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TABOO: THE ACTUAL MODERNIST AESTHETIC, MADE REAL A ...

TABOO: THE ACTUAL MODERNIST AESTHETIC, MADE REAL A ...

TABOO: THE ACTUAL MODERNIST AESTHETIC, MADE REAL A

TABOO: THE ACTUAL MODERNIST AESTHETIC, MADE REAL A Dissertation Submitted to the Graduate School of the University of Notre Dame in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Doctor of Philosophy by Christopher David Chapman Graduate Program in English Notre Dame, Indiana July 2011 Stephen Fredman, Director

  • Page 2 and 3: TABOO: THE ACTUAL MODERNIST AESTHET
  • Page 4 and 5: Nathan ii
  • Page 6 and 7: PREFACE This dissertation recovers
  • Page 8 and 9: The fourth chapter considers the me
  • Page 10 and 11: CHAPTER ONE: TABOO: THE ACTUAL MODE
  • Page 12 and 13: these two processes is so deeply en
  • Page 14 and 15: The origin of Benjamin‟s late tho
  • Page 16 and 17: foundational task the clarification
  • Page 18 and 19: the presence of leading commentary:
  • Page 20 and 21: disposition to rendering an aesthet
  • Page 22 and 23: Language never gives mere signs‖
  • Page 24 and 25: Benjamin‟s theories imply that th
  • Page 26 and 27: his objects as pieces of property;
  • Page 28 and 29: of signification, of an impassive h
  • Page 30 and 31: philosophy that God imparts to thin
  • Page 32 and 33: linguistic assumptions of the traue
  • Page 34 and 35: sadness allows nature to slough off
  • Page 36 and 37: history‖ overcomes its being ensn
  • Page 38 and 39: could have made possible were they
  • Page 40 and 41: an example of those studies where B
  • Page 42 and 43: Benjamin asserts blithely that this
  • Page 44 and 45: the reality of the dialogic king-he
  • Page 46 and 47: their knowledge that the sovereign,
  • Page 48 and 49: Taboo, then, as the object against
  • Page 50 and 51: I would have little luck Mein Fluge
  • Page 52 and 53:

    Benjamin connects this pursuit of t

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    narrative that affirms Benjamin‟s

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    fragments of lost totalities belong

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    spirit that Benjamin describes hidi

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    contradictory registers of symbolic

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    the bibliographic code, delicate as

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    historical moment. Pound‘s antiqu

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    things and artifacts, as they are b

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    The critics who have made the most

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    of Propertius). The signature of au

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    apostrophizes to Browning about his

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    mistakes leave the author‘s hand

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    ―[I]mpersonalizing ‗Three Canto

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    CHAPTER THREE: LONG SERIES OF TRANS

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    of Propertius has abducted and conc

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    and American speech dialects free f

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    story he uses to make sense out of

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    eviewer in the journal The New Age,

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    we might not: for example, sections

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    that the classics should be humanly

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    which I paid no conscious attention

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    emotional timbre of Cynthia's world

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    Propertius frequently manages to us

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    seduction as an insincere game. In

  • Page 100 and 101:

    example of the lengths to which a l

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    despairing over Cynthia's infidelit

  • Page 104 and 105:

    and transforms it into Callimachi m

  • Page 106 and 107:

    CHAPTER FOUR: DE-PERSONALIZATION AN

  • Page 108 and 109:

    and interesting as Saunders‘ must

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    It is with the question of allobiog

  • Page 112 and 113:

    interesting, a rapprochement is nec

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    tongue inside poetry that would pre

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    ely on the aboriginal poetic, lyric

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    that metalepsis is a useful heurist

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    finding first what the prefix "im"

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    archive of experiences (represented

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    impersonality. Weil uses a processe

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    As the most formally defined of mod

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    In the Goods of Day - (F 1203) Jack

  • Page 130 and 131:

    delirium of self-hood that my under

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    CHAPTER FIVE: ―DO YOU WANT ANY MO

  • Page 134 and 135:

    In other treatments of Ezra Pound

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    Renaissance now registers in modern

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    in Rimini, Pound finds the building

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    his invention of a unique poetic te

  • Page 142 and 143:

    …and here have I brought cutters

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    of the Lords Malatesta…‖ - woul

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    Pound ―discovered‖ the Broglio

  • Page 148 and 149:

    hands) favoured by Morris but updat

  • Page 150 and 151:

    focused on to narrate Pound‘s ind

  • Page 152 and 153:

    in Venice: On October the 26 th Cun

  • Page 154 and 155:

    Renaissance humanism inasmuch as th

  • Page 156 and 157:

    connection to the institutions that

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    “For Walter Strachan from his fri

  • Page 160 and 161:

    modernist poetry presented in 1930.

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    CHAPTER SIX: THE SUBSTANCE OF ALLEG

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    historical critique is done a disse

  • Page 166 and 167:

    that which they denote. Hullot-Kent

  • Page 168 and 169:

    Adorno favored the range and a-them

  • Page 170 and 171:

    classicism plays no role” (OGT 16

  • Page 172 and 173:

    orrowed the concept of natural hist

  • Page 174 and 175:

    non-identity and critical ―demyth

  • Page 176 and 177:

    To define the dialectical terms of

  • Page 178 and 179:

    Adorno‘s adoption of Lukacs‘ be

  • Page 180 and 181:

    ―argumentation is fruitless.‖ T

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    Hullot-Kentor eloquently makes the

  • Page 184 and 185:

    The replacement of the general cate

  • Page 186 and 187:

    has produced the condition in which

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    and titles become reactive cinders

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    Cunard, Nancy Clara. Letters to Ezr