ATOS MANOPS - Bathursted Ccnb

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ATOS MANOPS - Bathursted Ccnb

FOREWORD

DEFINITIONS

ABBREVIATIONS

INDEX

PART 1 — GENERAL

PART 2 — FLIGHT PLANNING

PART 3 – GENERAL FLIGHT DATA ENTRY

PART 4 — NFDPS/NAMES/FDPN/GAMES

PART 5 — RESERVED

TABLE OF CONTENTS

PART 6 — GANDER AUTOMATED AIR TRAFFIC SYSTEM

PART 7 — EMERGENCIES — SEARCH PROCEDURES — SPECIAL PROCEDURES

PART 8 — AMIS AND ALTITUDE RESERVATIONS

PART 9 — AIR TRAFFIC FLOW MANAGEMENT

PART 10 — TRAINING AND ATC OPERATING IRREGULARITIES

PART 11 — ICAO FLIGHT PLANS/ NADIN FORMAT/REPETITIVE FLIGHT PLAN

INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

ATOS TOC-1

2005-09-29


AIR TRAFFIC OPERATIONS SPECIALIST

MANUAL OF OPERATIONS

FOREWORD

The contents of this Manual supersede the directives contained in the 1995 edition of the Operations

Support Specialist Manual of Operations.

Although it is not mandatory to retain the “Blue Sheets”, which form an integral part of the ATOS

Directive (ATOSD) amendment process, users of this Manual are strongly encouraged to do so. The

information contained in the “Blue Sheets” is considered valuable to users, since it provides the

rationale, background and summary of each change made to this publication.

This edition of ATOS MANOPS includes a “Page Verification Sheet” which identifies the current status

of each individual page.

Suggestions for improvements or comments concerning apparent errors or omissions, should be

forwarded in writing through normal channels to the undersigned.

R.R. Speiran

Manager

ATS Standards and Procedures

APRIL 19, 2001

INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

ATOS-I

2006-04-13


RECORD OF AMENDMENTS

NUMBER DATE DATE ENTERED ENTERED BY

ATOSD 2001-2 2001-04-19 Included in this edition

ATOSD 2001-3 2001-07-12 Included in this edition

ATOSD 2001-4 2001-10-04 Included in this edition

ATOSD 2002-1 2002-01-24 Included in this edition

ATOSD 2002-2 2002-04-18 Included in this edition

ATOSD 2002-3 2002-07-11 Included in this edition

ATOSD 2002-4 2002-10-03 Included in this edition

ATOSD 2003-1 2003-01-23 Included in this edition

ATOSD 2003-2 2003-04-17 Included in this edition

ATOSD 2003-3 2003-07-10 Included in this edition

ATOSD 2003-4 2003-10-02 Included in this edition

ATOSD 2004-1 2004-01-22 Included in this edition

ATOSD 2004-2 2004-04-15 Included in this edition

ATOSD 2004-3 2004-07-08 Included in this edition

ATOSD 2004-4 2004-09-30 Included in this edition

ATOSD 2005-1 2005-01-20 Included in this edition

ATOSD 2005-2 2005-04-14 Included in this edition

ATOSD 2005-3 2005-07-07 Included in this edition

ATOSD 2005-4 2005-09-29 Included in this edition

ATOSD 2006-1 2006-01-19 Included in this edition

ATOSD 2006-2 2006-04-13 Included in this edition

ATOSD 2006-3 2006-07-20 Included in this edition

ATOS-II

2006-04-13


ATOS-I 2006-04-13

ATOS-II 2006-04-13

ATOS-III Original

ATOS-IV Original

ATOS-V 2006-07-20

ATOS-VI 2006-07-20

TOC-1 2005-09-29

TOC-2 2005-09-29

DEF-1 2006-07-20

DEF-2 2006-07-20

DEF-3 2006-01-19

DEF-4 2006-01-19

DEF-5 2006-07-20

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DEF-19 2006-07-20

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ABR-1 2006-07-20

ABR-2 2006-07-20

ABR-3 2006-07-20

ABR-4 2006-07-20

ABR-5 2006-07-20

ABR-6 2006-07-20

IND-1 2006-07-20

IND-2 2006-07-20

IND-3 2006-07-20

IND-4 2006-07-20

IND-5 2006-07-20

IND-6 2006-07-20

IND-7 2006-07-20

IND-8 2006-07-20

PART 1

1-1 2004-09-30

1-2 2004-09-30

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1-7 Original

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1-11 2002-07-11

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PAGE VERIFICATION SHEET

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PART 2

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2-7 2002-04-18

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2-47 2003-10-02

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PART 3

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3-5 2002-04-18

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3-7 2006-01-19

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3-17 2006-01-19

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PART 4

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ATOS-III

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PART 5

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PART 6

6-1 Original

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2006-07-20


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PART 7

7-1 2006-07-20

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PART 8

8-1 Original

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8-3 2006-04-13

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8-10 2006-04-13

8-11 Original

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8-15 2002-04-18

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8-17 Original

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8-19 2005-07-07

8-20 2005-07-07

8-21 Original

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8-29 2005-07-07

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PAGE VERIFICATION SHEET

8-31 Original

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PART 9

9-1 2005-09-29

9-2 2005-09-29

9-3 2006-07-20

9-4 2006-07-20

9-5 2005-07-07

9-6 2005-07-07

9-7 2005-09-29

9-8 2005-09-29

PART 10

10-1 Original

10-2 Original

10-3 2005-04-14

10-4 2005-04-14

10-5 2005-04-14

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10-9 2005-04-14

10-10 2005-04-14

10-11 2006-04-13

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PART 11

11-1 Original

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11-9 2006-04-13

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11-13 2006-07-20

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11-29 2006-01-19

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11-33 2006-04-13

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ATOS-IV

2006-07-20


DEFINITIONS

As used in this Manual, the following terms have the meanings defined:

ABEAM — The general position of an aircraft in relation to a fix, point or object that is approximately 90

degrees to the right or left of the aircraft's track.

ACCIDENT — Any aviation occurrence where, at any time during the period commencing when the first

person boards an aircraft for the purpose of flight and ending when the last person disembarks from the

aircraft after the flight:

A. a person, other than a stowaway, sustains a serious injury or fatal injury, that is not self-inflicted or

inflicted by another person or caused by natural causes, as a result of that person:

1. being in the aircraft;

2. coming into direct contact with any part of the aircraft, including any part that may have become

detached from the aircraft; or

3. being directly exposed to the jet blast of the aircraft;

B. the aircraft sustains damage or structural failure adversely affecting the structural strength,

performance or flight characteristics of the aircraft and normally requiring major repair or

replacement of any affected component part, other than damage or failure that is limited to:

1. the engine, its cowlings, or its accessories;

2. the propellers, wing tips, antennas, tires, brakes or fairings; or

3. small dents or puncture holes in the aircraft skin; or

C. the aircraft is missing or is completely inaccessible.

ADIS STATION — A station forming part of the Automated Data Interchange System in Canada.

ADS-ATC — ADS based ATC system — An ATC system with appropriate automation and

communications facilities relying on ADS updates to provide surveillance.

AERODROME — Any area of land, water (including the frozen surface thereof) or other supporting

surface used, designed, prepared, equipped or set apart for use, either in whole or in part, for the arrival,

departure, movement or servicing of aircraft. This includes any buildings, installations and equipment

situated thereon or associated therewith.

AERONAUTICAL FIXED TELECOMMUNICATIONS NETWORK — An integrated worldwide system of

aeronautical fixed circuits provided, as part of the Aeronautical Fixed Service, for the exchange of

messages between the aeronautical fixed stations within the network.

Note: “Integrated” is to be interpreted as a mode of operation necessary to ensure that

messages can be transmitted from an aeronautical fixed station within the network to an

other aeronautical fixed station within the network.

AERONAUTICAL INFORMATION PUBLICATION — A publication issued by or with the authority of a

State and containing aeronautical information of a lasting character essential to air navigation.

AIR DEFENCE IDENTIFICATION ZONE — An airspace of defined dimensions extending upwards from

the surface of the earth within which certain rules for the security control of air traffic apply.

ATOS DEF-1

2006-07-20


AIR DEFENCE LONG RANGE RADAR — A military radar sensor system comprised of a transmitter,

antenna and associated communications which can detect and track targets at all azimuths, ranges and

elevations. It is used for tactical warning/attack assessment and for command and control of fighters in

the conduct of air sovereignty missions.

AIR REFUELLING CONTROL POINT — The geographical point over which the receiver arrives in the

observation/refuelling position with respect to the assigned tanker.

AIR REFUELLING INITIAL POINT — The geographical point at which the receiver aircraft enters the

refuelling track, initiates radio contact with the tanker and begins a manoeuvre to rendezvous.

AIR SOVEREIGNTY TEST — An aircraft on a NOPAR flight plan or ALTRV that is designed to test the

detection, identification, and reporting functions of the air defence forces (ADCF and interceptor/fighter

units).

AIR TAXI — The movement of a helicopter or vertical takeoff and landing aircraft (VTOL) above the

surface of an aerodrome but normally not above 100 feet AGL. The aircraft may proceed via flight at

airspeeds of more than 20 knots (see HOVER TAXI)

AIR TRAFFIC — All aircraft in flight or operating on the manoeuvring area of an aerodrome.

AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL CLEARANCE — An authorization issued by an ATC unit for an aircraft to

proceed within controlled airspace in accordance with the conditions specified by that unit.

AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL INSTRUCTION — A directive issued by an ATC unit for ATC purposes.

AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL OPERATIONS SUPPORT SPECIALIST — An employee assigned to

perform non-control functions in an ATC unit.

AIR TRAFFIC CONTROL UNIT — As the circumstances require, this may be:

A. an ACC established to provide air traffic control service to IFR aircraft and controlled VFR aircraft;

or

B. a control tower established at an airport to provide air traffic control service to airport traffic.

AIR TRAFFIC CONTROLLER — A person holding a valid licence to control air traffic.

* AIR TRAFFIC SERVICES — The following services that are provided by ATC units:

A. IFR CONTROL SERVICES

1. AREA CONTROL SERVICE — The control service provided by ACCs to IFR and CVFR aircraft

operating within specified control areas.

