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For 44 Years, Covering Northeast Jackson, Madison and Ridgeland Vol. 44, No. 14 Two Sections, 24 Pages, Thursday, January 20, 2011

Cutting MPB

MSO plans Beatles tribute

northsidesun

the weekly

Lawmaker’s efforts may lack support from colleagues

By ANTHONY WARREN

Sun Staff Writer

THE ODDS seem to be stacked against

District 58 Rep. Rita Martinson’s effort to

cut funding for Mississippi Public Broadcasting

(MPB).

Martinson is proposing HB 742, a bill

that would phase out state funding for educational

television and radio over the

course of the next five years.

While many conservatives are opposed

to funding MPB, Martinson has had little

luck in getting House Republicans to sign

on to the measure.

The Mississippi Symphony Orchestra will perform with Classical

Mystery Tour: A Tribute to the Beatles, January 29, 7:30 p.m.

at Thalia Mara Hall. Tickets are available by calling 601-960-

1565, or at www.msorchestra.com. The show presents more

than two dozen Beatles tunes performed as they were originally

recorded. The event features Jim Owen (John Lennon) on

New Club

The Club is under construction at 151 South

Lake Ave. in The Township at Colony Park in

Ridgeland. Features include tennis, indoor and

outdoor pools, steam room, sauna, whirlpool

and 6,000 square foot spa. Completion is expected

in June.

Martinson said conservative members of

the Mississippi House of Representatives

were recently given a chance to co-sponsor

the bill, however no lawmakers signed

on. She believes legislators were hesitant

to sign on because 2011 is an election

year.

The fact that the bill has found little support

initially could be an ominous sign that

Martinson’s measure might not make it to

the floor for a vote.

If passed, the measure would phase out

funding for MPB over the next five years.

The bill will likely be assigned to the

TRIBUTE

Photos by Beth Buckley

house appropriations committee.

It has already sparked debate among

representatives on the Northside.

Martinson said MPB is antiquated, and

residents can obtain the same information

from cable, satellite and other news

sources. She also believes that reporting

on MPB has a liberal bias, something it

shouldn’t have if tax dollars go to support

it.

She also said the state agency responsible

for educational television and radio has

misspent funds appropriated to it.

See Cutting MPB, Page 9A

rhythm guitar, piano, and vocals; Tony Kishman (Paul McCartney)

on bass guitar, piano, and vocals; John Brosnan (George

Harrison) on lead guitar and vocals; and Chris Camilleri (Ringo

Starr) on drums and vocals. Martin Herman will be the conductor.

Planning the event are (from left) Wayne Linehan, Marta

Szlubowska, Bruce Golden, Crafton Beck.

Police suspect

recent arrest

linked to

purse snatching

JACKSON police say they’ve captured the

man they believe to be involved in a mid-December

purse snatching that left one woman

injured and lying in the middle of North State

Street.

The only problem is they haven’t been able

to pin the crime on him.

Fortunately, the department has several

charges pending against the suspect, meaning

that he likely won’t see the light of day for

several years.

Precinct Four Cmdr. Wendell Watts said the

suspect was picked up in early January on

warrants for armed robbery and burglary.

Watts said the suspect had been caught redhanded

on several instances, but had eluded

police during several pursuits.

The suspect was being held at the Hinds

County Detention Center. His name was not

being released because the investigation was

still ongoing.

He didn’t say why police believed the suspect

was involved in the case.

On Saturday, December 11, a woman and

her husband were walking from Babalu

restaurant at Duling School, when they were

approached by two black males driving a

light colored vehicle.

The robbers grabbed the woman’s purse as

they drove by and dragged the woman down

the street as they attempted to escape.

Police say the woman was dragged because

she was unable to release herself from her

purse straps. She was pulled about 365 yards,

her legs hitting the pavement and wheels simultaneously.

A chain e-mail received by the Sun stated

that the crooks were laughing all the way as

the woman was pulled up North State Street.

The woman finally was able to release herself

near the old Jackson Precinct Four location.

Publisher Wyatt Emmerich witnessed the

scene’s aftermath.

“I assumed she was a pedestrian who had

been hit by a car,” he said previously. “Several

people were attending to her.”

Emmerich had just left Walker’s Drive-In

with his family. “I stopped and asked if they

needed someone to call an ambulance, and

they said one had already been called.”

The woman was taken to the University of

Mississippi Medical Center, where she was

treated for minor scrapes and bruises. Accord-

See Purse Snatching, Page 8A

CIT Y CENTER

RIDGELAND CREATING ‘DOWNTOWN’ AREA FOR GOVERNMENT OFFICES

PLANS ARE moving forward on the

proposed Ridgeland City Center, although

Mayor Gene McGee said it could be

years before any actual construction begins

on it.

The city recently signed a contract to

purchase the remaining property needed

for the center, which will create a onestop

shop of sorts for city government.

McGee said an environmental assessment

is being conducted of the property,

and pending its outcome, the city will finalize

the purchase. In all, the land will

cost Ridgeland about $4.5 million.

“This was the number one project in

our master plan,” he said. “Once the site

was determined where we should put it,

we began negotiations.”

Once the environmental study is completed,

the city will then draw up the final

drawing for the center and come up with

a financial plan to pay for it.

McGee said plans were still in the conceptual

phase and he didn’t know how

much the final pricetag would be.

The center will be located on approximately

25 acres bordered by U.S. 51 to

the east, the railroad tracks and Northeast

Madison Avenue to the west, School

Street to the south and the Natchez Trace

to the north.

McGee said construction likely won’t

begin for several years.

The site will be home to a new Ridgeland

city hall and fine arts center. The

city is also working to bring a federal

agency to the area. McGee said negotiations

were still ongoing at press time and

wouldn’t say what agency the city is in

talks with.

It would also include a large public

green space for city gatherings and community

events and possibly a small commercial

area for economic development.

See City Center, Page 8A


Page 2A Thursday, January 20, 2011

Travelers Insurance sues

Northsiders over practices

of C.E. Frazier Construction

By JIMMY HENDRIX

Special to the Sun

TRAVELERS INSURANCE Company

filed a lawsuit on December 3, 2010 in U.S.

District Court against Spencer Copeland,

Sherry Frazier, Nan Copeland, and several

John Does. Travelers was the bonding agent

on several C.E. Frazier Construction

Company projects. The insurance company

took over the projects when the company

suffered financial difficulties. C.E. Frazier

Construction is owned by C.E. Frazier and

several members of his family.

Travelers claimed it is exposing the

“efforts of certain family members to steal

and convert assets of Frazier Construction”

and funneling “stolen monies in and out of

numerous bank accounts - including that of

a sham construction company - to conceal

and launder monies.” The alleged conversion

and money-laundering took place while

Travelers paid over six million dollars to

help Frazier Construction meet payroll and

complete various construction projects

bonded by Travelers. Frazier Construction

agreed to pay Travelers for any losses suffered.

Frazier defaulted on several projects bonded

by the insurance company in 2007.

Travelers calculated damages to be $6.4

million and demanded Frazier Construction

deposit the money or equivalent collateral

with Travelers. No such payment was ever

made so Travelers filed suit in U.S. District

Court for the Northern District of

Mississippi in December 2008 against

Frazier Construction and several family

members who were directors seeking $6.4

million. Travelers obtained a default judgment

against C.E. Frazier Construction

Company and pursued action against Austin

Frazier, a director and secretary of the company.

Mr. Frazier temporarily stopped

Travelers efforts to pursue legal action

against him by filing chapter seven bankruptcy.

TRAVELERS SWITCHED gears and

filed a complaint against Mr. Frazier in

bankruptcy court contesting any dismissal

of its claims against Mr. Frazier. Mr. Frazier

claimed assets between one and 10 million

dollars and equivalent liabilities on the

bankruptcy petition. Travelers stated the

“debtor’s financial statements were materially

false and misleading” and “grossly

overstated the value of Debtor’s assets and

grossly understated the extent of Debtor’s

liabilities” in order to obtain credit from

Travelers. Mr. Frazier consented to a $5

million judgment against him on August 3,

2010. The agreement states the judgment is

non-dischargeable and Mr. Frazier also has

to pay “future statutory interest.” Travelers

can garnish up to 10 percent of Mr. Frazier’s

wages from any of his employers. Mr.

Frazier also agreed to notify Travelers of

any new employer within five days of

accepting such employment. Travelers also

filed a $6.4 million dollar lawsuit containing

similar allegations in the chapter seven

bankruptcy of Clairborne Frazier, the brother

of Austin Frazier. Austin and Claiborne

are the sons of C.E. Frazier.

The lawsuit minces no words. It accuses

the defendants in the first paragraph of plun-

Mike Rives, a Modern Woodmen of

America representative, has completed a

five-day educational program in Rock

Island, Ill.

Thomas W. Tatnall, PGA Master

Professional and director of professional

program development at SkyGolf, has

been named the 2010 winner of the

Amateur Athletic Union Judith Belsky

Memorial Award. Named for the leader in

developing the 750,000 member AAU’s

junior golf program, the honor is “For

Outstanding Service to the Sport of Golf.”

Tom and his wife Pam live in Ridgeland.

business notes

dering, stealing, and converting assets of

Frazier Construction and funneling money

to avoid detection. Travelers claims “after

months of digging” it “discovered a stash of

monies stolen from Frazier Construction

and worse - a civil conspiracy to convert,

conceal, launder, and spend those monies.”

It accuses the defendants of filing “false

financial statements” so Travelers would

bond projects without knowing the true state

of the company’s finances.

TRAVELERS ACCUSES Austin and

Claiborne Frazier of “secretly working to

backstab Travelers.” Travelers claims “On

the eve of Frazier Construction’s implosion,

Austin Frazier and his step-brother, Spencer

Copeland, siphoned off a quarter-million

dollars of Frazier Construction assets.”

“Austin Frazier, Claiborne Frazier, and

Spencer Copeland moved Frazier

Construction’s heavy equipment up to their

hunting camp in Belzoni, in an attempt to

conceal its location from Travelers.”

Travelers claims Austin Frazier and Spencer

Copeland sold the hidden equipment

through South Lamar Truck and Trailer

Sales for nearly $50,000 even though

Travelers had a lien on the equipment.

Travelers alleges South Lamar claimed in a

letter it had no files or record of said transactions

even though it had written six

checks to Frazier Construction or Spencer

Copeland for the sale of said equipment.

The letter and checks are included in the

exhibits filed by Travelers.

The alleged misdeeds don’t stop with selling

equipment. Travelers claims Austin and

Spencer diverted $275,000 in Frazier

Construction checks into personal bank

accounts. Claiborne and his wife Sherry

allegedly “stole and converted” a $10,000

Frazier Construction check. Sherry Frazier

is said to have lived her new-found wealth

up, spending “some or all of the stolen

monies at restaurants, bars, and stores” in

Mississippi and Destin within a few days.

Bank accounts were allegedly opened and

phony companies were created so large

sums of money could be laundered.

Travelers claims Claiborne Frazier wrote a

check for $76,599 to Nan Copeland, claiming

it was for “Mothers Home Renovation.”

Travelers accuses Ms. Copeland of working

in concert with her son by allowing him to

deposit funds pulled from his accounts

(allegedly used to hide money) into her

bank account. Mr. Copeland repeatedly

invoked the Fifth Amendment when

deposed in Austin Frazier’s bankruptcy.

THE LAWSUIT charges the defendants

with counts of conversion, unjust enrichment,

civil conspiracy, Civil RICO, and

Fraudulent Conveyance. Travelers further

charges them with a “pattern of racketeering

activity”: wire fraud, money laundering, and

interstate transportation of stolen goods and

monies. Travelers asked for damages “in

excess of $75,000 exclusive of interest and

costs” for conversion, $75,000 in damages

for unjust enrichment, compensatory damages

to be determined by the court for

RICO violations, attorney’s fees, interest,

and court costs. Travelers requested the

court void all fraudulent transfers.

The BBB Mississippi Board and

Officers for 2011 are joined by three new

board members: Mike Allen, Foster Ellis

and Carolyn Harrison. Returning to the

board are former chairs Linda Ferguson

and Joe Schneeberger.

The American Association for

Respiratory Care (AARC), a 50,000member

national association for respiratory

therapists (RTs), honored nine RTs with

Specialty Practitioner of the Year awards at

its recent International Respiratory

Congress. Included were Management

Section: Ken Thigpen, RRT.

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a conversation with

Moak on chamber partnership

“I think anyone who has employees

that come to work every day knows

that health plays an important role.

“If an employee is not able to come

to work because of illness, then whatever

that employee does has to be handled

by someone else or go undone. In

retail, that makes it harder for the

company to meet the needs

of its customers. Cost-wise, to provide

health coverage is a major expenditure.”

--Paul Moak

Paul Moak was recently named chairman

of the board of directors for the

Greater Jackson Chamber Partnership.

Moak is a Northsider and is owner of Paul

Moak Automotive in Jackson. He has lived

in the capital city since 1949 and is a

graduate of the University of Mississippi.

He is married with a daughter and son. He

recently spoke to Sun Staff Writer Anthony

Warren about his position and plans for

the new year.

How are things going since becoming

chairman?

“I’ve only got 12 days under my belt,

but there have been a number of meetings

and a lot of activities. The chamber is very

busy and involved in a lot of things in the

metro Jackson area, so it’s pretty much

been full speed ahead.”

What are your plans for the chamber

this year?

“Well, just because a new year begins or

a new chair comes in it doesn’t mean that

the chamber goes back to zero and starts

over. There are ongoing projects and initiatives

the chamber is involved with. I don’t

come in and create a new list of plans,

because there’s pretty much a defined list

already in place that the chamber works

with. There may be some new items that

pop up throughout the year and get a higher

priority, but that’s not because of me, it’s

because those items deserve higher priority.”

Tell me about some of the chamber’s

ongoing projects.

“One thing that you may be familiar

with is Leadership Jackson. For 20 years or

so, it’s attempted to bring together young

people from various backgrounds to go

through a year-long training process, with

the idea that they’re leadership in the community.

The program has been very successful.

We also have a subset of that,

which focuses on high school juniors and

sophomores, where they go through similar

training.

“One of our biggest areas of focus is

economic development. We try to serve as

a one-stop shop of sorts for businesses

considering relocating or starting in this

part of the country. Rather than having

chambers in the metro compete, we try to

serve as a regional umbrella to show businesses

every side of town. That’s one of

the areas the chamber is involved with

daily.

“Another area is healthcare, which is a

big part of the economy in Mississippi and

the region. The chamber right now is

involved in how we can take something

that is very good and make it better. In

Mississippi, we don’t rank very well in a

lot of areas. Obesity is one area where we

rank number one. There is a tremendous

cost associated with the problem, as well

as numerous health issues. In the past year,

the chamber co-hosted an obesity summit

with the University of Mississippi Medical

Center, where leaders from around the

world came to our convention center and

focused on what we can do to move our

state in a more positive direction.”

