Six Monthly Technical Progress Report July 2011December ... - WWF

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Six Monthly Technical Progress Report July 2011December ... - WWF







SixMonthlyTechnicalProgressReport

July
2011­December
2011


for the BMU / ICI project

Avoidance of deforestation and forest degradation in the border area of

Southern Laos and central Vietnam for the long-term preservation of carbon

sinks and biodiversity (“CarBi Project”)

BMU signature 11_III_017_ASIEN_K_Eindämmung Leakage

Fanie Bekker, CarBi Project Director

January 2012


 1





 2



CarBi
SixMonthlyTechnicalProgressReport

July
2011­December
2011



Name
of
beneficiary
of
grant


contract:


World
Wide
Fund
for
Nature
(WWF)


Name
and
title
of
the
Contact


person:


Fanie
Bekker,
Trans
Boundary
Project
Director


Name
of
partners
in
the


action:


Provincial
Governments
of
Thua
Thien
Hue,
Quang
Nam


(both
Vietnam),
Xekong,
Saravanh
(both
Laos),


administrations
of
the
four
Protected
Areas
as
well
as
the


Department
of
Forestry
and
the
Department
of
Forest


Inspection
in
Laos.


Village
Focus
International
(VFI)



Title
of
the
Action:



CarBi
project
(Avoidance
of
deforestation
and
forest


degradation
in
the
border
area
of
southern
Laos
and


central
Vietnam
for
the
long‐term
preservation
of
carbon


sinks
and
biodiversity)



Contract
Number:



546030/12003



Start
date
and
end
date
of
the


reporting
period:


July
2011
to
December
2011


Target
countries:
 Southern
Laos,
Central
Vietnam



Final
beneficiaries:


Local
population
in
100
villages
in
the
surrounding
of
the


protected
areas
and
forest
corridors
–
approx.
5,000
to


7,000
people.



Forest
administrations
in
Laos
and
Vietnam
on
all
levels


(national,
provincial,
district,
community),
including


forest
police,
environmental
police,
border
police,
as
well


as
state
owned
forestry
enterprises
–
approx.
400
people.








Table
of
Contents


1. Introduction 5

2. Formalisation of statutory approvals 5

3. Staff matters 5

4. Communications 6

5. Technical Progress 7

Specific
Result
1:




7























































Intermediate
result
1.1 ............................................................................................................................................ 8


Intermediate
result
1.2 ............................................................................................................................................ 9


Intermediate
result
1.3 ..........................................................................................................................................11


Intermediate
result
1.4 ..........................................................................................................................................12


Intermediate
result
1.5 ..........................................................................................................................................12


Intermediate
result
1.6 ..........................................................................................................................................12


Intermediate
result
1.7 ..........................................................................................................................................13


Specific
result
2........................................................................................................................................................13


Summary......................................................................................................................................................................13


Intermediate
result
2.1 ..........................................................................................................................................14


Intermediate
result
2.2 ..........................................................................................................................................14


Intermediate
result
2.3 ..........................................................................................................................................15


Intermediate
result
2.4 ..........................................................................................................................................15


Intermediate
result
2.5 ..........................................................................................................................................15


Intermediate
result
2.6 ..........................................................................................................................................15


Intermediate
result
2.7 ..........................................................................................................................................16


Intermediate
result
2.8 ..........................................................................................................................................16


Intermediate
result
2.9 ..........................................................................................................................................16


Intermediate
result
2.10 .......................................................................................................................................17


Intermediate
result
2.11 .......................................................................................................................................17


Intermediate
result
2.12 .......................................................................................................................................17


Intermediate
result
2.13 .......................................................................................................................................18


Intermediate
result
2.14 .......................................................................................................................................18


Intermediate
result
2.15 .......................................................................................................................................19


Intermediate
result
2.16 .......................................................................................................................................19


Intermediate
result
2.17 .......................................................................................................................................19


Specific
result
3........................................................................................................................................................20


Summary......................................................................................................................................................................20


Intermediate
result
3.1 ..........................................................................................................................................20


Intermediate
result
3.2 ..........................................................................................................................................21


Intermediate
result
3.3 ..........................................................................................................................................22


Intermediate
result
3.4 ..........................................................................................................................................22



 3



Intermediate
result
3.5 ..........................................................................................................................................22


Intermediate
result
3.6 ..........................................................................................................................................22


Intermediate
result
3.7 ..........................................................................................................................................23


Specific
result
4........................................................................................................................................................23


Summary......................................................................................................................................................................23


Intermediate
result
4.1 ..........................................................................................................................................23


Intermediate
result
4.2 ..........................................................................................................................................25


Intermediate
result
4.3 ..........................................................................................................................................26


Intermediate
result
4.4 ..........................................................................................................................................26


Intermediate
result
4.5 ..........................................................................................................................................26


Intermediate
result
4.6 ..........................................................................................................................................26


Specific
result
5........................................................................................................................................................27


Summary......................................................................................................................................................................27


Intermediate
result
5.1 ..........................................................................................................................................27


Intermediate
result
5.2 ..........................................................................................................................................28


Intermediate
result
5.3 ..........................................................................................................................................29


Intermediate
result
5.4 ..........................................................................................................................................29


Intermediate
result
5.5 ..........................................................................................................................................29


Intermediate
result
5.6 ..........................................................................................................................................30


Intermediate
result
5.7 ..........................................................................................................................................30


6.
Vote
of
thanks




30







































7.
Annexes










30




 4




1.
INTRODUCTION



The
primary
objective
of
this
CarBi
TechnicalProgressReport
for
July‐December


2011,
is
to
provide
a
detailed
overview
of
actual
progress
made
towards
the


Indicators,
Specific
Results
and
Intermediate
results,
measured
against
the
planned


progress.
Challenges,
solutions
and
adaptive
management
options
based
on


potential
risks,
are
also
discussed.
Each
Specific
Result
is
also
complemented
by
a


summary
of
progress
made,
and
challenges
experienced
during
the
reporting


period.



The
formalization
of
the
statutory
approval
process
concluded
with
the
respective


governments
of
Laos
and
Vietnam,
recent
developments
in
CarBi
human
resource


related
matters,
as
well
as
a
brief
overview
of
progress
on
the
communications


front,
are
also
presented.
A
CarBi

Traffic
Light
report,
highlighting
progress
with


activity
implementation,
is
also
attached
for
illustrative
purposes
(this
version
is


still
a
draft
and
under
discussion
with
the
component
Leaders).
This
more
cryptic


version
endeavors
to
provide
a
quantitative
overview
of
implementation
progress


to
the
CarBi
team,
and
is
updated
quarterly.





2.
Formalization
of
Statutory
Approvals



The
signing
of
the
Vietnam
(one
for
Hue
and
Quang
Nam
Provinces
each)
and
Laos


(one
integrating
Saravanh
and
Xe
Kong
Provinces)
MOU’s
in
July
and
August
2011


formalized
the
agreements
with
the
relevant
governments
and
provided
the
final


approval
to
formally
activate
the
operationalization
of
CarBi.
The
formalization
of


the
two
Project
Management
Units
in
Vietnam
(Hue
and
Quang
Nam)
as
well
as
the


Implementation
Management
Committee
in
Laos,
as
specified
in
the
respective


MOU’s,
was
also
concluded
concomitantly.
We
also
concluded
and
signed
the
Service


Level
Agreement
with
Village
Focus
International
(VFI)
in
August
2011
which


provides
the
framework
for
the
important
community
based
natural
resource


management
interventions
in
Laos,
as
well
as
the
appointment
of
dedicated
staff
to


manage
this
process.



3.
Staff
matters



We
successfully
recruited
quality
and
experienced
staff
in
the
positions
of
Technical

Advisor:
Protected
Area
Management,
Technical
Advisor:
Law
Enforcement,
Wildlife


Biologist,
as
well
as
20
Forest
Guards
for
Quang
Nam
during
this
reporting
period.


Experienced
Administrative
and
Finance
Officers
have
also
been
appointed
to
attend


to
the
CarBi
related
administrative/financial
management
of
the
Laos
component,
in


partnership
 with
 the
 relevant
 Laos
 country
 staff.
 We
 were
 unsuccessful,
 after


several
months
of
active
recruitment,
to
conclude
the
appointments
of
a
PA
Manager


for
 Xe
 Sap
 NPA,
 as
 well
 as
 a
 Landscaper
 Manager
 for
 Southern
 Laos.
 Both
 these


vacancies
 have
 a
 significant
 impact
 on
 our
 ability
 to
 maintain
 the
 momentum



 5



equired
 to
 realise
 our
 specific
 targets
 on
 the
 Laos
 side.
 This
 necessitated
 the


deployment
of
some
of
the
PA:TA
and
Project
Director’s
capacity
in
Laos,
the
latter


at
a
more
strategic
level,
to
ensure
that
some
momentum
are
built
and
maintained.


Active
head
hunting
has
now
resulted
in
offers
to
highly
experienced
and
competent


individuals
for
both
these
positions
and
we
are
confident
that
appointments
will
be


made
 by
 the
 end
 of
 January
 2012.
 This
 additional
 capacity
 bodes
 well
 for
 the


intensification
 of
 our
 current
 project
 implementation
 trajectory,
 at
 both
 technical,


administrative
and
operational
levels.




We
unfortunately
also
had
two
resignations.
The
Forest
Carbon
Officer
for
Laos
as


well
 as
 our
 Timber
 Trade
 Component
 Leader,
 who
 are
 both
 pursuing
 new
 career


opportunities.
We
should
be
able
to
replace
the
Carbon
Officer
fairly
easily,
but
it


will
be
quite
a
challenge
to
replace
the
Component
Leader
in
the
immediate
future.


A
 strategic
 decision
 was
 made
 to
 split
 the
 current
 GMP
 Regional
 Timber
 Trade


position
 (only
 50%
 CarBi
 commitment),
 into
 two
 positions,
 thus
 facilitating
 the


recruitment
of
a
100%
CarBi
Timber
trade
Component
Leader.
The
same
strategy


will
 also
 be
 pursued
 in
 the
 case
 of
 the
 REDD
 Carbon
 Officer,
 whom
 will,
 after
 the


closure
 of
 WWF
 Laos’
 commitment
 to
 the
 Xe
 Sap
 project,
 also
 be
 100%
 CarBi


(compared
to
the
current
50%).
The
recruitment
processes
for
both
positions
have


already
been
activated.



Despite
the
fact
that
the
current
matrix
staff
structure
and
dual
roles
of
some
CarBi



key
staff
members
are
quite
taxing
on
both
the
individuals
and
the
team,
there
has


been
 consistent
 growth
 towards
 a
 strong,
 passionate
 and
 energetic
 unit.
 The


Regional
 and
 Country
 Financial,
 Human
 Resource
 and
 Administrative
 Support


Services
staff,
including
our
WWF
Germany
Colleagues,
are
also
an
integral
part
of


the
 extended
 CarBi
 Family,
 and
 contribute
 significantly
 to
 the
 strengths
 of
 the


collective
which
will
be
key
in
our
implementation
intensification
phase.