* 2. TERMINAL CONTROL SERVICE — The control service provided by ACCs to aircraft operating

within specified control areas.

B. VFR CONTROL SERVICES

1. AIRPORT CONTROL SERVICE — The control service provided by Airport Control Towers to

airport traffic.

2. RADAR SERVICE — The control service provided by ATC units to:

a. VFR aircraft operating within Class B C and D airspace; and

b. aircraft in a Tower Radar Area.

ATOS DEF-2

2006-07-20


C. INFORMATION SERVICES

1. AIRCRAFT MOVEMENT INFORMATION SERVICE (AMIS) — The service provided by ACCs

for the collection, processing, and dissemination of aircraft movement information, for use by air

defence units.

2. ALERTING SERVICE — The service provided by ATC units to notify appropriate organizations

regarding aircraft in need of search and rescue aid, and to assist such organizations, as

required. This service also includes the alerting of crash equipment, ambulances, doctors, and

any other safety services.

3. FLIGHT INFORMATION SERVICE — The service provided by ATC units for the purpose of

giving advice and information, useful for the safe and efficient movement of aircraft. This service

includes:

a. information on adverse weather conditions as reported, visually observed, or radar observed;

b. information on the unserviceability of NAVAIDs and facilities;

c. traffic information;

d. radar assistance, on request, to all aircraft operating within radar coverage and desiring

position information, navigational guidance, or both; and

e. VHF/UHF direction-finding assistance to aircraft operating within the range of stations so

equipped.

D. SUPPLEMENTARY SERVICES

1. ALTITUDE RESERVATION SERVICE — The service provided by ARE, ARW and ACCs to

provide reserved altitudes for specified air operations in controlled airspace and to provide

information concerning these reservations and military activity areas in controlled and

uncontrolled airspace.

2. CUSTOMS NOTIFICATION SERVICE (ADCUS) — Expression used by pilots to request that

ATC advise U.S. Customs on their behalf of the estimated time of landing at destination.

AIRBORNE COLLISION AVOIDANCE SYSTEM — An aircraft system, based on secondary

surveillance radar (SSR) transponder signals, which operates independently of ground-based

equipment, to provide advice to the pilot on potential conflicting aircraft that are equipped with SSR

transponders.

AIRBORNE WARNING AND CONTROL SYSTEM — An airborne radar unit used as an extension of a

military radar unit during planned exercises and daily training missions.

AIRCRAFT — Any machine, including a rocket, capable of deriving support in the atmosphere from

reactions of the air.

AIRCRAFT EMERGENCY — A situation that places an aircraft in a state of danger.

AIRCRAFT IDENTIFICATION — A group of letters, figures or a combination thereof which is either

identical to, or the coded equivalent of, the aircraft call sign to be used in air-ground communications,

and which is used to identify the aircraft in ground-ground ATS communications.

AIRCRAFT MOVEMENT — A takeoff, landing, or simulated approach by an aircraft.

AIRCRAFT MOVEMENT INFORMATION SERVICE — The service provided by ACCs for the

collection, processing, and dissemination of aircraft movement information for use by air defence units.

ATOS DEF-3

2006-01-19


AIRCRAFT MOVEMENT SURFACE CONDITION REPORT — The report that details the surface

conditions for all aircraft movement areas including runway, taxiways and aprons.

AIRCRAFT OPERATING AGENCY — The person, organization, or enterprise engaged in, or offering

to engage in, aircraft operation. Refer ICAO DOC 8585 for agencies, two letter designators, codes,

decodes and notifying states.

AIRFILE — Flight plan or flight itinerary information filed from an aircraft in flight.

AIR-GROUND COMMUNICATION — Two-way communication between aircraft and stations or

locations on the surface of the earth.

AIRMET — Short-term meteorological information intended primarily for aircraft in flight, to notify pilots

of potentially hazardous weather conditions not described in the current area forecast and not requiring

a SIGMET.

AIRPORT — An aerodrome in respect of which an airport certificate is in force.

AIRPORT CONTROLLER — Duty controller assigned to the airport control position in an Airport Control

Tower.

AIRPORT TRAFFIC — All traffic on the manoeuvring area of an airport and all aircraft flying in the

vicinity of an airport.

AIRWAY — A control area or portion thereof established in the form of a corridor equipped with radio

navigational aids.

ALERT AREA — An airspace of defined dimensions within which a high volume of pilot training or an

unusual type of aerial activity may be carried out.

ALERT NOTICE — An ALNOT message requests that a previously requested communication search

be expanded to all potential landing sites in the search area.

ALERT PHASE — A situation wherein apprehension exists as to the safety of an aircraft and its

occupants.

ALERTING SERVICE — A service provided by ATS units to notify appropriate organizations regarding

aircraft in need of search and rescue (SAR) aid and to assist such organizations as required. This

service also includes the alerting of crash equipment, ambulances, doctors, and any other safety

services.

ALTERNATE AERODROME — An aerodrome to which an aircraft may proceed when it becomes either

impossible or inadvisable to proceed to or to land at the aerodrome of intended landing.

Note: The aerodrome from which a flight departs may also be an alternate aerodrome for that

flight.

ALTERNATE UNIT — A Unit which assumes alerting service responsibility for a part-time FSS's AOR

during it's closed period.

ATOS DEF-4

2006-01-19


ALTIMETER SETTING REGION — Designated areas within which aircraft shall use the altimeter

setting of the nearest station along the route of flight.

ALTITUDE — The vertical distance of a level, a point or an object considered as a point, measured from

mean sea level.

ALTITUDE READOUT — SSR Mode C-derived altitude information displayed in a data tag or tabular

list.

ALTITUDE READOUT VALUE — The altitude figures currently displayed in an altitude readout.

ALTITUDE RESERVATION — An airspace of defined dimensions within controlled airspace, reserved

for the use of a civil or military agency during a specified period. An altitude reservation may be confined

to a fixed area (stationary) or moving in relation to the aircraft that operate within it (moving).

ALTITUDE RESERVATION SPECIALIST — An employee in ARE or ARW assigned responsibility for

processing requests for altitude reservations.

AMIS SECTION — A section established within an ACC to provide Aircraft Movement Information

Service to air defence units.

APPROACH LIGHTS — Lights indicating a desired line of approach to a landing area.

APRON — That part of an aerodrome, other than the manoeuvring area, intended to accommodate the

loading and unloading of passengers and cargo, the refuelling, servicing, maintenance, and parking of

aircraft, and any movement of aircraft, vehicles, and pedestrians necessary for such purposes.

ARC — The track over the ground, of an aircraft flying at a constant distance from a NAVAID, by

reference to distance measuring equipment (DME).

AREA CONTROL CENTRE — An ATC unit that provides ATC service to aircraft operating within a flight

information region.

AREA CONTROLLER — Duty controller assigned to a control position in an ACC.

* AREA NAVIGATION (RNAV) — A method of navigation which permits aircraft operation on any desired

flight path within the coverage of station-referenced NAVAIDs or within the limits of the capability of selfcontained

aids, or a combination of these.

AREA OF RESPONSIBILITY — A geographical area within which alerting service is provided by an

ATS unit designated as the responsible unit.

ARRIVAL CONTROLLER — Duty controller assigned to an arrival control position.

ARRIVAL REPORT — A report submitted by a pilot that contains specific information concerning the

arrival of an aircraft and that is forwarded, in the case of a flight plan (FP), to the ATS unit that has been

assigned alerting service responsibility or, in the case of a flight itinerary, to the ATS unit that has been

assigned alerting service responsibility or to the responsible person with whom the itinerary was filed.

ATOS DEF-5

2006-07-20


AUTOMATED DATA INTERCHANGE SYSTEM — The Canadian system which forms part of and is

fully integrated with the worldwide International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) Aeronautical Fixed

Telecommunications Network (AFTN) provided by States to ensure the safety of air navigation and the

regular, efficient and economical operation of Air Services. The ADIS fulfills Canada's obligations in

respect to the international AFTN and at the same time is employed for certain Domestic

communications tasks.

AUTOMATIC ALTITUDE REPORTING — The function of a transponder that responds to Mode C

interrogations by transmitting the aircraft's altitude in 100-ft increments.

AUTOMATIC DEPENDANT SURVEILLANCE — A service for use by air traffic services in which

aircraft automatically provide, via a data link, data derived from on-board navigation and position-fixing

systems. As a minimum, the data include aircraft identification and four-dimensional position. Additional

data may be provided as appropriate.

AVIATION OCCURRENCE — Any deviation from the Canadian Aviation Regulations associated with

the operation of an aircraft.

AUTOMATIC TERMINAL INFORMATION SERVICE — The provision, throughout the day or a specified

portion of the day, of current, routine information to arriving and departing aircraft by means of

continuous and repetitive recorded broadcasts.

AVIATION WEATHER BRIEFING SERVICE — A service provided by an FSS that gives meteorological

information through the process of selecting, interpreting, elaborating and adapting relevant charts,

reports and documents to support the safe, regular and efficient conduct of aviation operations.

BASE LEG — A flight path extending from the end of the downwind leg to the extended centreline of

the approach end of the landing runway (or landing path).

BEACON — An aeronautical light arranged, either through optical design or mechanical motion, to be

visible to all azimuths, either continuously or consecutively, to designate a particular point on the

surface of the earth.

BIG PHOTO — The general term used for aircraft performing ECM.

BORDER TIE-IN STATION — A Canadian flight plan office provided with direct communications access

to an American counterpart station for the purpose of exchanging information concerning VFR flights

across the Canada/U.S. border.

BURST — A code word signifying chaff drops at intervals short enough to appear on radar displays as

individual target returns.

CANADIAN DOMESTIC AIRSPACE — All navigable airspace of Canada defined and designated as

such in the Designated Airspace Handbook.

CANCELLING IFR – An expression used by a pilot, when flying on an IFR flight plan (FP) or flight

itinerary (FITN), to change flight rules from IFR to VFR. As a result, ATC will discontinue providing IFR

separation, but will not close the IFR FP or FITN or open a VFR FP or FITN.