Is health and wellness an issue the

chamber will focus on again this year?

“Yes, even more so than we have in the

past. We think about healthcare from the

standpoint of not only quality of life, but

job creation. When we have some big

company move here and build a plant, it

creates jobs. But when a doctor goes into

practice, he or she is also creating jobs and

providing opportunities. Mississippi,

according to many people who analyze the

numbers, is underserved by the medical

community. The chamber wants to work to

see what can be done to provide better

medical service to Mississippi residents.

We’re also working to raise awareness

about developing healthy habits, so we can

lessen the difficult medical problems that

people have down the road.”

As a business owner yourself, what

role does health and wellness play in

regard to cost and employees?

“I think anyone who has employees that

come to work every day knows that health

plays an important role. If an employee is

not able to come to work because of illness,

then whatever that employee does

has to be handled by someone else or go

undone. In retail, that makes it harder for

the company to meet the needs of its cus-

Page 3A

tomers. Cost-wise, to provide health coverage

is a major expenditure. Companies that

are able to promote wellness can reduce

health costs because their employees are

healthier, have fewer insurance claims,

and, as a result, lower premiums.

Employees that are healthy are also more

productive at work.

“On Saturday, January 22, we’re having

our second Heart Beats of Jackson, an

event in which different hospitals from the

metro area come together at the Trade Mart

and provide a free day of cardiovascular

screening. Last year, we were able to provide

that service to 350 people. This year,

we’re targeted to have more than 400. All

the doctors and hospitals that participate

donate their time and equipment. There are

other experts at the event as well, which

helps people learn about making healthier

decisions, cooking better and exercising

better. It’s all free of charge, but you have

to call in and get one of the 400 slots that

are available.”

If people are interested in attending,

who do they need to call?

“Call the Greater Jackson Chamber

Partnership and ask for Cynthia Caine. The

number is (601) 948-7575. We had about

100 slots left as of last Wednesday.”

In 2010, several chamber members

went to China. Did anything come of the

trip?

“Yes and no, not in the terms of forming

direct business relationships. The purpose

of the trips is to expose people who choose

to go to the cultures and business operations

in a different part of the world. China

is major player on the world’s economic

stage and will be more so going forward.

We had linkage to the Chinese government

and chamber of commerce and what we

were able to see for the price we paid was

remarkable. About 70 people attended the

trip. We also took a similar trip to Egypt

last fall to see how that country’s culture

works.”

Is the chamber sponsoring any international

trips in 2011?

“We have a second group expected to go

See Paul Moak, Page 11A


Page 4A Thursday, January 20, 2011

from the publisher

By WYATT

EMMERICH

Fundamental

choice: efficiency

versus equality

THERE’S BEEN a big commotion lately

about the bitter tone of political discourse.

Of course, good manners and politeness

should always be the order of the day, but

we often fail that standard.

Why the anger over politics? Well, politics

determines government and government

controls taxation and taxation determines

how much money is in your pocket versus

your neighbor’s.

We should be thankful. Bitter words are far

preferable to war, which is how these issues

have been typically resolved over the course

of human history. When the money in our

pocket determined our very survivability,

Barbour consolidation proposal

makes sense and should be pursued

GOV. HALEY BARBOUR, in his State of

the State address almost a year ago, made

some proposals many considered radical,

including:

Consolidating the state’s historically

black universities into Jackson State,

merging Mississippi University for Women

with Mississippi State University, reducing

the state’s 152 public school districts and

closing four Department of Mental Health

facilities and six crisis centers.

None of the above came to fruition,

except for some mental health changes

which are still in a state of flux, and a study

on school district consolidation.

Perhaps someday a few school districts

will be merged, as they should be. Don’t

look for any university mergers or closures

though, at least not in the foreseeable

future.

Another of Barbour’s proposals last year

— all purposed to streamline government

and save money — was to move the

Mississippi Department of Transportation’s

motor carrier division into the Mississippi

Department of Public Safety. In other

words, put those MDOT law enforcement

officers under the Highway Patrol.

Last year the proposal didn’t get much

more support than merging universities,

but it may come up again this year, and it

should.

MDOT’s law enforcement role on the

highways relates to commercial traffic,

including enforcing weight limits and a

plethora of other regulations on big trucks.

Admittedly that role is different from the

traditional state trooper’s.

But putting those officers in the same

agency makes a lot of sense administratively.

The Legislature should take another look

at it this year.

THERE WASN’T MUCH doubt about how

the governor’s race was going to turn out

in Mississippi four years ago. Incumbent

Gov. Haley Barbour, riding a wave of popularity

attributable in no small part to his

skillful handling of the response to

humans have readily traded blood for

money.

Fortunately, prosperity makes most things

better. In the U.S. - and in much of the world

- surviving is no longer at stake. The issue is

how the perks of prosperity get distributed.

Therein lies the rub.

In a perfect world, everyone would have

equal skills and share equally in society’s

bounty. But we don’t live in a perfect world.

There are huge inequalities, both in our

skills and our luck. Any parent of more than

one child knows this.

“From each according to his ability, to

each according to his need.” This was communism’s

slogan. Sounds great, but it didn’t

work well. Human nature is such that highly

skilled people are typically not well motivated

by pure altruism. We want to be rewarded

for our efforts. In a word, we are basically

selfish.

The communists had a solution for this

problem: Change human nature. Thus the reeducation

camps. Selfishness could be eradicated

through social engineering. It didn’t

work. Instead of bettering man, this tragic

effort led to tens of millions of innocent

deaths.

So we are back to square one. Income

redistribution through taxation can create

economic equality but it suppresses the motivation

of our most skilled individuals. There

is a fundamental trade-off between equality

and efficiency.

Distribution of skills conforms to a typical

Bell curve on an x-y axis. Most people have

average skills. The more you move from the

average, the fewer people you get. Only a

Hurricane Katrina, was expected to be easily

re-elected, and he was.

After winning the Republican primary

against a little known candidate with 93

percent of the vote, Barbour got 58 percent

in the general election to beat Democrat

John A. Eaves, who had defeated three

unknowns in the Democratic primary.

It’s going to be different this year.

Barbour can’t succeed himself for a third

term, and close races are shaping up in

both Republican and Democratic primaries

to see who does.

One thing never seems to change in

Mississippi governor’s races, though.

There’s nearly always someone in the race

— often more than one — who doesn’t

have a chance to win but still grabs a few

headlines by proposing unconventional

solutions to hot button issues.

One of those roles this year apparently

will be filled by James Broadwater, who

has entered the Republican primary with

Lt. Gov. Phil Bryant and Dave Dennis, the

two candidates expected to make a real run

for it. Pearl River County Supervisor

Hudson Holliday has also said he’ll run as

a Republican.

Hattiesburg Mayor Johnny DuPree and

Clarksdale attorney and businessman Bill

Luckett have filed to run as Democrats.

Broadwater says if he’s elected governor,

he wants Mississippi to eliminate every

type of tax except the sales tax because he

believes that would be a fair way to fund

government. He says he would use the

National Guard, the Mississippi Bureau of

Investigation, SWAT teams and other law

enforcement units to make sure people

from other countries are not living and

working illegally in Mississippi.

A state Department of Revenue employee,

Broadwater says he’s resigning that job

January 31.

Like other unlikely candidates who have

run for governor, he’s been in politics

before. He ran unsuccessfully for the U.S.

House in the Delta’s 2nd District in 2004,

for a state House seat in 2007, and for the

U.S. House seat in central Mississippi’s 3rd

District in 2008.

tiny percent of Americans have both the

intellect and organizational skills to advance

society. Maybe one-tenth of one percent.

But one-tenth of one percent in a country

with 300 million people is still a big number

- 30,000 to be exact. These are the people

who will push the economic needle forward.

So how do we make sure they do so?

Well, promising to tax away all the money

they may make is probably not a good way

to get them moving. If society holds out no

hope of reward, we won’t get the kind of

entrepreneurial effort that has led to most of

the technological advances behind our high

standard of living.

The world’s richest man - Bill Gates - is a

simple case in point. Think of how much

society has advanced because of personal

computers.

DO YOU BELIEVE Bill Gates would

have worked so hard solely to better

mankind? Better get on the Internet and take

a look at his 66,000-square-foot mansion.

Just about every significant advance we

now enjoy was invented and implemented

by someone motivated, in large part, by their

personal economic advancement.

Let’s face it. You and I didn’t invent the

car, the TV or the microchip. In fact, we

have little clue as to how all that stuff works.

Yet we enjoy their benefits every day. We

are average men and women standing on the

shoulders of geniuses. Do we want to kill the

goose that laid the golden egg? Are we so

consumed by envy that we will destroy prosperity

for the sake of our egos? Is it that hard

to accept the fact that your neighbor may

northside view

By

ROBERT

STEDMAN

Mailing fiasco

spurs New Year’s

resolution

I WENT OUT with a bang last year. Oh

yeah, this husband put a big stamp on

2010. Oh wait, "stamp" may not be the

best word.

Let's go back a few weeks and start the

story. And there I was, standing in 29

degree weather with the wind whipping

my face, staring at a post office box that

had just eaten my mail.

That's right. I had just dropped our

Christmas cards in that blue box with NO

STAMPS. Not only that, but it all happened

in some sorta cruel, slow motion. As

the cards slipped off my fingers, I immediately

knew what I had just done.

Of course, I was quickly reminded as the

mail crashed to the bottom. Not only that,

but the conversation from two nights

before replayed in my head. "Robert, don't

forget to stamp these." Even better than

that, I had done it the day before too. You

got it. As I stood there in 29 degree weath-

have more than you?

There are some Americans who believe

that all money is gotten through evil means.

These people believe if you are rich, you had

to cheat or steal. No doubt, this is true in

some cases. Humans are sinners. That will

never change.

So are we to cripple our economic engine

because of human imperfection? Shall we

throw out the baby with the bath water?

Truth be known, the vast majority of wealth

was created by creative, motivated individuals

offering goods or services that others

were willing to pay for. In a phrase, the rich

- or their forebears - earned their money.

Indeed, there are those who simply inherited

their money (even though half was taken

by the government). Luck is a fact of life.

The desire to provide for your family is a

great motivator. Deny that to our genius

entrepreneurs and prosperity takes a huge

hit.

Of course, taxation redistributes huge

amounts of wealth in our country. We have

leveled the gap between rich and poor in the

name of equality. Most of us have a sense of

fundamental decency that abhors dire poverty

in the midst of ostentatious consumption.

Crass displays of materialism haven’t exactly

helped the case of the wealthy.

Be that as it may, as a nation we are left

with a fundamental trade-off between equality

and efficiency. When the top five percent

of taxpayers pay more income taxes than the

bottom 95 percent - which is the case today

in our country - that golden goose is close to

being served as dinner.

er, I was clued in to the fact that I had

dropped two bundles of Christmas cards,

two days in a row, when I was clearly told

by my wife to "GET STAMPS."

This was not good. I started to get that

sickening feeling, as I remembered how

important these cards were to my wife. At

that point, I had a big decision to make. Do

I call her with the news or make a spastic

attempt to get into the box? Even if I found

a mail man, would he let me in that thing?

Certainly these cards would be returned

to our return address, that is, if there was a

return address. I didn't know because I didn't

pay attention to these cards or listen to

any of the simple instructions that went

with it.

It was time to face the music. As the 29degree

wind continued to whip my face, I

just grabbed my cell and tapped on St.

Dominic's. It was time to call a certain

nurse and pray she was having a great day.

It was time to brace myself for a welldeserved

lecture on why I need to listen

more. It was time to hear "ring, ring, ring,

ring.....NICU, this is Sandy."

I'll keep that conversation between husband

and wife, but it went a bit better than

expected. I was given a lifeline with a

"track 'em down" exclamation point.

Long story, short, I'm now known as the

"Christmas Card Guy" to the people at the

post office. I'd like to thank Tracy, who

helped me "track 'em down." She was very

attentive to the desperation in my voice

when I gave my version of the stamp story.

Just as cool as that, the cards we couldn't

track down ended up being delivered to

their recipients, unstamped. I have a feeling

there was a sympathetic postman, who

knew exactly what some poor husband had

done. God bless him.

In conclusion to this column, words like

listen, comprehend, concentrate, and focus

are all over my New Year's resolution list.

No more ADD for me. In 2011, I'm a

sponge.

Robert Stedman is a Northsider.

We Want Letters

The Northside Sun encourages readers to write letters and guest

columns. Letters of diverse viewpoints are welcome. You can send letters

to the Northside Sun, P.O. Box 16709, Jackson MS 39236. Or e-mail

letters to wyatt@northsidesun.com. Please e-mail or mail a photo if you

can. All letters must be signed and we reserve the right to edit them.


the side of reason

Republican office-holder and a leader of the

local Tea Party movement. So much for violence

from the right.

Valentine

gift

certificates

Are the

way to her

heart!

Less time spent cleaning means

more time with loved ones!

INSURED

BONDED

By

DAVID

SANDERS

New historical facts

reveal Soviet spies

did infiltrate U.S.

THE OUTRAGEOUS REACTION of

the American left to the mass shooting in

Arizona - and the blowback it rightly earned

them - is both a sign and symptom of the

breaking down of the Master Narrative that

has controlled the public understanding of

political, social, and economic events in the

U.S. for at least the last three-quarters of a

century. Within hours of the event, and

before much of anything was known about

the shooter or his background, Paul

Krugman of the N.Y. Times led a chorus of

voices on the left - including the buffoonish

local (Pima County) sheriff - condemning

talk radio, Sarah Palin, Fox News, the Tea

Party, Rush Limbaugh (in other words, the

left's usual line-up of villains) for creating

the "climate" in which such acts are, in their

view, inevitable.

The trouble was that, as information about

the shooter began to emerge, it became

increasingly obvious that he was a gardenvariety

psycho who, according to his

friends, never watched TV news and had no

political affiliation at all. Then, at a city

council meeting about a week later, an actual

death threat was made by one of the victims

who survived the shooting against a

We Want Your Story Ideas

WHY THIS PANICKY, hair-trigger

behavior by the left? It is because their paradigm

is crumbling. The once-settled official

view of, for lack of a more precise term,

"what happened" since approximately 1933

has been reshaped by new information, better

scholarship, and especially the explosion

of media - principally the Internet and its

progeny, the blogs - that cannot easily be

controlled. (No wonder the left is clamoring

for "net neutrality.")

Let's look at a few of the pillars of the liberal

temple that have been pulled down or

are wobbling. It was for years gospel in any

consideration of the 1930s and 1940s - and

still is on many college campuses, which

ironically have become the leading bastion

of the threatened orthodoxy - that the New

Deal "saved America" from the Great

Depression.