4.
Communications



The
Inception
Workshops
in
Vietnam
(Quang
Nam)
and
Laos
(Salavanh),
as
well
as


the
Technical
Trans
Boundary
Protected
Area
and
Timber
Trade
Workshop
in


Vietnam
(Hue),
received
extensive
media
coverage,
in
both
printed
and
television


formats.
The
REDD+
CarBi
and
Xe
Pian
PA
Workshop
in
Laos
(Pakse),
also
attracted


some
media
attention
from
the
National
Laos
newspaper.
Please
see
the
list
of


publications
in

Annex
1.
Besides
the
positive
media
exposure
to
our
donor
and
the


project,
we
were
also
able
to
attract
high‐level
government
officials
at
both
political


and
Departmental
level,
to
these
workshops,
which
provided
us
with
an
ideal


platform
to
engage
the
decision
makers
regarding
strategic
project
related
matters.



The
KFW
prescribed
protocols
have
been
applied
in
all
these
cases.
There
were
also


several
related
(regarding
themes)
articles
in
the
Vietnam
and
Laos
media,
which


highlighted
the
potential
of
CarBi
to
link
strategically
to
current
media
streams
and


themes,
and
also
to
synchronise
with
the
respective
countries’
main
focal
areas.
The



 6



establishment
of
a
Conservation
Economy
in
the
CarBi
planning
domain
and
beyond,


is
one
of
the
prioritized
themes
to
be
pursued
in
our
new
CarBi
Communications


Strategy.
A
summary
is
attached
as
Annex
2.
The
continued
focus
on
our
Forest


Guards’
achievements
(also
in
Quang
Nam
and
Laos),
as
well
as
some
special
focus


on
20
years
of
Saola
Conservation
(as
a
symbol
of
the
undiscovered
biodiversity
of


the
Annemites)
and
the
Xe
Sap
biological
survey,
which
will
unlock
a
wealth
of
new


biodiversity
data…and
lots
of
media
attention,
are
some
of
the
low
hanging
fruits
to


be
pursued
in
the
coming
months.



The
CarBi
website
www.panda.org/greatermekong/carbi
has
also
been
completed


and
is
active
since
December
2011.
Some
minor
calibrations
may
still
be
required


based
on
comments
received,
but
we
are
confident
that
this
medium
will
also


provide
us
with
an
ideal
platform
to
showcase
CarBi’s
value
offering
and


achievements.
We
will
also
explore
possible
ways
to
ensure
more
recognition
for


our
donor
by
using
this
platform.
The
continued
deployment
of
the
current


professional
communication
capacity
within
WWF
GMP
will
be
quite
fundamental
in


taking
us
to
the
next
CarBi
communication
level.




5.
TECHNICAL
PROGRESS




The
Goal
of
this
project
is:



For
a
species‐rich,
trans‐border
forest
complex
of
four
conservation
areas
in


Vietnam
and
Laos
(around
200,000
hectares)
and
priority
areas
in
Vietnam
in
two


connected
corridors,
a
more
sustainable
management
will
be
developed
and


implemented



Indicator
1:
GHG
emissions
that
stem
from
forest
degradation
and
loss
will
be


reduced
by
1,800,000
tons
CO2
in
5
years
through
improved
protected
areas


management
(50%
by
project
end,
measured
through
a
combination
of
recognized


instruments,
such
as
the
application
of
tracking
tools
from
the
World
Bank/WWF)


and
forest
regeneration
in
corridors.


Indicator
2:
Mammal
species
diversity
and
numbers
in
particular
for
ungulate


species
show
upward
trends
in
the
protected
areas
in
the
region.


Indicator
3:
The
“trans‐border
trade
of
illegally
cut
timber
in
Laos
and
Vietnam
will


be
reduced
by
40
%
in
the
project
region
by
end
of
2014.


Indicator
4:
The
sustainable
management
of
natural
forests
and
mechanism
to


compensate
for
the
losses
induced
by
restricted
use
and
effective
forest


conservation
contributes
significantly
to
improve
income
of
a
minimum
of
400


households
(annual
income
will
rise
up
to
15
%
due
to
project
activities).




SPECIFIC
RESULT
1



 7



The
Sao
La
Protected
Areas
of
the
central
Vietnam
provinces
from
Quang
Nam
and


ThuaTien
Hue,
as
well
as
the
expansion
area
of
Bach
Ma
National
Park
are


effectively
managed



Summary


Significant
progress
has
been
made
with
planned
activities
in
the
Hue
Saola
Nature


Reserve
(NR).
The
Forest
Guard
model
has
been
running
relatively
smoothly
since


its
establishment.
Some
2,553
snares
have
been
removed
and
43
illegal


logging/hunting
camps
have
been
destroyed
during
the
reporting
period.
A
Central


Annamite
wide
workshop
on
the
assessment
of
the
forest
guard
model
was


conducted
to
share
information
and
draw
lessons
for
adaptive
management
of


Nature
Reserves/National
Parks
in
the
region.


The
MIST
system
is
generally
operational
in
Hue
Saola
NR.
It
supports
data
storage


and
basic
analysis
for
enforcement
planning.
In
Quangnam
Saola
NR,
initial
steps


have
been
taken
to
get
MIST
installed
and
configured,
but
no
enforcement
activities


have
been
activated
yet
due
to
the
extensive
training
of
the
newly
appointed
Forest


Guards.

Some
specific
technical
input
will
be
required
to
address
specific
MIST


protocol
matters,
as
well
as
minor
technical
issues
to
ensure
accurate
validation.


The
capacity
to
accurately
analyze
the
data,
will
also
be
addressed.


Activities
in
Quang
Nam
Saola
NR
have
been
initialized.
The
Protected
Area
Manager


is
now
in
place
and
coordinating
the
work
within
the
reserve
under
the
technical


supervision
of
the
Technical
Advisors
for
Protected
Areas
and
Law
Enforcement.
20


Forest
Guards
have
been
recruited
and
introduced
to
basic
in‐service
training,
to
be


followed
by
formal
training
in
January
2012.
The
establishment
of
basic


infrastructure
to
facilitate
the
active
deployment
of
the
newly
appointed
Forest


Guards
is
now
in
the
preparation
stage.


Intermediate
result
1.1


Hue
and
Quang
Nam
Saola
Nature
Reserves
and
Bach
Ma
National
Park
extension:
By


end
of
the
project,
the
effectiveness
of
Protected
Area
management
has
increased
to


70%
of
total
possible
scores
(Source
of
verification:
WWF­World
Bank
Management


Effectiveness
Tracking
Tool).
The
following
base
lines
have
ben
established:
Hue
SNR


Sept
2010:
Scored
38:
Quang
Nam
SNR
Sept
2010:
Scored
33:
Bach
Ma
NP
Sept
2010:


Scored
67).


Progress

For
Hue
Saola
NR,
the
analysis
of
METT
for
assessing
management
effectiveness
of


the
NR
showed
that
there
are
still
short‐comings
in
some
aspects
of
the


management
of
the
NR
(scored
41
in
latest
asessment).
Examples
are:
low
level
of


tourism
development
(no commercial tourism activity in NR),
low
levels
of
economic


benefit
to
local
people
(there are no programs in support of the local people).

The


analysis
of
METT
in
July
2011
for
Quangnam
Saola
NR
(scored
41)
also
confirmed


some
short‐comings
in
the
effectiveness
of
the
management
of
the
NR

(insufficient



number
of
staff,

lack
of
equipment
and
little
or
no
flow
of
economic
benefits
to
local



 8



communities).
METT
analysis
for
Bach
Ma
NP
resulted
in
a
score
of
68.This


reconfirmed
the
relatively
solid
management
applied
in
the
BM
NP
extension.


The
METT
reports
are
in
general
comprehensive
with
minor
inaccuracies
and
gaps


which
will
be
addressed
in
the
annual
METT
review.


Challenges
and
solutions


An
analysis
of
the
shortfalls
in
management
effectiveness
will
be
carried
out
in
the


third
quarter,
but
it
is
only
from
the
second
METT
assessment
(June
2012)
where


persistent
problems
will
be
identified
and
from
which
strategies
can
be
developed


to
address
the
issues.



Intermediate
result
1.2


By
end
of
the
project,
infractions
(violation
of
law,
agreements
and
rules/illegal


activities)
into
the
three
protected
areas
have
been
reduced
by
at
least
30
%
(e.g.


based
on
trends
in
snare
traps
detected,
and
confiscation
of
timber
and
wildlife
in


relation
to
resource
inputs
from
patrolling).


Progress

The
enforcement
activities
within
Protected
Areas
within
CarBi
landscape
is
now


supported
by
the
presence
of
an
experienced
Enforcement
Technical
Advisor


working
closely
with
the
PA
Technical
Advisor.
It
is
anticipated
that
MIST
will


provide
the
measurable
indicators
for
this
result.
The
enforcement
activities
have


been
carried
out
according
to
plan
in
Hue
Saola
NR.
The
Central
Anamite


enforcement
workshop
raised
a
number
of
issues
to
be
addressed,
especially
the


weak
coordination
of
combined
patrols
(multi‐agency).


For
the
last
six
months,
from
July‐December
2011,
the
Forest
Guards
team
has
been


working
smoothly
under
the
leadership
of
the
Hue
Protected
Area
Manager
and
in


close
cooperation
with
ThuaThien
Hue
province
and
the
Hue
Saola
NR
authorities.


The
law
enforcement
activities
have
continuously
produced
encouraging
results:


• 45
patrols
totalling
304
patrol
days
(average
7
days
per
trip)


• 43
illegal
camps
of
hunters
and
loggers
destroyed


• 2553
illegal
animal
traps
(snares)
removed


• 10
cubic
meters
of
illegal
timber
have
been
confiscated
or
destroyed.



• Around
 200
 local
 people
 were
 confronted
 in
 the
 forest
 and
 records
 have


been
made:
These
people
have
been
formally
warned
by
the
Forest
Guards


not
 to
 illegally
 extract
 forest
 resources.
 The
 legality
 of
 confronting


community
members
when
harvesting
forest
products
for
own
use,
is
still
a


matter
which
needs
to
be
clarified
with
the
relevant
authorities.


To
improve
the
efficiency
of
the
enforcement
activities
in
the
Saola
NR
of
ThuaThien


Hue,
a
protection
strategy
based
on
priority
areas
(in
terms
of
level
of
illegal


incidents
and
biodiversity)is
being
finalised.
This
will
be
the
basis
for
improving
the


performance
of
the
Forest
Guard
team.



 9




From
the
appraisal
of
the
performance
of
the
forest
guard
model
in
Hue,
it
was


decided
that
the
same
basic
forest
guard
model
will
be
adopted
for
Quangnam
Saola


NR
(considering
the
refinement
and
improvement
which
will
be
ongoing).
The


Forest
Guard
team
for
Quangnam
Saola
NR
(
20),
has
been
carefully
recruited


through
a
series
of
enforcement
knowledge
and
field
skill
tests.
The
management
of


the
team
is
now
under
the
supervision
of
the
Protected
Area
Manager
and
in


collaboration
with
the
Management
Board
of
the
Reserve.
A
10
day
basic


enforcement
skill
training
course
for
the
newly
recruited
staff
members
will
be


conducted
by
Quangnam
PA
manager
and
Enforcement
Technical
Advisor
in


January
2012.