ATOS DEF-6

2006-07-20


CAVOK — A term (pronounced “KAV-OH-KAY“), derived from the words “ceiling and visibility OK,” that

may be used in air-ground communication when meteorological information is being transmitted to

aircraft. CAVOK refers to the simultaneous occurrence, at an airport, of the following meteorological

conditions:

A. no cloud below 5000 ft, or below the highest minimum sector altitude (MSA), whichever is higher,

and no cumulonimbus;

B. a visibility of 6 statute miles or more; and

C. no precipitation, thunderstorm, shallow fog or drifting snow.

CEILING — The lesser of:

A. the height above ground or water of the base of the lowest layer of cloud covering more than half

the sky; or

B. the vertical visibility in a surface-based layer which completely obscures the whole sky.

CHANGE — A CHG message modifies or replaces a previously transmitted flight plan or flight

notification.

CLASS A AIRSPACE — Controlled airspace within which only IFR flight is permitted and IFR separation

is provided.

CLASS B AIRSPACE — Controlled airspace within which IFR and VFR flight is permitted. VFR aircraft

require an ATC clearance to operate within the airspace and are separated from all other aircraft.

CLASS C AIRSPACE — Controlled airspace within which both IFR and VFR flight is permitted and VFR

flights require a clearance from ATC to enter.

CLASS D AIRSPACE — Controlled airspace within which both IFR and VFR flight is permitted.

CLASS E AIRSPACE — Basic classification of controlled airspace — separation is provided to IFR

aircraft only. VFR flight is not subject to ATC.

CLASS F AIRSPACE — Airspace of defined dimensions within which activities must be confined

because of their nature or within which limitations are imposed upon aircraft operations that are not

a part of those activities, or both.

Examples are:

A. an active alert area;

B. an active danger area;

C. an active area of the Churchill Rocket Range;

D. a restricted area;

E. a MFA;

F. a military activity active area; and

G. aircraft test area

CLASS G AIRSPACE — Uncontrolled airspace within which ATS provides flight information and

alerting services. Separation is not provided.

CLEARANCE LIMIT — The point to which an aircraft is granted an ATC clearance.

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CLEARED FOR THE OPTION —

A. For an arriving aircraft — ATC authorization for an aircraft to make a touch-and-go, low approach,

missed approach, stop and go, or full stop landing at the discretion of the pilot.

B. For a departing aircraft — ATC authorization for an aircraft to make a simulated rejected takeoff,

reduced power takeoff and a simulated engine out failure on departure procedure at the discretion

of the pilot.

CLOSED RNAV STAR — A STAR that terminates at the Final Approach Course Fix (FACF). Normally

used when the inbound track is within plus or minus 90 degrees of the final approach course to the

runway.

COAST LIST — A tabular record of flight data on previously correlated targets whose position

updates are no longer received by RDPS.

COASTING — A function that displays the predicted position of a target for a flight plan correlated radar

track in the event of a missed or ambiguous radar return.

CODE (SSR) — The number assigned to a particular multiple-pulse reply signal transmitted by a

transponder.

COMPANY INSTRUMENT APPROACH PROCEDURE — An approach procedure, approved by

Transport Canada, for use by an operator, or number of operators, that is not published in the Canada

Air Pilot.

COMPULSORY REPORTING POINT — A reporting point over which an aircraft must report to ATC.

CONTACT APPROACH — An approach wherein an aircraft on an IFR flight plan, having an ATC

authorization and operating clear of clouds with at least 1 mile flight visibility and a reasonable

expectation of continuing to the destination airport in those conditions, may deviate from the instrument

approach procedure and proceed to the destination airport by visual reference to the surface of the

earth.

CONTROLLED AIRPORT — An airport at which an airport control service is provided.

CONTROLLED AIRSPACE — An airspace of defined dimensions within which ATC service is provided.

CONTROLLED VFR FLIGHT — A flight conducted under the visual flight rules within Class B Airspace

and in accordance with an ATC clearance.

CONTROLLER JURISDICTION SYMBOL (CJS) — Symbol that identifies a sector.

COORDINATING CONTROLLER — A duty controller assigned to coordinate flight data between two

or more control positions.

CORRELATED TARGET — A digital target symbol displayed in a FDB.

CORRELATION — A function that matches a radar track with flight plan data on the basis of an aircraft’s

discrete SSR code or a manual input.

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CORRELATION LINE — A line, with reference to which aircraft movement information is required.

CROSSING TRACK — A term used in the application of separation, indicating tracks that converge or

diverge at an angle of 45 degrees to 135 degrees inclusive.

CRUISING ALTITUDE — The altitude, as shown by a constant altimeter indication in relation to a fixed

and defined datum, maintained during a flight or portion thereof.

DANGER AREA — An airspace of defined dimensions above international waters within which activities

dangerous to the flight of non-participating aircraft could take place at specified times.

DAYLIGHT — The period of time during any day that begins with the morning civil twilight and ends with

the evening civil twilight.

DEFENCE VFR — Rules applicable to flights within an air defence identification zone (ADIZ) conducted

under VFR.

DEPARTURE UNIT — The responsible unit whose area of responsibility (AOR) encompasses the

departure aerodrome.

DESTINATION UNIT — The responsible unit whose area of responsibility (AOR) encompasses the

destination aerodrome.

DIRECT USER ACCESS TERMINAL SYSTEM — A computer-based system provided by a vendor to

pilots or other operational personnel. A DUATS supplies the aviation weather and NOTAM information

necessary for preflight planning via computer terminals or personal computers owned by the vendor or

users. DUATS services approved by Transport Canada provide flight plan filing capability.

DISTANCE MEASURING EQUIPMENT (DME) — Airborne and ground equipment used to measure the

slant range distance from a DME NAVAID in nautical miles.

DISTRESS — A condition involving a threat of serious or imminent danger and a need for immediate

assistance.

DISTRESS PHASE — A situation wherein there is a reasonable certainty that an aircraft and its

occupants are threatened by grave and imminent danger or require immediate assistance.

DME FIX — A geographical position determined by reference to a NAVAID, which provides distance

and azimuth information and is defined by a specified distance in nautical miles and a radial in degrees

magnetic from the NAVAID.

DOWNWIND LEG — A flight path parallel to the landing runway (or landing path) in the direction

opposite to landing. The downwind leg normally extends between the crosswind leg and the base leg.

ELECTRIC COUNTER COUNTER MEASURES — Actions taken to ensure effective use of the

electromagnetic spectrum despite the employment of ECM with the intent to reduce the radar

degradation induced by certain types of ECM.

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ELECTRONIC COUNTER MEASURES — Electronic radiation or chaff dispensing activities with the

object of impairing (electronic jamming) the use of electronic devices, equipment, systems or with the

intent to mislead (electronic deception) users in the interpretation or use of information by his electronic

system.

EMERGENCY COORDINATION CENTRE (ECC) — A facility established at selected airports to

provide assistance to aircraft experiencing emergencies such as bomb threats or acts of unlawful

interference.

EMERGENCY LOCATOR TRANSMITTER — A generic term describing equipment that broadcasts

distinctive signals on designated frequencies and, depending on application, may either sense a crash

and operate automatically or be manually activated.

EMERGENCY PHASE — A generic expression meaning, as the case may be, uncertainty phase, alert

phase or distress phase.

END EXERCISE POINT — The point at which an aircraft is no longer classified as faker.

ESTABLISHED HOLDING AREA — A holding area which has been predetermined by the unit

responsible for the airspace concerned.

ESTIMATE — The time in UTC at which an IFR aircraft is calculated, by either the controller or pilot, to

arrive over a significant point.

ESTIMATED — The terminology used within Air Traffic Services when communicating an ATC

estimate.

ESTIMATED TIME OF ARRIVAL — The time at which it is estimated that the aircraft will land, provided

that no delay is experienced. Calculation of the ETA in the case of an IFR flight, to an aerodrome served

by one or more NAVAIDs, is based on the average time required by the aircraft to complete an

instrument approach procedure at the aerodrome.

ESTIMATING — The terminology used within Air Traffic Services when communicating a pilot estimate.

EXERCISE ROUTE — The route of flight to be flown by strike force aircraft from departure to point of

recovery.

EXPANDED FRONTAL WIDTH — Either the lateral distance between the outermost aircraft in a

moving altitude reservation, when such distance has been stated in an APREQ and has been approved,

or the approved frontal width for a non-standard formation flight.

EXPECT APPROACH CLEARANCE TIME — The time at which it is expected that an aircraft will be

cleared to commence approach for a landing.

EXPECT FURTHER CLEARANCE TIME — The time at which it is expected that further clearance will

be issued to an aircraft.

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FAKER MONITOR/TARGET MONITOR — Military personnel responsible for monitoring the progress

and providing safety to faker aircraft in accordance with safe intercept criteria, beginning at the IP/HHCL

and terminating at the BRL/EEP or at the point of final neutralization.

FAKER TARGET — A strike force aircraft simulating a hostile aircraft during an air defence exercise

while in the strike route portion of the mission; i.e., IP/HHCL to ground target BRL/EEP.

FINAL APPROACH — Other expression for: final approach segment.

FINAL APPROACH FIX — The fix of a non-precision instrument approach procedure (IAP) where the

final approach segment commences.

FINAL APPROACH LEG OR FINAL LEG — A flight path extending from the end of the base leg in the

direction of landing, to and along the extended centreline of the runway (or landing path), to the

threshold of the landing runway (or landing path).

FINAL APPROACH SEGMENT — That part of an instrument approach procedure from the time that

the aircraft:

A. completes the last procedure turn or base turn, where one is specified;

B. crosses the final approach fix, waypoint or point; or

C. intercepts the last track specified for the procedure until it reaches the missed approach point. It is

in this part of the procedure that alignment and descent for landing are accomplished. Also called:

final approach.

FIRE ACTIVITY AREA — The airspace below 3,000 feet AGL within 5 miles of a forest fire area that is

described in a NOTAM and any additional airspace, the dimensions of which are described in a

NOTAM, within which forest fire control operations are being conducted.

FIX — A geographical location determined either by visual reference to the ground, or by means of radio

aids or other navigational devices.

FIX TOLERANCE AREA — An area determined by considering the position indication errors applicable

to a particular type of fix.

FLIGHT INFORMATION REGION — An airspace of defined dimensions, extending upwards from the

surface of the earth, within which flight information service and alerting service are provided.