This, in fact, is the cornerstone of the

belief on the left that government intervention

into the markets - whether through regulation

or, as we are seeing with the Obama

administration, outright control of day-today

operations - produces benevolent results

and, just as important, "fairer" outcomes

than the unregulated market. More recent

scholarship, however, seriously challenges

this conclusion.

Closer analysis suggests that government

intervention actually greatly prolonged the

depression by "crowding out" the efforts of

private capital to respond in ways that

should have corrected the downtrend much

sooner.

Unemployment at the end of the 1930s

was just as high as it was at the decade's

beginning. Mobilization for World War II

finally pulled the nation out of the depression,

but the Dow Jones Industrial Average

did not return to its 1929 pre-crash level

until 1954. Government intervention

arguably turned what otherwise should have

been a mere downdraft of historically-average

length into a 25 year economic ordeal. It

is inarguable that what it emphatically

accomplished was a huge expansion of the

Do you ever think, “Somebody should write a story about that?”

Well if you do, let us know at the Sun - your community newspaper.

Most of our story ideas come from our readers. It’s easy to

do. Just phone Wyatt Emmerich at 601-977-0470 or Jimmye

Sweat at 601-957-1123. Or email wyatt@northsidesun.com or jimmye@northsidesun.com

Jackson’s Quality

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size, scope, and reach of government.

WE ALL LEARNED that America in

the 1950s was a cauldron of paranoia, with

baseless fear of communist infiltration of

governmental and social institutions leading

to trumped-up investigations, such as the

McCarthy hearings, that heedlessly ruined

careers in government and resulted in the

"blacklisting" of many Hollywood figures.

In fact, the Red Scare, as it was derisively

called by every writer who covered the subject

in the 1960s when I was a college student,

introduced into the language a new

noun: McCarthyism. Its intended meaning

was any campaign that used false smears to

attack its targets.

The left's hero in this episode was Alger

Hiss, the urbane Ivy League grad and State

Department employee who was portrayed

as under unwarranted attack by the unattractive,

slovenly McCarthy. Hiss still had many

defenders on the left, even up to the very

end. When the end came, however, it was

decisive.

Two events have not just undercut the

left's account of all this, they have totally

destroyed it in a more dramatic fashion than

I can remember seeing any such orthodoxy

refuted. The first was the fall of the Soviet

Union, eventually giving scholars access to

KGB files. The second was the publication

of the fully decrypted Venona Cables. These

latter were some 3,000 or so cables between

Moscow and its embassies and consuls in

various places, mainly Washington, D.C.,

and New York.

U.S. intelligence began intercepting these

cables in the late 1930s or early 1940s, but

they were "double encrypted," and analysts

did not decrypt all of them until sometime

in the 1980s. The full set was published in

1995.

This set up the perfect historical trap: a

period of decades for partisans to put themselves

on the record before the irrefutable

proof was presented. What the decrypted

cables and Soviet files revealed was that the

U.S. government, as well as many other

institutions, were shot through with Soviet

spies throughout the run-up to WW II and

on into the 1950s. Hiss was one of them. He

USPS 598 760

Wyatt Emmerich, Publisher

Jimmye Sweat, Editor

Published weekly on Thursday by Sunland Publishing Co., Inc. Offices

at 246 Briarwood, Jackson, MS, 39206. Mailing address is P.O. Box

16709, Jackson, MS, 39236. Phone is 601-957-1122. Subscription price

in Hinds, Madison and Rankin counties, $20 per year. Long distance

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northsidesun

the weekly

Page 5A

was not merely a communist sympathizer

but an actual Soviet agent with a handler in

Moscow.

There were more Soviet agents than

McCarthy ever suspected. Incidentally, virtually

everyone he did suspect was, in fact,

an agent. We had three State Department

people in China, reporting on events in the

struggle between Chiang Kai-shek and Mao

Tse-tung. Their reports downplayed Mao's

communist leanings and depicted Chiang's

forces as ineffective and corrupt. We abandoned

Chiang, and China fell to the communists.

All three of our people in China

were Soviet agents.

All of this information - and much more -

is contained in an astounding piece of scholarship

called “Blacklisted by History,” by

M. Stanton Evans, which I strongly recommend

for persons of my era and later, who

need to correct their defective education in

this area. What this means is that the

American left has bequeathed us a history of

the Cold War that is a pack of lies. What do

they do when they are caught red-handed?

Simple: talk about something else. Elvis has

left the building, and Alger Hiss has now

gone officially down the memory hole.

One change that has accounted for a shaking

of the foundations of the left's mendacious

version of almost everything is that

the right today has far more intellectual firepower

than in my college days, when there

was William F. Buckley and then …. Much

of this has developed outside of the universities,

in such think tanks as the Cato

Institute in Washington and the Independent

Institute in Oakland. But even college campuses

are more receptive to questioning of

the reigning orthodoxy than in the 1960s.

So what do they have remaining? If, in the

run-up to 2012, it appears that the Tea Party

may be poised to make additional gains in

Congress or Republicans to take the presidency,

look for everything anyone on the

right says, including "and" and "the," (to

borrow a quote from the left) to be characterized

as racist, an incitement to violence,

or both. It's all they've got, folks.

David Sanders is a Northsider.

accepts no responsibility for unsolicited stories, artwork or photographs.

Photos are filed according to the week they appear. Usually those that

are not published are not kept on file. If a stamped, self-addressed envelope

is enclosed, we will try to return such photos, if possible. POST-

MASTER: Send address changes to the Northside Sun, P.O. Box 16709,

Jackson, MS, 39236. E-mail: sun@northside sun.com


Page 6A Thursday, January 20, 2011

Judge postpones guilty

plea in Evans’ trial

By JIMMY HENDRIX

Special to the Sun

U.S. DISTRICT JUDGE

Dan Jordan III postponed a

guilty plea by Charles and

Chris Evans on December

22 when the prosecution

admitted his office had not

provided proper notice to the

victims. Judge Jordan immediately

asked if such notice

was provided when he

assumed the bench and

remarked the courtroom was

nearly empty. The judge

delayed accepting the pleas

after conferring with

Assistant U.S. Attorney

Michael Hurst and Evans

defense counsel John

Colette. Mr. Colette offered

to waive the requirement but

Judge Jordan pointed out the

law said “shall notify” and

no such waiver could be

accepted. The prosecution

had not filed a new notice of

a hearing when this story

went to press.

The U.S. attorney in

Jackson charged Charles H.

Evans Jr. and Jon

Christopher Evans on

December 16, 2010 with

bank fraud and conspiracy

to commit money laundering.

Acting U.S. Attorney

Donald Burkhalter also

seeks the civil forfeiture of

all assets involved in the

alleged commission of these

crimes. The penalties for

bank fraud are a fine of $1

million or less and/or

imprisonment of not more

than thirty years. The

Criminal Information alleges

30 banks with offices in

Mississippi, 16 banks in

Texas, and several other

banks and trusts in other

states.

THE INFORMATION

charges Charles Evans was

“an approved attorney for

Mississippi Valley Title,

authorized to provide title

opinions and prepare certificates

for title for MVT,

which MVT used and relied

upon in order to issue title

insurance polices.” The government

charges Chris

Evans is the registered agent

for the companies used to

perpetuate the alleged criminal

acts.

The Bill of Information

alleges the Evans brothers

initiated their scheme in

January 2003 until October

2009 in Madison County

and later DeSoto County, the

Mississippi Gulf Coast, and

Texas “in order to pay down

debt held by their company

Gulf States Publishing and

to enrich themselves,

Charles and Chris Evans

devised a plan to fraudulently

secure mortgage proceeds

from financial institutions by

misrepresenting to such

financial institutions the

legal descriptions, title and

lien history, and ownership

of real estate the Defendants

intended to purchase.”

This correspondent

reviewed numerous deeds of

trust and estimated the exposure

by banks was nearly

$75 million. ($37 million in

Madison, approximately $10

million in DeSoto, approximately

$27 million in Texas.

Most of the Texas banks

have been able to foreclose

on the properties as the multiple

loans were not issued

on Texas properties as they

were in Mississippi.) The

government claims the

brothers used the proceeds

of the loans to buy more

land, make mortgage payments

on the outstanding

loans, and enrich themselves.

THE BROTHERS would

Belhaven development

Northsider Virgi Lindsey, (center) director of the Greater

Belhaven Neighborhood Foundation, recently spoke to

the Rotary Club of North Jackson. Lindsey has lived 26

years in Belhaven and is a Rotarian in the Jackson

Downtown Club. She said the foundation now has

$3,000,000 in assets and recently spent $300,000

improving the Belhaven Park. Rotarians Rob Farr, Cooper

Morrison and Wilson Hood are among those serving on

the Belhaven Foundation board. Lindsey, wife of Charles

Lindsey, is currently president of the Rotary Club of

North Jackson. She said the foundation is involved in

fund-raising, long-range planning and development. She

spoke of the unique partnership with Baptist Health

Systemns which is bringing “amazing” development to

six blocks bounded by Fortification, Poplar, Jefferson and

North State Street, including a new five-story 187,000 sq.

ft. building with retail, office and apartments. Keifer’s will

relocate to the new planned building, keeping a decor

and ambience very similar to their existing location. She

is shown with Rotarians (from left) Bill Osborne and Rob

Farr.

buy a large tract of land in

the name of one LLC. The

brothers would “fictitiously

subdivide” the land before

they even bought it. After

closing, they would obtain

large mortgage loans (average

loan size was $620,000

in Mississippi, over $1 million

in Texas) on smaller

portions of the tract purchased

through other LLCs

they owned. Unfortunately

for the banks, no smaller

tracts existed and the LLC

owning the parent tract

never transferred ownership

to the LLC claiming ownership

of the smaller tract

despite the fact Charles

Evans provided title certificates

showing the LLC did

indeed own the land in reality

it did not own. The banks

were in effect making unsecured

loans and in reality,

the Evans brothers were perpetuating

a Ponzi scheme

using banks instead of

investors.

The government also

claims the Evans brothers

ran out of “suitable properties”

to purchase and began

“stacking” new mortgages

on top of the older ones on

the same land. Mississippi

Valley Title testified in an

October 2009 Chancery

Court hearing the scheme

was discovered when bank

examiners asked Holmes

County Bank to see the

deeds on two loans as part

of its examination. The bank

called the MVT for a copy.

MVT had no copies of the

deeds and the bank could

not find one at the courthouse.

Holmes County Bank

notified the title insurance

company about the missing

deeds. MVT attempted to

contact Mr. Evans, who

would not return calls or

appear at his office. MVT

investigated and discovered

fraud took place.

business

notes

Dale Shearer, an attorney

with Copeland, Cook,

Taylor, and Bush, has

joined the executive committee

of the Southern Miss

Alumni Association as vice

president. He is slated to

become president of the

21,000-member association

in 2012-13. Shearer lives in

Ridgeland with Janet,

daughter Mary Kate, and

son Sam.

Laniece Walker has been

named the recipient of

Mississippi State

Hospital’s Hero Award for

the month of December.

Walker has been associated

with the hospital for one

year. The Hero Award is

given every month to

employees who go above

and beyond the scope of

their work, or who through

their positions perform a

heroic act to assist a patient

in some way. Employees

can be nominated either by

their co-workers or by

patients and residents.

Join us!
























To subscribe to the Northside Sun call 601-957-1542


Page 7A


Page 8A Thursday, January 20, 2011

Developing downtown

Jackson downtown developer David Watkins spoke to

the Rotary Club of North Jackson, naming a multitude of

exciting new projects in downtown Jackson. Last year,

Watkins told the group by the time he spoke again, the

King Edward and Standard Life Building would be renovated

and open and sure enough, he was dead on.

Watkins’ new predictions are even more fantastic. He

says Farish Street will be up and open for business by

this summer and “will be better than Beale Street,” with

65 full-time musicians employed, “a colony if you will.” He

said 4.5 million tourists visit Beale Street a year, 2.5 million

on tour buses, 20 a day. He projects Farish Street will

get one million tourists a year, with 2.5 million a year

soon to follow. He said the city will get $4 to $5 million a

year in new ad valorem taxes from the project. Watkins

talked about his $80 million Whitney Place development

in Fondren, saying construction would begin in the fall

of 2011. Watkins has now got his teeth into the

Metrocenter Mall by purchasing the 240,000-square-foot

Belk building which he plans to rent to the city of

Jackson. He plans to turn the 1.2 million square foot

Metrocenter Mall - the largest building in the state - into

an upscale designer outlet mall for the entire state,

including an indoor “wave pool” that will be open all

year. Watkins said the list of downtown development

projects “is almost infinite.” He said if he had another 200

downtown luxury apartments, he could rent them in

one day. He said several demographic trends are converging

to generate this downtown renewal: urbanization,

better race relations, later marriage, fewer children

and older parents. The cost of commuting - both in

terms of time and gas - is another big factor. “People are

either going to have to find new jobs closer to where

they live or get new homes closer to where they work

and it’s going to happen a lot faster than I thought - in

the next five years.”Watkins praised Jackson. “What other

city are you five minutes from deer hunting?” He said the

Riverwalk would be “a game changer,” and foresaw a day

when you could boat from Lake Hico to downtown

along a beautiful city river. Watkins also plans to turn the

old Eastland Courthouse building into a school of music

- the Julliard of the South - with 300 full-time students

and 100 faculty members. He mentioned Old Capitol

Green and the District of Eastover as other big projects in

the works. “None of it would be done without tax credits,”

he told the Rotarians. “It would cost 50 percent

more.” Shown are (from left) Watkins, Jason Goree and

Rotarian Andy Young.

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City Center

Continued from Page One

With little economic development to generate sales and

property taxes to pay for it, McGee said the city will have

to issue bonds to cover its construction. He said taxes

won’t be raised to pay for it.

The Ridgeland Public Library, police department and

municipal court system are already located near the site,

McGee said, making it the perfect spot in which to relocate

city hall.

The site will be connected to West Jackson Street by

Madison Avenue and the area’s multipurpose trails.

Motorists would also have easy access to the site from the

Trace, according to the Ridgeland Area Master Plan

(RAMP).

BETSY LILES, owner of B. Fine Art Jewelry on West

Jackson, likes the idea of having the city center located

near the historic Jackson Street Overlay District.

“It will be nice to have the library, police and city services

together,” she said. “It will have a good feeling.” She

also likes the fact that the center will have a large green

space, an area that she believes will be perfect for Jackson

Street’s annual Hamstock festival.

The event was held in June last year and is a Memphis

in May-sanctioned barbecue cookoff. Last year, Lyles said

a portion of Madison Avenue had to be closed to accommodate

the event. “This will mean less people in the

road,” she said.