The
construction
of
the
second
patrol
outpost
in
Hue
Saola
NR
is
in
the
final


preparation
stage.
The
design
and
procedure
authorization
from
authorities
was


obtained,
and
official
approval
from
Hue
PPC
was
issued.
The
Protected
Area


Manager
in
Hue
and
the
PA
Technical
Advisor
are
working
on
the
final
placing
of
the


outpost.
The
construction
will
be
conducted
during
the
next
quarter.
For
Quangnam


Saola
NR,
the
Protected
Area
Manager
is
working
with
Dong
Giang
and
Tay
Giang


districts
to
select
locations
for
the
Ranger
Station
and
two
patrol
outposts.
The


design
of
the
outpost
in
Quangnam
may
be
adopted
from
the
ones
in
Hue.


Procurement
of
most
of
the
basic
personal
outdoor
equipment
such
as
hammocks,


backpacks,
raincoats,
etc.
has
been
concluded
(awaiting
delivery).
The
specification


of
the
equipment
needed
to
carry
out
protection
activities,
has
been
developed
by


the
Technical
Advisors
to
assure
that
the
same
standard
is
applied
across
the
CarBi


operational
domain.




Following
up
on
the
recommendation
from
Hue
Saola
NR
forest
guard
model


appraisal
workshop,
a
multi‐disciplinary
reaction
task
force
(using
currently


employed
members
of
relevant
partners)
to
respond
to
more
serious
environmental


crime
such
as
bigger
scale
illegal
logging
and
poaching,
has
been
established.
The


force
includes
staff
members
from
Hue
Saola
NR,
Bach
Ma
NP
and
637
Army
Station


(contracts
established).
Regular
monthly
multi‐agency
task
force
patrols
were
also


established
(co‐funded
from
rhino
fund
and
CEPF).



Patrols
based
on
intelligence
gathered
through
the
establishment
of
an
informant


network
in
Hue
Saola
NR,
have
been
initialized.
These
patrols
focus
on
specific
“hot


spot”routes
identified
through
the
intelligence
mapping
system.
In
Quangnam,
the


intelligence
network
has
been
established
with
5
local
people
engaged
to
provide


relevant
information.



The
good
enforcement
results
are
playing
a
positive
role
in
convincing
the


Government
authorities
to
accept
the
Forest
Guard
model
as
standard
practice
in


the
CarBi
project,
and
are
facilitating
excellent
cooperation
and
buy‐in
among
the


project
partners.
The
CarBi
TA:
Law
Enforcement
was
also
instrumental
in


developing
a
Law
Enforcement
training
curriculum
according
to
ASIAN
standards,


which
has
also
been
adopted
by
Vietnam
as
the
national
curriculum.
This
will
be



 10



olled
out
across
the
CarBi
planning
domain,
including
Laos,
after
agreement
was


reached
with
government
counterparts
at
the
Trans
Boundary
workshop
in


December
2011.
We
believe
that
CarBi
can
be
a
catalyst
in
terms
of
implementing


this
training
beyond
our
current
sphere
of
direct
impact,
through
the
development


and
refinement
of
our
law
enforcement
system
as
a
model
to
be
replicated.


Challenges
and
solutions


While
implementing
the
enforcement
activities
in
the
Saola
protected
areas
in


ThuaThien
Hue
and
Quangnam
provinces,
there
have
been
a
number
of
issues
which


have
arisen.
The
main
issue
which
makes
the
enforcement
in
Saola
NR
in
ThuaThien


Hue
less
effective,
was
the
weak
coordination
of
combined
patrols
(multi‐agency).


This
was
addressed
through
the
establishment
of
the
multi‐agency
team
and
patrols.


It
is
envisaged
that
this
team
will
periodically
conduct
patrols
with
a
focus
on
illegal


logging
and
hunting
hot
spots.
For
patrols
along
the
border,
a
special
cooperation


arrangement
with
the
border
army
is
under
exploration
to
reduce
the
risk
of
severe


incidents
and
ensure
compliance
with
border
regulations
of
both
countries.


However,
this
has
just
initialized,
and
to
make
the
team
more
efficient,
more
effort


has
to
be
made,
especially
in
training
them
in
terms
of
dealing
with
serious


environmental
crimes.
The
PA
Technical
Advisor
and
Enforcement
Advisor
are


working
on
this,
with
further
training
to
be
carried
out
in
2012.



The
intelligence
network
is
quite
a
new
concept
to
both
Saola
NRs
in
ThuaThien
Hue


and
Quangnam
PA,
and
the
site‐specific
detail
must
still
be
developed
for
these
three


reserves.
This
is
also
in
the
2012
agenda
of
the
PA
Technical
Advisor
and


Enforcement
Advisor.



Due
to
the
rough
terrain
of
the
PA’s
the
Forest
Guards
are
at
risk
of
accidents
while


on
patrol,
especially
in
the
wet
winter.
One
of
the
solutions
which
will
be


implemented
by
the
PA
manager,
is
to
ensure
that
patrols
will
not
be
planned
in


steep
terrain
areas
in
rainy
time.



Intermediate
result
1.3


By
end
of
the
project,
mammal
species
diversity
and
numbers
in
particular
for


ungulate
species
show
upward
trends.



Progress

Monitoring
ungulates
in
Indochinese
ever
wet
forests
is
extremely
difficult
due
to


both
the
shy
and
elusive
habits
of
focal
species,
and
greatly
reduced
densities
due
to


historic,
and
continuing
hunting
pressure.
However,
the
CarBi
project
will
pioneer
a


novel
survey
technique
involving
the
genetic
analysis
of
haemophagous
leaches
to


detect
large
mammals,
including
ungulates,
within
all
CarBi
protected
areas.
Trials


have
already
demonstrated
these
methodologies’
potential
for
detecting
cryptic


species
including
Troung
Son
Muntjac
and
Annamite
Stripped
Rabbit.
During
this


survey
period,
a
draft
field
data
collection
and
analysis
protocol
have
been



 11



developed.
It
is
hoped
that
these
will
allow
monitoring
of
ungulates
within
an


occupancy
framework.
Protocols
have
also
been
developed
for
monitoring


Nomascus
gibbon
within
CarBi
project
sites.




Intermediate
result
1.4


On
an
annual
basis
as
of
project
start,
the
effectiveness
of
the
patrolling
and


Management
Information
System
(MIST)
has
been
externally
verified
and
validated.


Progress

Draft
TOR
for
external
evaluator
has
been
developed,
and
verification
is
planned
for


June
2012



Intermediate
result
1.5


By
12
months
after
project
start:
MIST
and
all
ranger
stations
are
established
and
fully


operational.


Progress

The
MIST
systems
in
the
three
protected
areas
in
Vietnam
(Hue
Saola
NR,


Quangnam
Saola
NR
and
Bach
Ma
NP)
are
up
and
running,
but
some
adaptive


management
will
be
applied
to
ensure
that
best
practice
is
established
and
pursued


with
the
assistance
from
the
PA
and
Law
Enforcement
Technical
Advisors.



Challenges
and
solutions



Under
the
informal
internal
review
by
the
Technical
Advisor
for
the
MIST
system
in


Hue
Saola
NR,
the
MIST
is
showing
some
obvious
errors
in
the
data
calibration
and


its
basic
application
which,
if
addressed,
will
increase
the
effectiveness
and


efficiency
of
the
system
significantly.




It
is
planned
that
a
MIST
expert
will
be
recruited
to
calibrate
and
improve
the
MIST


system
in
February2012.
A
CarBi
wide
Regional
Law
Enforcement
and
MIST


Strategy
is
also
being
developed
to
ensure
consistency
and
high
quality
throughout


the
operational
domain.



Intermediate
result
1.6


By
18
months
after
project
start:
Management
plans
for
the
saola
Nature
Reserves


have
been
developed
and
appraised
as
well
as
revised
for
Bach
Ma
National
Park


respectively.



Planning
towards
this
intermediate
result
has
been
initialized.
Management


planning
includes
functional
Zonation
and
Conservation
Needs
Assessment.
ToR’s


for
the
management
planning
and
zonation
consultants
have
been
drafted
and
they



 12



will
be
recruited
in
January
2012.

A
National
planning
team
has
been
identified
and


the
planning
framework
and
schedule
agreed
upon
with
the
relevant
role
players.



Intermediate
result
1.7


By
end
of
the
project:
One
sustainable
financing
mechanism
will
have
been
developed


per
Protected
Area.



Although
no
specific
action
has
been
taken
regarding
this
intermediate
Result
yet,


the
unlocking
of
the
potential
of
the
Protected
Areas
and
related
corridors
to
“sell”


ecosystem
services,
more
specifically
watershed
services,
is
a
matter
which
will
be


explored
with
the
relevant
authorities.
Some
informal
discussions
have
been


conducted
in
this
regard.
The
same
principle
applies
to
the
tourism
potential
of
the


PAs
.
Interest
has
also
been
expressed
in
conducting
“conservation
tourism”
where


tourists
accompany
Forest
Guards
on
patrols
(conditionally).
“Scientific
tourism”,


where
tourists
accompany
biologists
on
specific
field
surveys,
may
also
be
an


alternative
to
explore.




Specific
result
2


The
Xe
Sap
National
Protected
Area
is
effectively
managed


Summary



Planning
and
preparation
for
the
implementation
of
the
CarBi
project
started
well,


with
an
MoU
between
WWF
and
Government
Counterparts
signed
on
19
July
2011


and
a
four
year
work
plan
agreed
to
and
finalized
on
5 
August
2011.
An
NPA
office


was
established
in
Saravane
in
July
2011
and
a
project
management
organization


structure
at
central,
provincial
and
district
levels
was
established
on
10
August


2011.
Twenty
Two
government
staff
were
assigned
to
the
NPA
while
WWF
was
able


to
recruit
and
train
a
MIST/GIS
Officer,
Admin
Officer
and
Finance
Officer.
VFI
was


contracted
as
service
provider/partner
to
progress
the
community
cooperation
and


development
goals,
and
the
10
target
villages
have
been
identified
in
conjunction


with
the
District
Governor’s
offices.
A
protection
strategy
workshop
was
held
in


October
2011
where
a
zonation
framework
and
basis
for
a
protection
strategy
were


developed. Of
concern
have
been
the
capacity
challenges
at
all
levels
in
Lao.
The


project
has
been
without
a
Landscape
Manager
from
the
beginning
despite
a


number
of
recruitment
attempts.
The
Protected
Area
Manager
left
at
the
end
of


October
2011
and
has
not
been
replaced
yet.
Forest
Guard
recruitment


(assignment)
only
took
place
in
December,
and
will
begin
patrols
in
February.

Despite
this,
planning
has
moved
ahead
and
strides
were
made
in
village
PRA


methodology
development,
biodiversity
reconnaissance
surveys
and
planning,


infrastructure
planning
and
approvals
and
trans
boundary
cooperation.


Importantly,
a
management
planning
process
was
initiated,
with
process
and


structure
agreed
upon.
A
Forest
Guard
training
curricula
has
been
agreed
upon,
and


MIST
technical
implementation
received
a
boost
with
agreement
to
review
technical



 13



aspects
with
a
MIST
expert.
The
CarBi
project
will
also
pioneer
a
novel
survey


technique
in
Xe
Sap
involving
the
genetic
analysis
of
haemophagous
leaches
to


detect
large
mammals,
including
ungulates,
within
all
CarBi
protected
areas.