FLIGHT ITINERARY (FITN) – Specified information, submitted in accordance with the Canadian

Aviation Regulations (CARs), regarding the intended flight of an aircraft.

FLIGHT LEVEL — An altitude expressed in hundreds of feet, indicated on an altimeter set to 29.92

inches of mercury or 1013.2 millibars.

FLIGHT LINE — An actual photographic run of a photo survey aircraft, in which a series of overlapping

photographic exposures are being taken and in which the aircraft must necessarily move precisely

along a predetermined track or tracks and at a predetermined critical altitude.

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FLIGHT MANAGEMENT SYSTEM — A computer system that uses a large database to allow routes to

be programmed and fed into the system by means of a data loader. The system is constantly updated

with respect to position and accuracy by reference to conventional navigational aids.

FLIGHT PLAN — Specified information submitted in accordance with the Canadian Aviation

Regulations with regard to the intended flight of an aircraft.

FLIGHT PLAN OFFICE — The office at which flight plans are to be filed. This may be an ATC unit, an

FSS, an operations office, or other designated airport office.

FLIGHT SERVICE SPECIALIST — A certified employee assigned duties and responsibilities at a flight

service station (FSS) or flight information centre (FIC).

FLIGHT SERVICE STATION — An ATS unit established to provide selected flight services.

FLIGHT SERVICE STATION RADAR AREA — An area of defined dimensions surrounding an airport

within which radar is used by an FSS to monitor aircraft movement and to provide traffic information.

FLIGHT VISIBILITY — The average range of visibility at any given time, forward from the cockpit of an

aircraft in flight.

FORECAST — A statement of expected meteorological conditions for a specified time or period, and

for a specified area or portion of airspace.

FORMATION FLIGHT — More than one aircraft which, by prior arrangement between the pilots,

normally operate as a single aircraft with regard to navigation and position reporting. Formation flights

may be identified on individual IFR flight plans or may be contained within an ALTRV. As circumstances

require, they may be:

A. Standard formation — One in which:

1. the formation leader will operate at the assigned altitude and the other formation aircraft will be

within one hundred feet vertically of the altitude of the formation leader;

2. the formation will occupy a maximum frontal width of one NM; and

3. the formation will have a maximum longitudinal spacing of one NM between the first and the last

aircraft.

B. Non-standard Formation—An individual flight plan formation, whereby through prior arrangement

with ATC, the flight leader has requested and ATC has approved other than standard formation

dimensions.

FREE AREA — An area of defined dimensions, within which the flight of an aircraft, under certain

conditions, does not normally require AMIS action.

FUEL REMAINING — A phrase used by both pilots and ATS when referring to the amount of fuel

remaining on board until actual fuel exhaustion. When transmitting such information, either in response

to an ATS query or a pilot initiated advisory, pilots will state the approximate number of minutes the flight

can continue with the fuel remaining. All reserve fuel should be included in the time stated, as should

an allowance for established fuel gauge system error.

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2006-07-20


FUNCTION — A single task performed by the system, either automatically or in response to a manual

input.

GROUND VISIBILITY — The visibility at an airport, as reported by an observer accredited by the

Minister for that purpose or the prevailing visibility as observed by an airport controller.

HAND-OFF — The process of transferring radar identification of an aircraft target and radio

communications for that aircraft, to another controller, to enable uninterrupted provision of radar

service.

HAZARDOUS SITUATION — An occurrence in which flight safety was jeopardized, or was not assured

for a period of time.

HEADING — The direction in which the longitudinal axis of an aircraft is pointed, usually expressed in

degrees from north (true, magnetic, compass, or grid north).

HEAVY AIRCRAFT — An aircraft certificated for a maximum take-off weight of 136,000 kilograms

(300,000 pounds) or more.

HIGH LEVEL AIRSPACE — All airspace within the Canadian Domestic Airspace 18,000 feet and

above.

HOLDING AREA — The airspace to be protected for holding aircraft, in accordance with the ATC

Holding Criteria Document.

HOLDING FIX — A fix that is specified as a reference point in establishing and maintaining the position

of a holding aircraft.

HOLDING PROCEDURE — A predetermined manoeuvre which keeps an aircraft within a specified air

space while awaiting further clearance.

HOVER TAXI — Movement of a helicopter above the surface of an aerodrome and in ground effect at

airspeeds less than approximately 20 knots. The actual height may vary, and some helicopters may

require hover taxi above 25 feet AGL, to reduce ground effect turbulence or provide clearance for cargo

slingloads. (See AIR TAXI).

IDENTIFICATION ZONE — An airspace of defined dimensions extending upwards from the surface of

the earth within which certain rules apply for the security control of air traffic.

IFR AIRCRAFT — An aircraft operating in accordance with the instrument flight rules.

IFR FLIGHT — A flight conducted in accordance with the instrument flight rules.

INCIDENT — An event or sequence of events which may endanger human lives or compromise the

safety of aircraft or equivalent.

INFORMATION REQUEST — A message requesting that a communications search be carried out in

the standard search area, using government circuits and local telephone.

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INITIAL POINT/H-HOUR CONTROL LINE — That point at which the faker route portion of the exercise

begins.

INSTRUMENT APPROACH PROCEDURE — A series of predetermined manoeuvres for the orderly

transfer of an aircraft under instrument flight conditions, from the beginning of the initial approach to a

landing or to a point from which a landing may be made visually.

INSTRUMENT FLIGHT RULES — A set of rules governing the conduct of flight under instrument

meteorological conditions.

INSTRUMENT METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS — Meteorological conditions less than the minima

specified in CARs 602 for visual meteorological conditions, expressed in terms of visibility and distance

from cloud.

INSTRUMENT RUNWAY — Runway intended for the operation of aircraft making a precision or nonprecision

instrument approach.

INTERMEDIATE APPROACH SEGMENT — That segment of an instrument approach between the

intermediate fix or point and the final approach fix or point, wherein aircraft configuration, speed and

positioning adjustments are made in preparation for the final approach.

INTERMEDIATE FIX — The fix at which the aircraft enters the intermediate approach segment of an

instrument approach.

INTERNATIONAL CIVIL AVIATION ORGANIZATION — A specialized agency of the United Nations,

the objective of which is to develop the principles and techniques of international air navigation and to

foster planning and development of international civil air transport

INTERSECTION — As the circumstances require, this may be:

A. the point defined by a combination of courses, radials, arcs or bearings of two or more navigational

aids; or

B. the point where two runways, a runway and a taxiway, or two taxiways cross or meet.

ITINERANT AIRCRAFT — For the purpose of completing air traffic records, itinerant aircraft are

considered as:

A. aircraft proceeding to or arriving from another location; or

B. aircraft that leave the circuit, but will be returning to land.

JAMMING — Electronic or mechanical interference which may disrupt the display of aircraft on radar or

the transmission or reception of radio communications or navigation.

KNOWN AIRCRAFT — Aircraft of whose movements ATS has been informed.

LANDING — In relation to an aircraft, means the act of coming into contact with a supporting surface

and includes the immediately preceding and following acts and, in relation to an airship or free balloon,

means the act of bringing the airship or balloon under restraint and includes the immediately preceding

and following acts.

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2006-07-20


LATERAL SEPARATION — Separation between aircraft at the same altitude expressed in terms of

distance or angular displacement between tracks.

LIGHT AIRCRAFT — An aircraft certificated for a maximum take-off weight of 5,700 kilograms (12,500

pounds) or less.

LOCAL AIRCRAFT — For the purpose of completing air traffic records, local aircraft are considered as

aircraft which remain in the circuit.

LOCATION INDICATOR — A 4 letter code group formulated in accordance with rules prescribed by

ICAO and assigned to the location of an aeronautical fixed station. In Canada and the U.S., a location

indicator may be a code group comprised of a letter-number combination.

LONGITUDINAL SEPARATION — Separation between aircraft at the same altitude, expressed in units

of time or distance along track.

LOSS OF SEPARATION — An occurrence in which less than the authorized minimum existed, or in

which the minimum was not assured.

LOW APPROACH — An approach over an airport or runway following an instrument or VFR approach,

including the go-around manoeuvre, where the pilot intentionally does not make contact with the

runway.

LOW LEVEL AIRSPACE — All airspace within the Canadian Domestic Airspace (CDA) below 18 000

ft ASL.

LOW LEVEL AIRWAY — Within low level airspace, a route extending upwards from 2,200 ft above the

surface of the earth and for which air traffic control is provided.

MACH-NUMBER TECHNIQUE — The assignment by ATC of Mach-number values to aircraft that are

in level flight, climbing or descending, in order to ensure that longitudinal separation is maintained.

MANAGER — The person responsible for subordinate personnel. Authority may be delegated to a

subordinate level unless otherwise indicated.

MANOEUVRING AREA — That part of an aerodrome intended to be used for the takeoff and landing

of aircraft, and for the movement of aircraft associated with takeoff and landing, excluding aprons.

MARKERS — Objects of a conventional shape, flags, or painted signs used to indicate specific areas

and obstructions.

MARSA — A term used, whereby the military command/pilots involved, assume responsibility for

separation of participating aircraft in a formation flight, or indicating that a military agency originating an

ALTRV APREQ will assume responsibility for the separation of:

A. all aircraft operating within the same ALTRV; or

B. all aircraft operating within ALTRVs that are separated by less than the minima in Section 820 of

ATC MANOPS.

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2006-07-20


MEAN WIND — In OIDS, wind direction and speed as determined from a sample reading every second

over the last two minutes. The display value is updated every 5 seconds.

MEDEVAC — A term used to request Air Traffic Service priority handling for a medical evacuation flight,

based on a medical emergency in the transport of patients, organ donors, organs or other urgently

needed life-saving medical material. The term is to be used on flight plans and if a pilot determines that

a priority is required in radiotelephony communications.

MEDIUM AIRCRAFT — An aircraft certificated for a maximum take-off weight of more than 5,700

kilograms (12,500 pounds), but less than 136,000 kilograms (300,000 pounds).

METEOROLOGICAL OFFICE — An office designated to provide meteorological conditions for

international air navigation.