The center is on land that was previously home to a concrete

factory owned by Jackson Ready-Mix, and Madison

Materials, a beam manufacturer.

McGee said Madison Materials was closed, but building

materials and other equipment are still located on the site.

As part of the purchase agreement, the company would

be responsible for clearing the area.

Purse Snatching

Continued from Page One

ing to e-mails, the victim suffered no broken bones and

no head or face injuries. The e-mail stated that the woman

did suffer scrapes to her left shoulder, back and hands.

The suspects escaped with the woman’s purse and $150

in cash.

She was wearing tall leather boots, something that likely

protected her feet and legs during the attack, the e-mail

stated.

The incident occurred around 9:30 or 10 o’clock that

night. The woman was released from the hospital on

December 12.

WATTS DIDN’T know if the suspect was driving the

vehicle or riding as a passenger.

He said detectives have thrown the book at the suspect,

but haven’t been able to charge him with the pursesnatching,

because the victims have been unable to identify

him in a photo lineup.

“They (the detectives) will do a couple of more lineups

and hope that the victims pick him out,” he said.

977-8122

Ask for Beth

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Page 8A Thursday, January 13, 2011

Developing downtown

Jackson downtown developer David Watkins spoke to

the Rotary Club of North Jackson, naming a multitude of

exciting new projects in downtown Jackson. Last year,

Watkins told the group by the time he spoke again, the

King Edward and Standard Life Building would be renovated

and open and sure enough, he was dead on.

Watkins’ new predictions are even more fantastic. He

says Farish Street will be up and open for business by

this summer and “will be better than Beale Street,” with

65 full-time musicians employed, “a colony if you will.” He

said 4.5 million tourists visit Beale Street a year, 2.5 million

on tour buses, 20 a day. He projects Farish Street will

get one million tourists a year, with 2.5 million a year

soon to follow. He said the city will get $4 to $5 million a

year in new ad valorem taxes from the project. Watkins

talked about his $80 million Whitney Place development

in Fondren, saying construction would begin in the fall

of 2011. Watkins has now got his teeth into the

Metrocenter Mall by purchasing the 240,000-square-foot

Belk building which he plans to rent to the city of

Jackson. He plans to turn the 1.2 million square foot

Metrocenter Mall - the largest building in the state - into

an upscale designer outlet mall for the entire state,

including an indoor “wave pool” that will be open all

year. Watkins said the list of downtown development

projects “is almost infinite.” He said if he had another 200

downtown luxury apartments, he could rent them in

one day. He said several demographic trends are converging

to generate this downtown renewal: urbanization,

better race relations, later marriage, fewer children

and older parents. The cost of commuting - both in

terms of time and gas - is another big factor. “People are

either going to have to find new jobs closer to where

they live or get new homes closer to where they work

and it’s going to happen a lot faster than I thought - in

the next five years.”Watkins praised Jackson. “What other

city are you five minutes from deer hunting?” He said the

Riverwalk would be “a game changer,” and foresaw a day

when you could boat from Lake Hico to downtown

along a beautiful city river. Watkins also plans to turn the

old Eastland Courthouse building into a school of music

- the Julliard of the South - with 300 full-time students

and 100 faculty members. He mentioned Old Capitol

Green and the District of Eastover as other big projects in

the works. “None of it would be done without tax credits,”

he told the Rotarians. “It would cost 50 percent

more.” Shown are (from left) Watkins, Jason Goree and

Rotarian Andy Young.

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City Center

Continued from Page One

With little economic development to generate sales and

property taxes to pay for it, McGee said the city will have

to issue bonds to cover its construction. He said taxes

won’t be raised to pay for it.

The Ridgeland Public Library, police department and

municipal court system are already located near the site,

McGee said, making it the perfect spot in which to relocate

city hall.

The site will be connected to West Jackson Street by

Madison Avenue and the area’s multipurpose trails.

Motorists would also have easy access to the site from the

Trace, according to the Ridgeland Area Master Plan

(RAMP).

BETSY LILES, owner of B. Fine Art Jewelry on West

Jackson, likes the idea of having the city center located

near the historic Jackson Street Overlay District.

“It will be nice to have the library, police and city services

together,” she said. “It will have a good feeling.” She

also likes the fact that the center will have a large green

space, an area that she believes will be perfect for Jackson

Street’s annual Hamstock festival.

The event was held in June last year and is a Memphis

in May-sanctioned barbecue cookoff. Last year, Lyles said

a portion of Madison Avenue had to be closed to accommodate

the event. “This will mean less people in the

road,” she said.

The center is on land that was previously home to a concrete

factory owned by Jackson Ready-Mix, and Madison

Materials, a beam manufacturer.

McGee said Madison Materials was closed, but building

materials and other equipment are still located on the site.

As part of the purchase agreement, the company would

be responsible for clearing the area.

Purse Snatching

Continued from Page One

ing to e-mails, the victim suffered no broken bones and

no head or face injuries. The e-mail stated that the woman

did suffer scrapes to her left shoulder, back and hands.

The suspects escaped with the woman’s purse and $150

in cash.

She was wearing tall leather boots, something that likely

protected her feet and legs during the attack, the e-mail

stated.

The incident occurred around 9:30 or 10 o’clock that

night. The woman was released from the hospital on

December 12.

WATTS DIDN’T know if the suspect was driving the

vehicle or riding as a passenger.

He said detectives have thrown the book at the suspect,

but haven’t been able to charge him with the pursesnatching,

because the victims have been unable to identify

him in a photo lineup.

“They (the detectives) will do a couple of more lineups

and hope that the victims pick him out,” he said.

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Cutting MPB

Continued from Page One

Martinson said she’s received calls

and letters from her constituents who

support her efforts. Several conservatives

in the House have said they

would vote on the measure if it made

it to the floor.

District 66 Rep. Cecil Brown,

though, said he won’t support the

measure. “I will do anything I can to

defeat it,” he said. As chairman of the

House Education Committee, Brown

stands a good chance of being able to

keep the bill from making it to the

floor for a vote if the bill is doublereferred.

If it does bypass the education

committee, Brown said he will still

fight it. Unlike Martinson, Brown

believes MPB provides an unbiased

source of reporting that can’t be

found elsewhere. He also points to

the fact that public broadcasting is

one way the state helps to improve

quality of life.

“People talk about the core function of government and

what it is that the government should be doing,” he said.

“Should we have museums? Should we provide scholarships

for students to go to universities?”

District 68 Rep. Bill Denny said he was inclined to agree

with Martinson, but wanted to do more research before

making a final decision.

The bill proposes reducing funding for the agency by 20

percent in 2011, and by an additional 20 percent each year

for the next four years until funding is completely phased

out.

Martinson said the bill only affects funding coming from

the state’s general fund balance. MPB would still receive

funding from other revenue streams.

One of Martinson’s biggest concerns was that the agency

spent more than $21,000 last year on meals for business

meetings. She believes that money could have been better

spent on programs like “Mississippi Roads,” which provide

a greater service to the state. She said 13 episodes

Agencies spend

big bucks eating

power lunches

By ANTHONY WARREN

Sun Staff Writer

WHILE COMING under fire recently for spending

too much on food, Mississippi Public Broadcasting

(MPB) isn’t the only state agency that has racked up

hefty expenditures for power lunches.

In fact, the agency that oversees public television

and radio was responsible for only a small fraction of

the money spent on meals for business meetings by

state agencies.

Seethespending.org states that during the last year,

the state spent over $1.67 million on food and beverages

for business meetings.

Of that, MPB spent approximately $21,700 on

luncheons, a small amount when compared to some

of the state’s big spenders.

The Mississippi Department of Education, for

example, racked up nearly a third of the state’s total

bill, spending approximately $630,000 last year on

luncheons and other refreshments for gatherings.

Behind that agency was the state attorney general’s

office, which racked up $175,676 for meals for business

meetings.

A good portion of that apparently went for attorney

training. According to seethespending.org, the funds

came from the office’s State Prosecutor Education

Fund. In December 2009, Jim Hood’s office gave

Harrah’s Casino $38,783 in funds for meals. In June

2010, the Imperial Palace of Mississippi received

$45,601 from the office of the state’s top attorney.

Other agencies also spent a good bit. The

Department of Human Services doled out more than

$45,000 in the last fiscal year; and the Department of

Health paid out more than $149,000 for businessrelated

meals.

During the same year, the Arts Commission doled

out $45,097 for meals, about half of what the

Department of Transportation paid out. MDOT paid

out $86,391 for lunches and other foodstuffs.

Lawmakers also contributed to the state’s bill.

During the 2010 fiscal year, the Mississippi House of

Representatives paid out more than $10,000 for coffee;

the Senate paid a little less than half that amount

for a morning pickup for legislators and visitors.

Rita Martinson

could be produced for virtually the

same amount the agency spent on

meals.

“They help promote tourism and economic

development,” she said.

MPB DIRECTOR of Public

Relations Margaret McPhillips said

funds used for business meals didn’t

come entirely from taxpayers’ wallets.

She said of the $21,700, only $500

came from state funding. The rest came

from grants.

She said some grants required the

agency to host business luncheons and

other gatherings.

One of those grants, a Ready to

Learn grant from the U.S. Department

of Education, was spent for a two-week

summer literacy camp for third through

fifth-graders. The grant also helped pay

for an MPB education summit in which

educators and government leaders were

brought together to discuss accomplishing

educational goals during the recession.

Another program was an e-learning for educators program

that included workshops and meetings, McPhillips

said.

McPhillips said a large portion of state money goes to

employee salaries.

MPB has 112 people on the payroll. McPhillips stopped

short of saying whether or not any positions had been cut

as a result of the state’s budgetary crisis, but said employees

had “all taken on extra work and cut corners.”

The agency has an annual budget of roughly $12.6 million.

Of that, $1.6 million comes from state-supported special

funds; $5.1 million comes from grants and donations;

and the remaining $5.9 million comes from the state’s general

fund budget.

Mississippi’s general fund balance is expected to be

around $4.587 billion this year, about $300 million less

than the state brought in 2008. The drop-off in revenue is a

result of the economic recession.

As for having left-leaning reporting, Mississippi’s

agency doesn’t have control over what is produced nationally.

Instead, McPhillips said the group works to produce

programs that are relevant to the state. Two examples, she

said, are “Job Hunter,” a new television service that helps

residents find manufacturing jobs, and “Southern

Remedies,” a local radio program that is now focusing on

curbing obesity in the Magnolia State.

Page 9A


Page 10A Thursday, January 20, 2011

Belhaven hosts

health, wellness

seminar series

BELHAVEN UNIVERSITY is launching a new Health

and Wellness Seminar Series designed to help

Northsiders live a healthier lifestyle. The monthly free

programs were made possible through a grant from the

Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Mississippi Foundation.

The health series includes unique, educational, and

hands-on programs that have been developed to help participants

with simple steps to improve their quality of

life. Led by experts in their fields, the health series will

be full of both “learning and doing” activities.

The series kicks off January 20 at 5:30 p.m. in Barber

Auditorium (at the intersection of Arlington Street and

Peachtree Street). Titled “Know Your Numbers: What’s

Your Health IQ,” the first program will help participants

measure their baseline health by determining their body

mass index or “BMI.”

Jackson Cardiologists Dr. Quinton Dickenson and Dr.

Richard Guynes will share motivational health insights,

while the BU Sports Medicine and Exercise Science faculty

and students will be available to conduct BMI measurements

for those in attendance. For a complete listing

of the Health Series programs see

www.belhaven.edu/health.

KEVIN RUSSELL, vice president for advancement at

Belhaven said, “We want the community to come, learn,

and become equipped to make healthy choices a way of

living…not just a New Year’s resolution.” Russell also

noted that the university has recently added a one-mile

walking trail around the perimeter of campus, “We invite

neighbors to come to the BU campus and use our new

trail as a regular part of their exercise program. The combination

of the walking trail and the Health Series is a

perfect addition to anyone’s health routine.”

Sheila Grogan, executive director of the foundation

said the program dovetails with other initiatives of the

company, “The Blue Cross and Blue Shield of

Mississippi Foundation is focused on providing resources

and funding to continue our commitment to a healthier

Mississippi.

“We are excited about the health and wellness initiatives

being implemented at Belhaven University and

believe they will help foster a healthy environment for

the university and surrounding community.”

Belhaven Neighborhood Foundation Director Virgi

Lindsay also welcomed the partnership.

“These programs are wonderful news for the residents

of Belhaven and will only add to the vibrant community

activities found in the neighborhood.”

For questions about the health series or the walking

trail, call the Belhaven University Advancement Office at

601-968-8746.

Facts of Millsaps

Millsaps President Robert Pearigen (left) spoke to the

Rotary Club of North Jackson, saying he and his wife

are delighted to be in the South and really enjoying

Jackson. He informed the club of the diverse programs

at Millsaps such as its 4,000-acre reserve in the Yucatan

peninsula were students can study biology. He said

Millsaps has the first neuroscience major in the state.

The student body is diverse - five percent of students

come from Mississippi, 25 percent from Louisiana and

50 percent from all the other states. There are international

students representing 20 countries. Half the

Millsaps students and faculty go abroad. Tuition is

$38,000, including room and board, which is one of the

best bargains among quality private colleges in the

country. Twenty percent of the students are eligible for

Pell grants. Pearigen said he plans on implementing a

marketing program, especially focusing on the 10 million

people who live in Houston, Dallas and Fort Worth.

He praised Jackson as a great environment in which to

be located. “Many of the best liberal arts colleges are in

rural, isolated areas, but at Millsaps we have an opportunity

to interact with business and civic leaders in a

way that is unique.” Pearigen said new honors college

programs at larger state schools have created competition

for the best students. “They are trying to replicate

the intimate settings of a small private liberal arts college.

I would argue that we are the authentic item. It’s

in our DNA.” He is shown with Rotarian Jim Walden

(right).

sunlanders in service

Army National Guard Spec. Joshua J. Quinn has

graduated from basic infantry training at Fort Benning,

Columbus, Ga. He is the son of Demetras Quinn of

Northview Drive. Quinn was graduated in 2005 from

Callaway High School, and received a bachelor’s degree

in 2010 from the University of Southern Mississippi.

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Phil Moore opens

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dealership on I-55

PHIL MOORE recently acquired the franchises of Buick

and GMC and is now Phil Moore Buick GMC.

“We have been in the GM family for a long time and

although we were saddened to see the Saturn brand be discontinued

we are extremely excited to have acquired the

Buick and GMC Truck franchises. By remaining in the

GM family with these acquisitions, we will continue to be

able to service our longtime and loyal Saturn customers’

vehicles as well as being able to accommodate current

Buick and GMC owners’ service needs.”

The dealership is located at 5728 I-55N.

