TUESDAY Stork delivers county's first baby of 2012 - Matchbin

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TUESDAY Stork delivers county's first baby of 2012 - Matchbin

WEATHER

Tomorrow

Thunderstorms

are possible

High 66

Low 50

Bladen Journal

County

jobless

rate goes

down

slightly

Page 3A

s

TUESDAY

INSIDE TODAY

n More than $14.60

of savings inside

Vol. 113 No. 59 n Est. 1899

January 10, 2012

www.bladenjournal.com

Eagles

rally for

Waccamaw

Conference

victory

Page 8A

God bless America n 50 cents n All rights reserved

Stork delivers county’s first baby of 2012

Staff report

ELIZABETHTOWN — Bladen County’s first

baby of the new year arrived on Monday, Jan.

2, at Cape Fear Valley/Bladen County Hospital.

The baby, Chloe Elizabeth Hensley, was born

at 12:25 p.m. and weighed 8 pounds, 3 ounces,

and measured 20 inches in length.

Her parents are Bridget D. Raynor and Gary

Albert Hensley Jr. of Salemburg. She also has a

big brother, Houston Nathaniel Rose.

Crash

spills

the

‘taters

Staff report

Chloe Elizabeth Hensley gets

welcomed into the world Jan. 2

TAR HEEL — A tractor-trailer

was involved in a crash on

N.C. 20 near Maudie Rozier

Road on Friday, causing the

truck to overturn and spill its

load of sweet potatoes, according

to reports.

The crash occurred at about

10:50 a.m.. North Carolina

Highway Patrol troopers arrived

on the scene to find a Chevrolet

Tahoe and the tractor-trailer off

the side of the roadway, according

to a Fayetteville Observer

report.

Both vehicles were traveling

east on N.C. 20 when the truck

attempted to pass the Tahoe,

according to published reports.

As the truck attempted to pass

the Tahoe, the driver, Chester

See Crash | 2A

Convenience

store robbed

in Council

Staff Report

COUNCIL —A convenience

store in Council was robbed

Friday evening, according to

the Bladen County Sheriff’s

Office.

The robbery ocurred at the

Food Plus convenience store

located at 10374 N.C. 87 East

in Council shortly before 8:30

p.m. according to Capt. Rodney

Hester.

“A black male entered the

store with his face covered and

displayed a black revolver handgun,”

said Hester. “A second

black male stood in the doorway

while the robbery was tak-

See Robbery | 2A

2006 Cadillac SRX $15,977

2006 Buick Lucerne $12,377

2007 Chevy Trailblazer $10,977

2010 Chevy Malibu LTZ $23,577

Her maternal grandparents are Delores

Annette Mote and Dewayne Edward Raynor,

and her paternal grandparents are Gary Albert

Hensley and the late Vivian Sue Hensley.

Baby Chloe was presented with gifts from the

following businesses: Bladen County Hospital,

Bladen County Hospital Volunteers, Campbell

Oil/Minuteman, Dickerson’s Pharmacy, First

Bank of Elizabethtown, Front Porch Restaurant

and Catering and Toddlers and Teens of

Elizabethtown.

Roof scrapers

W. Curt Vincent | Bladen Journal

Employees with Baker Roofing out of Wilmington peel the old roofing off the sanctuary building of

Elizabethtown Baptist Church, which was damaged during the April tornado. Chris Fisher, construction

manager for Baker Roofing, said the work of tearing off the old roofing and replacing it is expected to be

completed by the end of January.

Get 10% Off Your Next Service Appointment Booked Online.

(excludes tire purchase and oil change)

Bill Carone

Chevrolet-GMC-Buick-Ford

$19.95 Oil Change (Excludes diesel & synthetic)

5093 N US 117 • Wallace, NC • 910-285-7151 • billcaronecars.com

s

With Chloe and

her parents,

Bridget D. Raynor

and Gary Albert

Hensley Jr., are

Bladen County

Hospital Birth

Center staff Kelly

Melvin, CNA, and

Amber Sholar, RN.

Not pictured is

Chasity Cannady,

RN.

Schools

testing

digital

learning

Pilot program

already in place

Erin Smith

Staff writer

ELIZABETHTOWN— Bladen

County Schools is embarking on a

digital initiative for the high schools

called the 1:1 Technology Initiative.

This digital approach to learning will

see that students in the high schools

are issued a Lenovo tablet for the

entire academic year.

The school system received a Golden

Leaf Grant in the amount of $800,000

and a Race to the Top

grant in the amount

of $300,000 to pay for

about 1,500 devices.

“We received a

Golden Leaf Grant

about 18 months ago

to do 1:1 in the middle

schools,” said Robert

Taylor, Bladen County

Schools superintendent.

“We were going

Robert P. Taylor

to provide all students in the middle

schools with an iPod Touch which

would then become part of the curriculum.”

Taylor said the more the his staff

studied the iPod idea, the more they

saw a need for the addition of technology

at the high school level.

“We found we were doing a lot of

things at the high school level, but

didn’t really have the technology we

needed,” said Taylor. “We requested to

change the grant to move the initiative

to the high schools.”

Taylor said the goals of the initiative

include providing access to 21st

Century technology, meet online testing

requirements for Race to the Top,

See Schools | 2A

2010 Ford F-150 $22,977

2010 Dodge Grand Caravan $18,977

2011 Ford Crown Victoria $19,977

2012 Ford Focus $18,977


Obituaries

...

Florence Smith

WILSON — Florence

Hues McLemore Smith,

95, of 4761 Ward Blvd.,

died on Monday, Jan. 2,

2012, at Wilson Medical

Center.

The funeral was held

at 2 p.m. on Thursday,

Jan. 5, at Butler Funeral

Home with the Rev.

Ray Smith officiating.

Burial followed at the

Parkersburg Cemetery.

She was born on Nov.

7, 1916, in Sampson

County to the late

David Warren and

Lonie Matilda Ezzell

McLemore. She is preceded

in death by her

parents; her husband,

Joe Calvin Smith; and

two brothers, Thomas

McLemore and Lacy

McLemore. She worked

at Fleetline Industries

in Garland for 20 years

before retiring. She then

became a homemaker.

She is survived by

her daughter, Mary

Schools

From page 1A

close the technology gap

between students who

have technology in the

home and those that do

not have access to technology,

enhance teaching,

and they hope to eventually

expand the initiative

to include middle and

elementary schools.

“Even kids in poverty

have some access to technology

whether it be an

Xbox game, cell phone

or the computer at the

library. They don’t know

how to use it for learning,”

said Taylor.

The school system

hopes that this initiative

will help students to

better learn how to use

technology for learning

purposes.

Crash

From page 1A

Arthur Benson, 24,

slowed and attempted

to turn into a driveway,

according to the troopers’

reports. The truck

was moving at about 45

mph when the Tahoe col-

Robbery

From page 1A

ing place.”

Both suspects

appeared to be between

5-foot, 7 inches and 5-9

and weighed between

150 ande 160 pounds,

Page 2A n Bladen Journal n www.bladenjournal.com n January 10, 2012

DeaDline to submit information is 11 a.m. on monDay for tuesDay’s eDition; 11 a.m. on thursDay for friDay’s eDition

Janice Munn and husband,

Mack, of Harrells;

two grandchildren,

Bonnie M. Lennon

of Elizabethtown and

Janet M. Evans of Rocky

Point; and two greatgrandchildren,

Wesley

James Lennon and Mary

Katelyn Lennon.

The family received

friends on Wednesday

evening from 6 to 8 p.m.

at Butler Funeral Home

in Roseboro.

Services entrusted to

Butler Funeral Home,

401 W. Roseboro Street,

Roseboro.

Paid

Craig Smith

GREENSBORO —

Craig Rydell Smith,

46, formerly of

Elizabethtown, died

Monday, Jan. 2, 2012.

He was a U.S. Army

Veteran.

A viewing was held

Friday, Jan. 6, from

2 until 5 p.m. at F.

W. Newton and Sons

“When kids have technology

in the classroom

they are more engaged

than those that don’t,”

said Taylor.

Taylor sited an example

of a school system he had

recently visited where

students in the classroom

were using iPads to look

up answers to problems

on a worksheet. Taylor

noted that every student

in that particular class

was engaged and working

to complete the assignment.

Taylor pointed out that

students have access to

much more information

now than before. In the

past the teachers were

the purveyors of knowledge

and they passed

lided with the front wheel

of the truck. The driver

of the truck was Kent L.

Cavender, 58, of Garland.

Following the collision,

the truck and SUV ran off

the road with the truck

according to Hester.

The robbers forced

the store’s clerk to

open the register and

turn over the money,

said Hester. An undis-

Mortuary.

The funeral service

was held at 1 p.m.

Saturday, Jan. 7, at

Brown’s Creek AME Zion

Church in Elizabethtown.

Burial was in McKeithan

Cemetery in Clakrotn.

Surviving are children,

Shaunice Smith, Devin

Avery, Camere Smith,

and Terrance Smith;

his parents, Shirley

and Woody W. Grimes;

sisters, Vickie Kursey,

Audrey Ripley, Cedric

Miminger and Darrell

Lesane.

A service of F.

W. Newton and

Sons Mortuary in

Elizabethtown.

James White

ELIZABETHTOWN

— James Thomas White,

71, of 620 McLeod

Street, died Sunday,

Jan. 1, 2012, in Bladen

County Hospital. He was

a U.S. Army Veteran.

A viewing was held

on Saturday, Jan. 7,

Holiday donation

Contributed photo

For the third year in a row, the Bladen County Farm Bureau ladies group has supported the BCAEOP

Pre-K Pictures with Santa project. The ladies group donated individually boxed crayon boxes to go in

the goody bags. Pre-k students had the opportunity to take a field trip to the Board of Education’s

“Winter Wonderland” to visit Santa and have their picture taken with the jolly old elf. Above, Farm

Bureau Ladies Representative Kelli Hill and BCAEOP President Renatha Gibbs pose with a box of crayons

donated by farm Bureau. While waiting to have their picture taken, the students were entertained

by Buster the Bus from the transportation department. After visiting Santa the students watched

holiday movies and were given a goody bag on their way back to school filled with pencils, stickers, a

coloring book, crayons and other treats.

that knowledge on to the

students. Now, the teachers

are the facilitators of

the knowledge and help

the students learn how to

sort out the information

they find on the Internet

and use it wisely.

“We want teachers to

be facilitators of knowledge

not givers of knowledge,”

said Taylor. “We

have got to teach kids

how to live in a digital

world.”

He added that includes

digital literacy and digital

responsibility. He also

said part of the reason

for this move is that all

testing is moving toward

being done electronically.

For example, the

10th-grade writing test

landing on its side, the

reports stated.

The road was closed

for several hours as crews

worked to unload the cargo

before the truck could be

removed from the scene

closed amount of

money and cigarettes

were removed from the

store.

“Neither the clerk nor

a customer who was in

from 2 until 5 p.m.

at F. W. Newton and

Sons Mortuary in

Elizabethtown.

The funeral was held

on Sunday, Jan. 8, at 2

p.m. at Bakers Creek

AME Zion Church in

Dublin. Burial was in

the Lesane Cemetery in

Dublin.

Survivors include

his wife, Leola Jessup

White; daughters,

Michelle White, Genfra

Johnson, Sylvia Thomas

and Karen Robertson;

sons, Franklin Crumb,

Vernon Jackson and

Charles Jessup; brothers,

Clyde White, Carl White,

Richard White; and sisters,

Sylvia Jacobs and

Agnes Lesane.

A service of

F.W. Newton and

Sons Mortuary in

Elizabethtown.

Winston Richardson

WHITE OAK —

Winston Richardson,

68, died Monday, Jan. 2,

Construction employment

increases by 17,000 in

the month of December

Industry’s unemployment rate hits 16 percent

Construction employment increased

in December by 17,000 driven by gains

in nonresidential construction employment,

according to an analysis of

new federal employment data released

today by the Associated General

Contractors of America. Association

officials said that construction employment

likely benefitted from unseasonably

warm weather across much of the

country that extended the construction

season.

“Nonresidential construction is

clearly driving last month’s employment

gains,” said Ken Simonson, the

association’s chief economist. “But it

is too early to tell whether those gains

came because the weather was good

enough for crews to keep working well

into December or because demand is

truly rebounding.”

Total construction employment

now stands at 5,544,000 or 0.3 percent

higher than a month earlier and

46,000 (0.8 percent) higher than in

December 2010, the economist said.

He added that the latest employment

figures continue a months-long trend

of slight gains followed by slight

declines in construction employment

and that overall construction employment

is still far below its peak level of

7,726,000 in April 2006.

The nonresidential construction sector

added 17,200 construction jobs in

December, Simonson noted. He said

for 2012-13 will be done

electronically and, in

2013, the EOG and EOC

testing will also be done

electronically.