Intermediate
result
2.1


By
7
months
after
project
start:
the
Xe
Sap
biodiversity
survey
has
been
completed,
and


from
its
results,
a
conservation
needs
assessment
and
a
zonation
map
have
been


compiled.



Progress

The
biodiversity
survey
was
initially
scheduled
for
March/
April
2011
(as
part
of


another
envisaged
project),
but
due
to
the
fact
that
no
MoU
was
in
place
at
that
time,


permissions
were
not
readily
available.
The
survey
has
been
postponed
to
the


beginning
of
2012.
However,
a
number
of
preliminary
expeditions
into
Xe
Sap
NPA


have
confirmed
the
potential
significance
of
the
protected
area
for
globally


threatened
biodiversity.
Local
villagers
have
reported
populations
of
Red‐shanked


Douc
and
Nomascus
gibbon,
whilst
a
number
of
Indochinese
and
Annamite
endemic


bird
species
–
including
the
Near‐threatened
Austen’s
Brown
Hornbill
(1 st 
record
for


Xe
Sap
NPA)
and
Blyth’s
Kingfisher
have
also
been
recorded.
Extensive
planning
for


the
upcoming
surveys
have
also
been
concluded
and
the
contracting
of
specialist



biologists
as
consultants
are
also
in
process.
The
financial
assistance
in
this
regard


from
Global
Wildlife
Conservation,
will
also
assist
CarBi
to
pursue
a
more


comprehensive
approach,
whilst
also
contributing
toward
our
match
funding.



Intermediate
result
2.2


By
7
months
after
project
start:
MIST
is
established
and
fully
operational.


Progress

A
MIST/GIS
officer
was
recruited
and
trained
from
25
August
–
2
September
2011.


MIST
has
been
established,
but
no
enforcement
activities
have
been
activated
to


produce
any
data
thus
far.


Challenges
and
solutions



As
with
the
Saola
NR’s,
data
calibration
errors
and
under
achieving
are
recognised.


MIST
implementation
in
both
Xe
Sap
NPA
and
Saola
NR’s
will
be
standardized.
This


will
include
a
systematic
approach
to
patrol
planning,
execution,
data
collection


methodology,
data
analysis
as
well
as
reporting.
A
trans
boundary
workshop
in


December
2011,
has
addressed
standardization
issues.
The
PA
and
Law


Enforcement
Technical
Advisors
will
review
the
system
and
its
deployment,
and
a


specialist
MIST
consultant
will
be
invited
to
bring
about
necessary
changes
towards


adaptive
management.
This
is
planned
for
February
2012.




 14



Intermediate
result
2.3


By
18
months
after
project
start:
an
incentive
system
for
patrol
staff
payments
has


been
devised
and
is
being
implemented.


Progress

Extensive
discussions
and
analysis
have
taken
place
to
devise
a
good
system,
but
no


final
decision
has
been
taken
yet.
Initial
research
indicates
that
relatively
little


experience
and
best
practice
models
seem
to
exist
elsewhere,
so
the
system
likely


needs
to
be
developed
from
within
CarBi.




Challenges
and
solutions


Besides
the
fact
that
we
want
to
encourage
effectiveness
and
efficiency,
we
also


need
to
apply
a
system
which
is
in
line
with
the
Rewards
Foundation
Policy
of
WWF

GMP
to
ensure
consistency.
This
matter
was
taken
up
with
the
Regional
HR
Director


(who
will
be
leaving
WWF
soon).
It
will
also
be
pursued
with
the
new
Director
to


explore
the
options
available.
We
will
also
explore
the
various
options
pursued
by


other
conservation
agencies
internationally.




Intermediate
result
2.4


By
12
months
after
project
start:
two
ranger
outposts
have
been
constructed
and


equipped,
and
are
operational
a
minimum
of
20
days
per
month
by
trained
and


equipped
field
staff.


Progress:



Ranger
station
and
outpost
design
was
completed
and
formally
approved.
Site


selection
criteria
have
been
agreed
upon,
and
the
actual
site
selection
will
be


concluded
early
in
2012,
with
construction
of
outposts
to
be
carried
out
in
the
third


quarter
of
2012.
The
recruitment
of
a
PA
Manager
for
Xe
Sap
is
seen
as
fundamental


to
the
implementation
of
this,
and
other,
objectives.




Intermediate
result
2.5


By
18
months
after
project
start:
four
ranger
outposts
have
been
constructed
and


equipped,
three
of
which
are
operational
a
minimum
of
20
days
per
month
by
trained


and
equipped
field
staff.


Progress:



It
is
envisaged
that
the
construction
of
all
four
outposts
will
begin
early
in
2012
(see


2.4).



Intermediate
result
2.6


By
7
months
after
project
start:
Co­operation
agreements
between
key
law


enforcement
agencies
within
Laos
have
been
signed
and
activities
have
begun.



 15




Progress:


No
real
progress
has
been
made.




Challenges
and
solutions



Difficulty
in
extracting
the
current
formal
agreements
from
the
relevant
government


counterparts
as
a
platform
from
which
this
cooperation
will
be
built,
as
well
as
the


lack
of
CarBi
capacity
in
Laos
to
regularly
follow
up,
has
resulted
in
little
progress
in


this
regard.
The
matter
was
also
raised
at
the
trans
boundary
workshop
in
Hue


(although
the
focus
was
on
trans
boundary
cooperation,
internal
cooperation
should


be
stabilized
before
international
cooperation
can
be
pursued
successfully).
This


matter
will
again
be
formally
addressed
in
a
Laos
IMC
meeting
with
senior


counterparts
on
30
January
2012.
The
recruitment
of
a
new
PA
Manager
will


hopefully
also
be
concluded
by
the
end
of
January
2012.



Intermediate
result
2.7


By
12
months
after
project
start:
district
level
trans­boundary
(Laos
/
Vietnam)
cooperation
agreements
have
been
signed,
including
a
budget
and
work
plan,
and


activities
have
begun.


Progress:



A
trans
boundary
workshop
held
in
Hue
in
December
2011
initiated
the
process


towards
trans
boundary
cooperation
agreements.
There
was
a
lot
of
goodwill
shown


from
all
role
players
from
both
countries,
and
consensus
regarding
a
formal
process


towards
the
cooperation
agreements.


Intermediate
result
2.8


By
9
months
after
project
start:
two
biodiversity
monitoring
plots
have
been
selected


and
established,
and
one
survey
in
each
plot
has
been
conducted.


Progress

Areas
of
potentially
important
biodiversity
within
Xe
Sap
NPA
have
been
identified


based
on
preliminary
expeditions
and
discussions
with
local
communities.
Between


Feb
and
July
2012
all
plots
will
be
visited
by
biodiversity
survey
teams
with


expertise
on
birds,
large
mammals,
camera‐trapping,
vegetation
communities,
and


herpetology.
These
field
visits
will
allow
the
identification
of
a
suite
of
focal
species


for
monitoring
(likely
to
include
Nomascus
gibbon,
Crested
Argus,
ungulates,
bears)


and
robust
monitoring
protocols
will
be
developed.


Intermediate
result
2.9


By
24
months
after
project
start:
both
biodiversity
monitoring
plots
are
being


monitored
twice
a
year,
(Dry
and
wet
seasons)



 16



Progress

Dependent
upon
results
of
the
biodiversity
surveys
(summarized
above),
a
focal


suite
of
priority
species
for
monitoring,
and
monitoring
methodologies,
will
be


developed.
However,
preliminary
protocols
for
occupancy
monitoring
of
large


ungulates
based
on
MIST
enforcement
ranger
activities
and
occupancy
monitoring


of
Nomascus
gibbon
have
been
developed.
These
protocols
will
be
implemented


within
Xe
Sap
NPA
during
2012/2013.


Intermediate
result
2.10


By
3
months
after
project
start:
10
key
target
villages
have
been
selected
for


interventions.


Progress

10
target
villages
have
been
identified:
3
in
Kaleum,
2
inTaoi
and
5
in
Samoi.
The
7


villages
in
Saravanh
have
been
approved
by
the
District
Governors
while
the
3


villages
in
Xekong
still
need
Governor
approval.



Intermediate
result
2.11


By
7
months
after
project
start:
one
target
village
(selected
as
a
model)
has
signed
a


biodiversity
agreement,
and
has
begun
with
implementation.


Progress

The
design
for
PRA
for
the
target
villages
has
been
completed.
The
appraisals
will
be


conducted
in
the
coming
months.
There
was
a
slow
start
to
community
engagement


due
to
a
lack
of
capacity,
and
understanding
of
community
agreements.



Proposed
solution


PA
Technical
Advisor
will
support
VFI
(Community
Conservation
Partner)
in


understanding
and
implementing
Community
Conservation
Agreements
(CCA).
It
is


still
hoped
to
partially
realize
this
target
by
the
end
of
January
2012,
but


implementation
will
only
commence
in
February/March
2012.


Intermediate
result
2.12


By
12
months
after
project
start:
three
target
village
have
signed
biodiversity


agreements,
and
have
begun
with
implementation



Progress


The
same
process
followed/to
be
followed
for
2.11,
will
be
applied
to
address
the


additional
villages.




 17



Intermediate
result
2.13


By
end
of
the
project,
monitoring
of
the
implementation
of
biodiversity
agreements
in


10
key
villages
within
the
Xe
Sap
Protected
Area
show
improvement
of
livelihoods
by
a


minimum
of
15
%
over
the
course
of
the
project.


n/a



Intermediate
result
2.14


By
end
of
the
project,
the
effectiveness
of
Protected
Area
management
has
increased
to


70%
of
total
possible
scores
(Source
of
verification:
WWF­World
Bank
Management


Effectiveness
Tracking
Tool).
Base­line
for
Sept
2010:
Scored
17.




A
draft
METT
baseline
was
established
in
a
desktop
analysis
in
2010,
but
requires


verification
and
a
retrospective
project
base‐line,
which
is
planned
for
the
next


quarter.


Progress

Support
staff
for
Xe
Sap
have
been
recruited:
MIST/GIS
officer,
admin
officer


(started
1
November
2011)
and
finance
officer
(started
1
December
2011)


successfully
recruited,
and
trained.
For
Xe
Sap
NPA,
a
4
year
work
plan
and
budget


was
developed
by
5th
July
2011.
It
has
been
reviewed
and
revised
in
line
with
the


signed
MoU.
The
annual
work
plan
and
budget
was
also
completed
by
5th
July
2011,


and
approved
by
the
Implementation
Management
Committee.



Management
planning
processes
and
schedule
were
agreed
at

the
trans
boundary


workshop
of
6‐8
December
2011
in
Hue,
Vietnam.
An
in‐house
zonation
map
has


been
prepared
as
part
of
the
management
plan
The
map
was
prepared
based
on
the


results
from
the
wildlife
protection
strategy
workshop
held
in
October
2011.


However,
zonation
needs
a
broader
technical
review
which
will
be
carried
out
in


conjunction
with
the
management
planning
process.
The
organizational
structure


for
Xe
Sap
was
completed
on
10th
August
2011.
This
will
be
part
of
the
management


plan.
A
training
needs
assessment
for
Xe
Sap
is
also
in
the
planning
phase.



NPA
headquarter
design,
bill
of
quantities
and
quotations
have
been
achieved,
but


approvals
have
not
yet
obtained
yet.
Location
sighting
is
also
still
to
be
finalized.