Along with a fully operational service department, Phil

Moore Buick GMC has a fully stocked parts department.

If you need a part, we will have it. With these acquisitions

Phil Moore Buick GMC is going to be able to put several

people back to work. “This is a great thing for the Jackson

and tri-county area,” Moore said. “This is a bright spot in a

gloomy economy right now. There are not many areas that

are growing and being able to put people back to work and

we are going to be able to do just that. I hope to add as

many as 20 people to my workforce in the coming

months. We will need sales professionals, mechanics, customer

service representatives and others to completely

staff our dealership.”

ALTHOUGH NEW employees will be hired for the

“all new” Phil Moore Buick GMC, many of the faces at

the location are faces that have been there for nearly 20

years. “We built this location in 1992 and have been in the

GM family since this dealership was built and we look forward

to many more years with many of the same faces

that started with me nearly 20 years ago,” Moore said.


City official shares plans

to correct water, sewer

problems on Edmar Place

By ANTHONY WARREN

Sun Staff Writer

RELIEF COULD soon be in sight for

residents on Edmar Place, who have had to

endure the sounds and smells of a sewage

pump and above-ground sewer lines for the

past year.

In January 2010, the city installed the

equipment in the Fondren neighborhood as

a temporary solution to a sewer main collapse.

The pump was needed to re-route wastewater

from collapsed mains to another line

to prevent sewage from backing up into

residents’ yards. It has since become an

unwelcome fixture on the dead-end street

and has run almost non stop, only being

turned off minutes at a time to be serviced.

Neighbors’ frustrations were recently

expressed in a Christmas greeting sent to

Public Works Director Dan Gaillet and

Ward Seven Councilwoman Margaret

Barrett-Simon.

A copy of the card obtained by the Sun

included a photo of the large pump, decorated

with a green Christmas wreath, and a

poem summing up residents’ concerns.

“A year is passing with no resolution in

sight. Will Santa want to visit us on

Christmas Eve night?”

Paul Moak

A Christmas card from Edmar Place residents

Continued from Page 3A

to China in April. The trip is open to members

and nonmembers of the chamber alike.

Anyone can sign up to go, the difference

between the cost is a couple hundred dollars.

The trip is relatively inexpensive in

the way that it’s packaged, but high in

quality in terms of what those on the trip

get to experience.”

What is the chamber’s membership

right now? And what programs are in

place to grow that number?

“We have approximately 2,000 members.

Our membership area is working from time

to time on different things. For instance, we

hosted several membership luncheons in

2010; Lt. Gov. Phil Bryant spoke at one;

Rep. Bennie Thompson spoke at one; and

Marty Wiseman spoke at another. These

luncheons are periodic opportunities to

come together and be exposed to information

they might not hear somewhere else.

We also host professional development

happenings

Concert

The Jackson Chapter of American Guild of

Organists presents David Higgs in concert at

St. Andrew’s Cathedral, January 28 at 7:30

p.m. No admission charge. For more information

call 601-362-3235.

Choral rehearsals

The Jackson Choral Society invites inter-

Gaillet said he understood the neighborhood’s

frustrations. “We hoped to go to

construction before Thanksgiving, but we

ran into some right-of-way issues,” he said.

“We believe those are resolved.”

Gaillet met with residents last Tuesday to

lay out plans.

In the coming weeks, the city will bring

on two independent firms to appraise the

right-of-way needed for the project. From

there, offers will be made to the landowners

and the city will obtain the property.

From there, Gaillet said city officials will

have to bid out the project, including advertising

for bids for 30 days. From there, bids

will be open and the best offer will be

accepted by the city council.

Gaillet expects the project to take 60 to

90 days to complete once the contractor is

brought on, weather pending. He said

repairs should cost around $300,000.

The project calls for combining the 10

and 12-inch mains under Edmar, as well as

rerouting piping and adding new manholes

where needed. Mains in the neighborhood

collapsed last January when the support

system at a nearby creek eroded. He said

the project shouldn’t affect traffic on the

roadway.

workshops on how to hire someone, how

laws apply to businesses and how to create

Web sites. The chamber also has an ambassadors

program and frequent ribbon cuttings.

We had about 60 ribbon cuttings last

year that our membership participated in.

That’s about five a month.”

Last year, then Chairman Clay Hays

told us that the chamber was going to

work on an area-wide multipurpose bike

trail. How’s that going?

“Quite a bit has been done. The project

got started before Clay Hays became chair,

but Clay gave it a boost. He met with the

mayors of Jackson, Ridgeland and

Flowood, and we are currently in the status

of putting together an inter-local agreement

under already established legislative guidelines

and are working on identifying where

the trails would start and end, how they

would connect and which portions would

be built first.”

ested singers to rehearse with them as they

prepare for their spring concert, “The Art of

Music,” to be held May 3. Rehearsals will

begin January 25, 7 - 9 p.m. at Trinity

Presbyterian Church. For more information

call 601-927-9604.

Share the love

Southern Breeze Gallery will participate in

Ridgeland Rendezvous January 20 from 5 - 8

p.m. For more information call 601-607-

4147.

Support your local community -- Shop with Northside Sun advertisers

Page 11A


Page 12A Thursday, January 20, 2011

GJCP MEETING

The Greater Jackson Chamber Partnership’s Annual Meeting is scheduled for January 26, at the Jackson Convention

Complex. The event will feature Don Meyer, currently the winningest coach in any division in NCAA history, as the

guest speaker. Dr. Clay Hays, 2010 chairman, will give a review of the activities and accomplishments of 2010, and

incoming 2011 Chairman Paul Moak will lay out priorities for the coming year. The annual meeting also will

announce the winners of the Business of the Year, Pat Yarborough Award (Outstanding Individual), Ambassador of

the Year and will recognize incoming and outgoing board members. Planning committee members include (from

left, back) Lewis Slater, Duane O’Neill, Moak, Tyler Armstrong, Hays; (front) Paul Bowers, Lynda Raines and Lashanda

Alexander. For more information or to reserve a seat, call 601-948-7575.

business notes

J. Frank Betts, managing

member of the Jackson based

firm of Eubank, Betts, Hirn,

Wood, PLLC, attended the

combined Asia Pacific (AP)

and Europe, Middle East and

Africa (EMEA) Annual

Conference in Dubai, United

Arab Emirates. Betts, CPAAI

International Chairman, along

Police arrest two

juveniles for

house burglary

By ANTHONY WARREN

Sun Staff Writer

TWO JUVENILES were having to get used to their new

living arrangements last week after police say they broke

into a home on the Northside.

On January 12, police arrested two boys in connection

with burglarizing a home in the 700 block of Benning

Drive.

At press time, the suspects were being held at the

Henley-Young Juvenile Justice Center. The boys, who are

15 and 12, were facing charges of felony home burglary.

Precinct Four Cmdr. Wendell Watts said a call came in at

approximately 10:52 a.m. that two unidentified black males

were attempting to break into a residence through its back

door. Watts said a neighbor likely called in the report.

“We had officers stationed on the next street over when

the call came out. We had units close off the area and we

were able to capture them,” he said.

When police arrived, the suspects fled the scene, but

were picked up a few blocks over. Watts said they were

captured in the 200 block of Benning.

Police noticed that the boys had taken several items out

of the house, but had not gotten away with any of them.

Items included two video game systems, video games, two

televisions and jewelry.

About a week earlier, on January 6, a man was robbed at

his hotel room in the 5400 block of I-55 North.

Watts said the man was sitting in his room when an

unidentified black male and female burst through the door

and robbed him at gunpoint. The suspects took the man’s

wallet, two smartphones and an electronic music device

before fleeing the scene. The incident occurred at 9:14 that

night. Watts said video surveillance has been recovered by

detectives and is being reviewed.

Despite the January 6 robbery, the Northside started on a

positive note in regard to crime.

In the first week of January, the precinct only reported 11

auto burglaries, 10 house break-ins, two grand larcenies

and one armed robbery.

Typically, Watts said the Northside Precinct averages 20

or so auto break-ins each week. As for house burglaries, the

number reported in the first week of 2011 is down from the

mid to high teens.

with Jim Flynn, CPA

President, gave an update of

the association activities.

Liza Cirlot Looser, CEO

of The Cirlot Agency,

recently received the 2010

Tozzoli International

Business Leadership Award at

the Mississippi World Trade

Center’s annual meeting.

Attorney Leland S. Smith

III was recently selected as a

Mid-South Super Lawyer

2010. A partner in the firm of

Wilkins Tipton, P.A., Smith

has practiced law for 28

years.

Cooke Douglass Farr

Lemons Architects and

Engineers PA announce the

promotion of Ron Fender,

PE, Parker Reece, PE and

David Burnet, AIA to

Associate.

TAG SALE

2017 CULLEYWOOD RD. | JACKSON, MS 39211

JANUARY 21 AND 22

9 AM - 5 PM

Fine selection of furniture including Baker Museum pieces: Dining

Room, Living Rm, Louis XV silk chairs, Large Library Desk; 8' X 8'

Walnut Bookcase, John Widdicomb Master Bedroom furniture, Boy's

mahogany bedroom, lamps, 6-panel Oriental Screen w/ivory, oriental

rugs and items, Grandfather's clock, china, crystal, outdoor furniture

including wrought-iron pieces...

All sales final and all items sold as is! Buyer is responsible for packing and moving

items by the end of the sale. Not responsible for accidents. Check/Cash only.

Cheripitts@hotmail.com


Traffic study dashes hope

for Perkins traffic signal

By ANTHONY WARREN

Sun Staff Writer

PLANS TO install signal lights at the

intersection of Perkins and West Jackson

streets in Ridgeland have been nixed, at

least temporarily.

City officials spoke with residents at a

meeting last week to address traffic concerns

in the area.

Public Works Director Mike McCollum

told the 25 or 30 in attendance that a traffic

study conducted along the heavily traveled

roadway determined that traffic volume

was too high along West Jackson for lights

to be installed.

Residents had petitioned the city to have

a light installed, saying it was needed to

make it easier for motorists to turn on and

off of West Jackson. McCollum, though,

said having signalization would actually

lead to longer traffic jams in the area.

Complicating matters was the project’s

price tag. McCollum said installing signalization

would cost around $300,000, money

currently not set aside in the fiscal year

budget.

DAR meeting

The Rebecca Cravat

Chapter of the Daughters of

the American Revolution

will meet January 20, 10

a.m., at the home of Mrs.

Gilbert McSpadden. Guest

speaker will be Forrest

Thigpen. For more information

call 601-853-0451.

He said once the proposed Madison-

Ridgeland interchange is installed, the city

will likely reconsider installing the signals.

Officials believe that the interchange,

along with its frontage roads, will pull

much of the through-traffic off the street.

With less traffic on West Jackson, he

believes that conditions might be more

favorable for signal lights.

While signalization plans have stalled,

other plans to make West Jackson friendlier

to motorists and pedestrians are on the horizon.

To make it safer for residents crossing

the street, the city is considering installing a

lighted crosswalk between the First Baptist

Church and the church’s parking lot.

Ridgeland officials are also mulling over

installing a right-hand turn lane on Perkins

to make turning onto West Jackson easier.

McCollum said the city is taking preliminary

steps to ask the Mississippi

Department of Transportation for permission

to add the features. He said the projects

could get under way in the next five

years, pending the availabilty of funding.

PCA palooza

Ten members from Magnolia Region Porsche Club of America attended the 2010

PCA Palooza in Eureka Springs. Nearly 200 Porsche cars gathered for this sixth

annual event. For more information about Magnolia Region PCA events, visit magnoliapca.com.

Attending were (from left) Richard Stowe, Lynn and Tommy

Williamson, Tracy and Stacy Hipp, Leslie and Wanda Shivers, David and Sandra

Stewart. Not pictured: Nicole Stowe. Support your local community -- Shop with Northside Sun advertisers

Board gives approval

of St. Regis part two

ANOTHER portion of the St. Regis development has

been approved for sale, meaning that the second phase of

construction on the subdivision could get under way in

months.

At their first meeting in January, the Madison mayor

and board of aldermen approved the subdivision’s plat,

clearing the way for the lots to be sold.

Project Manager Ken Primos said there are 49 lots in St.

Regis for sale and seven homes currently under construction.

The second phase will add an additional 30 lots to the

subdivision. St. Regis is located on Hoy Road.

Primos said covenants for the area require homes to

have a minimum square footage of 3,000 square feet.

Most of the homes already constructed are between 3,400

and 4,200 square feet, he said.

All lots are approximately three quarters of an acre. He

said the neighborhood will be similar to St. Ives. “We’ll

start planning and working with engineers in the next couple

of months for the next phase,” he said. “We’ll do the

preliminary work, take it to the city for approval and then

do the detailed engineering.

“We hope to begin the project this summer.”

Hemphill Construction owns the development.

happenings

Page 13A


Page 14A Thursday, January 20, 2011

MISSISSIPPI’S FASHION &

COSMETICS LEADER

Highland Village 601.981.4621

THOMAS “TICO” HOFFMAN

1536 E. County Line Rd. P.O. Box 16875

Jackson, MS 39236 601/956-1030

1220 E. Northside Dr.

Jackson, MS 39211

601-366-8486

653 Duling Ave.

Jackson, MS 39216

601-366-5273

mcdades-markets@bellsouth.net

“Your Family’s

Restaurant”

KEVIN and TRACEY

THOMPSON

554A Hwy 51 North

Ridgeland, MS 39157

601-853-1014

McDade’s Market

904 E Fortification

Jackson, MS 39202

601-355-9668

2526 Robinson Rd, Ste 5

Jackson, MS 39209

601-353-0089

“Mississippi’s Photographic and Digital Headquarters

Film or Digital Developed at the

Same Place, Same Way!

I-55 North Serving Mississippi

DEVILLE PLAZA Since 1977! 601-956-9283

601.939.8810

High at North West Street Jackson (601) 352-3632

106 Cynthia Street Clinton

201 Hinds Blvd. Raymond

1161 Highland Colony Parkway Ridgeland

2323 Lakeland Drive Ste A

Flowood, Ms 39232

601-936-3398

600 Pear Orchard Road

Ridgeland, MS 39157

601-856-2205

515 Lake Harbour Drive

Ridgeland, Ms 39157

601-898-3600

• T • H • E •

ORCHARD

www.orchardretirement.com

619 Highland Colony Parkway | Ridgeland, MS

www.waterfordonhighlandcolony.com

DEVOTIONAL

EVOTIONAL PAGE AGE

ANGLICAN

CHRIST THE SAVIOUR

6014 Floral Dr., 209-5910

HOLY APOSTLES

3169 W. Tidewater Ln.

Madison, 829-2113

HOLY TRINITY (AMiA)

604 Goodridge Dr

Ridgeland, 601-956-1616

ST. MICHAEL AND ALL

ANGELS

12586 Midway,

Raymond, 857-2545

ASSEMBLY OF GOD

RIVER OF LIFE

101 Parkway Rd.,

Brandon, 919-1700

This Devotional and Directory Is Made Possible By These

Businesses Who Encourage All of Us to Attend Worship Services.