Pilot program

The school system has

set up a pilot program

this spring at East Bladen

High and West Bladen

High which will introduce

about 180 students to the

digital learning initiative.

Students in Stephanie

Hester’s classes at East

Bladen High School and

Susan Smith’s classes at

West Bladen High School

are currently participating

in the pilot program

said Taylor.

Both teachers are

of the crash, according to

The Fayetteville Observer.

A passenger in the

SUV, 40-year-old Joseph

McNair of St. Pauls, was

transported to the hospital

along with both driv-

the store at the time

of the robbery were

injured,” said Hester.

The suspects were

last seen running

behind the store.

2012.

The funeral services

were held Monday, Jan.

9, at F. W. Newton and

Sons Mortuary chapel in

Elizabethtown.

Survivors include a sister,

Annie Hickman.

William Beatty

COUNCIL – William

M. “Buddy” Beatty, 79,

of 308 Cord Road, died

Wednesday, Jan. 4, 2012.

The funeral was held

at 2 p.m. Saturday, Jan.

7, at Carvers Creek AME

Zion Church. Burial

followed in the church

cemetery.

A viewing was held

from 1 to 6 p.m Friday,

Jan. 6, at Johnson’s

Funeral Service in

Elizabethtown. Visitation

was held at other times

at 336 Cord St.

Surviving are sisters,

Valaree Andrew, Maybell

Simpson and Velma

Johnson; and brothers,

Cornel, Samuel and

Loydell.

engaged in teaching science

courses and have

both AP classes and regular

classes. They will be

incorporating the tablets

this spring into their

courses. Both the teachers

and students will be

providing feedback to the

staff at the Central Office

on the program and offering

tips and ideas to make

the program better before

the official roll out in the

fall, according to Taylor.

All of the teachers in

both high schools have

also received their tablets

and are now receiving

professional development

courses utilizing their

tablets and learning how

to develop lesson plans

on the new tablets, said

ers for treatment.

According to reports,

Benson was cited with

unsafe movement and

Cavendar was charged

with driving with an

expired license.

If anyone has any

information on this robbery,

they are asked to

call the Bladen County

Sheriff’s Office at 910-

862-6960.

A service of Johnsons

Funeral Service of

Elizabethtown.

Mary LeSane

ELIZABETHTOWN

— Mary L. LeSane, 83,

of 2214 MLK Drive, died

Saturday, Jan. 7, 2012,

at the Elizabethtown

Nursing Center.

Arrangments are

incomplete and will be

announced by Johnson’s

Funeral Service of

Elizabethtown.

Clifton Davis

ELIZABETHTOWN

— Clifton Davis, 76, of

804 Poplar Height, died

Friday, Jan. 6, 2012. at

Cape Fear Valley Medical

Center in Fayetteville.

The family will receive

friends at the home of

Marcia McDowell, located

at 503 Old Hickory

Lane, Elizabethtown.

Arrangemtns are

incomplete and will be

announced by Johnson’s

Funeral Service of

Elizabethtown.

nonresidential specialty trade contractors

added 20,200 positions, while

heavy and civil engineering construction

firms – which perform the majority

of publicly-funded construction

work – shed 300 jobs. Nonresidential

building contractors shed 2,700 jobs

in December. Residential construction

lost 400 total jobs, as the residential

specialty trade contractors shed 2,900

jobs and residential builder added only

2,500 positions in December.

Association officials said the increase

in construction jobs was welcome

news, but said they were concerned

that partisan fighting in Washington

would undermine chances of enacting

a number of long-overdue infrastructure

investment programs and measures

needed to boost the economy.

Without those measures construction

employment was likely to suffer.

“It is going to be hard to pass

tax and investment measures to help

boost private sector demand when

congress and the president are at

odds about everything from appointments

to how to curb growing federal

deficits,” said Stephen E. Sandherr,

the association’s chief executive officer.

“When elected officials are more

interested in scoring political points

than addressing our critical infrastructure

needs, everybody else – including

unemployed construction workers and

the economy – suffers.”

Taylor.

Out of the pilot program,

Taylor said the

school staff are looking

to learn a few different

things including what

issues students may be

having, suggestions from

the students on how to

improve the program,

teachers to give insights

on how to create lessons

on the 1:1 device, looking

for teachers to do some

preplanning for the next

academic year.

“A lot of school districts

around us are doing

similar things,” said

Taylor.

Regina M. Pridgen

Sept. 14, 1955 - Dec. 23, 2011

We would like to

thank everyone for

the prayers, notes

of concern, & visits

during our time of

bereavement. Your

thoughtfullness will

never be forgotten.

Thank you,

From the family of

Regina M. Pridgen


January 10, 2012 n www.bladenjournal.com n Bladen Journal n Page 3A

NC MarketReady announces 2012 equipment funding cycle

KANNAPOLIS – The North

Carolina Value-Added Cost

Share program, administered

by N.C. MarketReady, is now

accepting applications for the

2012 equipment cost share funding

cycle. The program, funded

by the N.C. Tobacco Trust Fund

Commission, provides up to

$50,000 to agricultural producers

and processors seeking to

purchase specialized equipment

to start or grow a value-added

operation.

A value-added agricultural

product is a raw, agricultural

commodity that has been

changed in some manner so that

it no longer can be returned to

its original state. This change

results in increased market

value, allowing the producer to

receive a higher price for these

value-added products compared

to the original commodity.

Cheese (from milk), wine (from

grapes) and bread (from grains)

are a few examples.

The NCVACS program works

hand-in-hand with the USDA

Value-Added Producer Grant by

reducing the costs of equipment

purchases that are not funded

by the USDA grant. The 2012

cost share cycle allows valueadded

producers and processors

to apply for funding to purchase

new or used equipment.

Equipment cost share awards

will vary from 25 to 50 per-

Keeping warm

The Bladen Journal’s series on

“FORGOTTEN

CEMETERIES”

will begin January 31

cent of the total cost of the

equipment, up to a maximum of

$50,000.

“The NCVACS program supports

the development of North

Carolina value-added agricultural

operations,” said Brittany

Whitmire, program coordinator

for NCVACS. “NCVACS is one of

the few cost share funding sources

for equipment, and we’ve

seen many recipients grow their

businesses and become more

successful after being awarded

the funds.”

Continuing from the 2011

funding cycle, the program’s

expanded guidelines for valueadded

products include nonstandard

production methods

(such as organic), physical product

segregation – keeping genetically

modified corn separate

from non-GM corn, farm-based

renewable energy and some

locally produced food products.

Examples of equipment previously

funded include an aging

cooler for meats, pasteurizing

machinery for goat milk, a seasoning

applicator for roasted

soybeans and fermentation

tanks for producing wines.

Applications for the NCVACS

2012 equipment cost share are

available online at http://plantsforhumanhealth.ncsu.edu/extension/cost-share.

Applications

are due by March 1. Guidelines

and a list of frequently asked

Contributed photo

The Bladen County Schools Educational Office Professionals, District 13 Educational Office Professionals, the Bladen County Division of Aging and Bladen County

School employees conducted a “Stay Cuddled” winter protection benefit for the children of the Pediatric Oncology Unit in Chapel Hill. Members of the Bladen

County EOP, District 13 EOP along with several Bladen County School employees donated and collected several hats, scarves, socks, and gloves. Members of the

Bladen County Division of Aging handmade hats and scarves that were donated to the children. Books, games and monetary donations were also donated to the

school that is on-site at the hospital. This was the largest Educational Office Professional donation to date. On December 15, 2011, members; Kimberly Harris,

Stacey Regan-Murphy, and President Renatha Gibbs presented the gifts to Dr. Gold and his staff. This scarves, hats, socks and gloves were a welcome gift for the

children who must endure treatment for various types of cancers during the winter months. Dr. Gold and his entire nursing staff were very appreciative for the

kindness shown by Bladen County Schools and District 13 Educational Office Professionals.

Woodell moves into advertising post

Erin Smith

Staff writer

ELIZABETHTOWN —

Some folks may have noticed

a new face around the Bladen

Journal office recently. Brittney

Woodell has joined the staff

at the Journal full-time as an

advertising representative.

She takes over the position

held by Charlotte Smith, who

recently took a position with

Assisted Care, a home-health

agency.

Woodell is a native of

Wisconsin and an avid Green

Bay Packers fan.

“I would like to see

Lambeau Field one

time in my life,” said

Woodell, who also

admitted she has never

owned a cheesehead.

While she is passionate

about her Packers

football, she is also

equally passionate Woodell

about helping local

businesses with their advertising

needs.

“We are extremely happy to

have Brittney here,” said W.

Curt Vincent, general manager/

editor for the Bladen Journal.

“She will give us more of a

presence throughout

the county, since she

lives here, and is an

experienced salesperson

whom area business

owners will enjoy working

with.”

When asked what

drew her to choose

advertising as a career,

Woodell said, “Being

with the public, meeting people

and being able to help them

with making marketing choices

that best suit their business.”

Woodell added, “I like meeting

new people and learning

about each business’ needs and

what our newspaper can offer

on the Internet and in print to

help them.”

Woodell is no stranger to

advertising. She began her

career at The Robesonian in

2000 first as a telemarketer,

then moved into outside sales.

She has been involved in outside

sales for about six years.

Woodell moved to Bladen

County with her mother in 1994

and is married to Ricky Woodell.

They have three children.

Woodell can be reached by

email at bwoodell@heartlandpublications.com

or by telephone

at 910-862-4163.

Holiday closings are announced

The following businesses

and government

offices have announced

they will be closed

in observance of the

Martin Luther King Jr.

holiday:

— All Bladen County

government offices

will be closed Monday,

Jan. 16, in observance

of the holiday. They

will resume their nor-

mal hours of operation

Tuesday, Jan. 17.

— Bladen County

Schools will be closed

Monday, Jan. 16, for

Martin Luther King Jr.

Day. The school system

will resume normal

operations on Tuesday,

Jan. 17.

— All municipal

offices will be closed

Monday, Jan. 16, for

the holiday. They will

resume normal operations

on Tuesday, Jan.

17.

— All North Carolina

Courts will be closed

on Monday, Jan. 16, for

the holiday. They will

resume their normal

hours of operation on

Tuesday, Jan. 17.

— All North Carolina

government offices will

be closed Monday, Jan.

16, in observance of

the New Year’s holiday.

They will resume normal

hours of operation

on Tuesday, Jan. 17.

— All federal offices

will be closed on

Monday, Jan. 16, in

observance of the holiday.

They will resume

normal hours of operation

on Tuesday, Jan.

17.

— There will be

njo mail delivery on

Monday, Jan. 16.

— All banks will be

closed Monday, Jan.

16, in observance of

the holiday. They will

reopen for business on

Tuesday, Jan. 17.

— The Bladen Journal

office will be open on

Monday, Jan. 17.

questions can be found on the

website.

NCVACS is coordinated

by N.C. MarketReady, the

Cooperative Extension outreach

of the N.C. State University

Plants for Human Health

Institute, located at the N.C.

Research Campus. Funded by

the N.C. Tobacco Trust Fund

Commission, the cost share

program was launched in 2009

and will have provided nearly

$1 million in direct cost share

assistance to value-added producers

and processors throughout

North Carolina by the end

of 2012.

Learn more at http://plantsforhumanhealth.ncsu.edu.

Unemployment

drops in county

for third month

Staff report

RALEIGH — Bladen

County saw it’s unemployment

rate drop for the third

straight month to 11.7 percent

for November. That follows

decreases to 11.9 percent in

October and to 12.3 percent

September. This comes after it

held steady from July through

August at 12.5 percent.

Bladen County was not the

only county to see its rate

drop.

Columbus County saw its

rate drop for the second month

to 12.0 percent for November.

That follows a decrease to

12.4 percent for October after

dropping to 12.7 percent in

September. That follows an

increase to 13.5 percent in

August.

Robeson County also saw

its rate drop to 12.4 percent

in November after a decrease

to 12.8 percent for October

after dropping to 13.0 percent

in September. That follows

an uptick for the fourth

straight month to 13.5 percent

in August.

All three counties remain

above both the state and

national unemployment rates

for November. The state of

North Carolina reported a drop

to 9.5 percent in November.

That follows a drop to 10.4

percent in October following

an increase in the statewide

unemployment rate to 10.5

percent in September. The U.S.

unemployment rate dropped to

8.6 percent for November following

a slight drop to 9.0

percent in October after holding

steady for three months at

a rate of 9.1 percent.

In November, Bladen County

had 1,758 workers who were

classified as unemployed

and claimed a labor force of

15,000. Columbus County had

2,819 workers classified as

unemployed. Robeson County

had 6,958 workers classified as

unemployed. Robeson County

claimed a labor force of 56,117

and Columbus County claimed

a labor force of 23,523.

