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Design for Peripheral Interaction - Technische Universiteit Eindhoven

Design for Peripheral Interaction - Technische Universiteit Eindhoven

Design for Peripheral Interaction - Technische Universiteit

Design for Peripheral Interaction Berry Saskia Bakker Elise

  • Page 3 and 4: Design for Peripheral Interaction D
  • Page 5 and 6: Design for Peripheral Interaction p
  • Page 7 and 8: Table of contents 1. Introduction 1
  • Page 9: Section III Reflection and generali
  • Page 12 and 13: 1.1. Attention in everyday life The
  • Page 14 and 15: can take place outside the attentio
  • Page 16 and 17: handing over a document, while he w
  • Page 18 and 19: design research (Hoven et al., 2007
  • Page 20 and 21: Chapter 1 Introduction Chapter 2 A
  • Page 22 and 23: 12 Chapter 2
  • Page 25 and 26: 2. A review of attention theory Abs
  • Page 27 and 28: distinguished in literature, the tw
  • Page 29 and 30: lAte Selection theory In shadowing
  • Page 31 and 32: enables stimuli to pass the filter
  • Page 33 and 34: multiple reSource theory Apart from
  • Page 35 and 36: salience A review of attention theo
  • Page 37 and 38: 2.4. Center and periphery of attent
  • Page 39 and 40: which are directed at goals. For ex
  • Page 41: have paint on your hands and are fo
  • Page 44 and 45: 3.1. Introduction to this chapter T
  • Page 46 and 47: In line with the contextmapping app
  • Page 48 and 49: Figure 3.1. The sensitizing package
  • Page 50 and 51: we steered our questions in such a
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    exercise, which show how different

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    Some quotes selected for the activi

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    To keep the overview of data clear,

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    numbers of quotes found in these cl

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    in this cluster. These quotes were

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    As a result of our clustering, we f

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    out of 21) described sensorial or c

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    temporAry SiDe ActivitieS, externAl

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    that can potentially be interacted

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    together, gives us reason to believ

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    not all examples in the clusters

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    A large majority of the everyday ac

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    66 Chapter 4

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    4. Related research and design Abst

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    fit into our lives. Weiser and Brow

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    and periphery of our attention” (

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    peripheral information displays, In

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    sounds. Participants use these soun

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    initiate and complete” (Ashbrook,

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    A. C. D. Figure 4.3. Images of tang

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    4.6. Peripheral interaction in a cl

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    manipulate Lantern to indicate whic

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    Insight 9. Interactive systems whic

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    Abstract 5. Exploring peripheral in

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    5.2. First iteration: AudioResponse

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    tones caused some confusion, as som

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    center of the room. The sounds are

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    user. As multiple users are provide

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    As we have seen, at times the sound

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    A. B. C. D. Figure 5.4. Illustratio

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    A. B. C. Figure 5.5. CawClock proto

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    A. B. C. Figure 5.7. NoteLet protot

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    tangible design, only the tokens we

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    still ongoing. To know how much tim

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    Deze foto is genomen op 20-06-2011

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    to look at the clock). Furthermore,

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    e too time-consuming and therefore

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    Abstract 6. Designing and deploying

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    in their periphery of attention, wh

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    6.2.2. FireFlies FireFlies is an op

  • Page 133 and 134:

    teacher’s clothing using the clip

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    6.3. User evaluation approach The a

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    of whether FireFlies was used in th

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    involved whole-class instructions,

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    which child she would visit next. I

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    to it. Most teachers mentioned that

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    Figure 6.8. Pictures taken during t

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    the example (inter)actions that wer

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    was constructed to offer more detai

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    four types of interaction (see Tabl

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    Teacher P1 P2 P3 P4 P5 P6 all Visua

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    presented in Chapter 2. When lookin

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    In this example, the reading-exerci

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    individual users, clearly does not

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    the questionnaire. They reasoned th

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    ended approach was successful and t

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    equire too much effort for it to be

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    grades, which makes background soun

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    the user study with FireFlies made

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    that they sometimes even automatica

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    FireFlies was used by the participa

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    165 Section III Reflection and gene

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    Abstract 7. Six considerations for

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    a larger body of work. Given the in

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    time time time goal deciding to giv

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    provided in the literature we revie

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    concluded that perceptions may attr

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    attached to the clothes of the teac

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    that are part of the everyday routi

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    are strongly connected to the conte

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    connected to bird sounds and blue t

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    in the everyday context and routine

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    the open-office space in which the

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    in the periphery of attention as we

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    8. Conclusions 191

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    area of interaction design in antic

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    presence of the auditory displays i

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    of a short duration and happen for

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    to physical interactions. However,

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    8.4. Concluding remarks This thesis

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    Buxton, W. A. S., Gaver, W. W., and

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    Hudson, S. E., Harrison, C., Harris

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    Mynatt, E. D., Back, M., Want, R.,

  • Page 219 and 220:

    Vermeulen, J., Luyten, K., Hoven, E

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    Zoon, H., Bakker, S., and Eggen, B.

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    SenSitizing exerciSe 2 (originally

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    SenSitizing exerciSe 4 (originally

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    SenSitizing exerciSe 6 (originally

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    Appendix 2. Questionnaire filled in

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    pArt ii: perception (explanation an

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    Summary In everyday life we perform

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    and suggests that alternative evalu

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    potentiële activiteiten. Wanneer a

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    Acknowledgements This work would no

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    231

  • Page 244:

    In everyday life we perform several

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