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PIERRE BOAISTUAU - eTheses Repository - University of Birmingham

PIERRE BOAISTUAU - eTheses Repository - University of Birmingham

PIERRE BOAISTUAU - eTheses Repository - University of

PIERRE BOAISTUAU (c. 1517-1566) AND THE EMPLOYMENT OF HUMANISM IN MID SIXTEENTH-CENTURY FRANCE by GEORGIOS DOUKAS A thesis submitted to the University of Birmingham for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY School of History and Cultures College of Arts and Law University of Birmingham September 2011

  • Page 2 and 3: University of Birmingham Research A
  • Page 4 and 5: To Dr Costas Gaganakis who introduc
  • Page 6 and 7: TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction 1 Ch
  • Page 8 and 9: LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS Figure 1: Map
  • Page 10 and 11: EDITORIAL CONVENTIONS In order to p
  • Page 12 and 13: same time causes wonder as to how s
  • Page 14 and 15: article ‘Notes sur Pierre Boaistu
  • Page 16 and 17: This was also the case in the 2002
  • Page 18 and 19: Histoires tragiques has attracted a
  • Page 20 and 21: tragiques as part of a literary gen
  • Page 22 and 23: contextualise its concept and chara
  • Page 24 and 25: Le Théâtre du monde translated by
  • Page 26 and 27: and natural histories, and to stres
  • Page 28 and 29: irths are linked to the issues of e
  • Page 30 and 31: Firstly, Boaistuau’s career as a
  • Page 32 and 33: Besides Boaistuau’s importance fo
  • Page 34 and 35: of his varied work together, and un
  • Page 36 and 37: a whole new level, much more signif
  • Page 38 and 39: which will add to the picture of Bo
  • Page 40 and 41: such as Joseph Scaliger, François
  • Page 42 and 43: endeavors but which have been hithe
  • Page 44 and 45: The place (Paris) and date (1566) o
  • Page 46 and 47: work). 91 If Simonin’s theory is
  • Page 48 and 49: known in France as the ‘tiers ét
  • Page 50 and 51: degree of inspiration which can be
  • Page 52 and 53:

    suggested the period between 1547 a

  • Page 54 and 55:

    that during his two years of servic

  • Page 56 and 57:

    canon law - which had become essent

  • Page 58 and 59:

    eputation and was among the key fig

  • Page 60 and 61:

    Paris, of the dissection of a human

  • Page 62 and 63:

    maintained a close relationship. 14

  • Page 64 and 65:

    must have caused Boaistuau, it also

  • Page 66 and 67:

    the most powerful monarchs in the s

  • Page 68 and 69:

    marvels which became a great succes

  • Page 70 and 71:

    Théâtre du monde. Histoires des a

  • Page 72 and 73:

    literary figures in sixteenth-centu

  • Page 74 and 75:

    of a wicked sect (‘ceste malheure

  • Page 76 and 77:

    his books. The aim was to present a

  • Page 78 and 79:

    laurier, puis en lames de plomb, su

  • Page 80 and 81:

    into the nature of French print cul

  • Page 82 and 83:

    2.1. The publishing history of Pier

  • Page 84 and 85:

    considering that the majority of th

  • Page 86 and 87:

    most famous work. 216 Most of the F

  • Page 88 and 89:

    and J. Froyen respectively, while t

  • Page 90 and 91:

    For instance, there is a seven-volu

  • Page 92 and 93:

    containing, inter alia, numerous ex

  • Page 94 and 95:

    all of which were published in Pari

  • Page 96 and 97:

    Tigurinus. 237 He also mentioned Tr

  • Page 98 and 99:

    les devroient pas retenir si long-t

  • Page 100 and 101:

    Scots also had a copy of L’Histoi

  • Page 102 and 103:

    […] sixteenth-century Spanish Ame

  • Page 104 and 105:

    print from scribal culture. 270 In

  • Page 106 and 107:

    2.2.1. The advent of print in Franc

  • Page 108 and 109:

    Soon after its establishment, print

  • Page 110 and 111:

    continued until the middle of the s

  • Page 112 and 113:

    Elizabeth Eisenstein has vividly de

  • Page 114 and 115:

    opportunity to proofread his work:

  • Page 116 and 117:

    stages of production. 302 Many prin

  • Page 118 and 119:

    Contrary to the commonplace notion

  • Page 120 and 121:

    growth in numbers of books publishe

  • Page 122 and 123:

    proofread his own works), a transla

  • Page 124 and 125:

    under the official responsibility o

  • Page 126 and 127:

    The fact that most of Boaistuau’s

  • Page 128 and 129:

    engraver of types. His roman fonts

  • Page 130 and 131:

    For example, figure 8 (see previous

  • Page 132 and 133:

    which were popular and fast-selling

  • Page 134 and 135:

    particular the bonds between the wr

  • Page 136 and 137:

    Title of work Editions Editions Edi

  • Page 138 and 139:

    people from the first tradition, gi

  • Page 140 and 141:

    theological-moralising context whic

  • Page 142 and 143:

    profession. They appeared as the fi

  • Page 144 and 145:

    CHAPTER 3 Humanism, narrative ficti

  • Page 146 and 147:

    neighbouring countries, such as Ita

  • Page 148 and 149:

    distinct philosophy, it nevertheles

  • Page 150 and 151:

    with legal texts, collections of st

  • Page 152 and 153:

    has seventy-two nouvelles, the Aman

  • Page 154 and 155:

    everything he disliked and suppress

  • Page 156 and 157:

    Taillemont’s Discours des champs

  • Page 158 and 159:

    transmission of rhetoric elements t

  • Page 160 and 161:

    made advances to the chamberlain’

  • Page 162 and 163:

    A fourth aspect of ‘love’ exami

  • Page 164 and 165:

    who married a woman from Milan but

  • Page 166 and 167:

    However, they each adopted a differ

  • Page 168 and 169:

    probably had a certain purpose whic

  • Page 170 and 171:

    ‘histoire’ to be an account or

  • Page 172 and 173:

    formation of the dramatic feel of t

  • Page 174 and 175:

    might follow any transgression of m

  • Page 176 and 177:

    purpose, to restore the social and

  • Page 178 and 179:

    scholarly work and thus appealed to

  • Page 180 and 181:

    Lothar explained these adversities

  • Page 182 and 183:

    allowed them to borrow and combine

  • Page 184 and 185:

    expressions and examples found in C

  • Page 186 and 187:

    language-learning intention. 536 Su

  • Page 188 and 189:

    Pico della Mirandola. 543 Its rathe

  • Page 190 and 191:

    Boaistuau was attracted by Stoic mo

  • Page 192 and 193:

    point de la haine de Dieu, mais de

  • Page 194 and 195:

    Le Théâtre du monde was a call to

  • Page 196 and 197:

    misery and dignity of Man proved to

  • Page 198 and 199:

    Mankind found fertile ground in Ren

  • Page 200 and 201:

    armé d’entendement, et vestu de

  • Page 202 and 203:

    celle qui est terrestre, souspire a

  • Page 204 and 205:

    example, this was evident when he w

  • Page 206 and 207:

    absolutism’. 603 It will be shown

  • Page 208 and 209:

    came into being after the visit of

  • Page 210 and 211:

    Boaistuau added three more treatise

  • Page 212 and 213:

    malice (‘une necessité qui forsa

  • Page 214 and 215:

    estrictions were integral parts of

  • Page 216 and 217:

    law in terms of form and context, w

  • Page 218 and 219:

    administration of the Church in Fra

  • Page 220 and 221:

    In the early modern period, however

  • Page 222 and 223:

    and particularly the classical peri

  • Page 224 and 225:

    visits to the poor to encourage the

  • Page 226 and 227:

    and can be seen not only as an exho

  • Page 228 and 229:

    conseil des sages’). The tyrant f

  • Page 230 and 231:

    les Citez sont edifiées… les loi

  • Page 232 and 233:

    keep the peace: ‘Maintenant ie co

  • Page 234 and 235:

    with many works focusing on the mal

  • Page 236 and 237:

    spread of Islam, the history and co

  • Page 238 and 239:

    4.2. Historical writing and the His

  • Page 240 and 241:

    historical works of various kinds u

  • Page 242 and 243:

    comprehensive history of historiogr

  • Page 244 and 245:

    sentiment of ‘national’ pride.

  • Page 246 and 247:

    also the first work titled as an ec

  • Page 248 and 249:

    his purpose was to record the event

  • Page 250 and 251:

    the effort of the Catholic Church t

  • Page 252 and 253:

    fussent punnis de peine de mort’.

  • Page 254 and 255:

    sang Chrestien respandu’. 761 Dio

  • Page 256 and 257:

    willing to die for their beliefs. B

  • Page 258 and 259:

    constrain their proliferation. For

  • Page 260 and 261:

    promote the spreading of new heresi

  • Page 262 and 263:

    history of the Christian Church, bu

  • Page 264 and 265:

    CHAPTER 5 Natural philosophy and th

  • Page 266 and 267:

    This incorporation of natural philo

  • Page 268 and 269:

    the tools necessary for that undert

  • Page 270 and 271:

    Boas went as far as to speak of a

  • Page 272 and 273:

    ideas, it revealed the degree of mi

  • Page 274 and 275:

    displacement of traditional notions

  • Page 276 and 277:

    driving forces for the study of nat

  • Page 278 and 279:

    Fig. 12: Dürer’s rhinocervs (151

  • Page 280 and 281:

    means of cataloguing and indexing w

  • Page 282 and 283:

    information and different views on

  • Page 284 and 285:

    an examination of the natural world

  • Page 286 and 287:

    least in terms of general structure

  • Page 288 and 289:

    observation déjà scientifique’.