Statewide for the month

of November 49 counties

reported unemployment rates

between 5 and 10 percent and

51 counties reported unemployment

rates above 10 percent.

In October, 46 counties

reported an unemployment

rate between 5 and 10 percent

and 54 counties reported an

unemployment rate above 10

percent. No county has reported

a rate below 5 percent.

North Carolina had paid a

total of $106 million in unemployment

benefits and classified

427,141 individuals as

unemployed for the month

of November. Regular Initial

Claims for Unemployment

Insurance totaled 64,622 in

November increasing 6,212

from October. The state has

paid $3,827,898,143 in total

unemployment benefits for

the period December 2010

through November 2011. The

Unemployment Insurance

Trust Fund balance at the end

of November was in the red

($2,569,875,724). The State

Reserve Fund balance was

$60,184,027.

FREE ON ME!

Tuesday

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Bladen Journal

Tuesday

January 10, 2012

Page 4A

EDITORIAL ...

LETTERS ...

Here’s WHat We tHink

Tampering

teacher

nother school district is feeling the sting of a

Apublic backlash. This time it’s a school district

in Albemarle County, Va., which is wincing after

public outcry over a song some third-grade students

allegedly penned about the Occupy Wall

Street movement.

The song in question is titled “Part of the 99” and was

performed at the Westbrook Elementary School. The

nature of the lyrics the students allegedly penned themselves

left some parents and political pundits wondering

just who really wrote the lyrics.

Some political blogs and commentators have even gone

so far as to label the song a form of “indoctrination.”

In our curiosity to see just what the hullabaloo was

about we took a peek at the lyrics. Here is a sample of

what we say is definitely advanced for an 8-year-old’s level

of thinking:

“Some people have it all

“But they still don’t think they have enough

“They want more money

“A faster ride

“They’re not content

“Never satisfied

“Yes — they’re the 1

percent

“I used to be one of the 1

percent

“I worked all the time

“Never saw my family

“Couldn’t make life rhyme

“Then the bubble burst

Bladen

Journal

Poll:

– The Bladen

Journal

conducts a

weekly online

poll for the

public. This

past week’s

question was

…Do you

plan to re-gift

any of the

Christmas

presents you

received?

72% No

28% Yes

Vote on the

weekly

question online

at the Bladen

website at

bladenjournal

.com

“It really, really hurt

“I lost my money

“Lost my pride

“Lost my home

“Now I’m part of the 99

“Some people have it all

“But they still don’t think

they have enough

“They want more money

“A faster ride

“They’re not content

“Never satisfied

“Yes — they’re the 1

percent

“I used to be sad, now

I’m satisfied

“‘Cause I really have

enough

“Though I lost my yacht

and plane

“Didn’t need that extra

stuff

“Could have been much

worse

“You don’t need to be first

“‘Cause I’ve got my

friends

“Here by my side

“Don’t need it all

“I’m so happy to be part

of the 99.”

We agree the topic itself

is definitely deep for an

8-year old. How many thirdgrade

students sit around

and discuss or contemplate

class warfare or poverty

among their friends?

It is more likely their

conversation will consist of

video games and the latest

songs by Justin Beiber.

We simply don’t see the lyrics as being written entirely

by a group of 8-year-olds without the influence of an adult.

Teachers suggest topics to students all the time and at

times teachers even go so far as to assign specific directions

for certain lessons.

So why would this song be any different?

We see this song as an attempt by the teacher to hijack

the classroom and student assignment to push their personal

point of view. In the words of another famous song,

“Hey, teacher! Leave those kids alone!”

Write to us!

The Bladen Journal welcomes letters to the editor.

Letters should be about issues of general interest,

brief and to the point.

We reserve the right to refuse letters longer than

250 words; poetry; letters that are in bad taste or

libelous; and letters from outside our readership.

Letters may be edited, but content will not be altered.

Letters should be original. They must be signed.

Please include your address and daytime phone

number. Street addresses and phone numbers will

not be published. A photograph of the writer will

be used if provided.

Send letters to: Bladen Journal, P.O. Box 70,

Elizabethtown, N.C. 28337 or fax them to (910)

862-6602. Letters can also be sent by e-mail to cvincent@heartlandpublications.com

or through the

Bladen Journal’s Web site at www.bladenjournal.

com.

Bladen Journal

Published by Heartland Publications, LLC

138 West Broad Street,

P.O. Box 70,

Elizabethtown, N.C. 28337

(910) 862-4163

Opinion

Bladen County Schools

are heading for the 21st

Century through the 1:1

digital initiative, which

is being implemented

through a pilot program

now and will be rolled out in its

entirety in the fall. I, for one,

think it’s a great opportunity to

help our students learn to cope in

a digital world.

While it is good our students

are learning how to use technology

for researching course

assignments and school

projects, let’s not forget

to teach them the simple

things such as how to

address a business envelop

and how to write a

proper business letter.

The real world is

becoming a more complicated

place with the

advent of new and ever

changing technology. It

is important to know

how to use that new

technology, but it is also

equally important for

students to realize that even if

they are using e-mail to send a

letter, it still needs to look like

a letter. In some places in the

world, business correspondence

is still done by completing a business

envelop and affixing whatever

the proper postage is to it.

Yes, I am well aware the use of

“snail mail,” as we like to call it,

is fading fast in the global work

place, but it is still a needed skill

in some places.

Many students are quite adept

at using the Internet for many

things such as social networking,

event planning, skyping

with friends and twittering about

the latest celebrity to fall from

grace. How are they at locating

scholarly sources for term papers

or solving complicated science

questions. With the advent of

what is commonly called, “The

Cloud” there is no need to print

out documents. Instead they are

saved in some far away place to

be retrieved as needed.

The school system received two

grants to help pay for about 1,500

high school students to receive

a Lenovo tablet for which they

will be responsible all during the

academic year. Superintendent

Robert Taylor said if

the tablet is stolen, the

student must file a police

report and bring a copy

of the police report to

the district office in

order to have the tablet

replaced. If a student

simply misplaces the digital

device, the parents of

the student will incur a

replacement fee.

There is a lot to be

said for students in

the high schools being

exposed to the use of

digital technology in the classroom.

I have heard many stories

of students who arrived at college

eager to learn only to be overwhelmed

by the amount of technology

in use in the college level

classroom.

While many students are fortunate

enough to have some exposure

to digital technology in the

home, not all students have that

luxury and this digital initiative

through the school system levels

that playing field somewhat and I

am happy to see our board of education

members agree.

I think our students need to be

exposed to as much technology,

especially in the sciences, as possible.

With the work place becom-

The Bladen Journal’s opinion is

expressed only in its unsigned editorials.

The opinions expressed in columns,

letters and cartoons are those of

the authors and artists.

Add more technology to our schools

Erin Smith

Staff Writer

ing more and more global, they

need to understand how to function

and how to use the myriad of

digital media to their advantage

when they join the work place.

While I am sure some teachers

will question the need for

the tablets in the classrooms, the

wisdom of such a move is indeed

forward thinking. Education is no

longer just the “Three Rs” though

they are still very important. It

is about teaching students to be

competitive in a global market

and how to function in a technologically

advanced world.

When I was growing up, the

Internet was just an idea and a

computer was so large and so

bulky, that took an entire building

to house one. Our concepts and

ideas of what the 21st Century

would hold was shaped by such

movies and television shows as

Star Trek, Star Wars and Lost in

Space.

We were told that one day we

would be able to press a button

and like magic we would receive a

complete meal in seconds. I guess

to some degree that has come to

pass with the invention of the

microwave oven.

Computers are now common

in the work place and at home.

When the computer malfunctions,

the world comes to a complete

stop until it is repaired or

replaced.

No longer can we sit back and

be satisfied with the status quo.

We have to find ways to incorporate

technology into our students

lives so they can compete in a

global network.

n Erin Smith is a staff writer

at the Bladen Journal and can

be reached by email at esmith@

heartlandpublications.com or by

telephone at 910-862-4163.

The Bladen Journal accepts guest columns from readers who want to write

about local, state, national or internation issues in a format longer than a

letter to the editor. Guest columns can be up to 750 words, must include a

phone number, be signed and must include a photograph of the writer. As

with anything submitted for publication in the Bladen Journal, guest

columns may not be libelous or contain knowingly false information. All

guest columns are subject to approval by the Bladen Journal management.

For more information about guest columns, call Editor W. Curt Vincent

at 862-4163, Ext. 261.

(USPS 057720)

Second class postage at Elizabethtown, N.C.,

and additional mailing offices

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Web address: www.bladenjournal.com

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THE STAFF

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general manager/editor

cvincent@heartlandpublications.

com

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January 10, 2012 n www.bladenjournal.com n Bladen Journal n Page 5A

Following Daniel Boone’s travels to the West

First there was Daniel Boone.

Boone’s real exploits on

America’s frontier made him a

legend in a new country whose

people were ever pushing westward,

driving the boundaries of their

nation to the Pacific and beyond.

The history of our country’s push

westward has never been easy to write,

wrapped up as it is with contradictory

themes. The tenacious heroism of the

settlers braving the long dangerous

treks to new homes has to be matched

up against the greed, deceit, and callousness

that forced the original inhabitants

off their lands.

While the expansion of democracy

led to a land of freedom admired

throughout the world, it was built

in part on lands seized from a weak

neighbor.

How can that story best be told?

North Carolina native poet, novelist,

and teacher Robert Morgan showed

us one way in his recent biography,

“Boone.” Using his great storytelling

skills, Morgan demythologized Boone,

while, at the same time, showing him

to be an extraordinary and fascinating

person.

From his home base along the Yadkin

River in North Carolina where he grew

up, Boone explored Kentucky and

then pulled his kinfolk, neighbors, and

countless others across the mountains

to his new home country. Later, many

of them followed Boone further west to

Missouri.

Other men, some of them with

adventurous spirits similar

to Boone’s, continued the

push westward long after

Boone left the scene. In his

latest book, “Lions of the

West: Heroes and Villains of

the Westward Expansion,”

Morgan continues the saga.

Instead of focusing on just

one man as he did with

“Boone,” he uses short profiles

of ten different men to

develop a panoramic look at

a historic era.

He picked a variety

of subjects. Some, like

David Crockett, Sam Houston, Kit

Carson, and John “Johnny Appleseed”

Chapman, are, like Boone, mythical

figures, demigods in America’s national

pantheon.

Others like Presidents Thomas

Jefferson, Andrew Jackson, James K.

Polk, and John Quincy Adams, though

not as colorful, were even more important.

They made controversial decisions

that put the power of the nation

behind their visions of an expanding

country.

Most of us remember learning

in high school history that the key

event in opening the door

to the expansion of the

United States was Jefferson’s

Louisiana Purchase in 1803.

Morgan’s portrait of Jefferson

shows how his strong and continuing

interest in the western

part of North America arose

long before 1803.

The largest acquisition

of territory, other than the

Louisiana Purchase, had a

North Carolina connection.

As president, North Carolina

native and UNC graduate

James K. Polk led the country

into the war with Mexico and

the acquisition of the Southwest and

California. Even while pointing out

Polk’s numerous flaws, Morgan praises

him as one of the country’s most effective

presidents.

Morgan includes another North

www.bladenjournal.com

Carolina-connected president, Andrew

Jackson, for his role in opening the

west. Today, historians criticize

Jackson for his part in the forcible

removal of the eastern tribes of Native

Americans. But Morgan’s sympathetic

portrait of Jackson’s bravery, tenacity,

and open democracy, shows the reader

why many historians admire him.

The tales of heroic fighters like

Sam Houston, David Crockett and Kit

Carson make them obvious choices

for “Lions of the West.” But why did

Morgan include “Johnny Appleseed”

Chapman? Although apples and trees

were important on the frontier, I think

Morgan used him to show that the

settlement of the West resulted more

from the determination of ambitious

ordinary people than from government

direction.

“Lions of the West” is full of many

more good stories, all told by a talented

author, whose histories and biographies

read like his much-admired fiction.

n D.G. Martin hosts UNC-TV’s “North

Carolina Bookwatch,” which airs

Fridays at 9:30 p.m. and Sundays at 5

p.m. For more information or to view

prior programs visit the webpage at

www.unctv.org/ncbookwatch/

Let’s add civility and civic skills to our goals

This is a season of giving,

good cheer, and

forbearance. Too bad

that, as the political

season begins in earnest

with the turn of the year,

all those fine sentiments will

become just a memory.

So maybe, as we jot down

our New Year’s resolutions,

we could add this one: “Every

action done in company, ought

to be with some sign of respect

to those that are present.” And

then let’s hope that our political

leaders add it to their lists, too.