MILITARY ACTIVITY AREA — An airspace of defined dimensions approved for extensive military

activity during a specified period. This airspace may include airspace reservations. A military activity

area may be confined to a fixed area (stationary) or moving in relation to the aircraft that operate within

it (moving).

MILITARY IFR FORMATION FLIGHT — More than one aircraft which, by prior arrangement between

the pilots, normally operate as a single aircraft with regard to navigation and position reporting.

Formation flights may be identified on individual IFR flight plans or may be contained within an ALTRV.

As circumstances require, they may be:

A. Standard formation — One in which:

1. the formation leader will operate at the assigned altitude and the other formation aircraft will be

within one hundred feet vertically of the altitude of the formation leader;

2. the formation will occupy a maximum frontal width of one NM; and

3. the formation will have a maximum longitudinal spacing of one NM between the first and the last

aircraft.

B. Non-standard formations:

1. Individual flight plan formations outside of ALTRVs whereby, through prior arrangement with

ATC, the flight leader has requested, and ATC has approved, other than standard formation

dimensions.

2. Individual flight plan formations within ALTRVs whereby, through prior arrangement with ATC,

the aircraft operate on the same route as a single aircraft with regard to altitude, navigation, and

position reporting, longitudinally contained within 1 minute flying time.

3. Cell formation:

A military term used to describe a number of aircraft operating along the same track, either on

an individual IFR flight plan or in an ALTRV, longitudinally contained within 1 minute flying time,

laterally contained within the track width to be protected and utilizing normally 3,000

consecutive feet of altitude.

4. Stream formation:

A military term to describe a number of aircraft operating along the same track within an ALTRV,

with more than 1 minute, but not more than 15 minutes longitudinal spacing between aircraft (or

cells), laterally contained within the route to be protected and utilizing normally 3,000

consecutive feet of altitude. With regard to position reporting, the first and last aircraft in the

stream shall make a position report at each reporting point and shall indicate their position in

the formation.

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2006-07-20


MILITARY RADAR CONTROL UNIT — A military ATC facility established to provide ATC services

using radar-derived information.

MILITARY TERMINAL CONTROL AREA — Controlled airspace of defined dimensions designated to

serve arriving, departing and en route aircraft within which special procedures and exemptions exist for

military aircraft.

MILITARY TERMINAL CONTROL UNIT — A surveillance and precision radar system of control,

consolidated into one specific military unit, to provide radar traffic control service to IFR flights operating

within a designated terminal control area.

MILITARY TRAINING ROUTE — An airspace of defined dimensions established for the conduct of

military training which may be flown IFR or VFR.

MINIMUM FUEL — An aircraft declaration that it's fuel supply has reached a state where, upon reaching

the destination, it can accept little or no delay. This is not an emergency situation but merely indicates

an emergency situation is possible should any undue delay occur.

MINIMUM IFR ALTITUDE — The lowest IFR altitude established for use in a specific airspace.

Depending on the airspace concerned, the minimum IFR altitude may be a MOCA, MEA, GASA,

minimum sector altitude, minimum vectoring altitude, safe altitude 100 nautical miles, transition altitude

or missed approach altitude. The minimum IFR altitude provides obstruction clearance, but may or may

not be within controlled airspace.

MINIMUM VECTORING ALTITUDE — The lowest altitude for vectoring aircraft by ATC that meets

obstruction clearance and radio coverage requirements in the airspace specified.

MISSED APPROACH PROCEDURE — The procedure to be followed if, after an instrument approach,

a landing is not effected. This action may be either:

A. PUBLISHED MISSED APPROACH PROCEDURES — Instructions published on the Canada Air

Pilot approach plate or approved company approach plate; or

B. ALTERNATE MISSED APPROACH INSTRUCTIONS — ATC-originated instructions which take

precedence over published missed approach procedures.

MISSING AIRCRAFT NOTICE — A message issued by an RCC to FSSs and ATC units, giving details

of a missing aircraft.

MODE (SSR) — The conventional identifier related to specific functions of the interrogation signals

transmitted by an SSR interrogator.

MOUNTAINOUS REGION — An area of defined lateral dimensions above which special rules

concerning minimum en route altitudes apply.

MOVEMENT AREA — That part of an aerodrome intended to be used for the surface movement of

aircraft and that includes the manoeuvring area and aprons.

NAVAID — Any visual or electronic device, airborne or on the surface of the earth, that provides

point-to-point guidance information or position data to aircraft in flight.

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NAVIGATION CHANGEOVER POINT — The geographical point, between two specified NAVAIDs or

between a geographical location and a NAVAID, at which a change is made from one navigation

reference to another.

NIGHT — The period of time during any day that starts at the end of evening civil twilight and ends at

the start of morning civil twilight.

NO TRANSGRESSION ZONE — A corridor of airspace of defined dimensions, located centrally

between the two extended runway centrelines, where controller intervention is required to manoeuvre

the non-blundering aircraft, when the airspace is penetrated by an aircraft conducting a simultaneous

approach to the adjacent parallel or near-parallel instrument runway.

NON-CONTROL FUNCTIONS — Duties that do not involve the application of any separation criteria

and their associated procedures.

NON-RADAR ROUTE — A route on which an aircraft is able to determine its position, track, and,

consequently, the minimum IFR altitude without the benefit of radar information.

NON-RADAR RULES AND PROCEDURES — The rules and procedures contained in Part 4, ATC

MANOPS.

NON-RADAR SEPARATION MINIMA — The separation minima contained in Part 4, ATC MANOPS.

NON-RVSM AIRCRAFT — An aircraft that does not meet aircraft RVSM certification/operator approval

requirements.

NORMAL OPERATING ZONE — An airspace of defined dimensions, extending to either side of an ILS

localizer centreline. Only the inner half of the normal operating zone is taken into account in

independent approaches.

NOTAM — A notice distributed by means of telecommunication containing information concerning the

establishment, condition or change in any aeronautical facility, service, procedure or hazard, the timely

knowledge of which is essential to personnel concerned with flight operations.

NOW WIND — In OIDS, wind direction and speed as determined from a sample reading every second

and averaged over the last five seconds. The display value is updated every second.

OCCURRENCE — Any event which is irregular, unplanned or non-routine in nature, including any

accident, incident or other occurrence which involves aircraft, NAV CANADA employees or facilities or

any ATS system deficiency.

OK FUNCTION — An RDPS function that enables execution of flight plan functions and certain other

functions, with respect to a correlated target which shows another sector's CJS.

OMNI FACILITY — A VOR, TVOR, VORTAC, or TACAN, which provides azimuth information through

360 degrees, expressed as radials in degrees from the NAVAID.

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OPEN RNAV STAR — A STAR that terminates at a Downwind Termination Waypoint (DTW). Normally

used for aircraft approaching the airport via the downwind leg to the DTW.

OPERATING IRREGULARITY — a situation which occurs when air traffic services are being provided

and when a preliminary investigation indicates that safety may have been jeopardized, less than

minimum separation may have existed, or both.

OPERATING POSITION — A position within a sector from which ATS are provided. There may be one

or more operating positions within a sector.

OPERATIONS SAFETY INVESTIGATION — A NAV CANADA board convened to investigate any

safety related event that implicates the Operations Group.

ORIGINATING UNIT — The Unit from which the activated flight plan is forwarded to the destination.

PARTICIPATING AIRCRAFT — Only those aircraft that are engaged in and identified as part of the

military activity being conducted or to be conducted through the auspices of an ALTRV APVL or an inflight

refuelling mission.

PHOTO BLOCK — An area of Canadian Domestic Airspace, approximately 30 by 40 miles in lateral

dimensions, which is charted to facilitate flight planning by photo survey operators and which is

delineated by quadrangles based on a modified National Topographic System for mapping.

PIREP — A pilot weather report pertaining to current weather conditions encountered in flight.

POINT OF ACTIVATION — A position, expressed in either 4-letter, 4-digit geographical reference

(GEOREF) or 4-digit latitude and longitude, from which an aircraft departs or is estimated to be along

its intended track.

PRECISION RADAR APPROACH — An instrument approach in which the final approach is conducted

in accordance with directions issued by a controller, referring to a precision approach radar display.

PRIMARY RADAR — A radar system that detects objects by means of reflected radio signals.

PROCEDURE — A recommended or optional directive or a mode of operation.

Q CODE — A three letter code representing text as defined in ICAO document.

RADAR — A radio detection device which provides information on range, azimuth and/or elevation of

objects.

A. PRIMARY RADAR — A radar system which uses reflected radio signals.

B. SECONDARY RADAR — A radar system wherein a radio signal transmitted from a radar station

initiates the transmission of a radio signal from another station.

RADAR APPROACH — Approach executed by an aircraft under the direction of a radar controller.

RADAR CONTROLLED AIRSPACE — Controlled airspace within which radar control service is

provided.

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2006-07-20


RADAR IDENTIFICATION — The process of ascertaining that a particular target is the radar return from

a specific aircraft.

RADAR SERVICE — The term used to indicate a service provided directly by means of radar.

A. RADAR ADVISORY — The provision of advice and information based on radar observations.

B. RADAR CONTROL SERVICE — The control of aircraft through the provision of radar vectors in

order to establish required separation and/or desired spacing between aircraft and between aircraft

and obstructions.

C. RADAR MONITORING — The use of radar for the purpose of providing aircraft with information

and advice relative to significant deviations from their normal flight path.

D. RADAR NAVIGATIONAL ASSISTANCE — The provision of position information, vectors, or track

and ground speed checks.

E. RADAR SEPARATION — Radar spacing of aircraft in accordance with established minima, with

information derived from radar sources.

RADIAL — A bearing from an OMNI facility, usually designated in degrees magnetic.

READBACK — A procedure whereby the receiving station repeats a received message or an

appropriate part thereof to the transmitting station so as to obtain confirmation that the message was

received correctly.

RECIPROCAL TRACK — A term used in the application of separation, indicating tracks that converge

or diverge at an angle of 136 degrees to 180 degrees inclusive.

REDUCED VERTICAL SEPARATION MINIMUM — The application of 1,000 feet vertical separation

between RVSM aircraft in RVSM airspace.

RENDEZVOUS — A planned arrival of 2 or more aircraft over a predetermined point terminating in a

visual contact prior to effecting a refuelling hook-up or conducting other activities requiring proximate

operations.