Design,
costing
and
approvals
for
outposts
have
also
been
made
and
site
selection


criteria
have
been
agreed
upon.
For
procurement
of
office
and
field
equipment,


specifications
have
been
developed
and
procurement
is
in
process.


Partnerships
with
all
relevant
stakeholders
were
established
at
the
beginning:


provincial
and
district
staff
in
Salavane
(26
people)
were
appointed
to
work
with
Xe


Sap
NPA.
Roles
and
responsibilities
for
Implementation
Management
Committee


have
been
defined
in
MoU
(July,
2011),
however,
review
is
being
carried
out
to



clarify
these
roles
and
responsibilities.




 18



Challenges
and
solutions


Currently,
there
is
a
serious
lack
of
capacity
in
Lao
(WWF
Field
Office
and
Xe
Sap


NPA)
to
drive
the
activities.
This
is
a
very
urgent
issue
which
is
currently
addressed


through
a
focused
head
hunting
recruitment
process.
We
are
positive
that


experienced
and
competent
staff
will
be
appointed
from
the
1 st 
of
February
2012.


Intermediate
result
2.15


By
end
of
the
project,
infractions
(violation
of
law,
agreements
and
rules/illegal


activities)
into
Xe
Sap
protected
area
have
been
reduced
by
at
least
30
%
(e.g.
based
on


trends
in
snare
traps
detected,
confiscation
of
timber
and
wildlife,
logging
roads).


Progress

A
wildlife
protection
strategy
workshop
was
organized
from
27‐29 th September


2011
to
identify
areas
of
conservation
importance
and
threats.
These
results
will
be


fed
into
a
Protection
Strategy,
which
will
be
developed
concurrently
with
the


Management
Plan.



Intermediate
result
2.16


By
end
of
the
project,
mammal
species
diversity
and
numbers
in
particular
for


ungulate
species
show
upward
trends


Progress

Mammal
monitoring
protocols
for
the
Xe
Sap
NPA
are
being
developed
for
focal


landscape
species:
large
ungulates
(including
large‐antlered
and
Annamite
muntjac,


serrow)
and
buff‐cheeked
crested
gibbon.
Training
of
field
teams
in
survey


methodologies
should
be
implemented
by
June
2012
and
baseline
occupancy


estimates
for
each
site
by
March
2013.
A
detailed
biodiversity
survey
report
for
Xe


Sap
NPA,
with
annotated
bird
and
mammal
species
lists,
will
be
available
at
the
end


2012.
Through
this
process,
indicators
will
be
developed
which
will
form
the
basis


of
a
proper
monitoring
strategy.



Monitoring
ungulates
in
Indochinese
ever
wet
forests
is
extremely
difficult
due
to


both
the
shy
and
elusive
habits
of
focal
species,
and
greatly
reduced
densities
due
to


historic,
and
continuing
hunting
pressure.
However,
the
CarBi
project
will
pioneer
a


novel
survey
technique
involving
the
genetic
analysis
of
haemophagous
leaches
to


detect
large
mammals,
including
ungulates,
within
all
CarBi
protected
areas.
Trials


have
already
demonstrated
these
methodologies’
potential
for
detecting
cryptic


species
including
Troung
Son
Muntjac
and
Annamite
Stripped
Rabbit.
During
this


survey
period,
a
draft
field
data
collection
and
analysis
protocol
have
been


developed.
It
is
hoped
that
these
will
allow
monitoring
of
ungulates
within
an


occupancy
framework.



Intermediate
result
2.17


On
an
annual
basis
as
of
project
start,
the
effectiveness
of
the
patrolling
and


Management
Information
System
(MIST)
has
been
externally
verified
and
validated



 19



Progress

A
draft
TOR
for
external
evaluator
has
been
developed.
Evaluation
planned
for
June


2012.



Specific
result
3


Natural
forests
are
restored
and
fragmentation
reduced
in
the
A
Luoi
corridor
in


ThuaThien
Hue
Province
and
the
TayGiang
corridor
in
Quang
Nam
province



Summary


The
focus
in
this
reporting
period
was
to
ensure
that
we
conclude
an
agreed
way


forward
with
the
Quang
Nam
PMU.
Two
important
and
focused


meetings/workshops
had
to
be
launched
to
stabilize
the
relationship,
clarify
roles


and
responsibilities,
and
to
ensure
proper
ownership
and
buy‐in.
Much
more


attention
will
have
to
be
given
to
the
maintenance
of
this
important
partnership
in


the
months
to
come.

We
can
also
report
that
the
partnership
with
the
Hue
PMU
is


very
constructive
and
stable.
Please
also
refer
to
the
Inception
Report
in
this
regard.


Most
of
the
activities
were
in
pursuance
of
preparing
the
framework
and
specific


steps
for
actual
implementation
of
the
reforestation
component.
Various


consultation
interventions
have
been
pursued
to
identify
the
prioritized
area
for


restoration
and
management,
and
to
conclude
the
guidelines
for
implementation.


We
also
arranged
a
meeting
with
the
Hanoi
office
of
KFW
to
discuss
CarBi
in


general,
and
specific
challenges
in
more
detail,
including
cooperation
with
other


KFW
projects.
This
initial
contact
will
be
maintained
to
facilitate
potential
future


assistance
as
and
when
required.


Intermediate
result
3.1


At
least
450
ha
corridor
area
is
reforested
by
individuals,
4700
ha
of
natural


regeneration
(also
individuals)
and
3000
ha
of
natural
forest
is
under
formal


community
forest
management
system
by
end
of
the
project.




A
list
of
villages/communes
that
belong
to
the
biodiversity
corridor
in
Aluoi


(Thuathien
–
Hue
province)
and
Taygiang
(Quang
Nam
province)
are
now
being


selected
for
restoration,
community
forest
management
and
protection
contracts.



The
consultant
has
been
selected,
contract
signed
and
the
final
target
villages
will
be


confirmed
soon
to
allow
implementation
of
the
related
restoration
activities.



The
Guideline
for
Village
land
use
planning
has
also
been
developed
(within
the


KFW
framework),
with
comprehensive
input
from
relevant
partners
in
Hue


(September
and
December
2011)
and
Quangnam
(September
2011).
The
revised


Guideline
has
been
submitted
to
relevant
agencies
for
final
approval.

For
the


Guideline
regarding
the
allocation
of
natural
forest
to
communities,
the
ToR
and


appointment
of
a
consultant
for
Hue
was
concluded,
but
negotiations
are
still


ongoing
with
the
Quang
Nam
PMU,
which
will
be
concluded
soon
after
the
recent


agreements
with
them
regarding
the
way
forward.
A
consultant
has
also
been



 20



contracted
and
started
to
develop
the
Guideline
for
site
mapping,
plantation
design,


afforestation
and
natural
forest
regeneration
techniques.


Consultation
workshops
on
the
implementing
of
the
Restoration
Component
were


conducted
in
Quangnam
and
ThuaThien
Hue.
Comments
from
related
partners
and


consultants
on
implementing
methods/system
for
key
activities
of
the
Restoration


Component
and
lessons
learnt
from
other
restoration
and
CFM
projects,
especially


KfW6
in
Quangnam,
also
contributed
positively
to
the
guideline
development


process
towards
actual
implementation.


A
fundamental
mechanism
for
the
implementation
of
the
forest
restoration
activities


in
Quangnam,
has
also
been
discussed
with
the
PMU,
and
it
was
concluded
that


relevant
agencies,
boards,
sectors,
and
authorities
will
actively
participate
in
the


planning
and
management
of
activities.

The
District
Forest
Restoration


Management
Board
will
for
instance
be
responsible
for
supporting
the
forest


plantation,
enhancement
and
forest
protection
activities;
District
FPD
will
support


CFM
activities
on
the
basis
of
the
plan
approved
by
District;
Natural
Resource
and


Environment
office
will
support
the
VLUP
activities,
etc.
This
agreement
was


fundamental
in
unlocking
the
synergy
and
goodwill
required
for
successful


implementation
of
this
important
CarBi
Component.


Challenges
and
solutions


The
qualified
consultants
(working
experience
with
KfW
projects)
were
quite
busy


with
other
projects
and
could
not
support
CarBi
as
initially
planned.

Alternative


qualified
and
experienced
consultants
have/will
be
sourced
to
address
this
issue,


and
the
KFW
experienced
consultants
will
also
be
considered
if
and
when
required


once
they
become
available
again.



The
project
implementing
structure
for
CarBi
does
not
provide
for
project
staff
at


district
or
commune
level
to
facilitate
implementation
and
monitor
progress
in
close


cooperation
with
communities
and
government
counterparts.

This
situation
was


integrated
into
the
discussions
with
the
PMU’s,
and
stronger
implementation


involvement
from
their
side
has
been
agreed
upon.

We
will
also
optimize
on


potential
synergy
with
other
related
KFW
projects,
and
discuss
this
with
KFW


during
their
upcoming
visit
to
Vietnam
in
February
2012.



Intermediate
result
3.2


Additionally
3000
ha
are
under
performance
based
protection
contracts
in
the
buffer


zones
in
both
provinces
by
12
months
after
project
start.



Progress

A
list
of
villages/communes
are
now
being
selected
for
forest
restoration,
including


protection
contracts.
The
guidelines
for
Village
land
use
planning
have
been


developed,
and
commented
upon
by
relevant
partners
in
Hue
(September
and


December
2011)
and
Quangnam
(September
2011).
The
guidelines
have
been


revised
by
the
consultant
and
submitted
for
approval
to
the
relevant
agencies.
A



 21



fundamental
mechanism
for
the
implementation
of
the
forest
restoration
activities


in
Quangnam,
has
also
been
discussed
with
the
PMU.
Please
also
refer
to
3.1.



Intermediate
result
3.3


By
end
of
the
project,
the
forest
fragmentation
index
for
the
project
areas
with
direct


rehabilitation
interventions
has
been
reduced
by
50
%
(based
on
an
analysis
of
the


fragmentation
and
the
monitoring
of
the
forest
carbon
in
those
areas).


Progress

Discussions
with
the
German
Air
and
Space
Agency
regarding
cooperating
on
forest


cover
mapping
and
fragmentation
analysis
are
ongoing.
A
short‐term
service


provider
has
also
been
appointed
to
assist
with
the
planning
of
an
optimal
way


forward
regarding
the
spectrum
of
technologies
available
to
provide
a
base
line


against
which
project
progress
can
be
measured.

We
are
also
planning
to
conduct


some
research
on
change
detection
over
time
on
the
basis
of
LANDSAT
imagery,


starting
in
the
1980s.
The
fragmentation
index
itself
will
be
calculated
upon
the


most
recent
remote
sensing
imagery
from
Rapideye
or
SPOT
images.
Preliminary


analysis
has
demonstrated
that
ground‐truthing
needs
to
be
deployed
in
order
to


achieve
accurate
figures.
There
will
also
be
close
cooperation
with
the
current
work


being
done
on
the
development
of
MRV
technology
for
the
REDD
component
of
the


CarBi
project.