That simple resolution

came from the pen of George

Washington. It was the first of

his “Rules of Civility & Decent

Behavior.” Washington was a

mere teenager of 16 when he

wrote them down, which ought

to make any number of our current

elected officials pause and

reflect.

For too often in recent

decades our politics have been

strident, polarized, coarse, even

mean. We do not show respect

L

to those present. We do not

even show respect to those who

are not present but, by virtue

of televisions, newspapers and

the Web, are just as tuned in

as those who are there. And

because we do not,

we are all the poorer.

Incivility directly

affects both the quality

and the quantity

of the hard work of

governance. Along

with the outright

rudeness that often

marks our public

discourse, it makes it

virtually impossible

to reconcile opposing

views and, therefore,

to meet our civic

challenges. Anyone

can walk into a room where

there are differences of opinion

and blow it apart. What is hard

to do is to walk into the room

and bring people together. That

is political skill of the highest

order.

So why shouldn’t we just

etters to the Editor

Director gives thanks

to community

Dear editor, On behalf

of the residents of West

Bladen Assisted Living,

I would like the opportunity

to thank the community

at large for their

generous out pouring of

kindness and generosity

not only during the

Christmas holidays but

year-round. We are so

truly blessed to have such

wonderful friends, relatives,

and churches come

out and share with us.

Just a single visit means

so very much! Some of

you sang carols, brought

gifts, and had services

with us. We appreciate

you! May we wish all of

you a Happy New Year,

hoping it will be a prosperous

one for everyone.

God bless you all,

Jo Harrison

Activity director

We must change

our ways

Dear editor:

At the present time,

there is great stress in

nearly every country

on Earth, including the

United States.

The Bible spoke of the

present time over 3,000

years ago. Christ spoke

about it in the 24th chapter

of Matthew.

Lee Hamilton

Contributing Columnist

COMMENTARY

D.G. Martin

Contributing Columnist

ask politicians to resolve to be

more civil? Why do we need to

put it on our lists, too? Because

everyone in this country has

a responsibility to foster a

civic dialogue that respects the

people with whom

we disagree and that

advances the interests

of the nation.

Knowing how to

disagree without

obstructing progress

is a basic civic skill.

The more that ordinary

citizens state

their case and their

principles cogently,

in a manner that is

substantive, factual,

and does not attack

the motivation or

patriotism of those with whom

they disagree, the better our

political system will work and

the stronger our nation will

be. If we know how to do this

ourselves and to accept no less

from our leaders, then we can

change our politics.

The year 2011 started

off like a scalded jackrabbit

with disaster after

disaster here and around

the world.

Here in the United

States, less than 50 percent

of men and women

get married. Gays bring

their lifestyles out into

the open. Stealing is

through the roof. Murder

and rapes are up.

By our actions we are

thumbing our collective

noses at God. Here is

what His word says: I will

not be mocked,” “woe

unto the man,” that says

good is evil and evil is

good. Woe unto the man

who brings his sins into

NEW E-MAIL ADDRESSES FOR

THE BLADEN JOURNAL

the open.

America is on the

threshold of being judged

by God for its many sins.

The return of Jesus Christ

is at the door, but before

he returns a great deal

of death and destruction

will take place because

of making the wrong

choices.

It does not have to happen

— if only America

would repent. But the

way things look, that will

not happen because the

American people think

that the government can

solve our nation’s problems.

Jerry Lewis

Harrells

GM/Editor: W. Curt Vincent n cvincent@heartlandpublications.com

Staff Writer: Erin Smith n esmith@heartlandpublications.com

Bladen Journal classifieds: n bladenjournalclass@gmail.com

Advertising: Brittney Woodell n bwoodell@heartlandpublications.com

In a democracy, it is not

enough just to let politicians

set the rules of engagement.

As citizens, we need to know

how to cultivate our own skills:

to stay informed, volunteer,

speak out, ask questions, make

discriminating judgments about

politicians and policies, and

improve our neighborhoods and

communities.

And we need to know the

values that underlie productive

civic dialogue: mutual respect

and tolerance; the humility

to know that sometimes

we’re wrong; the honesty to

keep deliberations open and

straightforward; the resolve to

surmount challenges whatever

the obstacles; and, of course,

the civility that allows us to

find common ground despite

our disagreements. If we come

to value all this, then the

politicians who spring from our

midst will have to, as well.

It seems a small thing, resolving

to be more civil. But it’s not

small if we put it into practice

ADOPT A

NEW BEST

FRIEND!

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at the shelter or visit

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— if we get off the sidelines,

engage with the issues in front

of us both large and small,

and learn firsthand a basic

appreciation for the hard work

of democracy: how to understand

many different points

of view and forge a consensus

behind a course of action that

leads towards a solution. It is

the actions of many ordinary

people rolling up their sleeves

and digging into the issues they

confront in their neighborhoods

and communities that keep this

great democratic experiment of

ours vital.

This is because every one of

us who hones the civic skills

needed to renew our politics

makes it that much more likely

that our nation will thrive.

That’s not a bad goal, as we

finish out one year and turn

toward the future.

n Lee Hamilton is director

of the Center on Congress at

Indiana University. He was a

member of the U.S. House of

Representatives for 34 years.

The Bladen Journal welcomes letters to

the editor. Letters should be about issues of

general interest, brief and to the point.

We reserve the right to refuse letters

longer than 250 words; poetry; letters that

are in bad taste or libelous; and letters from

outside our readership. Letters may be edited,

but content will not be altered.

Letters should be original. They must be

signed. Please include your address and

daytime phone number. Street addresses

and phone numbers will not be published.

A photograph of the writer will be used if

provided.

Send letters to: Bladen Journal, P.O. Box

70, Elizabethtown, N.C. 28337 or fax them

to (910) 862-6602. Letters can also be sent

by e-mail to cvincent@heartlandpublications.com

or through the Bladen Journal’s

Web site at www.bladenjournal.com.

Bladen County Animal Shelter

508 Smith Circle, Elizabethtown, NC

(next to the Powell-Melvin Ag g Service Center) )

Please visit or call during offi ce e hours

Monday, Wednesday & Friday 1:00-5:30

Saturday 9:00-12:00

910-862-6918

Please thank my Sponsor

No one will ever love you

more than a dog or cat

that was once abandoned...

Adopt

“Amelia”

TODAY!

BLADEN JOURNAL


Lifestyles

For Better Living:

Eat and snack differently

T

oo many snack foods are low in

nutrients and high in calories

from sugar, fat or both. Eating

too many of these extras often

becomes nothing more than

consumption of empty calories.

Sweets, chips and sugary sodas

account for nearly one-third of the

calories consumed by Americans. It’s

important to know that sweets, desserts,

snacks and alcohol are contributing

calories without providing vitamins

and minerals. In contrast, healthy foods

such as vegetables and fruit make up

only 10 percent of the caloric intake

in the U.S. diet. Many Americans are

undernourished in terms of vitamins

and minerals. You can actually be obese

and still be undernourished

with regard to important

nutrients. So, in many cases,

instead of eating less, we may

need to eat differently.

We all enjoy having extras

or treats, but the problem is

how much and how often. The

U.S. Dietary Guidelines rec-

ommend limiting discretionary

calories, which are calories

left in your calorie allowance

after meeting your nutrient

needs. The bad news is that

most of us don’t keep close

enough track of what our

calorie allowance is, and an extra 100

calories per day can result in a weight

gain of 10 pounds in one year. It’s easy

to exceed our discretionary allowance

when the average calories in a serving

of soda, beer, wine, candy bar or chips

can exceed 100 calories.

Here are a few ideas of how to make

gradual changes that may start you

down a new path of better nutrition.

Limit how often and how much

extras are eaten. If you pack your

lunch, include only one small treat. Eat

your fun food only once a day - perhaps

for a morning or afternoon snack.

Candy bars come in a “fun size,” which

average around 40 calories. Sodas are

available in 8 oz. cans for 100 calories.

Share a dessert when you eat out.

Reduce temptations. Even though the

economy size bag of chips is a good

deal for your wallet, it’s not necessarily

the case for your waistline if you

can’t control how much you eat. Buy

the small single-size packages instead.

Cut down on the snacks in your pantry,

refrigerator and freezer.Look for

healthier choices that are similar

to the high-calorie options. If you

like salty snacks, choose pretzels or

popcorn over chips. Try a cup of hot

cocoa made with nonfat milk if you

want chocolate. If you crave ice cream,

look for lower fat versions. Keep your

favorite fresh crunchy veggies on hand,

washed, ready-to-go and, most importantly,

easily visible when you want a

Sandra R. Cain

Bladen County

Cooperative

Extension

L C ocal

Jan 14

n Join a park ranger for a

discussion about Carolina

Bays at Jones Lake State

Park. After the discussion

a short hike through

a Carolina Bay, will give

you a chance to explore

these natural mysteries.

Participants should meet at

the Jones Lake State Park

Visitor Center at 2 p.m.

and be sure to dress appropriately.

This event is free

and open to the public.

Jan. 17

n The Bladen County

Educational Foundation,

Inc., will hold its regular

monthly meeting on

Tuesday, Jan. 17, at 5:30

p. m., in the “Blue Room”

of the Bladen County

Board of Education on

US Hwy. 701 South, in

Elizabethtown. This is

an important meeting as

we will be discussing our

upcoming service projects.

All folks who care about

the public schools of

Bladen County are urged

and invited to attend this

meeting.

Jan. 21

n Join a park ranger for

a discussion about butterflies

and how to attract

them to your back yard.

Participants should meet at

the Jones Lake State Park

Visitor Center at 2 p.m..

The event is free and open

to the public.

Jan. 28

n A wild game cook

off and barbecue supper

will take place at

Elizabethtown Baptist

Church in Elizabethtown

snack.

Do something physical to take you

away from food temptations. Take

a walk. Weed the garden. Clean out a

closet. Organize a drawer.

Changing your diet and snack habits

takes time. Some of the benefits that

you may see include better sleeping

patterns, less indigestion, less irritability,

increased stamina and even weight

loss for some.

Don’t be surprised if you find you

have less interest in returning to your

former eating style. Healthy habits can

make you feel great!

Source: Colorado Cooperative

Extension

Do you need to lose a few pounds?

Eat Smart, Move More, Weigh

Less will be offered in Bladen

County.

Did you make a New Year’s

resolution to eat less, exercise

more and lose some weight?

Bladen County Cooperative

Extension and the Health

Department have just the pro-

gram for you!

Eat Smart, Move More,

Weigh Less, a weight management

program developed by

the N.C. Cooperative Extension

and the N.C. Division of Public

Health, will be offered in

Bladen County starting in February

2012.

Eat Smart, Move More, Weigh Less

uses strategies proven to work. The

fifteen week program informs, empowers

and motivates participants to live

mindfully as they make choices about

eating and physical activity. The program

provides opportunities for participants

to track their progress and keep

a journal of healthy eating and physical

activity behaviors.

The program will meet once at week,

during the lunch hour, for 45 minutes.

The cost for the entire program is $35

which includes all program materials

and daily journal.

To register or to receive additional

information about the program, call

Sandra Cain at 862-4591 or Carol

Strickland at 872-6252.

Devil’s Food Cookies

1 package devil’s food cake mix

2 eggs

2 tablespoons butter, softened

3 tablespoons water

½ cup miniature semisweet chocolate

chips

In a large mixing bowl, combine

the cake mix, eggs, butter and water.

Batter will be thick. Fold in chocolate

chips. Drop by tablespoonfuls 2 inches

apart onto baking sheets coated with

nonstick spray. Bake at 350 degrees for

10 – 13 minutes or until set and edges

are lightly browned. Cool 2 minutes

before removing to wire racks.

alendar ...

CLARKTON — Never before in the

history of the state’s poetry contest for

middle-school students has one school

won first, second and third places.

But recently, three CSD sixth-graders,

taught by Sherry Hayes, walked

away with every top prize.

Allaysha Smith won first place for

“My Sister is a Werewolf;” Devon

VOLUNTEERS , GROUPS ...

Support Groups

— Bladen Correctional

Center is looking for volunteers

for its Community

Resource Council. The

Council, which normally

meets monthly, provides

public awareness and support

for the prison facility

and assists inmates

in making the transition

from prison back into the

community. Volunteer

activities may include

assisting inmate families

in understanding prison

policies and procedures,

and providing things for

the inmates who might

not get them from other

sources. Anyone interested

in becoming a volunteer

should call Supt.

Randy Register or Ass’t.

Supt. Cynthia Hester at

910-862-3107.

— Alcoholics

Anonymous meets every

Thursday night at 7:30

p.m. at Elizabethtown

Presbyterian Church, 800

W. Broad St. Anonymity

will be respected. For

more information, contact

Steve U. at 874-0147.