PLACES OF WORSHIP

BAPTIST

BRIARWOOD DRIVE

245 Briarwood Dr.,

956-4561

BROADMOOR BAPTIST

1531 Highland Colony,

Madison, 898-2345

CALVARY BAPTIST

1300 W. Capitol St.,

354-1300

CASTLEWOODS

175 Castlewoods Blvd.,

992-9977

COLONIAL HEIGHTS

444 Northpark Drive

Ridgeland, 956-5000

CROSSGATES BAPTIST

8 Crosswoods,

Brandon, 825-2562

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

OF JACKSON

431 N. State St., 949-1900

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH

OF MADISON

2100 Main St., 856-6177

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF

RIDGELAND

302 W. Jackson St.,

856-6139

FLOWOOD BAPTIST

1649 Old Fannin Rd., Flowood,

992-6464

GREATER RICHMOND

GROVE BAPTIST

Complex Road,

Ridgeland, 856-2209

GREATER ROSS CHAPEL

BAPTIST

Gluckstadt Road,

Madison, 856-8778

HIGHLAND COLONY

1200 H.C. Pkwy., Ridgeland,

856-4031

HORIZON COMMUNITY

CHURCH

4711 I-55 North, 982-8889

MOUNT CHARITY

964 Lake Harbour Dr.,

Ridgeland, 956-1767

MOUNT PLEASANT

Gluckstadt Rd.

Madison, 856-5862

NEW HOPE GROVE

Old Agency Rd.,

Madison, 856-5279

NEW LIFE BAPTIST

385 N. Old Canton Rd.,

Madison, 209-9500

NORTHMINSTER

3955 Ridgewood Rd.,

982-4703

PARKWAY BAPTIST

802 N. Frontage Rd., Clinton,

924-9912

PEAR ORCHARD

5725 Pear Orchard Rd.,

957-2086

PILGRIM’S REST

BAPTIST

409 Main St.,

Madison, 856-2609

PINELAKE BAPTIST

Lakeland Drive

RIDGECREST BAPTIST

7469 Old Canton Rd., Madison,

853-1090

RIDLEY HILL BAPTIST

1034 N. Livingston Rd.,

Madison, 853-1068

RIVERCREST FELLOWSHIP

21 Northtown Dr., 991-0046

ROCKY HILL BAPTIST

Rocky Hill Rd.,

Madison, 856-0759

SIMON HILL BAPTIST

139 W. Ridgeland, Ridgeland,

853-2669

TRACE RIDGE BAPTIST

238 Lake Harbour Dr.,

Ridgeland, 856-2529

BAPTIST (Cont.)

TWIN LAKES BAPTIST

673 Lake Cavalier Rd.,

Madison, 856-2305

VICTORY BAPTIST

420 Hoy Rd.,

Madison, 856-4260

WOODLAND HILLS

BAPTIST

3327 Old Canton Rd.,

981-1441

WOODMAN HILLS MB

468 Kearney Park Rd., Flora,

879-8347

GREATER MT. MORIAH

3672 Medgar Evers Blvd.

362-9088

BIBLE

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH

380 Highland Colony Pkwy.

991-1910

RIVERWOOD BIBLE

5228 Old Canton Rd.,

956-5694

CATHOLIC

ST. FRANCIS OF ASSISI

CATHOLIC

4000 W. Tidewater Ln.,

Madison, 856-5556

ST. PETER’S CATHOLIC

123 N. West St., 969-3125

ST. RICHARD CATHOLIC

1242 Lynnwood Dr.,

366-2335

CHRISTIAN

COMMUNITY CHRISTIAN

543 Eldorado Rd.,

Pearl, 936-9618

DISCIPLES OF CHRIST

FIRST CHRISTIAN

645 Briarwood, 977-9477

NORTHEAST

CHRISTIAN

3169 W. Tidewater Ln.,

Madison, 856-7399

UNITED CHRISTIAN

1730 Florence Ave., Ridgeland,

354-1177

CHRISTIAN SCIENCE

FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST

SCIENTIST

731 S. Pear Orchard Rd.,

Ste. 9, 952-0307

CHURCH OF CHRIST

MEADOWBROOK CHURCH

OF CHRIST

4261 I-55 N., 362-5374

SOUTH MADISON CHURCH

OF CHRIST

338 Lake Harbour Dr.,

Ridgeland, 856-2165

CHURCH OF GOD

CHRISTWAY

1501 Old Fannin Rd.

992-7474

COBBLESTONE CHURCH OF

GOD

444 Pebble Creek Dr.,

Madison, 853-6910

FIRST CHURCH OF GOD

829 Hwy. 51 N.,

Madison, 856-0652

EPISCOPAL

CHAPEL OF THE CROSS

EPISCOPAL

674 Mannsdale Rd., Madison,

856-2593

ST. ALEXIS

EPISCOPAL

650 E. South St.

stalexisjackson.org

ST. ANDREW’S

EPISCOPAL

305 E. Capitol St.,

354-1535

ST. COLUMB’S

EPISCOPAL

550 Sunnybrook Rd.,

Ridgeland, 853-0205

ST. JAMES EPISCOPAL

3921 Oakridge Dr.,

982-4880

ST. LUKE’S EPISCOPAL

CHURCH

N. College, Brandon,

825-5836

ST. PETER’S BY-THE-LAKE

EPISCOPAL

1954 Spillway Rd., Brandon,

992-2691

ST. PHILIP’S EPISCOPAL

5400 Old Canton Rd.,

956-5788

EPISCOPAL (Cont.)

ST. STEPHEN’S REFORMED

EPISCOPAL

5049 Lakeland Dr.,

992-4317

JEWISH

BETH ISRAEL

CONGREGATION

5315 Old Canton Rd.,

956-6215

LUTHERAN

ASCENSION LUTHERAN

Old Canton Rd./E. County Line

Rd., 956-4263

CHRIST LUTHERAN

4423 I-55 North

366-2055

GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN

Hwy. 25, 992-4752

NATIVITY LUTHERAN

495 Crossgates Blvd., Brandon,

825-5125

METHODIST

ALDERSGATE UNITED

METHODIST

655 Beasley Rd.

366-6630

ANDERSON UNITED

METHODIST

6205 Hanging Moss Rd.,

982-3997

BELLWETHER, Flowood

2625 Courthouse Cir.

BRIARWOOD UMC

320 Briarwood Dr.,

956-4035

BROADMEADOW UNITED

METHODIST

4419 Broadmeadow Dr.,

366-1403

CHRIST THE WAY

FREE METHODIST

978-3423

CROSSGATES UMC

23 Crossgates Dr., Brandon,

825-8677

CHRIST UNITED METHODIST

6000 Old Canton Rd.,

956-6974

EAST JACKSON UMC

855 S. Pear Orchard Rd.,

957-0515

EMMANUEL UNITED

METHODIST

100 Shands St., 372-9424

FIRST INDEPENDENT

METHODIST CHURCH OF

MADISON

1556 Hwy. 51N, 672-1240

FIRST UNITED METHODIST

Ridgeland, 856-6456

GALLOWAY MEMORIAL

UNITED METHODIST

305 N. Congress St.,

353-9691

MADISON UNITED

METHODIST

2050 Main St.,

Madison, 856-6058

PARKWAY HILLS

UNITED METHODIST

1468 Highland Col. Pky.,

Madison, 856-2733

RIVERSIDE INDEPENDENT

METHODIST

1127 Luckney Rd

Flowood, 919-8311

ST. LUKE’S UNITED

METHODIST

621 Duling Ave., 362-6381

ST. MARKS UNITED

METHODIST

400 Grants Ferry Rd., Brandon,

922-2131

ST. MATTHEW’S UNITED

METHODIST

7427 Old Canton Rd., Madison,

856-9581

WELLS CHURCH

UNITED METHODIST

2019 Bailey, 353-0658

WESLEY BIBLICAL

SEMINARY CHAPEL

787 E. Northside, 366-8880

NAZARENE

FIRST CHURCH OF THE

NAZARENE

5416 Lakeland Dr., Flowood,

992-8680

ORTHODOX

ST. PETER’S ORTHODOX

180 St. Augustine Dr., Madison,

856-3894

HOLY TRINITY, ST JOHN THE

THEOLOGIAN GREEK

ORTHODOX CHURCH

1417 West Capital St

Jackson, 601-355-6325

PENTECOSTAL

APOSTOLIC REVIVAL

CENTER-UPC

301 W. Washington St.,

Ridgeland, 856-2385

DAVIS TEMPLE CHURCH OF

GOD IN CHRIST

1700 Dalton St.,

969-9519

FIRST PENTECOSTAL

5000 I-55S, 373-9000

LANDMARK CHURCH

Springridge Rd., 372-7761

PARKWAY

1620 Mannsdale Rd., Madison,

853-2607

PRESBYTERIAN

BRIARWOOD

PRESBYTERIAN

620 Briarwood

956-4553

COVENANT

PRESBYTERIAN

4000 Ridgewood Rd

981-7236

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN

1390 N. State, 353-8316

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN

CHURCH OF MADISON

7717 Old Canton Rd.,

856-6625

FONDREN

PRESBYTERIAN

3220 Old Canton Rd.,

982-3232

GRACE CHAPEL

Hwy. 463, Madison,

856-7223

HIGHLANDS

PRESBYTERIAN

1160 H.C. Pkwy., Ridgeland,

853-0636

LAKELAND PRESBYTERIAN

5212 Lakeland Drive, Brandon,

992-2448

LAKESIDE

PRESBYTERIAN

2070 Spillway Rd., Brandon,

992-2835

NORTH PARK

PRESBYTERIAN

4624 Old Canton Rd.,

362-2886

PEAR ORCHARD

PRESBYTERIAN

750 Pear Orchard Rd.,

Ridgeland, 956-3283

TRINITY PRESBYTERIAN

5301 Old Canton Rd.,

977-0774

REDEEMER CHURCH

640 E. Northside Dr.,

362-9987

SEVENTH DAY

ADVENTIST

COLLEGE DRIVE

ADVENTIST CHRISTIAN

CHURCH

110 College Dr., Pearl

664-1408

NON-

DENOMINATIONAL

CALVARY CHAPEL

109 Jetport Dr., Pearl,

932-9673

CONGREGATION BEIT

LECHEM - MESSIANIC

110 Jones Ln. Ste F, Flowood

601-933-4913

CORNERSTONE CHURCH

2460 Terry Road,

371-3323

RIDGELAND FAMILY

CHURCH

Old Agency Rd., Ridgeland,

856-2101

CHURCH TRIUMPHANT

5075 I-55N, 898-2527

UNITARIAN

UNIVERSALIST

4872 N. State, 982-5919

UNITY OF JACKSON

4660 McWillie, 981-9412

VINEYARD CHURCH

600 Grants Ferry Rd.,

919-1414

4 locations to serve and 24 Hour Towing Service

Ridgeland 601-856-0700

Lakeland 601-939-9700

Richland 601-664-9770

South 601-372-0042

“Regardless”

601-825-2801 • TOLL FREE 1-800-489-FORD

HWY 80 & CROSSGATES BLVD. • BRANDON, MS 39042

115 Highland Village

Jackson, MS 39211

Store (601) 366-2557

info@buffalopeak.net

Toll Free 1-800-232-2503

www.buffalopeak.net

www.bellwetherchurch.org • Sunday, 10:30 at Jackson Academy

RAYFORD HUDSON

REAL ESTATE, LLC

231 Meadowoods Drive

Jackson, MS 39211

Email: rayfordrhudson@gmail.com

www.BankPlus.net

Member FDIC

Lake Harbour Commercial Parcels Available

RAYFORD R. HUDSON, III

Broker-Owner

(601) 956-1728 OFFICE

(601) 955-8161 CELL


thoughts from marita When does an apron

become cool?

By

MARITA

WALTON

IPUT AWAY some Christmas

things this morning and discovered

in the back of a drawer several

gingham aprons made by

my Aunt Mabel. These are old

fashioned June Cleaver pleated aprons

that tie at the waist with hand stitching in

little patterns on each. Those pink checks

peeked out from the drawer and reminded

me of a time not so long ago, when

women wore aprons in the kitchen and

cooked at home. In recent decades for

many, that has been merely a quaint

image....an anachronism in the modern

day of past-paced living and technologydriven

lifestyles. But I feel a bit of connection

to my forebears when I don a

good apron and get in the kitchen to

cook.

Just last night I listened on the way

home from work as the public radio program's

guests - hip young northeasterners

- touted the new value of 'reclaiming

domestic competencies.' They used this

phrase and others like it frequently,

describing what it meant to a (I suspect)

domestically illiterate audience. Growing

your own food - even in pots or window

boxes in the city, knowing how to cook

healthy meals at home, discovering how

to care well for one's self and others, living

responsibly to manage natural

resources and leave little waste in our

wake are discussed in 2011 as though

this is new discovery. They sounded a

clarion call to a generation to 'wake up'

and live well.

SUSTAINABLE AGRICULTURE

and responsible lifestyle choices figure

largely into the scheme of a new generation's

mantra they called domestic skills.

Seems like everything old is new again.

Pepper a conversation with organic,

reclaimed, and sustainable, and you're

golden.

Serving farm fresh local produce is

hailed on menus in swanky eateries.

Eating live grains (dating from Biblical

times) is celebrated for health's sake,

while buying highly-preserved, transfatimpregnated,

artificially flavored food

was last decade's triumph of convenience.

(Note: Try Ezekiel cereal mixed

with two parts Vanilla Almond Bare

Naked granola - 1/4 cup total - for Doc's

power breakfast for health, convenience

and protein staying power.)

Swelling lists of courses and blogs are

devoted to teaching a new generation

how to farm organically, sew clothing

for the family, eat fresh and local food,

and live in harmony with nature and one

another. Many are working to address

the fact Americans really do not make

anything anymore; we merely consume

at an astounding rate. And we know how

to do very little independently.

SO, TELL ME...why did they do

away with home economics?

I remember it well. Back in the day,

junior high and high school girls took

home economics and the boys took shop

Try 2011

(or agriculture preparedness and maintenance

courses) as electives. We made an

apron, sewed our kettle cloth shift, studied

cooking fundamentals and learned

budgeting. The guys built a bookcase

and picnic table and tackled welding

among the life skills. My friend, Betty,

said today that she took shop for a

semester, and one benefit was that it

demystified the unknown: "When you

know how to use a hammer or saw, you

are not intimidated by one."