REPORTING POINT — A specific fix in relation to which the position of an aircraft can be reported.

REQ R — Request Acceptance Message — A REQ R message asks the destination unit to send an R

message.

RESCUE COORDINATION CENTRE — A centre established within an assigned search and rescue

area to promote efficient organization of search and rescue.

RESPONSIBLE UNIT — The unit assigned an area of responsibility in the VFR flight planning and

alerting service.

RESTRICTED AREA — Class F airspace of defined dimensions above the land areas or territorial

waters within which the flight of aircraft is restricted in accordance with certain specified conditions.

RESTRICTED INSTRUMENT PROCEDURE — an approach, departure or transition procedure,

approved by Transport Canada for use by an operator or number of operators, that is not published in

the Canada Air Pilot.

ATOS DEF-20

2006-07-20


ROUTE SEGMENT — A route or portion of route usually flown without an intermediate stop.

RNAV SID — A published IFR standard instrument departure procedure coded and included in an

aircraft’s navigation database, published in graphic and textual form to be used by aircraft appropriately

equipped and authorized to conduct this procedure.

RNAV STAR — A published IFR air traffic control arrival procedure coded and included in an aircraft’s

navigational database, published in graphic and textual form to be used by aircraft appropriately

equipped and authorized to conduct this procedure.

RULE — A mandatory directive or a condition relating to the application of a separation minimum.

RUNWAY HEADING — The magnetic or true, as applicable, direction that corresponds with the runway

centreline; not the painted runway number.

RUNWAY LIGHTS — Lights that are arranged along a runway to indicate the area available for landing

and taking off.

RVSM AIRCRAFT — An aircraft that meets aircraft RVSM certification/operator approval requirements.

SAFETY ALERT — Notification by an air traffic controller to an aircraft that it is at an altitude which, in

the controller's judgment, places it in unsafe proximity to terrain, obstructions or other aircraft.

SAME TRACK — A term used in the application of separation, indicating identical tracks or tracks that

converge or diverge at an angle of 1 degree to 44 degrees inclusive.

SECTOR — A part of an air traffic control unit that has a designated area of responsibility, in which air

traffic services are provided.

SEPARATION — The spacing between aircraft, altitudes, or tracks.

SEPARATION MINIMUM — A statement of the least allowable amount of lateral, longitudinal, or vertical

separation to be applied.

SIGMET — A weather advisory issued concerning weather significant to the safety of aircraft. SIGMET

advisories include:

A. active thunderstorm areas or lines of thunderstorms;

B. hurricanes, tropical storms;

C. moderate hail;

D. severe turbulence;

E. severe icing;

F. marked mountain waves;

G. wide spread sand or dust storms;

H. volcanic ash;

I. severe squall lines;

J. low-level wind shear; and

K. tornado or waterspouts.

ATOS DEF-21


SIGNIFICANT POINT — An expression used to describe a NAVAID, a fix derived from a NAVAID, or a

geographical location as expressed in latitude and longitude.

SIMULATED APPROACH — An instrument approach, conducted in VFR weather conditions by an

aircraft not on an IFR clearance.

SPECIAL USE AIRSPACE — Includes airspace classified as:

A. Class F advisory (CYA) or Class F restricted (CYR), which can be controlled airspace, uncontrolled

airspace or a combination of both;

B. Military Operations Area (MOA), (below FL180 in the U.S.A.);

C. ATC-Assigned Airspace (Military Area) (ATCAA) (FL180 and above in the U.S.A.);

D. airspace restricted by NOTAM for forest fire aircraft operating restrictions; and

E. other airspace restricted by NOTAM to cover specific situations such as well fires, disaster areas,

airshows, etc.

SPECIAL VFR FLIGHT — Visual flight authorized by an ATC unit to operate within a control zone under

meteorological conditions that are below VFR weather conditions.

SPLAT — A digital symbol for an uncorrelated target.

STANDARD INSTRUMENT DEPARTURE — An IFR air traffic control departure procedure, published

in the CAP for pilot and controller use. SIDs may be either:

A. Pilot Navigation SIDs — SIDs where the pilot is required to use the applicable SID chart as

reference for navigation to the en route phase; or

B. Vector SIDs — SIDs established where ATC will provide radar navigational guidance to a filed or

assigned route, or to a fix depicted on the applicable SID chart. Pilots are expected to use the SID

chart as reference for navigation, until radar vectoring is commenced.

STANDARD PRESSURE REGION — The area within Canada outside the altimeter setting region.

STANDARD SEARCH AREA — The standard search area is the area extending 50 miles on either side

of the proposed route of flight, from the last reported position to the destination.

STANDARD TERMINAL ARRIVAL — An IFR ATC arrival procedure published in the CAP for pilot and

controller use.

STATE AIRCRAFT — For the purposes of RVSM operations, state aircraft are those aircraft used in

military, customs and police service.

STATION — One or more transmitters or receivers, or a combination of transmitters and receivers,

including the accessory equipment, necessary at one location for carrying on a radiocommunication

service.

STOP-AND-GO — A procedure in which an aircraft lands, makes a complete stop on the runway, and

then commences a takeoff from that point.

ATOS DEF-22


TAKEOFF — In relation to an aircraft, means the act of abandoning a supporting surface and includes

the immediately preceding and following acts and, in relation to an airship or balloon, means the act of

freeing the airship or balloon from restraint and includes the immediately preceding and following acts.

TARGET/RPS — The indication on a radar display of a primary radar return or a transponder reply.

TARGET/RPS IDENTITY TAG — The portion of a full data block that identifies the target.

TARGET/RPS RESOLUTION — In the application of radar separation, an action to ensure that radar

targets do not touch.

TELECOMMUNICATION — Any transmission, emission,or reception of signals, signal writing, images

and sounds or intelligence of any nature by wire,radio,visual,or other electro-magnetic systems.

TERMINAL AREA ENTRY FIX (BEDPOST) — A significant point located along the established en route

structure over which an aircraft cleared for a conventional RNAV STAR is required to pass prior to

entering terminal airspace.

TERMINAL CONTROL AREA — A controlled airspace of defined dimensions that is normally

established in the vicinity of one or more major aerodromes and within which ATC service is provided

based on the airspace classification.

* TERMINAL CONTROL SERVICE — The control service provided by ACCs to aircraft operating within

specified control areas.

TERMINAL CONTROLLER — Duty controller assigned to the terminal control position.

TERRAIN FOLLOWING — The flight of a military aircraft maintaining a constant altitude above the

terrain or the highest obstruction. The altitude will constantly change with the varying terrain or

obstruction.

THRESHOLD LIGHTS — Lights placed across the ends of a runway or landing strip to indicate its

usable limits.

TIE-IN-FACILITY — A telecommunication facility that handles flight plan (FP) messages for landing

facilities or navigational aids, as listed in the FAA Document 7350, Location Identifiers.

TIME OF ACTIVATION — The time, expressed in Coordinated Universal Time (UTC), at which an

aircraft departs from, or is estimated to arrive over, a specified point of activation.

TOUCH-AND-GO — A procedure in which an aircraft lands and then commences a takeoff, without

stopping.

TOWER RADAR AREA — An area of defined dimensions surrounding a controlled aerodrome within

which radar service is provided.

TRACK — The projection on the earth's surface of the path of an aircraft, the direction of which path at

any point is usually expressed in degrees from North (true, magnetic, or grid).

ATOS DEF-23


TRAFFIC ALERT AND COLLISION AVOIDANCE SYSTEM — Type of airborne collision avoidance

system based on a family of airborne equipment that functions independently of the ground-based ATC

system to detect potential conflicting aircraft that are equipped with secondary surveillance radar

transponders. There are three different versions: TCAS I provides traffic advisories; TCAS II provides

traffic advisories and vertical resolution advisories; and TCAS IV, when developed, will provide traffic

advisories and vertical and horizontal resolution advisories.

TRAFFIC INFORMATION — Information issued to advise pilots of known or observed air traffic, which

may be in such proximity to their position or intended route of flight, to warrant their attention.

TRANSITION — A published procedure used to connect the basic SID to one or more en route airways,

or to connect one or more en route airways to the basic STAR. More than one transition may be

published in the associated SID/STAR.

TRANSPONDER — The SSR receiver-transmitter installed in an aircraft.

UNCERTAINTY PHASE — A situation wherein uncertainty exists as to the safety of an aircraft and its

occupants.

UNCORRELATED TARGET — A digital target symbol displayed in an LDB.

URGENT PIREP — A pilot report containing weather information significant to the safety of flight. An

urgent PIREP includes information on the following:

A. volcanic ash;

B. tornado, funnel cloud, waterspout;

C. severe turbulence;

D. severe icing;

E. hail;

F. low level wind shear; and

G. any other reported weather phenomena considered to be hazardous or potentially hazardous to

flight operations.

VECTOR —

A. A heading issued to an aircraft, for the purpose of providing navigational guidance by means of

radar.

B. To issue headings to an aircraft, for the purpose of providing navigational guidance by means of

radar.

VERTICAL SEPARATION — The vertical spacing of aircraft.

VFR AIRCRAFT — An aircraft operating in accordance with visual flight rules.

VFR FLIGHT — A flight conducted in accordance with the visual flight rules.

VISIBILITY — The distance at which prominent unlighted objects may be identified by day and

prominent lighted objects may be identified by night.

ATOS DEF-24


VISUAL APPROACH — An approach wherein an aircraft on an IFR flight plan (FP), operating in visual

meteorological conditions (VMC) under the control of ATC and having ATC authorization, may proceed

to the airport of destination.

VISUAL FLIGHT RULES — Rules that govern the procedures for conducting flight under visual

meteorological conditions.

VISUAL METEOROLOGICAL CONDITIONS — Meteorological conditions, expressed in terms of

visibility, and distance from cloud, equal to or greater than the minima specified in CARs 602.

VISUAL SEPARATION — A means employed by controllers to separate aircraft operating in VMC.

A. VFR — The controller having determined that a potential conflict exists, issues clearances,

instructions or information, as necessary in order to either aid aircraft in establishing visual contact

with each other or to assist aircraft in avoiding other aircraft.