— The Bladen County

Free Clinic is now accepting

patients who qualify

for free medical care. If

you are uninsured and

live at or below the 200

percent poverty level call

for an appointment to

sign up at 669-3272. The

office is open Monday

through Thursday from

8:30 a.m. until 2:30 p.m.

— The Bladen County

Family Caregiver

Support Group meets on

Thursday after the first

Sunday of each month at

6 p.m. at Mt. Zion AME

Church on MLK Jr. Drive

in Elizabethtown. A light

dinner is served. Call

272-0121 for information.

— Bladen Pregnancy

Support Services located

at 509 Cypress Street,

Elizabethtown, offers

free support services.

Hours are Tuesdays, from

5 p.m. until 8 p.m. and

Thursdays from 4 p.m.

until 7 p.m. Call 862-7903

to make an appointment.

— Families First Inc.

Domestic Violence

Agency sponsors an

empowerment/support

group every other

Thursday from 5:30 - 6:30

p.m., and a parenting program

each Monday and

Wednesday from 6 to 7

p.m., at the agency at

208 S. Morehead St., in

Bladen Journal

TUESDAY

January 10, 2012

Page 7A

Contributed photo

Three CSD sixth graders, taught by Mrs. Sherry Hayes, walked away with every top prize. Allaysha

Smith won first place for “My Sister is a Werewolf”. Devon Stocks won second place for “The

Pledge of Sausage”, and Kenneth Mote won third place for “Pumpkin Patch”.

CSD poets sweep top awards

Stocks took second place for “The

Pledge of Sausage;” and Kenneth Mote

won third place for “Pumpkin Patch.”

The winners will receive a check and

certificate at the awards ceremony in

Hickory. Their poems will also be published

in the anthology, Bay Leaves,

and each student will receive a complimentary

copy of this book.

AROUND THE COUNTY

Elizabethtown. The public

is invited to attend

both events. For more

information, contact

Marjorie Walker at 862-

2534.

Volunteer

Organizations

— Bladen County

Habitat for Humanity

meets at 6:30 p.m. on

the second Monday

of each month at

the Elizabethtown

Presbyterian Church.

— Elizabethtown

Rotary Club meets every

Wednesday at 1 p.m. at

San Jose Restaurant in

Elizabethtown.

— The Elizabethtown

KIWANIS meets every

first and third Tuesday of

each month in at San Jose

restaurant at 7 p.m. For

more information about

becoming a member contact,

876-9543.

— Boys and Girls

Homes of N.C., Inc.,

needs foster and/or adoptive

parents. If you would

like a training to be available

in your area or if you

would like more information,

contact LeAnne

Fowler, 910-646-3083,

ext. 217, or Anna Scharff,

ext. 276.

FOR mORE EvENT lisTiNgs, OR TO sUbmiT A CAlENDAR iTEm ONliNE, gO TO www.blADENjOURNAl.COm

from 10 a.m. until 8 p.m.

Supper will start at 5:30

p.m. Events will include

a 3D archery shoot, long

range and iron buck shoot,

bounce houses for the

children, and U.S.D.A.

Wildlife services trapping

trailer. There will be door

prizes and more. The

grand prize will be pheasant

tower hunt at Allen

Brothers Hunting Preserve.

The church is located at

1800 W. Broad Street,

Elizabethtown.

n Join a park ranger

for a discussion about the

red-cockaded woodpecker

which calls Jones Lake

State Park home. Learn

about the many adaptations

that make this bird

unique. Participants should

meet at the Jones Lake

State Park Visitors Center

at 10 a.m. The program

will be followed by a short

hike. The event is free and

open to the public.

Ongoing

n Grandparents and kinship

caregiver’s raising

grandchildren support

group meets every third

Wednesday of the month

at the Bladen County

Division on Aging located

at 608 McLeod Street,

Elizabethtown. For more

information, call 910-872-

6334.

n Dublin First Baptist

Church Child Development

Center is enrolling children

ages 2-4 in the half-day

program. The program

uses the A Beka curriculum.

For more information

or to enroll call 862-2277

or 876-0419.

n The Bladen County

Youth Focus Project

will meet every second

Saturday of the month

at 10 a.m. at the Paul R.

Brown Building on Martin

Luther King Boulevard,

Elizabethtown. All interested

persons are welcome

to attend.

n The Bladenboro

Visual Arts Council Art

Gallery will feature the

artwork of Esther Colliers

through the holiday. The

gallery is located in the

Bladenboro Historical

Building and is open daily

from 10 a.m. to noon, and

on Saturdays and Sundays

from 2 to 4 p.m.

The Bladenboro

Historical Building is

located at 818 South Main

Street, Bladenboro.

n The Bladen County

Amateur Radio Society

meets the first Tuesday of

every month at the Bladen

County Courthouse in

Elizabethtown Room G7 at

7 p.m. The public with or

without an amateur radio

license are welcome to

attend.

n The Cape Fear

Farmer’s Market is now

offering its tailgate market

from 7 a.m. until 6 p.m.

Vendor information and

copies of the rules for the

market can be obtained by

contacting Sarah Baysden

at the Elizabethtown Town

Office at 862-2066.

n The Elizabethtown-

White Lake Chamber of

Commerce meets every

second Tuesday at the

Front Porch Restaurant at

noon.

n The Garland Lodge

1511 of the Woodmen

of the World Insurance

Society meets the first

Friday of every month at 7

p.m. at the Ammon community

building. Members

and guests are welcome.


CALL | 910.862.4163 • FAX | 910.862.6602

EMAIL | class@bladenjournal.com

ONLINE | www.BladenJournal.com

IN PERSON | 138 W. Broad Street, Elizabethtown, NC

MAIL | P.O. Box 70, Elizabethtown, NC 28337

DEADLINES

TUESDAY’S ISSUE: Thursday at 5:00 pm

FRIDAY’S ISSUE: Tuesday at 5:00 pm

EASY WAYS

TO PLACE YOUR AD

6

BEST WAY

TO WRITE YOUR AD

Begin with a KEY WORD such as “Item for Sale”, etc.

Use DESCRIPTIVE WORDS to identify the item

State your PRICE or TERMS for the Sale

Include a PHONE NUMBER and/or EMAIL ADDRESS

LOCAL RATES

LINE ADS ONLY $7.06 for the first FOUR LINES;

$1.30 for each additional line (about 34 letters per line)

DISPLAY ADS ONLY $10.85 per column inch

EXECUTOR/EXECUTRIX

ADMINISTRATOR/ADMINISTRATRIX $78 per series

INCLUDES

ONLINE

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Journal

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January 10, 2012 n www.bladenjournal.com n Bladen Journal n Page 7a















































EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Southeastern Community College is seeking to hire the following position.

RECRUITER

Minimum requirements, position description and required application

for this position can be found on the SCC website at

www.sccnc.edu or call 910-642-7141, ext. 310. SCC application, resume,

letter of interest and educational transcripts must be submitted in order

to be considered for this position. Application deadline is listed on the

position announcement. AA/EOE

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Southeastern Community College is seeking to hire the following position.

SMALL BUSINESS RESOURCE SPECIALIST

Minimum requirements, position description and required application for

this position can be found on the SCC website at www.sccnc.edu or

call 910-642-7141, ext. 310. SCC application, resume, letter of interest and

educational transcripts must be submitted in order to be considered for

this position. Application deadline is listed on the position announcement.

AA/EOE

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES

Southeastern Community College is seeking to hire the following position.

GENERAL MAINTENANCE/GROUNDS WORKERS

Minimum requirements, position description and required application for

this position can be found on the SCC website at www.sccnc.edu or call

910-642-7141, ext. 310. SCC application, resume, letter of interest and

educational transcripts must be submitted in order to be considered for

this position. Application deadline is listed on the position announcement.

AA/EOE

Legals

NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION

Having qualified as Executor of the

Estate of Juanita Walker, deceased,

late of Bladen County, North Caro-

lina, this is to notify all persons,

firms and corporations having

claims against said estate to present

them, duly verified, to the under-

signed c/o Eugene Walker, Jr., 1005

Wickerby Court, Indian Trail, NC

28079, on or before the 24th day of

April, 2012, or this notice will be

pleaded in bar of their recovery. All

persons indebted to said estate will

please make immediate settlement

with the undersigned.

This, the 30th day of December,

2011.

Eugene Walker, Jr.,

Executor of Estate of Juanita Walker

SHADL010312 1/3 1/10 1/17 1/24

NORTH CAROLINA

BLADEN COUNTY

Administrator/Administratrix Notice

Having qualified as Administratrix of

the estate of Norris O. Graham, de-

ceased, late of Bladen County, North

Carolina. This is to notify all persons,

firms and corporations having claims

against the estate of said deceased

to present the bills to me, the under-

signed at 21761 Hwy 87 E., Riegel-

wood, NC 28456, on or before the

29th day of March, 2012. This Notice

will be pleaded in bar of their recov-

ery. All persons indebted to said es-

tate please make immediate pay-

ment.

This the 27th day of December 2011.

Edell Graham, Administratrix of the

estate of Norris O. Graham

21761 Hwy 87 E.

Riegelwood, NC 28456

NOG122711 12/27 1/3 1/10 1/17

NORTH CAROLINA

BLADEN COUNTY

Administration/Administratrix Notice

Having qualified as Administrator of

the estate of Odessa M. Clark, de-

ceased, late of Bladen County, North

Carolina. This is to notify all persons,

firms and corporations having claims

against the estate of said deceased

to present the bills to me, the under-

signed at 18045 NC Hwy 87 West,

Tar Heel, NC 28392 on or before the

22nd day of March, 2012. This No-

tice will be pleaded in bar of their re-

covery. All persons indebted to said

estate please make immediate pay-

ment.

This the 14th day of December 2011.

George F. Clark, Administrator of the

Estate of Odessa M. Clark

18045 NC Hwy 87 W.

Tar Heel, NC 28392

OMC122011 12/20 12/27 1/3 1/10

11 SP 2

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NORTH CAROLINA, BLADEN COUNTY

Under and by virtue of a Power of

Sale contained in that certain Deed of

Trust executed by GERALD L GRA-

HAM, AND WIFE SARAH J GRAHAM to

ROBERT BAUCHLE, FIRST AMERICAN

TITLE INS. CO., Trustee(s), which was

dated October 23, 2007 and re-

corded on November 15, 2007 in

Book 00623 at Page 0598, Bladen

County Registry, North Carolina. De-

fault having been made of the note

thereby secured by the said Deed of

Trust and the undersigned, Trustee

Services of Carolina, LLC, having

been substituted as Trustee in said

Deed of Trust, and the holder of the

note evidencing said default having

directed that the Deed of Trust be

foreclosed, the undersigned Substi-

tute Trustee will offer for sale at the

courthouse door of the county court-

house where the property is located,

or the usual and customary location

at the county courthouse for con-

ducting the sale on January 19, 2012

at 10:00AM, and will sell to the high-

est bidder for cash the following de-

scribed property situated in Bladen

County, North Carolina, to wit: LAND

REFERRED TO IN THIS COMMITMENT

IS DESCRIBED AS ALL THAT CERTAIN

PROPERTY SITUATED IN CITY OF

ELIZABETHTOWN IN THE COUNTY OF

BLADEN, AND STATE OF NC AND BE-

ING DESCRIBED IN A DEED DATED

08/29/2006 AND RECORDED

10/27/2006 IN BOOK 600 PAGE 392

AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF THE

COUNTY AND STATE SET FORTH

ABOVE, AND REFERENCED AS FOL-

LOWS: LOCATED IN BETHEL TOWN-

SHIP, BLADEN COUNTY, NORTH

CAROLINA AND BEING DESCRIBED AS

FOLLOWS: THAT CERTAIN TRACT OR

PARCEL OF LAND CONTAINING 0.81

ACRE, MORE OR LESS AND CONSIST-

ING OF ALL OF LOT 4A AND A POR-

TION OF LOT 5A OF SECTION 1A OF

CAPE OWEN MANOR SUBDIVISION, A

MAP OF ALL LOTS 4A, 5A AND 6A

BEING FOUND IN PLAT BOOK 12,

PAGE 20, BLADEN COUNTY REGISTRY.