Designed to equip them/us to face a

future as a farmer or homemaker, this

model remained entrenched until the

social and political discord of the ’60s

and ’70s caused tremors cracking fault

lines in curricula across even the rural

South. I was caught in the crack, so to

speak, with one foot in two worlds.

Graduating from high school in '73 as

the Betty Crocker Homemaker of

Tomorrow (yes, there was such a thing),

I spanned a changing landscape in that

decade to begin practicing law in 1979.

Most all of the women law students I

spent the next few years with eschewed

anything having to do with homemaking

or confining women to traditional roles.

We were trail blazers - fighters all - for

the greater good of womankind! Power

to the people, doncha know. I knew how

to fall right in step, keeping my association

with Betty Crocker well hidden.

Last month, by sharp contrast, I read

the law school newspaper where a talented

orator and award-winning competitor

and law student wrote her Baking for

Page 15A

Barristers column about chocolate chip

pumpkin muffins. I stopped in my

tracks, slack-jawed and mouth agape, as

my father in law says. That would never

have happened in the seventies. We were

too defensive for our own good in the

collective quest for more options for

women. But this is now, when over half

the nation's law and medical students are

women. So maybe they are not as hypersensitive

as their less numerous counterparts

were decades ago; they exercise

their options.

TIME AND LIFE have a way of

either mellowing us or hardening us. Our

response makes the difference. I want to

mellow gracefully.

Learn a new skill. Identify a domestic

deficiency and do something about it.

The internet is replete with advice for

domestic divas who are discovering this

concept for the first time, because they

never had it in school and alarmingly

few have had it modeled at home.

There is immense value - for both men

and women - in having the skills to manage

and maintain one's home and personal

finances, to create a place of

warmth and hospitality for family, and to

provide healthy eating patterns and relationships.

They are calling this new,

essential body of knowledge domestic

competencies, and they are saying we

had better learn some soon, or no one

will remember how it is done.

Where is Betty Crocker when we need

her?


Page 16A Thursday, January 20, 2011

OUTDOORS IN THE SUN

b y J e f f N o r t h

FROM LATE AUGUST, when we began the

third season of “Outdoors in the Sun,” until

now, it’s so hard to believe that five months

have passed. Only last week, it seems, we were

scouring the closets for dove vests and number nines.

Here it is late January and we’re about done.

I have repeated over and over not to let it pass you by

and hopefully you haven’t. But as the season comes to

an end so does this year’s season for bringing you

weekly outdoor articles. It’s once again time to hit the

road controlling bugs, weeds, and whatever else annoys

us each year.

Though this one is about in the books, I assure you

our next season will be here quicker than you think and

we’ll all be talking about how the year flew by.

As I sit in my den this dreary January night, I can’t

help but relive some of the fond moments of this sea-

Writer reflects

on highlights of season

son. I will always remember the special Thanksgiving

buck of this year. Also, JH’s best buck of his hunting

career is something we’ll talk about for decades.

The morning JH and I returned with a limit of ducks

and were greeted in the driveway by Mel and our two

yorkies, Chloe and Lacey, was really special. Those

eggs and biscuits she had waiting for us made the morning

complete.

Wes Patrick’s first bow kill is a hard one to top too.

The two otters chasing each other by my deer stand

brought entertainment that you won’t find in many

places in today’s world. On those hot, humid summer

days, I’ll think back on the many redbirds that visited

our bird feeder on those frigid winter mornings.

Hopefully this will put just a bit of a chill in the air during

those dog days of summer. I know I’ll be listening

for the sounds of the first Katydid as they begin their

courtship this summer too.

THOUGH YOUR DAYS in the field for this season

may be over, what you store in your brain and photo

albums will remain forever. We may not have anything

to hang on our wall, but the fun and fellowship we had

will be remembered for years.

Stories of how the cornbread stuck in the skillet and

supper had to wait until another pone was made before

we could eat. It didn’t matter the fried pork chops were

getting cold, we absolutely couldn’t sit down until the

cornbread was perfect. All of those Christmas leftovers

filled the camp refrigerator to the point of the shelves

collapsing. If you were hungry it was your own fault.

I have to recruit another coffee drinker at our camp.

I’m the only one not drinking a pop before and after the

hunt. How can a deer camp kitchen survive without coffee

drinkers?

When I’m in the trenches of summer, I’ll hopefully

smile just a bit as I think back on those four wheelers,

golf carts, and trucks stuck in the delta gumbo. It will

probably be a lot more amusing to think of it this summer

than when it actually happened on those soggy winter

days in the swamps.

Plans of the upcoming dove season and the preparations

for the Drew Dove Deal should help us get

through the summer too. Every day we make it puts us

one step closer to freedom in the fall.

WITH THE temperatures still freezing here, I’m

already looking forward to that first cold snap in late

August or early September. Though many of us are tired

of this cold weather, I assure you everyone will welcome

the time when we don a sweater early next fall. I

guess blistering summer days make us appreciate those

cold fronts all the more.

Yes, that famous quote from Tucker in late August,

“I’m ready to smell some gunpowder, some perfume,

and some good Kentucky bourbon,” will get us all in

the mood for yet another hunting season.

Thank you for reading our articles and I hope I was

able to bring to your firesides, outdoor lore and tales in

a very entertaining fashion. I encourage you to reflect

on your most enjoyable days afield throughout the year.

I really think it will bring a smile to you as you await

the next hunting season to begin. I sure hope it does.

Until next time enjoy our woods and waters and

remember, let’s leave it better than we found it.


social news section B

Thursday, January 20, 2011

Becky Wooley, C.C. Henley, Tricia Walker, Amy MacNeill, Grace Henley, Rebecca Black, Melissa Murphree,

Jane Jones, Jean Bush, Sandee McPherson, Mamie Douglas, Marsha Hobbs, Tonya Favreau; (front) Mary

Shirley, Katie Houston, Sally North, Mona Evans, Whitney Evans, Linda Maxwell, Ellen Walker, Cindy Reed

Engagement celebration

Whitney Evans, Graves Maxwell honored in North home

An announcement party celebrating

the engagement of Whitney

Evans and Graves Maxwell was

held recently in the home of Sally

and Darden North.

Co-hosts and hostesses included

Rebecca and Marion Black, Susie

and Bill Brabec, Flo and Frank

Bryan, Leigh Buckner, Jean and

Glen Bush, Pat Crain, Vicki and Hal

Darden and Sally North

Daughdrill, Mamie and Steve

Douglas, Tonya and Larry Favreau,

Peggy and Larry Goldstein, Terre

and Hardy Harris, Grace and Will

Henley, C.C. Henley, Mark Earles;

Also, Marsha Hobbs, Pamela and

Larry Houchins, Katy and Jamie

Houston, Jane and Ken Jones, Julie

Levanway, Amy and John

MacNeill, Sandee and Scott

Haley Westbrook,

Ann Fly Howard

McPherson, Melissa and Robert

Murphree, Cindy and Bill Reed,

Mary Pryor and Joe Sherman, Mary

and George Shirley, Ellen Walker,

Tricia and Carson Walker, Becky

and John Wooley.

Shown are scenes from the

evening,

Sandy Temple, Claire Aiken,

Taylor Morse Davis

Bill and Linda Maxwell, Bob and Sandra Hayne, Meagan and Robert Maxwell, Beth Maxwell,

Isabel and Mark Maxwell, Austin Maxwell

Angela Herzog, Anna McVey Usry, Mona Evans, Jim Herzog,

Sarah Henley Ulmer and Joe Ulmer, Alison Hogan Ross;

(front) Morgan Bush

Johnny, Mona and Whitney Evans, Graves,

Linda and Bill Maxwell

Frank and Flo Bryan, Mary and George Shirley, Ken Jones


Page 2B Thursday, January 20, 2011

Weddings & Engagements

Miss Tinnin,

Grogan to marry

MR. AND MRS.

Charles Alexander

Tinnin announce the

engagement of his

daughter, Jill Allison

Tinnin, to Kenneth

Forbes Grogan IV,

son of Mr. and Mrs.

Kenneth Forbes

Grogan III of

Vicksburg.

The bride-elect is

the daughter of the

late Janet Alexander

Tinnin. She is the

granddaughter of

the late Mr. and

Mrs. Samuel

Eldridge Alexander

Sr. of Ridgeland,

Elizabeth Rea

Tinnin of Madison

and the late Charles

Alexander Tinnin Sr.

Jill Tinnin

The prospective

bridegroom is the grandson of the late Mr. and Mrs. Dewey

Dunagin Blackledge Sr. of Laurel, and the late Mr. and Mrs.

Kenneth Forbes Grogan Jr. of Vicksburg.

Miss Tinnin is a graduate of Jackson Academy. She

received a bachelor’s degree in banking and finance from

Mississippi State University, where she was active in Chi

Omega sorority and the student association. She is a member

of the Junior League of Jackson and the Metro Jackson Chi

Omega Alumnae Association board. Miss Tinnin is associated

with BankPlus in Ridgeland.

GROGAN IS A graduate of St. Aloysius High School. He

received a bachelor’s degree in managerial finance from the

University of Mississippi, where he served as president of

Sigma Alpha Epsilon fraternity. He received a diploma from

the Graduate School of Banking at Louisiana State

University. He is a member of First Baptist Church of

Vicksburg, Vicksburg Warren County Chamber of

Commerce board, past president of Vicksburg Kiwanis Club,

and president of the Y’s Men Club. Grogan is a senior vice

president and senior lender at BancorpSouth in Vicksburg.

The couple will exchange vows February 19 at First

Presbyterian Church in Jackson, with a reception to follow at

The South.

Miss Ainsworth,

Taggart engaged

Mr. and Mrs. Jim

Ainsworth of

Houston, Texas,

announce the

engagement of their

daughter, Kata

Rose Ainsworth, to

Lee Andrew

Taggart, son of Mr.

and Mrs. Andy

Taggart of

Madison.

Miss Ainsworth is

the granddaughter

of Pat Ainsworth

and the late Robert

Ainsworth of

Malvern, Ark., and

the late Henry and

Mary Patricia

Frantzen of

Baldwin, N.Y. She

is a graduate of the

University of Texas Lee Taggart, Kata Ainsworth

in Austin, and teaches

preschool at St. Luke’s Methodist Day School in

Houston.

The prospective bridegroom is the grandson of Jan

Grantham and the late R.A. Taggart of Moss Point, and

Madeleine Bronson and the late L.H. Bronson Jr. of

Jacksonville. He is a graduate of Madison Central High

School and the University of Mississippi. He is associated

with Ozone Ministries in Dallas, and plans to enroll in law

school in the fall of 2011.

The couple will wed February 19 at The Parador in

Houston.

happenings

Choral rehearsals

The Jackson Choral

Society will begin rehearsals

for their spring concert

January 25, 7 - 9 p.m., at

Trinity Presbyterian Church.

New singers welcome. For

more information call 601-

927-9604.

Family fun

The Mississippi Museum

of Natural Science will host

Family Fun Science Night

January 20, 6-8 p.m., $2 per

person.

sunbeams

Grayson William Smith

Drew Smith and Heather Teshima of Canton

announce the birth of their son, Grayson William

Smith, November 29 at Baptist Medical Center.

Grandparents are Richard and Pam Teshima and Lester

and Sandy Smith.

Thomas Cash Clardy

Harold and Jennifer Clardy of Brandon announce the

birth of their son, Thomas Cash Clardy, December 17

at Baptist Medical Center. Grandparents are Danny and

Cindy Goza, and Harold Clardy and Anita Mcbride, all

of Greenwood.


social news

Weddings & Engagements

Miss Harris, Koury

to wed on January 22

Mr. and Mrs. Steven Owen

Harris of Crystal Springs

announce the engagement of

their daughter, Bethany Alison

Harris, to Matthew Blair

Koury, son of Dr. and Mrs.

Albert Michael Koury.

The bride-elect is the granddaughter

of Mrs. Mary Lou

‘Tommie’ Barnhart and the

late Harry Clifford Barnhart

and Carroll Little Harris and

the late Louise Fortenberry

Harris.

The prospective bridegroom

is the grandson of the late Mr.

and Mrs. William Timothy

Carr Jr. of McComb, and the

late Mr. and Mrs. Michael

Albert Koury of Leland.

Miss Harris was graduated

from Copiah Academy in

2002 and received her bachelor’s

degree in kinesiology

from Mississippi College in

2006. She received her doctorate

in physical therapy from

the University of Mississippi Matthew Blair Koury, Bethany Alison Harris

Medical Center in 2009. She is

a physical therapist at St. Dominic Hospital outpatient clinic.

Koury was graduated from Jackson Preparatory School in 2004 and received his bachelor’s

degree from the University of Mississippi in 2008. He is an underwriter for FCCI

Insurance Group.

The couple will be married January 22 at 2:30 p.m. at First Baptist Church of Crystal

Springs with a reception to follow at River Hills Club.

The Northside Sun’s wedding and engagement policy

--All write-ups need to be submitted at least a week prior to publication date; Color photo (vertical

please) should be submitted at the time the write up is.

--Priority is given to write-ups that appear in the Northside Sun first. If announced first in the Sun,

the picture and as much of the story will be used as soon as possible;

--No forms are used. Please type, double space, the article in story form;

--Coverage is restricted to residents in the Sun’s prime circulation area - North Jackson, South

Madison County, the Reservoir - and former Northsiders;

--The Sun accepts no responsibility for unsolicited stories, artwork or photographs. All photos

published are filed according to the week they appear. If a stamped, self-addressed envelope is

enclosed, every effort will be made to return such photos, but this cannot be guaranteed;

--Please include a daytime phone number on all releases;

For more information, call 957-1122

For advertising information call 601-977-0470

Page 3B


Page 4B Thursday, January 20, 2011

Solution for this week’s puzzle next week.

This solution for January 13 puzzle

To advertise in the Northside Sun

call 601-957-1123


social news

Gardening Glimpses

Visiting public gardens helps keep them in operation

IF YOU LOVE PLANTS, individually, or

garden landscapes, you surely look beyond

your own garden, or gardens of friends, for

inspiration and education and pleasure.

When you do, you appreciate the existence

everywhere, nearby or in accessible locations

where you might travel, public gardens

which can expand your gardening

horizons.

My thoughts on public gardens were

focused recently by a magazine issue and

by a new book.

Horticulture magazine is one of the best

that remains on my subscription list, and the

February issue is one of the most inspiring

issues in recent years. With a new young

editor, Horticulture is changing, adding to,

re-focusing. This issue celebrates public

gardens. I have read and re-read it, and it

sent me also to a more detailed search

through a gift book, “1001 Gardens You

Must See Before You Die.”