Intermediate
result
3.4


The
participatory
land
use
planning
of
the
forest
areas
to
be
restored
has
been


completed
for
the
first
areas
by
18
months
after
project
start,
including
the


development
of
maps
and
the
red­book
allocation.


n/a



Intermediate
result
3.5


At
least
7500
ha
of
forest
land
(e.g.
natural
forests
and
afforestation)
areas
are


formally
allocated
to
households
and
communities
by
the
end
of
the
project.


n/a



Intermediate
result
3.6


By
30
months
after
project
start,
first
land
titles
with
red
book
certificates
of
natural


forests
of
good
quality
(at
least
2c
or
3a)
have
formally
been
issued
to
communities
for


sustainable
forest
management.


n/a




 22



Intermediate
result
3.7


By
36
months
after
project
start:
Restoration
measures
are
completed
on
50%
of
the


designated
areas
for
reforestation,
enrichment
planting
and
natural
regeneration
as


well
as
all
forest
protection
agreements
have
been
signed.


n/a



Specific
result
4


The
Provinces
of
Xekong
and
Salavan
consistently
apply
transparent
and
efficient


timber
tracking
systems
for
logging
quotas
and
effectively
cooperate
with
relevant


Vietnamese
agencies.



Summary


Fact‐finding
studies
have
been
completed
in
both
Vietnam
and
Laos.
The


procurement
preparation
for
the
international
leakage
baseline
study
is
underway.


The
draft
TORs
for
the
tender
itself
has
been
developed.
A
remote
sensing
study
to


identify
“hotspots”
for
illegal
logging
activities
in
the
project
is
in
its
final
ground


truthing
stage.
Consultations
have
been
initiated
to
set
up
a
cross‐border


coordination
mechanism
on
trans‐boundary
timber
trade
issues.
The


implementation
of
the
activities
under
this
component
may
be
faced
with
difficulties


in
the
next
few
months
due
to
the
resignation
of
Phonexay
Khammavong,
Lao


Timber
Trade
Manager,
as
of
December
1st
for
personal
reasons,
which
will
likely


result
in
a
delay
of
the
field
activities.
Discussions
have
resulted
in
an
interim


solution,
i.e.
a
continued
part‐time
employment
of
Phonexay
until
27
February


2012,
in
order
to
minimize
the
negative
impacts
of
this
move.
A
replacement
should


be
recruited
before
his
departure.



The
cooperation
with
DoFI
on
national
level
slowed
down
due
to
the
changing


hierarchies
in
the
re‐organisation
of
the
Ministry
of
Agriculture
and
Forestry
and


the
creation
of
the
new
Ministry
of
Environment
and
Natural
Resources.
The


discussion
on
whether
DoFI
will
remain
under
MAF
or
move
to
MoNRE
is
still
on


going,
but
there
are
some
indications
that
DoFI
will
remain
under
MAF,
which
will


have
no
impact
on
CarBi’s
implementation.




At
the
end
of
November
2011,
Sebastian
Schrader
has
resigned
from
the
position
as


Regional
Coordinator
for
the
Timber
Trade
Component
and
will
leave
WWF
on
27


February
2012
to
pursue
a
new
career
opportunity
in
Africa.
Discussions
within


GMP
and
potential
donors
are
underway
to
recruit
a
suitable
replacement
as
soon
as


possible,
on
a
full
time
basis
(Sebastian
was
50%
for
CarBi).




Intermediate
result
4.1


By
end
of
the
project,
reduction
of
illegal
timber
harvesting
and
trade
by
80
%
in
the


selected
logging
quotas
in
the
two
provinces
of
Xekong
and
Salavan
provinces



 23



compared
to
other
logging
quotas
outside
the
project
region
assessed
in
the
baseline


study.


Progress

WWF,
DoFI
(Laos)
and
FPD
(Vietnam)
have
jointly
decided
that
fact‐finding
studies


in
Vietnam
and
Laos
shall
be
conducted
in
order
to
ensure
that
the
tender


documents
for
the
international
leakage
baseline
study
can
be
completed
and


evaluated
on
an
adequate
information
basis.
Two
separate
scoping
studies
to
get


some
fundamental
data
on
the
situation
of
illegal
timber
trade/logging
in
the
project


area
have
been
completed.
The
missions
were
carried
out
by
DoFI
and
the


provincial/district
agencies
PoFI
and
DAFO
(for
Laos),
and
supported
by
WWF
(in


Laos)
and
a
consultant
(in
Vietnam).
Roughly
70%
of
the
expected
data
has
been


collected,
and
the
reports
have
been
written
up
and
translated.




Regarding
the
procurement
process
for
the
leakage
study,
it
was
decided
to
pursue



two
consultancies
below
80,000
EUR,
instead
of
targeting
one
international
tender.


This
will
maintain
the
project’s
flexibility
to
assign
the
final
study
after
4
years
to
a


suitable
consultant.
The
draft
ToR
for
the
first
study
has
been
completed.



A
German
M.Sc
student
from
the
university
of
Frankfurt
has
acquired
2011
Rapid‐

eye
hi‐res
satellite
imagery,
and
the
desk‐based
analysis
of
logging
roads
has
been


concluded
in
mid
December.
Information
on
access
development
to
Xe
Sap
NPA
has


been
derived
by
remote
sensing
technology.
The
study
identified
preliminary


“hotspots”
for
illegal
logging
activities
in
the
project
area
and
has
now
moved
to
the


final
ground
truthing
stage.
Maps
showing
accessibility
and
the
risk
for
illegal


logging
are
expected
by
February
2012
to
coincide
with
the
beginning
of
the
leakage


baseline
study.




Challenges
and
solutions


Data
 on
 timber
 trade
 is
 very
 sensitive
 and
 not
 always
 available,
 and
 data
 sources


provide
 conflicting
 information.
 Data
 collection
 and
 sharing
 has
 been
 particularly


challenging
in
Vietnam
where
a
part
of
the
information
collected
was
not
allowed
to


be
shared
by
the
PMU
because
it
was
sensitive,
partly
due
to
the
fact
that
it
was
not


collected
through
“official
channels”,
and
thus
not
deemed
acceptable
by
PMU.



The
information
collection
was
commissioned
to
DoFI
(Laos)
and
FPD
(Vietnam)


and
supported
by
the
component
managers.
However,
shortcomings
in
government


capacity
and
possibly
also
the
lack
of
real
transparency
due
to
confidentiality


challenges,
made
it
challenging
to
get
to
the
desired
result.
In
Laos,
some
substantial


information
on
legal
logging
under
“special
quotas”
is
still
missing,
whilst
the
official


information
on
timber
imports
in
Vietnam
didn’t
match
informally
collected


information
during
the
survey.
On
the
other
hand,
if
WWF
staff
was
collecting


information
with
more
limited
involvement
of
government
counterparts,
access
to


informants
would
have
been
more
difficult
and
the
results
might
have
been



 24



disputed
in
a
bigger
way.




The
following
solutions
were
recommended/undertaken:
Build
trust
with
the


IMC/PMU
in
Laos
and
Vietnam
through
discussion
of
scoping
study
results
and


more
focus
on
joint
field
surveys
and
activities.
The
submission
and
approval
of


clear
annual
and
quarterly
work
plans
in
early
November
and
two
planning


meetings
at
national
and
provincial
level
towards
the
end
of
November
and


beginning
of
December,
which
were
organized
by
the
CarBi
team,
were
constructive


steps
in
the
right
direction.
The
First
Secretary
and
head
of
development


cooperation
of
the
German
Embassy
in
Laos,
has
a
particular
interest
in
increasing


transparency
for
concession
quota
allocation
processes,
logging,
etc.
He
has
offered


to
bring
up
the
issue
when
the
German
Minister
for
International
Economic


Cooperation
visits
Laos
next
year
for
a
German‐Lao
bilateral
dialogue.
Feeding


issues
into
in
bilateral
German
Lao
dialogue
is
going
to
be
a
good
opportunity
to


address
our
concerns
at
an
appropriate
level.



Intermediate
result
4.2


At
regular
meetings
between
Salavan
and
Xekong
Provinces
(Lao
PDR)
and
ThuaThien


Hue
and
Quang
Nam
Provinces
(Vietnam),
both
at
technical
and
political
level,
include


results
from
baseline
assessments
of
timber
trade
and
jointly
set
reduction
targets
to


be
monitored.
The
first
cross­border
meeting
takes
place
latest
two
years
after
the


project
start
at
provincial
level,
involving
governors’
offices
(Laos)
and
representatives


from
People’s
Committees
(PPC)
in
Vietnam,
to
agree
on
tangible
measures
to
address


illegal
timber
harvesting
and
to
control
illegal
wood
trade.


Progress

The
first
regional
workshop
of
trans‐border
cooperation
on
timber
tracking
and


control
of
illegal
logging
was
conducted
on
06‐07
December
2011.
The
workshop


was
combined
with
the
regional
PA
components.
It
is
the
first
in
a
series
of
regional


workshops
to
set
up
a
trans‐boundary
agreement
on
provincial
or
district
level.
The


meeting
was
the
first
of
its
kind
(NGO
facilitating
between
Lao‐Vietnamese


Agencies),
and
touching
on
highly
sensitive
issues.
The
agendas
of
the
participating


agencies
and
their
willingness
to
cooperate
were
difficult
to
predict,
and
so
were
the


outcomes
of
the
workshop.
Therefore,
the
agenda
was
kept
flexible,
focusing
on


group
work
and
discussions.
WWF
remained
in
the
background.
A
professional


facilitator
and
a
simultaneous
translator
were
hired.
The
workshop
was
an


opportunity
to
build
a
better
understanding
of
the
component
for
various


stakeholders
at
the
provincial
and
district
level,
but
also
established
a
consensus
on


the
key
contents
next
steps
for
the
trans‐boundary
agreement:


• The
 trans‐boundary
 agreement
 will
 be
 broken
 down
 into
 several
 specific


Annual
 Operational
 Plans
 (AOP),
 which
 translate
 existing
 bi‐lateral


agreements
on
national
and
provincial
level
into
clear
actions
and
timelines


on
 district
 level
 and,
 where
 applicable,
 between
 key
 Lao
 and
 Vietnamese


agencies
on
national
and/or
provincial
level.



 25



• Key
contents
include
(i)
cooperation
on
traceability
of
timber
imports
from


Laos
 and
 (ii)
 regulate
 trans‐border
 movements
 of
 inspection
 and
 NPA


patrolling
staff.

• Stakeholders
and
their
roles
have
been
identified
during
the
workshop


• A
Vietnamese‐Lao
consulting
team
will
be
deployed
in
early
2012
to
further


consult
with
the
relevant
agencies
and
will
develop
a
draft
agreement,
which


shall
be
discussed
during
a
follow
up
meeting
mid
2012.



Intermediate
result
4.3


By
12
months
after
project
start:
The
scope
of
the
cross­border
timber
trade
between


Laos
and
Vietnam
has
been
analyzed
in
a
comprehensive
study
that
will
provide
the


baseline
for
project
monitoring.


See
above
(intermediate
result
4.1)



Intermediate
result
4.4


By
12
months
after
project
start:
An
analysis
of
trade
routes
of
timber
from
special


quotas
in
Xekong
and
Salvanh
provinces
has
been
conducted.


See
above
(intermediate
results
4.1)



Intermediate
result
4.5


By
12
months
after
project
start:
A
training
needs
assessment
for
relevant
national


and
local
Government
forest
inspection
staff
has
been
conducted
and
a
training


concept
has
been
developed.