B. IFR or CVFR — Following a pilot's report that the traffic is in sight, the controller issues the

clearance and instructs the aircraft to provide its own separation by manoeuvring the aircraft as

necessary to avoid or follow the traffic.

WAKE TURBULENCE — The turbulent air behind an aircraft caused by any of the following:

A. Wing-tip vortices.

B. Rotor-tip vortices.

C. Jet-engine thrust stream.

D. Rotor downwash.

E. Prop wash.

WAYPOINT — A specified geographical location, defined by longitude and latitude used for defining

routes, terminal segments, and progress reporting purposes.

WIND DIRECTION INDICATOR — The actuated device to indicate visually to aircraft the direction of

the surface wind.

WIND SHEAR — A change in wind speed and/or wind direction in a short distance. It can exist in a

horizontal or vertical direction and occasionally in both.

ATOS DEF-25


ABBREVIATIONS

As used in this Manual, the following abbreviations have the meanings defined:

ABM Abeam

ACA Arctic Control Area

ACAS Airborne Collision Avoidance

System

ACC Area Control Centre

ACFT Aircraft

ACID Aircraft Identification

ACK Acknowledge

ACM Aircraft Conflict Message

ACP Accept or Accepted

ADAPS Automated Data Acquisition and

Processing System

ADC Air Defence Command

ADCF Aerospace Defence Control

Facility

ADCUS Advise Customs

ADF Automatic Direction Finding

Equipment

ADG Air Defense Group (Canadian)

ADIS Automated Data Interchange

System

ADIZ Air Defence Identification Zone

ADLO Aerospace Defence Liaison

Officer

ADMIS Aircraft Departing with Minimum

Separation (minutes)

ADS Automatic Dependant

Surveillance

ADS-ATC ADS based ATC System

ADT Automatic Data Transfer

ADZ Advise

AFB Air Force Base

AFS Aeronautical Fixed Service

AFTN Aeronautical Fixed

Telecommunications Network

AGCS Air Ground Communication

System

AGDL Air Ground Data Link

AGL Above Ground Level

AIRFL Air Refuelling

AIS Aeronautical Information Services

ALERFA Alert Phase

ALNOT Alerting Notice Message

ATOS ABB-1

ALSF2 High Intensity Approach Lighting

System Category II configuration

with RAIL

ALT Altitude

ALTN Alternate Airport

ALTRV Altitude Reservation

ALTRV APVLAltitude Reservation Approval

AMC USAF Air Mobility Command

AMD Air Movement Data

AMIS Aircraft Movement Information

Service

ANG Air National Guard

AOE Airport of Entry

AOR Area of Responsibility

APN Apron

APREQ Approval Request

APVL Approval

ARCP Air Refuelling Control Point

ARCT Air Refuelling Control Time

ARE Altitude Reservations East

ARFF Aircraft Rescue and Fire Fighting

ARIP Air Refuelling Initial Point

ARTCC Air Route Traffic Control Center

ARW Altitude Reservations West

ASAP As Soon As Possible

ASDE Airport Surface Detection

Equipment

ASL Above Sea Level

ASPRV Airspace Reservation (Canadian)

ASW Antisubmarine Warfare

ATA Actual Time of Arrival

ATC Air Traffic Control

ATC MANOPSAir Traffic Control Manual of

Operations

ATCSCC Air Traffic Control System

Command Center (FAA)

ATD Actual Time of Departure

ATFM Air Traffic Flow Management

ATIS Automatic Terminal Information

Service

ATO After Take-off or Departure

ATOS Air Traffic Operations Specialist

ATOS MANOPSAir Traffic Operations

Specialist Manual of Operations

2006-07-20


ATOSM Air Traffic Operations Specialty

Manager

ATOSTL Air Traffic Operations Specialty

Team Leader

ATOSY Air Traffic Operations Specialty

ATS Air Traffic Services

ATSAMM Air Traffic Services Administration

and Management Manual

AVANA Approval Void if Aircraft Not

Airborne by (time)

AWACS Airborne Warning and Control

System

AWBS Aviation Weather Briefing Service

AWIS Aviation Weather Information

Service

AWOS Automated Weather Information

Systems

AWY Airway

B Cleared out of Controlled Airspace

(control strip)

BD/B&D Bare and Dry

BDRY Boundary

BK Black

BLU Blue

BN Brown

BRL Bomb Release Line

BW/B&W Bare and Wet

CAATS Canadian Automated Air Traffic

System

CADIZ Canadian Air Defense

identification Zone

CADORS Civil Aviation Daily Occurrence

Reporting System

CAP Canada Air Pilot

CARs Canadian Aviation Regulations

CARF Central Altitude Reservation

Function (U.S.)

CASARA Civil Air Search and Rescue

Association

CAT Clear Air Turbulence

CAVOK Ceiling and Visibility OK

CB Cumulonimbus

CCT Circuit

CDA Canadian Domestic Airspace

CELNAV Celestial Navigation Training

CFB Canadian Forces Base

CFP Current Flight Plan

CFS Canada Flight Supplement

CHG Change Message

ATOS ABB-2

CINCNORADCommander in Chief North

American Air Defense Command

CIRVIS Communication Instructions for

Reporting Vital Intelligence

Sightings

CIV Civil

CJS Controller Jurisdiction Symbol

CMNPS Canadian Minimum Navigation

Performance Specifications

CMPS Compress

CNL Cancellation Message

CNLG Celestial Navigation Leg

CPU Central Processing Unit

CRFI Canadian Runway Friction Index

CS Compacted Snow

CSFP Centre Stored Flight Plan

CST Coast

CTA Control Area

CTS Common Time Source

CUSNO Customs Have Been Notified

CVFR Controlled VFR

CVIDS Computorized Visual Information

Display System

DADS Digital Altimeter Display System

DAH Designated Airspace Handbook

DAU Data Acquisition Unit

DB Data Block

DCPC Direct Controller-Pilot

Communication

DEP Departure Message

DEST Destination

DETRESFA Distress Phase

DEW Distant Early Warning

DEWIZ Distant Early Warning

Identification Zone

DF Direction Finding

* DG Dangerous Goods

DME Distance Measuring Equipment

DND Department of National Defence

DOLLY Datalink

DPRT Departure or Depart

DRCT Direct

DSC Data System Coordinator

DSCND Descend

DSE Display Site Equipment

DT Daylight Saving Time

DUATS Direct User Access Terminal

System

DVFR Defence VFR

2006-07-20


EC Environment Canada

ECC Emergency Coordination Centre

ECM Electronic Counter-Measures

EEP End Exercise Point

EET Estimated Elapsed Time

ELT Emergency Locator Transmitter

EMO Emergency Measures

Organization

ENCAN Enter Canadian Airspace

ENDAR End Aerial Refuelling

ESCAT Plan for the Emergency Security

Control of Air Traffic

EST Estimated Time

ETA Estimated Time of Arrival

ETD Estimated Time of Departure

ETE Estimated Time En Route

ETMS Enhance Traffic Management

System

EXCAN Exit Canadian Airspace

FAA Federal Aviation Administration

(U.S.)

FACF Final Approach Course Fix

FAF Final Approach Fix

FAR Federal Aviation Regulations

(U.S.)

FDB Full Data Block

FIMS FSS Information Management

System

FIR Flight Information Region

FITN Flight Itinerary

FL Flight Level

FLNOT Flight Notification

FLT Flight

FLTCK Flight Check

FMS Flight Management System

FMU Flow Management Unit

FNM Flow Notification Message

FP Flight Plan

FPF Flight Plan File

FPOF Flight Plan On File

FREQ Frequency

FRMN Formation

FS MANOPSFlight Services Manual of

Operations

FSS Flight Service Station

FYI For Your Information

GAATS Gander Automated Air Traffic

System

ATOS ABB-3

GAMES Gander-AFTN Message Extractor

System

GASA Geographic Area Safe Altitudes

GATE General Aviation Telephone Entry

GDP Ground Delay Program

GEN General

GEO Geographical

GEOREF Geographical Reference

GND Ground

* GNSS Global Navigation Satellite

System

GPS Global Positioning System

GST GAATS Support Terminal

HDG Heading

HE High En Route Charts

HF High Frequency

Hg Mercury

HI En Route High Altitude

HLA High-Level Airspace

HVY Heavy

IAS Indicated Airspeed

IBASF Interval Between Aircraft in

Stream-Type Formation (minutes)

IBCSF Interval Between Cells in Stream-

Type Formation (minutes)

IC Ice Covered

ICA In Controlled Airspace

ICAO International Civil Aviation

Organization

ICCS Integrated Communications

Control System

IFPFP Individual Flight Plan From this

Point

IFPS Initial Flight Plan Processing

System

IFPU Initial Flight Plan Processing Unit

IFR Instrument Flight Rules

IFSS International Flight Service

Station

IIDS Integrated Information Display

Sytem

ILS Instrument Landing System

IMC Instrument Meteorological

Conditions

INCERFA Uncertainty Phase

INFO Information

INREQ Information Request Message

INS Inertial Navigation System

IP Initial Point

2006-07-20


JBI James Brake Index

JET High Level Airway

kHz Kilohertz

KT Knots

LAT Latitude

LDB Limited Data Block

LFP Link Flight Plan

LLA Low-Level Airspace

LO En Route Low Altitude

LONG Longitude

LORAN Long Range Air Navigation

LS Light Snow

LTD Along Track Distance

LVLOF Level Off

M or MAG Magnetic

MAA Military Activity Area

MALSR Medium Intensity Approach

Lighting System with RAIL

MANOT Missing Aircraft Notice

MARSA Military Assumes Responsibility

for Separation of Aircraft

MB Millibars

MEA Minimum En Route Altitude

MEDEVAC Medical Evacuation Flight

MET Meteorological or Meteorology

MFA Military Flying Area

MHz Megahertz

MIDS Multi-Purpose Information Display

System

MITO Minimum Interval Takeoff

MLS Microwave Landing System

MMO Main Meteorological Office

MNPS Minimum Navigation Performance

Specifications

MNVR Manoeuvre

MOA Military Operations Area

MOCA Minimum Obstruction Clearance

Altitude

MOU Memorandum of Understanding

MRA Minimum Reception Altitude

MRCU Military Radar Control Unit

MTCA Military Terminal Control Area

MTCU Military Terminal Control Unit

MTR Military Training Route

MTT Minimum Time Track

MVA Minimum Vectoring Altitude

NACC NORAD Airborne Control Centre

NADIN National Automated Data

Interchange Network

ATOS ABB-4

NADS Northern Airspace Display

System

NAMES NFDPS-AFTN Message Extractor

System

NAR North American Route

NASA National Aeronautics and Space

Administration

NAT North Atlantic

NATO North Atlantic Treaty Organization

NAV Navigation

NAVAID Navigation Aid

NAVSTAR A Global Positioning System

NC NAV CANADA

NCA Northern Control Area

NCAMS NAV CANADA Aircraft Movement

System

NCC NORAD Control Centre

NDA Northern Domestic Airspace

NDB Non-Directional Beacon

NEG Negative

NFDPS National Flight Data Processing

System

NLT No Later Than

NM Nautical Miles

NOF International NOTAM Office

NOPAR Do Not Pass to Aerospace

Defence Radar

NORAD North American Aerospace

Defence Command

NORDO No Radio

NSCC National Systems Control Centre

(AFTN)