How is “public garden” defined? Very

simply, to begin with, as contrasted with

“private gardens,” owned by individuals

and only accessible if “you know somebody,”

or happen on the right tour at the

right time. Our United Kingdom friends,

with centuries of devotion to gardens, blur

the distinction on a regular basis. Through

various programs and supporting myriad

charities, most of the great private gardens

are open once or twice a year, and draw

record crowds.

A public garden can be quite organized

and developed, by some educational entity

or an area government. There can be an

admission fee (and there should be, because

public gardens cost mega-bucks for mainte-

nance and development). There can be

research projects. Or, public spaces can be

public gardens, even though you walk

freely through the pathways. But always,

you the public, within various time restrictions,

are welcome to come and learn, to

enjoy, to return to often, just to be one with

a great garden you could not achieve on

your own, in many lifetimes.

BOTH IN THE UK and in this country,

there’s another set of garden destinations

which should never be overlooked: garden

nurseries. Even if you only learn what new

and tried-and-true plants are available this

season, a leisurely stroll through area nurseries

is an education and a pleasure. (And if

you find displays of plant combinations or

mini-landscapes particularly helpful, be sure

to tell someone in charge, because achieving

this took a lot of work.) I’d never realized

what nurseries could be until Mary

Price and I were in England, and, forbidden

by customs and by shipping costs to buy

anything, we were totally focused on looking

- and on getting acquainted with other

people out for a weekend afternoon.

In the “1001 Gardens” book, I found

many places I’ve enjoyed over the last four

decades, but there were none there from

Mississippi; and the New Orleans Botanical

Garden, which surely should have qualified,

is also noted by its absence. The book was

copyrighted in 2007, so I am assuming that

the damage from Katrina, and the uncertainty

about the NOBG’s immediate future,

contributed to this choice.

This book is divided by continents, and

then by countries. Every garden, large or

IN THE CHANCERY COURT OF THE FIRST` JUDICIAL DISTRICT

OF HINDS COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI

IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF

RONNIE T. WILLIAMS, DECEASED

DORIS WILLIAMS, PETITIONER

No. P2010-603

NOTICE TO CREDITORS

I, the undersigned, DORIS WILLIAMS, hereby gives notice that on the 4th day of January,

2011, I was appointed Administratrix of the estate of RONNIE T. WILLIAMS, deceased, in the

Chancery Court of the First Judicial District of Hinds County, Mississippi, in the above entitled

and numbered cause. I therefore give notice to all persons having claims against the estate of

RONNIE T. WILLIAMS, deceased, to file, probate and register their claims in said cause in

said Court, as required by law, within ninety (90) days from the date of the first publication of

this notice or they will be forever barred.

THIS the 5th day of January, 2011.

/s/ DORIS WILLIAMS

W.E. GORE, JR.

P. O. Box 186

Jackson, MS 39205

601/355-8775

MSB# 4918

(January 13, 20, 27, 2011)

Cozy. Casual.

Comfortable.

N O S T A L G I C S E T T I N G IN

D O W N T O W N J A C K S O N .

SAMPLE OUR FRESH SEAFOOD:

Red Snapper, Red Fish, Jumbo

Fried Shrimp, Rainbow Trout,

Speckled Trout, Fried or Broiled

Catfish, Flounder, Fried Oysters

Try OOur BBlue PPlate SSpecials

Served Fresh & Hot Daily

141 East Capitol • 601-352-5606

small, fills exactly one page, sometimes

with pictures, sometimes none. The authors

and editors wisely make no attempt within

the text pages to give specific locations,

prices, hours of admission - all those items

which can and do change seasonally, and

which are available easily on the Internet.

There is, however, an appendix of 14 pages

called, quite rightly, “Useful Addresses,”

which locates each garden described,

including mailing addresses, phone numbers,

and many times, Web sites or e-mail

addresses.

ONCE YOU KNOW where you might

like to go, you can find out how and when

to get there.

The February Horticulture has a few specialized

articles, all of which I greatly

appreciated.

The first focuses on the work of introducing

new plant finds, both those brought

back to the United States by 21st century

plant hunters, and those developed by present-day

hybridizers. From the Missouri

Botanical Garden, second only to Kew in

London for its range of sponsored explorations,

to the J.C. Raulston Garden in

Raleigh, N.C., which specializes in developing

and propagating and sharing regional

success stories freely, both in education and

in plant samples, with other gardens, gardeners,

and nurseries. There’s a story of a

garden I’d never known about: Quarryhill,

in Glen Ellen, Calif., which specializes only

in plants which are natives of China. Then,

the essence of “public” in gardens: those

surrounding and a part of the Smithsonian

complex in Washington, D.C., (my special

Page 5B

By Mrs. Herman McKenzie

favorite here is the garden gem, the Mary

Ripley Garden, just adjoining the “Castle”).

And the final public-garden story is about

one which should certainly qualify as “most

unique” - a new public garden, featuring

native plants gone wild, (in a slightly tamed

fashion) on an old elevated railway in

Chicago. If I get back to Chicago, the High

Line will be way up on my destination list.

WHAT SHOULD WE DO about public

gardens? We should go there, whenever we

can, and gladly pay the fee charge. The

New Orleans Botanical Garden asked most

of all that we come back, as visitors, not just

with our admission price but with our concerned

interest. If we have time and some

skill, volunteer. All levels of strength and

expertise are welcome. I have had friends in

Richmond who grieved to give up their

own gardens when they moved to the

Westminster-Canterbury retirement complex,

but got up several days a week and

traveled by public transportation to the

Lewis Ginter Botanical Gardens to do any

kind of volunteer work needed, week after

week, year after year.

Most of all, we should appreciate the existence

of public gardens in any form - just be

glad they are there for us.

Give a gift subscription to the Northside Sun

for just $20 per year locally


Page 6B Thursday, January 20, 2011

Little house

Jackson Academy third-graders dress in

American frontier style to present the annual

“Little House in the Big Woods”program

based on the book by Laura Ingalls Wilder.

Students present poems, readings, square

dances and skits they have learned while

Rock slingers

Fourth-grade students at First Presbyterian

Day School recently presented “The Rock

Slinger and His Greatest Hit.”Shown are

(from left, back) Sybil Roberson, Phoebe

Diamond Sponsor

Mississippi Press Association

Education Foundation

Proudly supporting

journalism education

in Mississippi.

Celebrity Roast

January 20, 2011

Honoring

Dr. Mark Keenum

President, Mississippi

State University

Member FDIC – www.cadencebanking.com - 1-800-636-7622

studying the book. Shown are (from left,

back) Don Waller, Harris McLemore, John

David Hendrick; (front) Holden Hankins,

Elizabeth Magee, Ashlie Henderson and

Sarah Harrison.

Waters; (front) Taylor Moore, Grayson Fulton,

Abby Newton, Meriwether Marchetti, Holly

Kullman, Preiss Terry.

Presented by the

Eighth-graders team

Members of the Jackson Prep 2010-2011

eighth-grade girls white basketball team

include (from left, back) Kennady Galloway,

happenings

Trail opening

A ribbon-cutting ceremony

for a new section of the

Natchez Trace Parkway

Multiuse Trail will be held

CARSON KERN, son of

Kristen and Todd Kern,

enjoys play time at the

Privette School.

The American Bridal Show gives

future brides the opportunity to

meet face-to-face with local and

regional businesses ready to make

their wedding dreams come true.

January January 23, 23, 2011

2011

1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Lake Terrace

Convention Convention Center

Center

Vendors include:

• Bridal Shops

• Bakeries

• Caterers

• Florists

• Photographers

• Videographers

• Tuxedo Rental

• Party Rentals

• Spas

• Wedding

Coordinators

• Ceremony &

Reception Locations

and many others.

Tickets are $7 and will be sold

at the door. Vendor opportunities are

still available. Visit www.hubbrides.com

for more details and vendor applications.

SP295

January 21, 11 a.m., at the

Ross Barnett Overlook. Call

662-680-4027 for more

information.

school news

Caroline Hannon, Ashley Johnston; (front)

Katie Carter, Dotsie Stevens, Madison Weeks

and Ainsley Smith.

RED HILLS MINE

will be accepting applications from 8am-4pm on

Tuesday, Jan. 25th & Wednesday, Jan. 26th

for

REGULAR FULL-TIME

DIESEL MECHANIC

Diesel Mechanics are responsible for performing maintenance,

troubleshooting, and diagnosing problems on heavy equipment.

Successful candidates will have a background in repair and

maintenance of heavy equipment, knowledge of mechanical diesel

engines, transmissions, drive trains, pneumatic, hydraulic, electrical

and air-conditioning on diesel and mechanical systems. Vocational

training is preferred and a minimum of a high school diploma or GED.

Only Individuals Who Meet The Above Qualifications Will Be Considered!

Applications will be accepted at:

North American Coal, Red Hills Mine

1000 McIntire Road

Ackerman, MS 39735

**All applicants should bring a list of at least 3 work-related references

with phone numbers and addresses.

“RED HILLS MINE IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER”


school news

Ballet Mississippi

Fourteen Jackson Academy students performed in Ballet

Mississippi’s production of “The Nutcracker” held in

December at Thalia Mara Hall. Shown are (from left) Isabel

Temple, Maggie Allen, Frances Anne Fortner, Rebecca

Top legislators

Upperclassmen at the Veritas School participated in the

2010 Senior Youth Legislature. Students from public and

private schools across the state participated in a mock legislative

session. Veritas students who received tops awards

were (from left) Airriel O’Banner, Most Outstanding Chair

Person; Cameron Clarke, Outstanding Representative and

Most Outstanding Representative; and Rose Turner,

Outstanding Senator and Outstanding Statesman.

Saints senior

St. Andrew’s Episcopal School’s varsity football team,

cheerleaders and band celebrated Senior Night during the

last game of the regular season. Cheerleader Mary Chris

Galicki (center) is shown with her parents Stan and

Melanie.

Nosef, Avenell Newman, Mary Paxton Gibson, Dalton

Gibson, Suzie Raines, Carlisle Yoste, Bryn Noble, Hope Berry,

Lindsey Nosef, Liv Noble. Not pictured: Rebecca Costas.

Crowned queen

St. Joseph Catholic School recently crowned its

Homecoming Queen, senior Alyssa Nuzzo (right). She is

shown with her father, Al Nuzzo. She is the daughter of Al

and Lesa Nuzzo.

Migration festival

The National Migration

Festival will be held January

21, noon to 5 p.m., at the Ag

Museum, featuring food

from around the world and

cultural performances. Free

Page 7B

Angel help

Jackson Prep junior high students took angels for the

Mustard Seed, Prep’s community partner of the year. The

angels represented needs of the organization as a whole,

rather than presents for individual Seedsters. Shown (from

left) are two student council members after the last angel

was taken off the tree, Caroline Jones and Betsy Byrd.

Team wins

St. Andrew’s Episcopal School’s varsity football team celebrated

Senior Night during the last game of the regular

season. Shown is Charlie Scott (center), who had six touchdowns

and more than 400 rushing yards in the game,

with his parents Chris and Stephanie.

happenings

admission. For more information

call 601-948-2635.

Diabetes seminar

The Diabetes Foundation

of Mississippi will host a

conference, New Horizons in

Diabetes Care, January 22, 8

a.m. to 3 p.m., at the Jackson

Marriott.


Page 8B Thursday, January 20, 2011

Raider night

Secondary students at Jackson Academy

host an extracurricular exhibition area at the

annual Raider Night to introduce students

to the opportunities available to students.

All for others

Students from Jackson Preparatory School

recently attended a cooking class at Viking.

The class was offered in partnership with

Jackson Prep and Viking to train students

how to prepare a meal suitable to take to a

family in need. The Jackson Prep Senior

Web production

St. Andrew’s Episcopal School’s thirdgraders

recently staged a production of

“Charlotte’s Web.”Actors include (from left,

back) geese Eliza Black, Simone

Weatherspoon, Katelyn Tanaka, Ann Ross

special days

Staffing the Film Club table are (from left,

back) Madalyn Temple, Maci McElroy, Bryant

Hutchins, Tyler Alford; (front) Mary Alex Nail

and Mary Stewart Thompson.

High Service Club utilizes these skills for

culinary endeavors where volunteer service

is desired. Shown in the class are (from left)

Karin Ann Buckels, Meagan Robinson, Bailey

Smith, Parker Stevens.

Berry, Grace McIntire, Molly Spencer; (middle

row) goslings Mirren Viola, Aubrie

Tolbert, Lauren Brown, Ivy Renfroe; (front)

Sauny Sewell, Kaylan Hall, Olivia Smith, and

Gianna Esposito.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY

January 20: W.H. Pittman Sr., Tony Klingler, Courtney Milan, A.D. Buffington,

Emily Thomas, John Cosier, James Alvin (Steve) Stephens, Jeff Wilson. January 21:

Carolyn Mozingo, J.C. Patterson, Virginia Ezelle, Julie Perry, Steen Dennis, Maxwell

Huff. January 22: Pat Cappaert, Bo Tucker, W.J. Evans, Marydell Fleming, Hilda

McAdory, Jackie Johnson, Robert Lazarus, Linda Shelton, Frances Jones, Beth

Garriga. January 23: Danny Collier, Tucker McGeoy, Leigh McGehee, Monroe S.

Woodward, Bettie Lane Clark. January 24: Mack Cox, Becky Carr, Ferris Sullivan,

Joseph Sullivan, Mandi Davis Easterling, Jennifer Forman, Lisa Lloyd. January 25:

Chip Lind, Leanne Earwood, Mrs. Reed B. Hogan, Nick Mayfield, Jenny Sullivan,

Grayson Paynter, Max McDaniel, Elizabeth Calhoon, Rebecca Ansah. January 26:

Nancie Dawn Johnson, Jill Ratcliffe, Emily Phillips Salmon, Jack Carrington, Lynda

Fant, Dick Whitehead, Ben West, Cliff Williams, Jean Moak, Sally Thompson.

Cross country awards

Receiving awards for their performance on

the 2010 varsity boys cross country team at

Jackson Academy are (from left) Bracken

Limo ride

Ann Smith Elementary participated in

“Reading Rally,”their fall magazine fund-raiser

through QSP Inc. Students who sold 12

or more magazine subscriptions were

rewarded by getting to ride in a limousine,

followed by a pizza picnic lunch at Freedom

Ridge Park. Shown are winners (from left,

Ray - most improved, James Peeples - captain,

Sykes Moak - most dedicated, Curt

Knight - most valuable runner.

back) Xzeria Denson, Serenity Williams, Sarai

Banks, Destiny Le’Sure, Payton Dill, Braden

Bailey, Taylor Wells, Brandon Kirchoff, Daniel

Lynn, Bryce Chance; (front) Madisyn Scott,

Aerianna King, Maggie Sims, Landon

McGee, Bella Rose Kopf and Jesslynn

Hughes.

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