The
training
needs
assessment
is
scheduled
for
the
end
of
the
first
year,
once
the


logging
quotas
and
a
traceability
system
has
been
developed.




Intermediate
result
4.6


By
36
months
after
project
start:
Lessons
learned
from
the
project
on
the
control
of


timber
trade
have
been
fed
into
national
forums
and
the
development
of
legislation
in


Laos
as
well
as
into
the
voluntary
FLEG­T
processes
at
national
level
in
Vietnam.



The
project
maintains
a
close
contact
with
the
European
Forestry
Institute
(EFI),


which
implements
the
FLEGT
Asia
Program
on
behalf
of
the
EU.
The
fact‐finding


missions
have
been
conducted
in
consultation
with
EFI.
Representatives
from
the


FLEGT
VPA
working
group
(Vietnam)
and
the
FLEGT
focal
point
(Laos)
have
been


consistently
involved
in
consultations,
and
have
provided
inputs
to
the
regional


workshop
(see
intermediate
result
4.2)




 26



Specific
result
5


Capacity
Building
for
REDD+
and
Development
of
a
Project
Design
Document
for
the


transboundary
area
in
Xekong
and
Salavan
Provinces
in
Lao
PDR
and
Quang
Nam


and
ThuaThien
Hue
Provinces
of
Vietnam



Summary


Initial
relationships
have
been
established
with
government
counterparts
at
the


provincial
level
during
the
Hue
inception
workshop
in
June
2011.
Engagement
with


the
national
REDD
working
groups/task
forces
in
Laos
and
Vietnam
has
been


stepped
up
to
closely
align
the
CarBi
project
with
national‐level
developments
and


approaches.
Initial
research
into
available
MRV
methods
has
commenced
to
ensure


that
negotiations
with
government
partners
on
the
best
suitable
approach
are


informed.
Although
the
REDD
component
team
brings
a
wealth
of
experience
to
the


project,

it
is
worthwhile
to
incorporate
expertise
from
outside
of
CarBi,
especially
in


relation
to
detailed
knowledge
of
MRV
methodologies.

Therefore,
the
expertise
of


the
global
WWF
network
will
be
leveraged
to
ensure
that
decisions
in
the
project,


particularly
on
MRV,
are
based
on
the
best
available
evidence
and
experience.
We


also
finalized
a
solid
draft
TORs
for
the
PDD
feasibility
study
after
extensive


consultation
with
WWF
Colleagues
in
Austria
and
Germany.



Intermediate
result
5.1


The
methodology
for
the
forest
carbon
inventory
has
been
negotiated
with
all
relevant


Government
partners
by
6
months
after
project
start.



Progress

Comprehensive
assessment
and
documentation
of
descriptions,
costs,
advantages


and
disadvantages
of
the
available
MRV
options
in
a
“menu”
has
been
developed.


These
are
being
communicated
in
an
accessible
and
user‐friendly
way
to
facilitate


negotiations
with
both
technical
and
non‐technical
government
counterparts.
This


material
has
been
revised
by
the
global
WWF
Forest
Carbon
Initiative
MRV
team
to


provide
technical
feedback
and
input.
Progress
on
MRV
capacity
building
and


decision
making
workshops
is
provided
in
5.2
below.
During
these
meetings
and


workshop,
we
sought
advice
and
ownership
from
counterparts
regarding
the


necessary
approval
process,
with
the
aim
of
developing
a
roadmap
of
the
necessary


processes
to
be
completed
by
the
final
workshop
planned
for
February
2012.


Following
facilitated
discussion,
Laos
Government
counterparts
recommended
that


Spot‐5
satellite
data
be
used
as
the
basis
of
the
project
MRV
system,
as
Spot‐5
is


currently
being
used
for
the
National
MRV
system.
Government
officials
advised
that


no
formal
permissions
would
be
required
in
order
to
utilize
this
data.




The
Hue
PMU
members’
recommendations
were
in
In
line
with
the


recommendations
from
the
Laos
workshop
to
use
Spot‐5
remote
sensing
data
as
the


basis
of
the
project
MRV
system.
They
also
recommended
to
use
forest
status
maps


and
Landsat
methods
for
conducting
the
historical
carbon
baseline.
If
we
wanted
to



 27



use
LiDAR
technology,
Vietnamese
government
officials
advised
that
it
would
take


normally
6
months
to
seek
approval
for
the
flights
from
the
Military
Ministry
and


the
Ministry
for
Foreign
Affairs
–
with
no
guarantee
of
a
positive
result.
Hence
the


above
recommendations
did
not
include
LiDAR.

The
meeting
with
the
Quang
Nam


PMU
is
planned
for
19
Jan,
with
the
final
decision
on
the
MRV
system
to
be
made
at


the
Technical
Trans
Boundary
Workshop
on
14‐15
February
2012.




Challenges
and
solutions


1.
No
specific
budget
(other
than
a
small
allocation
for
travel)
for
the
MRV
decision‐

making
process
/
workshop.
Solutions:
1.
Mobilizing
expertise
in
MRV
within
the


global
WWF
network
to
build
capacity
of
Greater
Mekong
team;
learning
from


experience
of
other
projects
in
the
region;
utilising
experience
of
CarBi
REDD


volunteer
in
remote
sensing
technology.
2.
Combining
decision‐making
workshop


with
capacity
building
workshop,
REDD+
Regional
Inception
workshop
and
XePian


project
REDD+
workshop
to
share
expenses.



Intermediate
result
5.2


Representatives
of
local
Government
agencies
in
Vietnam
and
Laos
are
trained
in


REDD
baseline
and
monitoring
methods
by
9
months
after
project
start,
in


development
of
PDDs
by
12
months
after
project
start
as
well
as
in
compensation
and


benefit
mechanisms
by
24
months
after
project
start.



Progress

Surveys
of
government
counterparts
attending
the
Laos
and
Quang
Nam
inception


workshops
provided
guidance
on
areas
of
focus
for
capacity
building
interventions


(Note
that
the
Hue
inception
workshop
was
held
before
the
survey
was


designed).This
feedback
is
now
being
used
to
design
targeted
capacity
building


interventions,
the
first
of
which
was
a
workshop
in
November
2011
focused
on


familiarizing
counterparts
with
a
range
of
MRV
technology
options
so
that
they

can


make
informed
decisions
about
the
MRV
system
for
the
project.
Learning
from
the


experiences
of
the
Xe
Pian
REDD+
project
was
also
a
focus
of
the
workshop.




Capacity
building
on
MRV
system
design
has
been
integrated
into
the
MRV
decision‐

making
workshop
to
ensure
that
MRV
system
recommendations
are
informed.
See


above
for
details
of
the
workshop
that
has
already
been
held
in
Laos,
and
workshops


in
Vietnam
were
carried
out
in
December
2011
and
planned
for
January
2012
in
Hue


and
Quangnam.
The
Technical
Trans
Boundary
REDD
workshop
planned
for


February
14‐15
will
further
deepen
counterparts’
knowledge
and
understand
of


REDD,
particularly
MRV.
Some
introductory
training
on
PDD
development
is
also


planned
as
part
of
this
workshop
and
we
hope
that
a
representative
from
Winrock


or
SNV
will
attend
to
share
their
practical
experience
in
PDD
development.





 28



Challenges
and
solutions


Budgetary
gaps
–
no
budget
allocated
for
a
capacity
building
needs
assessment;
no


specific
budget
allocations
for
capacity
building
for
PDD
development
or


compensation
and
benefit
mechanisms
as
agreed
with
KfW
under
intermediate


result
5.2.
Solutions:
Use
of
inception
workshops
to
conduct
informal
capacity


building
needs
assessments
with
government
counterparts;
collaboration
with


organizations
like
RECOFTC
and
the
ADB
in
Vietnam
who
are
also
working
in
the


area
of
REDD+
capacity
building;
exploring
opportunities
for
combining
capacity


building
activities
with
other
CarBi
project
activities;
focusing
on
capacity
building


through
working
closely
with
counterparts/on‐the‐job
training
as
well
as
formal


capacity
building
workshops/training.



Intermediate
result
5.3


By
11
months
after
project
start:
Carbon
baseline
for
the
project
area
is
established.


See
5.1
above



Revision
of
the
initial
estimation
(developed
during
the
project
planning
stage)
of


forest
carbon
emissions
preserved
over
the
project
lifetime
is
a
key
part
of
the


upcoming
feasibility
study
(see
below
for
more
details
of
feasibility
study).
This


revision
will
include
estimation
of
the
carbon
baseline
for
the
project
area
based
on


analysis
of
remote
sensing
data.
As
part
of
the
full
PDD
development
process,

this


estimation
will
be
further
refined
based
on
site‐specific
biomass
and
carbon
stock


information
from
the
field
plots.





Intermediate
result
5.4


By
12
months
after
project
start:
The
framework
and
scope
for
a
possible
cross­border


REDD
project
has
been
appraised
with
a
feasibility
study.



A
solid
draft
of
the
TORs
for
the
feasibility
study
has
been
prepared
and
has
recently


been
improved
through
technical
input
from
WWF
Austria
and
Germany.
The
next


version
of
the
draft
will
be
shared
with
Laos
and
Vietnamese
government


counterparts
for
their
approval,
with
a
view
to
having
a
final
version
to
send
to
KfW


for
approval
in
February.



As
the
value
of
the
feasibility
study
is
estimated
at
10,000
Euro,
an
international


procurement
process
is
not
required.
However,
as
the
consultant
who
conducts
the


feasibility
study
may
be
selected
to
complete
the
PDD
(valued
at
over
200,000


Euro),
the
TORs
will
be
sent
to
several
local
and
international
consulting
firms
for


proposals
to
ensure
the
best
option
is
selected.





Intermediate
result
5.5


By
18
months
after
project
start:
The
framework
and
the
terms
of
references
for
the


development
of
the
PDD
have
been
developed.



 29



n/a



Intermediate
result
5.6


By
23
months
after
project
start:
The
ToR
and
tender
for
the
development
of
the
PDD


has
been
published.


n/a



Intermediate
result
5.7


By
end
of
project,
the
changes
in
forest
carbon
and
degradation
and
deforestation
in


the
project
areas
are
assessed.



n/a



6.
Vote
of
thanks



The
establishment
of
the
CarBi
Family
brand
has
been
quite
successful.
From
our


very
dedicated
and
diligent
CarBi
Component
Leaders
and
their
Team
Members,
to


the
very
able
support
from
our
extended
family
members
in
WWF
Germany,
as
well


as
our
Finance,
Administration
and
HR
Directorates
and
support
staff,
both


Regionally
in
GMP
and
locally
in
Laos
and
Vietnam,
and
also
our
Communications


Staff
and
government
counterparts,
have
all
played
a
key
role
in
the
establishment


of
CarBi
and
its
progress
thus
far.
The
strategic
support
from
our
Representative


and
Biodiversity
as
well
as
Country
Directors,
also
provided
important
direction
and


guidance.
It
is
the
strength
of
this
extended
Family,
which
will
carry
us
through
the


challenges
towards
excellence…and
realizing
our
vision
of
becoming
a
world‐class


project.



