of Medicine study day to be held at the museum. Dr Maerker has

recently also authored web-content for ‘Brought to Life: Exploring the History of

Medicinefor the Science Museum, London (2009) and ‘Dr Auzoux’ papier mâché

models’ for the Whipple Museum of Science (2006-2009) as well as co-curating the

exhibition ‘Objects in Transition’ at the Max Planck Institute for the History of Science

(2007). Dr Elizabeth Hurren was guest speaker at ‘A Night at the Museum: Death and

Dissection in Oxford’ last May to a full house of 600 members of the community of all

ages.

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Jane Szele and Georgina Ferry are working on a multi-media centennial celebration of

the life and work of Dorothy Hodgkin in collaboration with the Natural History Museum at

Oxford (where her laboratory was housed) scheduled for May 2010.

Engagement with Schools

The goals of the Centre’s involvement with schools are three-fold. As educators and

academics we are particularly concerned with: making university accessible to those

who may not have thought they could attend; to generating awareness and interest in

history of medicine to students; and, to providing support and encouragement to

teachers.

Regular visits to schools involve discussing curricular-based topics from changing

concepts of religion and belief to ‘Before CSI: Crime, Medicine and Science in History’

and giving workshops on historiographic techniques and methodology such as taking

oral histories. As well as holding taster days on campus, the department is now

increasing its efforts to build relationships with individual schools in the region. Travelling

members of the department regularly interact with school children in classrooms in

Oxfordshire, the surrounding counties and as far afield as South Africa and France. In

January Professor Anne Digby gave five talks to summer school students in and around

Cape Town on the history of the Groote Schuur Hospital in conjunction with the

publication of her new book on the topic. Dr Viviane Quirke will visit school children in

France in October as part of the British Council’s Science in Schools programme

describing what it is like to work in research, using examples from her work on the

pharmaceutical industry.

In December we participated in an AimHigher Day on campus as part of a governmental

initiative designed to raise the aspirations and develop the abilities of young people from

under-represented groups. And in May we organized and ran a balloon debate between

key figures in the history of medicine at the Petchey Academy, an AimHigher school, in

Hackney, London. Students studying science and history for their GCSEs quizzed

Galen, Hippocrates, Thomas Willis and Mary Seacole to determine which individual had

contributed most to medicine. The debate was recorded as part of our ‘Moments in

Medicine’ podcast project and a DVD was produced.

In a collaborative project with Epigeum, Professor Paul Weindling helped develop a

series of on-line educational courses on Research Skills for postgraduate students.

Epigeum is a spin-out company from Imperial College London to help staff and students

in academic institutions fulfil their potential by providing high-quality, state-of-the art

training courses in key skill areas.

Dr Alysa Levene organized an exciting schools’ debating competition held at Oxford

Brookes in 2007 designed to introduce year 11 to 13 pupils to the history of medicine, as

well as giving them a taster experience of university. Teams battled it out to prove or

disprove that ‘This house believes that we are due for another plague’, ‘This house

believes that clean water is the best medicine of all’, and ‘This house believes that war

has done more for medicine than peace.’

Jane Szele is in discussion with DebatingMatters, the schools component of the Institute

of Ideas to plan a day of workshops for local schools in which to encourage debate and

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use examples from the past as a way of exploring contemporary issues in science and

medicine.

Communities

As part of our commitment to community we are working to interact with groups at the

local, regional and global level in meaningful ways that respond to their needs and best

utilize our expertise and resources.

In March Jane Szele served on the planning committee for the Oxford Brookes Science

Bazaar – a day of family friendly activities as part of Oxfordshire’s annual month long

science festival. Approximately 500 members of the community attended. In another

event for the festival Dr Elizabeth Hurren was featured amongst the panellists in an

audience led programme entitled ‘60 Minutes of Sex’ at the Oxford Play House.

Moderated by Judith Hann, other panel members represented fields such as psychiatry,

religion, biomedical science, zoology (evolution and behaviour) and psychology.

In July Dr Yolanda Eraso advised on setting up a ‘Consumer Research Partnership’

within the Thames Valley Cancer Network assisting 2.4 million people in Oxfordshire and

the surrounding counties. The purpose of this partnership is ‘to ensure active

involvement of consumers in cancer research based partly or fully in Thames Valley, in

order to improve its quality and value.’ The group will help to shape the design and

conduct of future research into any aspect of cancer. Dr Eraso is also active in the

Thames Valley Cancer Network Support group, an organization linking patients and

families with support services and advocating how to conduct research involving the

patient/family point of view.

Professor Paul Weindling continues to be actively involved in the Council for Assisting

Refugee Academics (CARA) serving on their Council of Management. CARA is currently

assisting over 140 refugee academics from all disciplines, helping them to rebuild their

lives and careers in dignity and ensure that their skills and knowledge are not lost to

future generations. Professor Weindling has also facilitated a work placement

programme for history of medicine students at CARA.

Medical Humanities and Interdisciplinary Study

As we look towards the future we are seeking ways to enrich the study of the history of

medicine and bring new perspectives to traditional and emerging concepts in the field by

creating opportunities for interdisciplinary study and cross-fertilization of ideas.

We are proud to announce the launch of a new combined honours undergraduate

degree in History of Medicine in 2010. This degree is designed to be unique in the UK in

that it will offer an unparalleled opportunity for interdisciplinary study in the field.

Students will be able to combine their interest in History of Medicine with all other Arts

and Humanities subjects at Oxford Brookes including foreign languages, art and drama,

Social Sciences subjects such as anthropology and psychology, and Life Sciences

subjects including biology, biological sciences and human biology. Integral to the degree

will be a careers development programme tailored to help each student apply the skills

and knowledge they acquire to a variety of professions.

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Dr Yolanda Eraso is part of a team of specialists from different fields who have

developed a new MSc degree in Cancer Studies to be launched in 2010. The course

offers an innovative and interdisciplinary perspective to the study of cancer. It is

designed to capitalise on collaborations across the university and emphasises the

interaction of biomedical sciences with the fields of sociology and psychology offering

teaching in applied biology, epidemiology and public health, sociology, psychology,

history, ethics and law.

Dr Glen O’Hara was one of the co-founders of Reinvention: A Journal of Undergraduate

Research. This is a new peer-reviewed journal dedicated to the publication of highquality

undergraduate student research co-sponsored by Oxford Brookes University and

the University of Warwick. It received 40,000 hits in its first year and now, in its second is

accepting submissions world-wide. Dr. O’Hara is also the Editor for History. Lauren

Paice and Fraser Joyce (now a PhD student in the Centre) were published in the first

volume of the journal whilst working toward their MAs in history of medicine at Oxford

Brookes.

Dr Viviane Quirke determines the judging criteria as well as serving on the judging panel

for the British Society for the History of Science Dingle Prize for the best book in the

history of science, technology and medicine. This year’s winner was ‘Science and

Religion: A Very Short Introduction’ by Thomas Dixon. She also advised the British

Society for the History of Maths on setting up the BSHM Neumann Prize which was first

awarded this September.

In summary, it has been a productive period of growth and exploration in outreach and

public engagement for the Centre. We developed our first formal strategy and have

made great progress in achieving its primary goals. In the next phase we will continue to

refine and focus our efforts to maximize the impact of the Centre’s unique resources on

our target audiences. We look forward to the future and to building an increasingly

effective and exciting outreach programme.

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