SAID 0.81 ACRE, MORE OR LESS OF

LAND CONSISTING OF ALL LOT 4A

AND A PORTION OF LOT 5A BEING

FURTHER DESCRIBED BY METES AND

BOUNDS AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT

THAT IRON IN TH EASTERN EDGE OF

STATE ROAD 1336 REPRESENTING

THE SOUTHWESTERNMOST CORNER

OF AN ADJACENT 0.81 ACRE TRACT

OF KENNETH E. THOMPSON AND

WIFE, GWENDOLYN S. THOMPSON

SHOWN ON A PLOT PLAN RECORDED

IN DEED BOOK 219, AT PAGE 387 OF

THE BLADEN COUNTY REGISTRY;

RUNNING THENCE FROM THE POINT

OF BEGINNING NORTH 57 DEGREES

27 MINUTES EAST 206.6 FEET TO AN

IRON; THENCE SOUTH 18 DEGREES

26 MINUTES EAST 191.12 FEET TO

AN IRON; THENCE SOUTH 64 DE-

GREES 51 MINUTES WEST 201.76

FEET TO AN IRON IN THE EASTERN

EDGE OF STATE ROAD 1336;THENCE

NORTH 18 DEGREES 26 MINUTES

WEST 164.32 FEET ALONG THE EAST-

ERN EDGE OF STATE ROAD 1336 TO

THE BEGINNING, CONSISTING OF 0.81

ACRE, MORE OR LESS. THIS BEING

THE SAME PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN A

DEED DATED JUNE 30, 2003 FROM

RITCHIE JERRY NORTON AND RENEE

ROBESON NORTON TO GREEN POINT

CREDIT, LLC AND RECORDED IN

BOOK 524, PAGE 859, BLADEN

COUNTY REGISTRY. ALSO BEING FUR-

THER DESCRIBED IN A DEED RE-

CORDED IN BOOK 558, AT APGE639,

BLADEN COUNTY REGISTRY.

PARCEL NO: 039400001453

Save and except any releases, deeds

of release or prior conveyances of re-

cord. Said property is commonly

known as 3442 Owen Hill Road,

Elizabethtown, NC 28337. Third

party purchasers must pay the excise

tax, and the court costs of Forty-Five

Cents (45) per One Hundred Dollars

($100.00) pursuant to NCGS

7A-308(a)(1). A cash deposit (no

personal checks) of five percent (5%)

of the purchase price, or Seven Hun-

dred Fifty Dollars ($750.00), which-

ever is greater, will be required at the

time of the sale. Following the expi-

ration of the statutory upset bid pe-

riod, all the remaining amounts are

immediately due and owing. Said

property to be offered pursuant to

this Notice of Sale is being offered

for sale, transfer and conveyance AS

IS WHERE IS. There are no represen-

tations of warranty relating to the ti-

tle or any physical, environmental,

health or safety conditions existing

in, on, at, or relating to the property

being offered for sale. This sale is

made subject to all prior liens, un-

paid taxes, any unpaid land transfer

Legals

11 SP 2

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NORTH CAROLINA, BLADEN COUNTY

Under and by virtue of a Power of

Sale contained in that certain Deed of

Trust executed by GERALD L GRA-

HAM, AND WIFE SARAH J GRAHAM to

ROBERT BAUCHLE, FIRST AMERICAN

TITLE INS. CO., Trustee(s), which was

dated October 23, 2007 and re-

corded on November 15, 2007 in

Book 00623 at Page 0598, Bladen

County Registry, North Carolina. De-

fault having been made of the note

thereby secured by the said Deed of

Trust and the undersigned, Trustee

Services of Carolina, LLC, having

been substituted as Trustee in said

Deed of Trust, and the holder of the

note evidencing said default having

directed that the Deed of Trust be

foreclosed, the undersigned Substi-

tute Trustee will offer for sale at the

courthouse door of the county court-

house where the property is located,

or the usual and customary location

at the county courthouse for con-

ducting the sale on January 19, 2012

at 10:00AM, and will sell to the high-

est bidder for cash the following de-

scribed property situated in Bladen

County, North Carolina, to wit: LAND

REFERRED TO IN THIS COMMITMENT

IS DESCRIBED AS ALL THAT CERTAIN

PROPERTY SITUATED IN CITY OF

ELIZABETHTOWN IN THE COUNTY OF

BLADEN, AND STATE OF NC AND BE-

ING DESCRIBED IN A DEED DATED

08/29/2006 AND RECORDED

10/27/2006 IN BOOK 600 PAGE 392

AMONG THE LAND RECORDS OF THE

COUNTY AND STATE SET FORTH

ABOVE, AND REFERENCED AS FOL-

LOWS: LOCATED IN BETHEL TOWN-

SHIP, BLADEN COUNTY, NORTH

CAROLINA AND BEING DESCRIBED AS

FOLLOWS: THAT CERTAIN TRACT OR

PARCEL OF LAND CONTAINING 0.81

ACRE, MORE OR LESS AND CONSIST-

ING OF ALL OF LOT 4A AND A POR-

TION OF LOT 5A OF SECTION 1A OF

CAPE OWEN MANOR SUBDIVISION, A

MAP OF ALL LOTS 4A, 5A AND 6A

BEING FOUND IN PLAT BOOK 12,

PAGE 20, BLADEN COUNTY REGISTRY.

SAID 0.81 ACRE, MORE OR LESS OF

LAND CONSISTING OF ALL LOT 4A

AND A PORTION OF LOT 5A BEING

FURTHER DESCRIBED BY METES AND

BOUNDS AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT

THAT IRON IN TH EASTERN EDGE OF

STATE ROAD 1336 REPRESENTING

THE SOUTHWESTERNMOST CORNER

OF AN ADJACENT 0.81 ACRE TRACT

OF KENNETH E. THOMPSON AND

WIFE, GWENDOLYN S. THOMPSON

SHOWN ON A PLOT PLAN RECORDED

IN DEED BOOK 219, AT PAGE 387 OF

THE BLADEN COUNTY REGISTRY;

RUNNING THENCE FROM THE POINT

OF BEGINNING NORTH 57 DEGREES

27 MINUTES EAST 206.6 FEET TO AN

IRON; THENCE SOUTH 18 DEGREES

26 MINUTES EAST 191.12 FEET TO

AN IRON; THENCE SOUTH 64 DE-

GREES 51 MINUTES WEST 201.76

FEET TO AN IRON IN THE EASTERN

EDGE OF STATE ROAD 1336;THENCE

NORTH 18 DEGREES 26 MINUTES

WEST 164.32 FEET ALONG THE EAST-

ERN EDGE OF STATE ROAD 1336 TO

THE BEGINNING, CONSISTING OF 0.81

ACRE, MORE OR LESS. THIS BEING

THE SAME PROPERTY DESCRIBED IN A

DEED DATED JUNE 30, 2003 FROM

RITCHIE JERRY NORTON AND RENEE

ROBESON NORTON TO GREEN POINT

CREDIT, LLC AND RECORDED IN

BOOK 524, PAGE 859, BLADEN

COUNTY REGISTRY. ALSO BEING FUR-

THER DESCRIBED IN A DEED RE-

CORDED IN BOOK 558, AT APGE639,

BLADEN COUNTY REGISTRY.

PARCEL NO: 039400001453

Save and except any releases, deeds

of release or prior conveyances of re-

cord. Said property is commonly

known as 3442 Owen Hill Road,

Elizabethtown, NC 28337. Third

party purchasers must pay the excise

tax, and the court costs of Forty-Five

Cents (45) per One Hundred Dollars

($100.00) pursuant to NCGS

7A-308(a)(1). A cash deposit (no

personal checks) of five percent (5%)

of the purchase price, or Seven Hun-

dred Fifty Dollars ($750.00), which-

ever is greater, will be required at the

time of the sale. Following the expi-

ration of the statutory upset bid pe-

riod, all the remaining amounts are

immediately due and owing. Said

property to be offered pursuant to

this Notice of Sale is being offered

for sale, transfer and conveyance AS

IS WHERE IS. There are no represen-

tations of warranty relating to the ti-

tle or any physical, environmental,

health or safety conditions existing

in, on, at, or relating to the property

being offered for sale. This sale is

made subject to all prior liens, un-

paid taxes, any unpaid land transfer

taxes, special assessments, ease-

ments, rights of way, deeds of re-

lease, and any other encumbrances

or exceptions of record. To the best

of the knowledge and belief of the

undersigned, the current owner(s) of

the property is/are Gerald L. Graham

and wife, Sarah J. Graham. An Order

for possession of the property may

be issued pursuant to G.S. 45-21.29

in favor of the purchaser and against

the party or parties in possession by

the clerk of superior court of the

county in which the property is sold.

Any person who occupies the prop-

erty pursuant to a rental agreement

entered into or renewed on or after

October 1, 2007, may, after receiving

the notice of sale, terminate the

rental agreement upon 10 days writ-

ten notice to the landlord. The notice

shall also state that upon termination

of a rental agreement, the tenant is

liable for rent due under the rental

agreement prorated to the effective

date of the termination. If the trustee

is unable to convey title to this prop-

erty for any reason, the sole remedy

of the purchaser is the return of the

deposit. Reasons of such inability to

convey include, but are not limited

to, the filing of a bankruptcy petition

prior to the confirmation of the sale

and reinstatement of the loan with-

out the knowledge of the trustee. If

the validity of the sale is challenged

by any party, the trustee, in their sole

discretion, if they believe the chal-

lenge to have merit, may request the

court to declare the sale to be void

and return the deposit. The pur-

chaser will have no further remedy.

Trustee Services of Carolina, LLC

Substitute Trustee

Brock & Scott, PLLC, Attorneys for

Trustee Services of Carolina, LLC

5431 Oleander Drive Suite 200

Wilmington, NC 28403

PHONE: (910) 392-4988

FAX: (910) 392-8587

File No.: 08-19106-FC02

BS011012 1/10 1/17

Legals

BLADEN COUNTY REGISTRY.

PARCEL NO: 039400001453

Save and except any releases, deeds

of release or prior conveyances of re-

cord. Said property is commonly

known as 3442 Owen Hill Road,

Elizabethtown, NC 28337. Third

party purchasers must pay the excise

tax, and the court costs of Forty-Five

Cents (45) per One Hundred Dollars

($100.00) pursuant to NCGS

7A-308(a)(1). A cash deposit (no

personal checks) of five percent (5%)

of the purchase price, or Seven Hun-

dred Fifty Dollars ($750.00), which-

ever is greater, will be required at the

time of the sale. Following the expi-

ration of the statutory upset bid pe-

riod, all the remaining amounts are

immediately due and owing. Said

property to be offered pursuant to

this Notice of Sale is being offered

for sale, transfer and conveyance AS

IS WHERE IS. There are no represen-

tations of warranty relating to the ti-

tle or any physical, environmental,

health or safety conditions existing

in, on, at, or relating to the property

being offered for sale. This sale is

made subject to all prior liens, un-

paid taxes, any unpaid land transfer

taxes, special assessments, ease-

ments, rights of way, deeds of re-

lease, and any other encumbrances

or exceptions of record. To the best

of the knowledge and belief of the

undersigned, the current owner(s) of

the property is/are Gerald L. Graham

and wife, Sarah J. Graham. An Order

for possession of the property may

be issued pursuant to G.S. 45-21.29

in favor of the purchaser and against

the party or parties in possession by

the clerk of superior court of the

county in which the property is sold.

Any person who occupies the prop-

erty pursuant to a rental agreement

entered into or renewed on or after

October 1, 2007, may, after receiving

the notice of sale, terminate the

rental agreement upon 10 days writ-

ten notice to the landlord. The notice

shall also state that upon termination

of a rental agreement, the tenant is

liable for rent due under the rental

agreement prorated to the effective

date of the termination. If the trustee

is unable to convey title to this prop-

erty for any reason, the sole remedy

of the purchaser is the return of the

deposit. Reasons of such inability to

convey include, but are not limited

to, the filing of a bankruptcy petition

prior to the confirmation of the sale

and reinstatement of the loan with-

out the knowledge of the trustee. If

the validity of the sale is challenged

by any party, the trustee, in their sole

discretion, if they believe the chal-

lenge to have merit, may request the

court to declare the sale to be void

and return the deposit. The pur-

chaser will have no further remedy.