7.
Annexes


Annex
1


Media
Coverage
for
the
reporting
period


CarBi
inception
workshop
in
Quang
Nam



1.
Báo
Quảng
Nam


http://baoquangnam.com.vn/xa‐hoi/38/32339‐du‐tru‐cac‐bon‐va‐bao‐ton‐da‐

dang‐sinh‐




2.
The
People’s
newspapers


http://nhandan.com.vn/cmlink/nhandandientu/thoisu/khoa‐hoc/khoa‐h‐c/qu‐ng‐

nam‐




3.
Việt
Nam
plus


http://www.vietnamplus.vn/Home/18‐trieu‐euro‐cho‐du‐an‐bao‐ton‐da‐dang‐

sinh‐




 30




4.
The
People’s
Representative



http://daibieunhandan.vn/default.aspx?tabid=83&NewsId=220153



5.
Quang
Nam
External
Affair
Dept.
website


http://ngoaivuquangnam.gov.vn/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=1

320&




6.
Go
News


http://news.go.vn/tin/197774/Quang‐Nam‐th‐agrave‐nh‐lap‐Ban‐quan‐l‐yacute‐

Du‐




7.
QRT


http://www.qrt.vn/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=5370&Itemid=

666:tes




8.
Trang
web
Chính
phủ
nước
cộng
hoà
xã
hội
chủ
nghĩa
VN


http://baodientu.chinhphu.vn/Home/Quang‐Nam‐Gan‐18‐trieu‐euro‐bao‐ton‐da‐

dang‐




9.
Nam
Trà
My
district
newspapers


http://namtramy.gov.vn/index.php/vi/news/KINH‐TE‐XA‐HOI/Quang‐Nam‐Khoi‐

dong‐




10.
General
Administration
of
Tourism



http://www.moitruongdulich.vn/index.php?itemid=5202




11.
Long
Truong
Vu
company
website



http://www.longtruongvu.com/quang‐nam‐thanh‐lap‐ban‐quan‐ly‐du‐an‐du‐tru‐

cac‐bon‐





Sharing
workshop
on
Forest
Guard
Patrolling
model




1.
Vietnam
Times
(Thời
đại)


http://thoidai.com.vn/WWF‐Bao‐ve‐SAO‐LA‐2201‐2805.htm




2.
Thừa
Thiên
Huế
newspaper
(báo
TTH)


http://www.baothuathienhue.vn/?gd=1&cn=5&id=315&newsid=20110802093338



3.
People’s
police
(Công
an
Nhân
dân)



http://cadn.com.vn/News/Phap‐Luat/Toa‐Soan‐Ban‐Doc/2011/9/5/65224.ca



4.
Thua
Thien
Hue
province
TV
website


http://www.trt.com.vn/tabid/57/ctl/PrintNewsArticle/mid/439/itemid/7243/cat

egoryId/12/type/1/Default.aspx



 31




5.
Communist
party
website


http://www.baomoi.com/Home/AnNinh/www.cpv.org.vn/Cam‐go‐bao‐ve‐rung‐

dac‐dung‐tai‐Khu‐bao‐ton‐Sao‐La‐Thua‐Thien‐‐Hue/6935299.epi



6.
Bao
moi


http://www.baomoi.com/Cam‐go‐bao‐ve‐rung‐dac‐dung‐tai‐Khu‐bao‐ton‐Sao‐La‐

Thua‐Thien‐‐Hue/141/6935299.epi



7.

A
blog


http://saola‐wwf.blogspot.com/




CarBi
Trans­boundary
workshop




1.
Báo
mới


http://www.baomoi.com/Viet‐‐Lao‐hop‐tac‐chong‐khai‐thac‐buon‐ban‐go‐trai‐

phep/122/7494295.epi



2.
Thiennhien.net


http://www.baomoi.com/Home/DoiNoi‐DoiNgoai/www.thiennhien.net/Viet‐‐Lao‐

hop‐tac‐chong‐khai‐thac‐buon‐ban‐go‐trai‐phep/7494295.epi



3.
Hải
quan
online


http://www.baohaiquan.vn/Pages/Viet‐Nam‐Lao‐hop‐tac‐nham‐quan‐ly‐hieu‐qua‐

cac‐khu‐bao‐ton‐va‐kiem‐soat‐buon‐ban‐go‐trai‐phep.aspx



4.
Vietnamplus


http://www.vietnamplus.vn/Home/VietLao‐hop‐tac‐quan‐ly‐hieu‐qua‐cac‐khu‐

bao‐ton/201112/116273.vnplus



5.
Vnexpress


http://vnexpress.net/gl/xa‐hoi/2011/12/kho‐kiem‐soat‐go‐lau‐qua‐bien‐gioi‐viet‐

lao/



6.
Báo
điện
tử
Đại
biểu
nhân
dân


http://daibieunhandan.vn/default.aspx?tabid=83&NewsId=231955



7.
Thừa
Thiên
Huế
Online


http://www.baothuathienhue.vn/?gd=1&cn=36&newsid=20111206172717



8.
Cổng
thông
tin
điện
tử
Thừa
Thiên
Huế


http://www1.thuathienhue.gov.vn/Portal_News/Views/NewsDetail.aspx?Id=14574



9.
Doanh
nghiệp
Huế


http://doanhnghiephue.com.vn/Print.aspx?ArticleID=1201



 32




10.
Sở
Nông
nghiệp
và
phát
triển
nông
thôn


http://www.sonongnghiepquangnam.gov.vn/index.php?option=com_content&view

=article&id=1166:hp‐tac‐nhm‐ci‐thin‐qun‐ly‐cac‐khu‐bo‐tn‐thien‐nhien‐kim‐soat‐

vic‐khai‐thac‐g‐trai‐phep‐va‐buon‐ban‐g‐xuyen‐bien‐gii&catid=106:tin‐ni‐

bt&Itemid=8



11.
Công
an
thành
phố
Đà
Nẵng


http://cadn.com.vn/News/Chinh‐Tri‐Xa‐Hoi/Thoi‐Su/2011/12/7/69664.ca



12.
Đài
phát
thanh
truyền
hình
Thừa
Thiên
Huế


http://trt.vn/tabid/57/itemid/8598/categoryId/0/type/1/Default.aspx



13.
Báo
ảnh
Việt
Nam


http://vietnam.vnanet.vn/vnp/vi‐vn/13/124/124/29771/default.aspx



14.
Báo
điện
tử
Đảng
Cộng
sản
Việt
Nam


http://www.cpv.org.vn/CPV/Modules/News/NewsDetail.aspx?co_id=30089&cn_id

=494560



15.
Báo
Đại
Đoàn
Kết


http://mobi.daidoanket.vn/index.aspx?Menu=1371&chitiet=43249&Style=1



16.
Net
Cố
Đô


http://www.hue.vnn.vn/hue24h/201112/VN‐Lao‐hop‐tac‐nham‐cai‐thien‐quan‐ly‐

Khu‐bao‐ton‐va‐kiem‐soat‐buon‐ban‐go‐trai‐phep‐2115611/



MOU
Signing
Ceremony
with
Laos
Government


http://www.vientianemai.net/teen/khao/1/3793



Salavanh
Inception
workshop
in
Laos


(no link available)



REDD+
Lessons
Learnt
Workshop
for
Xe
Pian
and
Xe
Sap
in
Pakse


Article
on
workshop
published
in
Vientiane
Times
(18
November
2011)…no
link
available.



Laos
Government
article
on
funding
support
for
Xe
Sap



http://www.vientianetimes.org.la/FreeContent/FreeContent_Forest.htm




Annex
2


Summarised
CarBi
Communications
Strategy
(progress
made
thus
far
in



italics)




 33



CARBI
COMMUNICATIONS
GOALS
AND
OBJECTIVES:


Goal
1:
Positioning

and
protocols
­
Government
officials,
local
NGOs,
funding


partners
and
local
communities
recognize
WWF
as
a
trusted
expert
and
credible


leader
in
conserving
the
border
area
of
southern
Laos
and
central
Vietnam
and


revitalizing
local
economies
in
ways
that
support
wildlife
conservation
and
benefit


livelihoods.




o


Objective
1.1
‐
By
end
of
Q2
FY12,
messaging
guide
and
online


presence
established
on
www.panda.org
.
The
first
draft
CarBi
site


is
ready
(please
see
www.panda.org/greatermekong/carbi).



o


Objective
1.2
‐
By
end
of
Q2
FY12,
key
spokespeople
identified
and


media
communications
protocol
established
for
CarBi,
in
line


with
KfW’s
Communications
Protocol

and
the
internal
approval


process
guidance.
Done.


o


Objective
1.3
‐
By
end
of
Q2
FY12,
consistent
guidelines
for


branding
CarBi
communications
materials
established
with
clear


guidance
on
using
various
logos,
including
WWF
and
partners.


Done.


o


Objective
1.4
‐
core
assets
to
communicate
the
project
–
photos,


video,
maps

–
reviewed
and
acquisition
plan
established.
In


process.



Goal
2:
Showcase
innovation
and
achievements
–
protection
wins,
high


biodiversity,
critical
threats
and
climate
and
forest
linkages
within
one
of
the
largest


continuous
natural
forest
areas
in
continental
Asia
are
shared
and
communicated


effectively
with
target
audiences.


o


Objective
2.1
–
During
FY12,
CarBi
project’s
protected
areas
goals


reinforced
through
strategy
celebrating
the
20 th 
anniversary
of


the
saola’s
discovery
to
science.
In
process.



o


Objective
2.2
–
During
FY12,
profile
of
Forest
Guards
and
forest


guard
model,
and
the
associated
places
and
endemism,
increased


through
stories
from
the
field,
camera
traps
and
press
trips.
Some


products
(media
exposure,
flip
cams)
already
delivered...some
in


preparation.



 34



o


Objective
2.3
–
By
end
of
Q2
FY12,
awareness
and
importance
of


Xe
Sap
protection
increased
through
online
expedition
and
media


strategy
for
the
Xe
Sap
biodiversity
survey.
Will
be
activated
once


we
are
ready
to
launch
the
survey.


o


Objective
2.4
–
During
FY12,
awareness
of
the
livelihood
benefits


of
forest
restoration,
the
“conservation
economy,”
increased


through
stories
from
the
field
and
press
trips.
Will
be
planned
in


consultation
with
the
counterparts.


Goal
3:
Internal
communications
­

WWF
staff
speak
with
one
voice
on
WWF’s


CarBi
project
—a
move
that
will
help
build
trust
and
credibility
with
target


audiences
—and
CarBi
staff
utilize
knowledge
management
and
sharing
platforms


to
ensure
efficient
and
effective
internal
communications
within
the
project
and


across
the
wider
WWF
Network.
.









o


Objective
3.1:
By
Q3
FY12,
WWF’s
CarBi
team
utilize
joint




messaging

that
defines
the
trans
boundary,
cross‐cutting
conservation


activities
of
WWF’s
work
with
forestry
and
other
relevant
departments


and
local
populations.
Trans
Boundary
workshops
are
used
as
platforms.























o



Objective
3.2:
By
Q3
FY12,
CarBi
staff
are
trained
and
equipped
to









update
and
manage
their
content
areas
within
the
Greater
Mekong
google
site


and
provide
timely
updates
for
inclusion
in
the
Greater
Mekong
newsletter.


Already
contributed
to
first
newsletter.
Drop
Box
is
currently
CarBi's
shared


platform...will
migrate
finished
products
to
google
site.



Annex
3


Summarised
CarBi
Traffic
Light
Tracking
System











 35


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