  • Page 290 and 291:

    character, which was evident in lat

  • Page 292 and 293:

    Fig. 14: A man washing his hands wi

  • Page 294 and 295:

    There is no doubt that this interes

  • Page 296 and 297:

    spiritual reality’. 903 The means

  • Page 298 and 299:

    made excellent material for works s

  • Page 300 and 301:

    Another example of preoccupation wi

  • Page 302 and 303:

    sleeping with Desdemona. 924 In art

  • Page 304 and 305:

    ciel, brusle les lieux qu’il atta

  • Page 306 and 307:

    the same day as the Venetians and G

  • Page 308 and 309:

    made a lasting impression on sixtee

  • Page 310 and 311:

    (conducted to determine the cause o

  • Page 312 and 313:

    monsters. Intercourse with menstrua

  • Page 314 and 315:

    Iustice, chastiment, et malediction

  • Page 316 and 317:

    Ottoman Empire, which explored the

  • Page 318 and 319:

    Such dramatic descriptions emphasis

  • Page 320 and 321:

    (comme lon dit) tout à l’entour

  • Page 322 and 323:

    de sang’ which fell near Fribourg

  • Page 324 and 325:

    y many calendars, prognostications,

  • Page 326 and 327:

    The debate as to whether earthquake

  • Page 328 and 329:

    à l’entour les champs estoient s

  • Page 330 and 331:

    of a particular set of features whi

  • Page 332 and 333:

    changing world. The agenda of Frenc

  • Page 334 and 335:

    1585 Lyon Benoist Rigaud French (16

  • Page 336 and 337:

    1588 Lyon Jean Gazaud French (8º)

  • Page 338 and 339:

    Paris Gilles Robinot French (16º)

  • Page 340 and 341:

    APPENDIX B DEDICATORY PIECES TO PIE

  • Page 342 and 343:

    Et des tresors quel t’ont donnés

  • Page 344 and 345:

    9. L. du Lys au seigneur de Launay.

  • Page 346 and 347:

    Qui en telles mains laissecheoir, V

  • Page 348 and 349:

    Launay tu es aussi l’Hercule de l

  • Page 350 and 351:

    Qui nous serrant soubz le fardeau D

  • Page 352 and 353:

    O Launay, ny les grans, ny ceux la

  • Page 354 and 355:

    Boaistuau, P., Histoires prodigieus

  • Page 356 and 357:

    luy mesme en François. Auec un bri

  • Page 358 and 359:

    surnommé Launay, natif de Bretaign

  • Page 360 and 361:

    Cardanus, H., De subtilitate libri

  • Page 362 and 363:

    Armstrong, E., Robert Estienne, Roy

  • Page 364 and 365:

    Bernstein, J., Print Culture and Mu

  • Page 366 and 367:

    Brooke, J., Maclean, I. (eds), Hete

  • Page 368 and 369:

    Cazauran, N., ‘L’Heptaméron fa

  • Page 370 and 371:

    Courbet, E., ‘Jean d’Albret et

  • Page 372 and 373:

    De Lamar, J., ‘French Diplomacy a

  • Page 374 and 375:

    Eisenberg, D., Romances of Chivalry

  • Page 376 and 377:

    Francisco, A., Martin Luther and Is

  • Page 378 and 379:

    Gordon, B., Campi, E. (eds), Archit

  • Page 380 and 381:

    Hartle, A., Michel de Montaigne: Ac

  • Page 382 and 383:

    Jordan, A., Visualizing Kingship in

  • Page 384 and 385:

    Kritzman, L. D., ‘Représenter le

  • Page 386 and 387:

    Lotario dei Segni (ed. R. E. Lewis)

  • Page 388 and 389:

    McLean, I., Learning and the Market

  • Page 390 and 391:

    Nunn, H. M., Staging Anatomies: Dis

  • Page 392 and 393:

    Picone, M., Di Stefano, G., Stewart

  • Page 394 and 395:

    Roper, L., Oedipus and the Devil: W

  • Page 396 and 397:

    Semonin, P., ‘Monsters in the Mar

  • Page 398 and 399:

    Spijker, W. van’t, The Ecclesiast

  • Page 400 and 401:

    Van de Wetering, M., ‘Moralizing

  • Page 402 and 403:

    Willet, L., Poetry and Language in

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