Trustee Services of Carolina, LLC

Substitute Trustee

Brock & Scott, PLLC, Attorneys for

Trustee Services of Carolina, LLC

5431 Oleander Drive Suite 200

Wilmington, NC 28403

PHONE: (910) 392-4988

FAX: (910) 392-8587

File No.: 08-19106-FC02

BS011012 1/10 1/17

11 SP 10

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NORTH CAROLINA, BLADEN COUNTY

Under and by virtue of a Power of

Sale contained in that certain Deed of

Trust executed by LINDY C MELVIN,

AND DARLENE HIGHSMITH MELVIN to

TRUSTEE SERVICES OF CAROLINA,

LLC, Trustee(s), which was dated

August 14, 2009 and recorded on

August 14, 2009 in Book 00651 at

Page 0954, Bladen County Registry,

North Carolina. Default having been

made of the note thereby secured by

the said Deed of Trust and the un-

dersigned, Trustee Services of Caro-

lina, LLC, having been substituted as

Trustee in said Deed of Trust, and

the holder of the note evidencing

said default having directed that the

Deed of Trust be foreclosed, the un-

dersigned Substitute Trustee will of-

fer for sale at the courthouse door of

the county courthouse where the

property is located, or the usual and

customary location at the county

courthouse for conducting the sale

on January 19, 2012 at 10:00AM, and

will sell to the highest bidder for

cash the following described prop-

erty situated in Bladen County, North

Carolina, to wit: Lying and being in

Central Township, Bladen County,

North Carolina and being more par-

ticularly described as follows: BEGIN-

NING at an old point marked by an

old iron; said Point of Beginning be-

ing located by tie line from an old

point marked an old nail in the cen-

ter of paved S.R. 1513, some mile

Southwardly along S.R. 1513 from it's

intersection with U.S. Highway 701,

said tie line along an old line be-

tween lands of Bonita Alice Willis

Randolph (Deed Book 313 Page 478)

and lands now or formerly Marion

Robinson, et al, South 38 degrees 42

minutes 00 seconds West (S 38 42'

00" W), a distance of 303.35 feet to

said Point of Beginning; THENCE

FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING and

with an old line, North 59 degrees 18

minutes 00 seconds West (N 59 18'

00" W), a distance of 294.40 feet to

an old point marked by an iron pipe,

thence with an old line, South 56 de-

grees 53 minutes 30 seconds West (S

56 53' 30" W), a distance of 120.66

feet to an old point marked by an old

iron pipe, the Northernmost corner

of lands of Lillian D. McDaniel and

Liddie Agatha Cromartie as set out in

Deed recorded in Deed Book 393

Page 346; thence with the Eastern

line of said lands of McDaniel and

Cromartie, South 19 degrees 46 min-

utes 30 seconds East (S 1946'30"E), a

distance of 200.00 feet to an old

point marked by an old iron pipe, the

Easternmost corner of said lands of

McDaniel and Cromartie; thence with

a new line South 19 degrees 46 min-

utes 30 seconds East (S 1946'30"E), a

distance of 70.95 feet to a new point

marked by an iron pipe set in a

Southeastern line of the Original

Tract of which this is a part as set

out in Deed recorded in Deed Book

319, Page 634; thence with said

Southeastern line, North 56 degrees

58 minutes 00 seconds East (N

5658'00"E), a distance of 23.43 feet

to an old point marked by an old

iron; thence an old line, North 56 de-

grees 59 minutes 20 seconds East (N

5659'20"E), a distance of 289.66 feet

to the Point of Beginning, containing

1.31 Acres, more or less, according

to a survey map of same entitled

"SURVEY FOR MARY MATTHEWS",

dated October 21, 1997, by Lloyd R.

Walker, Registered Land Surveyor.

Borrowers also convey to the Trustee

for the benefit of the Lender all of

their right, title, and interest in and

to the non-exclusive 20 foot wide

Right-of-Way Easement over and

upon a 20 foot wide strip or parcel of

land, adjacent to and on the South-

west side of the First and Northeast-

ern line of the Subject 1.31 Acre

Tract and on the Southeast side of

the Second and Northwestern line of

Subject 1.31 Acre Tract, all as deline-

ated on hereinabove referenced Sur-

vey Map entitled "SURVEY FOR MARY

MATTHEWS", dated October 21,

1997, by Lloyd R. Walker, Registered

Land Surveyor, said 20 foot wide

Right-of-Way Easement extends to

and from S.R. 1513 and is over and

upon the same strips or parcels as

the 20 foot wide non-exclusive

Right-of-Way Easement as set out in

Deed to Lillian D. McDaniel and Lid-

die A. Cromartie, dated July 25,

1997, and recorded in Deed Book

393 Page 346. This Easement is to

run with said 1.31 Acre Tract de-

scribed hereinabove. Save and except

any releases, deeds of release or

prior conveyances of record. Said

property is commonly known as 62

Mary C Drive, Elizabethtown, NC

28337. Third party purchasers must

pay the excise tax, and the court

costs of Forty-Five Cents (45) per

One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) pur-

suant to NCGS 7A-308(a)(1). A cash

deposit (no personal checks) of five

percent (5%) of the purchase price, or

Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars

($750.00), whichever is greater, will

be required at the time of the sale.

Following the expiration of the statu-

tory upset bid period, all the remain-

ing amounts are immediately due

and owing. Said property to be of-

fered pursuant to this Notice of Sale

is being offered for sale, transfer and

conveyance AS IS WHERE IS. There are

no representations of warranty relat-

ing to the title or any physical, envi-

ronmental, health or safety condi-

tions existing in, on, at, or relating to

the property being offered for sale.

This sale is made subject to all prior

liens, unpaid taxes, any unpaid land

transfer taxes, special assessments,

easements, rights of way, deeds of

release, and any other encumbrances

or exceptions of record. To the best

of the knowledge and belief of the

undersigned, the current owner(s) of

the property is/are Lindy C. Melvin

and wife, Darlene Highsmith Melvin.

An Order for possession of the prop-

erty may be issued pursuant to G.S.

45-21.29 in favor of the purchaser

and against the party or parties in

possession by the clerk of superior

court of the county in which the

property is sold. Any person who oc-

cupies the property pursuant to a

rental agreement entered into or re-

newed on or after October 1, 2007,

may, after receiving the notice of

sale, terminate the rental agreement

upon 10 days written notice to the

landlord. The notice shall also state

that upon termination of a rental

agreement, the tenant is liable for

rent due under the rental agreement

prorated to the effective date of the

termination. If the trustee is unable

to convey title to this property for

any reason, the sole remedy of the

Legals

11 SP 10

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE

NORTH CAROLINA, BLADEN COUNTY

Under and by virtue of a Power of

Sale contained in that certain Deed of

Trust executed by LINDY C MELVIN,

AND DARLENE HIGHSMITH MELVIN to

TRUSTEE SERVICES OF CAROLINA,

LLC, Trustee(s), which was dated

August 14, 2009 and recorded on

August 14, 2009 in Book 00651 at

Page 0954, Bladen County Registry,

North Carolina. Default having been

made of the note thereby secured by

the said Deed of Trust and the un-

dersigned, Trustee Services of Caro-

lina, LLC, having been substituted as

Trustee in said Deed of Trust, and

the holder of the note evidencing

said default having directed that the

Deed of Trust be foreclosed, the un-

dersigned Substitute Trustee will of-

fer for sale at the courthouse door of

the county courthouse where the

property is located, or the usual and

customary location at the county

courthouse for conducting the sale

on January 19, 2012 at 10:00AM, and

will sell to the highest bidder for

cash the following described prop-

erty situated in Bladen County, North

Carolina, to wit: Lying and being in

Central Township, Bladen County,

North Carolina and being more par-

ticularly described as follows: BEGIN-

NING at an old point marked by an

old iron; said Point of Beginning be-

ing located by tie line from an old

point marked an old nail in the cen-

ter of paved S.R. 1513, some mile

Southwardly along S.R. 1513 from it's

intersection with U.S. Highway 701,

said tie line along an old line be-

tween lands of Bonita Alice Willis

Randolph (Deed Book 313 Page 478)

and lands now or formerly Marion

Robinson, et al, South 38 degrees 42

minutes 00 seconds West (S 38 42'

00" W), a distance of 303.35 feet to

said Point of Beginning; THENCE

FROM SAID POINT OF BEGINNING and

with an old line, North 59 degrees 18

minutes 00 seconds West (N 59 18'

00" W), a distance of 294.40 feet to

an old point marked by an iron pipe,

thence with an old line, South 56 de-

grees 53 minutes 30 seconds West (S

56 53' 30" W), a distance of 120.66

feet to an old point marked by an old

iron pipe, the Northernmost corner

of lands of Lillian D. McDaniel and

Liddie Agatha Cromartie as set out in

Deed recorded in Deed Book 393

Page 346; thence with the Eastern

line of said lands of McDaniel and

Cromartie, South 19 degrees 46 min-

utes 30 seconds East (S 1946'30"E), a

distance of 200.00 feet to an old

point marked by an old iron pipe, the

Easternmost corner of said lands of

McDaniel and Cromartie; thence with

a new line South 19 degrees 46 min-

utes 30 seconds East (S 1946'30"E), a

distance of 70.95 feet to a new point

marked by an iron pipe set in a

Southeastern line of the Original

Tract of which this is a part as set

out in Deed recorded in Deed Book

319, Page 634; thence with said

Southeastern line, North 56 degrees

58 minutes 00 seconds East (N

5658'00"E), a distance of 23.43 feet

to an old point marked by an old

iron; thence an old line, North 56 de-

grees 59 minutes 20 seconds East (N

5659'20"E), a distance of 289.66 feet

to the Point of Beginning, containing

1.31 Acres, more or less, according

to a survey map of same entitled

"SURVEY FOR MARY MATTHEWS",

dated October 21, 1997, by Lloyd R.

Walker, Registered Land Surveyor.

Borrowers also convey to the Trustee

for the benefit of the Lender all of

their right, title, and interest in and

to the non-exclusive 20 foot wide

Right-of-Way Easement over and

upon a 20 foot wide strip or parcel of

land, adjacent to and on the South-

west side of the First and Northeast-

ern line of the Subject 1.31 Acre

Tract and on the Southeast side of

the Second and Northwestern line of

Subject 1.31 Acre Tract, all as deline-

ated on hereinabove referenced Sur-

vey Map entitled "SURVEY FOR MARY

MATTHEWS", dated October 21,

1997, by Lloyd R. Walker, Registered

Land Surveyor, said 20 foot wide

Right-of-Way Easement extends to

and from S.R. 1513 and is over and

upon the same strips or parcels as

the 20 foot wide non-exclusive

Right-of-Way Easement as set out in

Deed to Lillian D. McDaniel and Lid-

die A. Cromartie, dated July 25,

1997, and recorded in Deed Book

393 Page 346. This Easement is to

run with said 1.31 Acre Tract de-

scribed hereinabove. Save and except

any releases, deeds of release or

prior conveyances of record. Said

property is commonly known as 62

Mary C Drive, Elizabethtown, NC

28337. Third party purchasers must

pay the excise tax, and the court

costs of Forty-Five Cents (45) per

One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) pur-

suant to NCGS 7A-308(a)(1). A cash

deposit (no personal checks) of five

percent (5%) of the purchase price, or

Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars

($750.00), whichever is greater, will

be required at the time of the sale.

Following the expiration of the statu-

tory upset bid period, all the remain-

ing amounts are immediately due

and owing. Said property to be of-

fered pursuant to this Notice of Sale

is being offered for sale, transfer and

conveyance AS IS WHERE IS. There are

no representations of warranty relat-

ing to the title or any physical, envi-

ronmental, health or safety condi-

tions existing in, on, at, or relating to

the property being offered for sale.

This sale is made subject to all prior

liens, unpaid taxes, any unpaid land

transfer taxes, special assessments,

easements, rights of way, deeds of

release, and any other encumbrances

or exceptions of record. To the best

of the knowledge and belief of the

undersigned, the current owner(s) of

the property is/are Lindy C. Melvin

and wife, Darlene Highsmith Melvin.

An Order for possession of the prop-

erty may be issued pursuant to G.S.

45-21.29 in favor of the purchaser

and against the party or parties in

possession by the clerk of superior

court of the county in which the

property is sold. Any person who oc-

cupies the property pursuant to a

rental agreement entered into or re-

newed on or after October 1, 2007,

may, after receiving the notice of

sale, terminate the rental agreement

upon 10 days written notice to the

landlord. The notice shall also state

that upon termination of a rental

agreement, the tenant is liable for

rent due under the rental agreement

prorated to the effective date of the

termination. If the trustee is unable

to convey title to this property for

any reason, the sole remedy of the

purchaser is the return of the de-

posit. Reasons of such inability to

convey include, but are not limited

to, the filing of a bankruptcy petition

prior to the confirmation of the sale

and reinstatement of the loan with-

out the knowledge of the trustee. If

the validity of the sale is challenged

by any party, the trustee, in their sole

discretion, if they believe the chal-

lenge to have merit, may request the

court to declare the sale to be void

and return the deposit. The pur-

chaser will have no further remedy.

Trustee Services of Carolina, LLC

Substitute Trustee

Brock & Scott, PLLC, Attorneys for

Trustee Services of Carolina, LLC

5431 Oleander Drive Suite 200

Wilmington, NC 28403

PHONE: (910) 392-4988

FAX: (910) 392-8587

File No.: 10-32886-FC01

BS011012 1/10 1/17

Legals

Tract of which this is a part as set

out in Deed recorded in Deed Book

319, Page 634; thence with said

Southeastern line, North 56 degrees

58 minutes 00 seconds East (N

5658'00"E), a distance of 23.43 feet

to an old point marked by an old

iron; thence an old line, North 56 de-

grees 59 minutes 20 seconds East (N

5659'20"E), a distance of 289.66 feet

to the Point of Beginning, containing

1.31 Acres, more or less, according

to a survey map of same entitled

"SURVEY FOR MARY MATTHEWS",

dated October 21, 1997, by Lloyd R.

Walker, Registered Land Surveyor.

Borrowers also convey to the Trustee

for the benefit of the Lender all of

their right, title, and interest in and

to the non-exclusive 20 foot wide

Right-of-Way Easement over and

upon a 20 foot wide strip or parcel of

land, adjacent to and on the South-

west side of the First and Northeast-

ern line of the Subject 1.31 Acre

Tract and on the Southeast side of

the Second and Northwestern line of

Subject 1.31 Acre Tract, all as deline-

ated on hereinabove referenced Sur-

vey Map entitled "SURVEY FOR MARY

MATTHEWS", dated October 21,

1997, by Lloyd R. Walker, Registered

Land Surveyor, said 20 foot wide

Right-of-Way Easement extends to

and from S.R. 1513 and is over and

upon the same strips or parcels as

the 20 foot wide non-exclusive

Right-of-Way Easement as set out in

Deed to Lillian D. McDaniel and Lid-

die A. Cromartie, dated July 25,

1997, and recorded in Deed Book

393 Page 346. This Easement is to

run with said 1.31 Acre Tract de-

scribed hereinabove. Save and except

any releases, deeds of release or

prior conveyances of record. Said

property is commonly known as 62

Mary C Drive, Elizabethtown, NC

28337. Third party purchasers must

pay the excise tax, and the court

costs of Forty-Five Cents (45) per

One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) pur-

suant to NCGS 7A-308(a)(1). A cash

deposit (no personal checks) of five

percent (5%) of the purchase price, or

Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars

($750.00), whichever is greater, will

be required at the time of the sale.

Following the expiration of the statu-

tory upset bid period, all the remain-

ing amounts are immediately due

and owing. Said property to be of-

fered pursuant to this Notice of Sale

is being offered for sale, transfer and

conveyance AS IS WHERE IS. There are

no representations of warranty relat-

ing to the title or any physical, envi-

ronmental, health or safety condi-

tions existing in, on, at, or relating to

the property being offered for sale.

This sale is made subject to all prior

liens, unpaid taxes, any unpaid land

transfer taxes, special assessments,

easements, rights of way, deeds of

release, and any other encumbrances

or exceptions of record. To the best

of the knowledge and belief of the

undersigned, the current owner(s) of

the property is/are Lindy C. Melvin

and wife, Darlene Highsmith Melvin.

An Order for possession of the prop-

erty may be issued pursuant to G.S.

45-21.29 in favor of the purchaser

and against the party or parties in

possession by the clerk of superior

court of the county in which the

property is sold. Any person who oc-

cupies the property pursuant to a

rental agreement entered into or re-

newed on or after October 1, 2007,

may, after receiving the notice of

sale, terminate the rental agreement

upon 10 days written notice to the

landlord. The notice shall also state

that upon termination of a rental

agreement, the tenant is liable for

rent due under the rental agreement

prorated to the effective date of the

termination. If the trustee is unable

to convey title to this property for

any reason, the sole remedy of the

purchaser is the return of the de-

posit. Reasons of such inability to

convey include, but are not limited

to, the filing of a bankruptcy petition

prior to the confirmation of the sale

and reinstatement of the loan with-

out the knowledge of the trustee. If

the validity of the sale is challenged

by any party, the trustee, in their sole

discretion, if they believe the chal-

lenge to have merit, may request the

court to declare the sale to be void

and return the deposit. The pur-

chaser will have no further remedy.

Trustee Services of Carolina, LLC

Substitute Trustee

Brock & Scott, PLLC, Attorneys for

Trustee Services of Carolina, LLC

5431 Oleander Drive Suite 200

Wilmington, NC 28403

PHONE: (910) 392-4988

FAX: (910) 392-8587

File No.: 10-32886-FC01

BS011012 1/10 1/17

FINANCIAL

300 SERVICES

Instruction & Training

Carolinas Home Care

Agency, Inc

Will be offering MAPP training

for Foster Care beginning

Feb. 1, 2012--March 31, 2012.

If you are interested in

becoming a Foster Parent

please contact

Erica Thompson at

910-642-3700

for more information.

Want To Buy (MERCH)

I buy junk cars

Pay from $170-600. 100%

Guarantee call-910-385-8585.

Open 7 days a week.

RECREATIONAL VEHICLES

REAL ESTATE SALES

For Sale By Owner (REAL

2 bedroom 1 bath 14x48

Fleetwood mobile home un-

derpinning, new gutters and

deck included. $7000 Negotia-

ble call 910-872-3040

REAL ESTATE RENTALS

House For Rent (RENT)

HOME FOR RENT IN

CENTER ROAD AREA

3-BR, 1 BA, LIVING ROOM

AND SEPARATE DEN.

1800 SQ. FT. $700. MONTH,

PLUS DEPOSIT.

CALL 910-874-2609.

Lease (RENT)

Lot For Lease. Interior lot on

Maple Ave. Whitelake, N.C.

Pier access. Suitable for

single/doublewide unit.

City water /sewer. Contact

252-753-6539 leave message.

MANUFACTURED HOUS-

Rentals (MANUFACTURED)

FOR RENT: 2 BR/1 BA mobile

home. NO PETS.

References. $285 month,

deposit $285. South of

Bladenboro. 910-874-0470.

RESORT PROPERTY

EMPLOYMENT

Help Wanted - General (HW)

Full Time Maintenance

Position open. Elizabethtown

area. Pick up application at

620 McLeod St.,

Elizabethtown, NC or call

910-862-3339


www.bladenjournal.com v All rights reserved

Sports

BLADEN JOURNAL

Tuesday

Jan. 10, 2012

Page 8A

S

coreboard ...

West Bladen 55

North Brunswick 51

West Bladen 13-6-16-20 — 55

N. Brunswick 8-15-10-18 — 51

Highlights: For West Bladen,

D.J. Mason scored 20 points;

Justin Gillespie scored 12 points;

Shaquan Whitfield scored eight

points.

Records: West Bladen 4-1,

10-5.

Jayvee: West Bladen wins,

58-54.

East Bladen 60

Whiteville 53

East Bladen 11-7-16-26 — 60

Whiteville 13-10-14-16 — 53

Highlights: For East Bladen,

Montrel Rogers scored 26 points

with two 3-pointers; Ray Beatty

scored 11 points; Jessie Johnson

scored nine points.

Records: East Bladen 4-0,

13-1; Whiteville 1-3, 6-6.

Whiteville 52

East Bladen 36

East Bladen 3-14-9-10 — 36

Whiteville 15-11-15-10 — 52

Highlights: For East Bladen,

Zhane Johnson scored 15 points.

Records: East Bladen 3-1,

9-5.

PREP BASKETBALL

Eagles rally for a win;

sit alone in first place

Staff report

WHITEVILLE —

The Eagles of East

Bladen High took over

sole possession of first

place in the Waccamaw

Conference on Friday,

but needed a secondhalf

rally to get past

Whiteville High, 60-53.

The Eagles are now

4-0 in the conference,

one-half game ahead of

West Bladen and North

Brunswick, and 13-1

overall.

Montrel Rogers

canned two 3-pointers

early in the game to help

East Bladen get out to

an 11-4 lead, but fullcourt

defensive pressure

by the Wolfpack

shut down the Eagles’

offense for 8 full minutes.

Whiteville reeled off

16 straight points to

take a 20-11 lead midway

through the second

stanza, and the Wolfpack

went on to claim a 23-18

lead at the intermission.

East Bladen coach

Ken Cross worked his

magic at halftime and

the Eagles came out in

the third quarter with

a 9-5 run that pulled

to within one of the

lead at 28-27. The

Eagles stayed right with

Whiteville the rest of

the quarter and trailed

by just 37-34 going into

the fourth quarter.

The final period

belonged to Rogers,

as he scored 14 points

down the stretch and

helped East Bladen outscore

the Wolfpack by a

26-16 margin and seal

the come-from-behind

win.

Rogers led all scorers

with 26 points, while

Ray Beatty added 11

points and 12 rebounds

for the Eagles. Jessie

Johnson contributed six

steals and nine points,

while Jaquan Jones had

eight points and five

boards.

Kenny Armstrong | Bladen Journal

East Bladen High’s Montrel Rogers gets off a jumper against Whiteville High on Friday. Rogers led

the Eagles with 26 points en route to a 60-53 win and a 4-0 Waccamaw Conference record.

BOYS BASKETBALL GIRLS BASKETBALL

LocaL resuLts

West Bladen 52

North Brunswick 45

W. Bladen 10-17-13-16 — 52

N. Brunswick 6-15-12-12 — 45

Highlights: For West Bladen,

Courtney Thompson scored 13

points and grabbed 20 rebounds;

Lexi Storms scored 12 points and

had 11 rebounds; Abbey Walters

scored 16 points and had eight

steals; Taylor Stephens scored

nine points and had eight steals.

Records: West Bladen 3-2,

8-6.

If you have sports news,

we want to hear from you

Send photos and news to the

editor

cvincent@heartlandpublications.com

Lady Knights

pick up a big

Waccamaw win

LELAND — The Lady

Knights of West Bladen

High used a late surge to

crack open a nip-and-tuck

game for a 52-45 win over

North Brunswick High.

The win improves the

Lady Knights to 3-2 in the

Waccamaw Conference

and 8-6 overall.

West Bladen took a 10-6

lead after the first quarter

behind a pair of baskets

from Abbey Walters. In the

second stanza, it was the

Lexi Storms show, as she

canned eight points to help

the Lady Knights stay out

front, 23-21, at halftime.

The lead rarely grew

more than three points

in the third quarter, as

LELAND — The

Scorpions of North

Brunswick High held

Knights star D.J. Mason

in check for 16 minutes,

but couldn’t contain

him in the second

half. Mason’s 18 points

down the stretch led West

Bladen High to a 55-51

win on Friday.

The victory puts the

Knights at 4-1 in the

Waccamaw Conference,

one-half game behind

East Bladen, and 10-5

overall. The two teams

will aquare off on Friday

in Dublin.

West Bladen opened the

game with a 10-6 spurt,

but the Scorpions used

a 15-6 run in the second

stanza to take a 23-19

Walters hit a 3-pointer and

scored five in the period

for a 36-33 West Bladen

edge going into the final

quarter.

Taylor Stephens fueled

a fourth-quarter spurt for

the Lady Knights, scoring

eight points down the

stretch and leading the

West Bladen 8-0 run late

that sealed the win.

Walters led West Bladen

with 16 points and eight

steals, while Courtney

Thompson added 13

points and 20 rebounds.

Storms contributed 12

points and 11 boards in the

win, and Stephens finished

with nine points and eight

thefts.

Mason fuels

the Knights’

second-half surge

WHITEVILLE — A

pair of rallies by East

Bladen High couldn’t

overcome a Whiteville

High lead and the Lady

Eagles fell on Friday,

51-36, in Waccamaw

Conference showdown

between two conference

unbeatens.

The loss drops East

Bladen to 3-1 in the conference

and 9-5 overall.

The Lady Wolfpack

raced out to a 17-3 advantage

to open the game, but

East Bladen caught fire

and outscored Whiteville

by a 12-5 margin to cut

the deficit to 22-15. The

Lady Wolfpack stopped

the East Bladen run with

lead into halftime.

But Mason, who had

scored just two points

in the first half, erupted

for 12 points in the third

quarter and six more in

the final stanza for West

Bladen. The Knights outscored

North Brunswick

by a 16-10 margin to establish

a 35-33 lead going

into the last 8 minutes.

Down the stretch, Justin

Gillespie hit four straight

free throws and, coupled

with mason’s six points,

the Eagles took a 20-18

final-quarter verdict to

post the win.

Mason led West Bladen

with 20 points, while

Gillespie added 12 points

and Shaquan Whitfield

had eight.

Lady Eagles fall in

conference matchup

of unbeaten teams

a 4-2 advantage to end

the first half with a 26-17

edge.

The Lady Eagles started

the second half strong,

fueled by a Zhane Johnson

3-pointer, and East Bladen

pulled to within 32-26.

But Whiteville wouldn’t

let the Lady Eagles any

closer, closing the third

quarter with a 9-0 run to

take a 41-26 edge into the

fourth quarter.

The two teams traded

points down the stretch

and the Lady Wolfpack

sealed the 15-point win.

Johnson led East

Bladen with 15 points,

while Abbey Norris contributed

six rebounds.

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