NTZ No Transgression Zone

NWS North Warning System

OAC Oceanic Area Control Centre

OCA Oceanic Control Area

OCD Oceanic Clearance Delivary

OCR Operational Condition Report

OFP Open Flight Plan

OIDS Operational Information Display

System

OJI On-the-job Instructor

OMNI Omnirange

ONS OMEGA Navigation System

OSAF Operational Software Adaption

Facility

OVR Over

P Proposed

2006-07-20


PACE Performance Analysis by

Continuous Evaluation

PADRA Pass to Air Defence Radar

PAL Peripheral

PAPI Precision Approach Path

Indicators

PARROT Position Adjustable Range

Reference Orientation

Transponder

PCA Positive Control Area

PCM Planner Conflict Message

PDC Pre Departure Clearance

PED Position Entry Device

PIREP Pilot Report of Weather

Conditions Encountered by

Aircraft in Flight

PLN Plan

PNR Prior Notice Required

POB Persons on Board

PPI Plan Position Indicator

PPR Prior Permission Required

PSR Primary Surveillance Radar

PVT Private Use

PX Position or Position Report

QALQ Has Aircraft Landed? message

QDB This Message Also Sent To ...

(addressees).

QNH Altimeter Setting for Altitude

Above Sea Level

R Acceptance Message

RACE Request Altitude Change En

Route

RAMP Radar Modernization Project

RAPCON Radar Approach Control (U.S.)

RAPPI Random Access Plan Position

Indicator

RATCON Radar Terminal Control Unit

(Canadian Armed Forces)

RAVEC/RV Radar Vectors

RAZ Reserve Air Zone

RBL Range Bearing Line

RCC Rescue Coordination Centre

RCO Remote Communications Outlet

RCR Runway Condition Report

RCVR Receiver Aircraft For Air

Refuelling

RD Red

RDPS Radar Data Processing System

REF Reference To or Refer To

ATOS ABB-5

REQ Request

REQ R Request Acceptance Message

RFSS Remote Flight Service Station

RGN Region

RID Route Identification

RMNDR Remainder

RNAV Area Navigation

RNDZ Rendezvous

RNPC Required Navigation Performance

Capability

ROF Rest On File

ROMES Reference Our Message

RONLY Receiver Only

RPL Repetitive Flight Plan (Centre-

Stored)

RPS Radar Position Symbol

RRU Remainder of Route Unchanged

RSC Runway Surface Condition

RSiT RDPS Situation Display

RT Radio Telephone

RTB Return to Base

RTE Route

RTN Return, Returned or Returning

RU Remainder Unchanged

RUMES Reference Your Message

RV (R/V) Radar Vectors

RVR Runway Visual Range

RVSM Reduced Vertical Separation

Minimum

RZPT Rendezvous Point

RWY Runway

SAC Strategic Air Command

SAGE Semi-Automatic Ground

Environment

SAOC Sector Air Operations Control

Centre

SAR Search and Rescue

SC Snow Covered

SCA Southern Control Area

SCAT Security Control of Air Traffic

SD Snow Drifts

SDA Southern Domestic Airspace

SELCAL Selective Calling System

SGOB Survival Gear On Board

SID Standard Instrument Departure

SIF Selective Identification Features

* SIR Scramble, Intercept and Recovery

Agreement

SKED Schedule or Scheduled

2006-07-20


SL Slush

S/O Stop Over

* SPADE Special Air Defence Exercise

SRIP Snow Removal In Progress

SSD Scheduled Shutdown

SSR Secondary Surveillance Radar

SST Supersonic Transport

STAR Standard Terminal Arrival

STN Station

STOL Short Takeoff and Landing

SUA Special Use Airspace

SUADE Air Sovereignty Test (Canada)

SUPU Static Uninterruptible Power Unit

SVC Service or Service Message

SVFR Special VFR

TACAN Tactical Air Navigation Aid

TALEX Tactical Airlift Exercise

TAS True Airspeed

TC Transport Canada

TC AIM Transport Canada Aeronautical

Information Manual

TCAS Traffic Alert and Collision

Avoidance System

TCLO Transport Canada Liaison Officer

TDM Technical Duty Manager

THR Threshold

TIL Until

TKOF Take off

TM(U) Traffic Management (Unit)

TNKR Tanker

TOCC Technical Operations

Coordination Center

TRA Tower Radar Area

TRP Tower Radar Plan

TS Technical Services

TSB Transportation Safety Board

TSR Terminal Surveillance Radar

TVOR Terminal VOR

ATOS ABB-6

TWR Control Tower

TWY Taxiways

UFN Until Further Notice

UHF Ultra High Frequency

UIR Upper Flight Information Region

UNCHG Unchanged

UNK Unknown

URG Urgent

U/S Out of Service

USAF United States Air Force

USTATCOM United States Strategic Command

UTC Coordinated Universal Time

V/A Voice Advisory

VAR Magnetic Variation

VASIS Visual Approach Slope Indicator

System

VCSL Voice Call Sign List

VDF VHF Direction Finding System

VFR Visual Flight Rules

VHF Very High Frequency

VIA Way Of

VIP Very Important Person

VMC Visual Meteorological Conditions

VMI Vertical Movement Indicator

VOR VHF Omnidirectional Range

VORTAC Collocated VOR and TACAN

VSP Variable System Parameter

WAC World Aeronautical Chart

WAS Water Aerodrome Supplement

WEF Effective From or With Effect From

WH White

WICA While In Controlled Airspace

WIP Work In Progress

WP Waypoint

WS Wind Shear

WX Weather

XPND Expand

Z Coordinated Universal Time

2006-07-20


INDEX

A

above sea level, 105.5

acceptance - destination unit, 274

ADH command, 412.1

aeronautical fixed services, 240

AFTN message addressing, 243

AFTN message preparation, 244

AFTN message priority, 242

general, 241

air traffic flow management, 900

background, 912

delays, 902

guidelines, 913

procedures, 910

responsibilities, 901

air traffic services messages, 250

ADCUS, 258

categories of messages, 254

general, 251

ICAO, 259

message distribution, 252

message format, 256

method of message exchange, 255

supplementary messages, 257

types of messages, 253

air traffic services operating irregularities, 1060

aircraft, 103.1

aircraft accident, 1063.5

aircraft identification, 105.6, 303

aircraft movement information service - AMIS,

800

application, 801

communication, 805

coordination responsibilities, 804

objective, 802

requirements, 803

aircraft occurrence report, 1063.6

aircraft speed, 306

aircraft type, 304

airway and air route identification, 119

ATOS IND-1

alert phase, 721.3, 742.1, 743.2

alerting service, 210

ALNOT message, 722.6, 723.4

altimeter information, 108

settings, 108.1, 108.2

issuing, 105.8

setting, 107.1

altitude, 103.1

altitude field, 308

altitude reservations, 820

objective, 822

altitude reservations - special flights, 840

canadian military refuelling flights, 843

electronic couter-measures, 846

military operations on air refuelling tracks, 845

military training routes, 844

modification of minima for military aircraft, 842

altitude reservations processing, 830

ALTRV APREQ filing and amendment, 834

areas of authority, 831

coordination, 835

NOTAM, 836

responsibilities, 832

responsibilities - MARSA, 833

AMIS, 800

application, 801

communication, 805

coordination responsibilities, 804

objective, 802

requirements, 803

AMIS data handling, 810

data format - manual, 815

data format - SOCC, 814

exemptions, 812

interphone operating technique, 817

interphone procedures, 816

special notifications, 813

unknowns, 818

APF command, 412.3

arrival messages, 277

2006-07-20


ATOS organization, 120

ATOS, 121.4

ATOSM, 121.2

ATOSTL, 121.3

ATOSY, 121.1

ATOS responsibilities, 130

ATOSM, ATOSTL, 131.2

ATOSY, 131.1

certification, 133

legal responsibility of employees, 136

legal responsibility of NAV CANADA, 137

local or national emergency, 134

ATS training aids, 1010

responsibility, 1011

attendance register, 124.2, 124.3

authorized communications, 232

auto editing fields, 442

B

BOISE, 755

BRO command, 412.4

C

CAN command, 412.6

canadian military refuelling flights, 843

categories of messages, 254

category of flight plan, 302

centre stored flight plan program (CSFP), 227

certification, 133

CFP processing commands, 423

change messages, 276

CIRVIS messages, 266

civil air search and rescue association (CASA-

RA) aircraft, 117

SAR missions, 117.1

SAR training, 117.2

civil aircraft identification, 112

command formats (NFDPS), 411

communication search, 215.1, 721, 740

ATOS IND-2

communication systems, 230

communications, 273

alerting service messages, 273.2

flight data messages, 273.1

communications positions, 122.5

company routes and approaches, 268

composite flight plans, 226

consecutive IFR flight plans, 224.2

coordination with searchmaster, 732

correspondence, 156

custom field, 316

customs notification (ADCUS) service, 258

D

dangerous goods, 752

data entry, 402

days, 103.1

departure point field, 310

destination field, 312

diagram, 102.4

direction of flight, 225

DIS command, 412.9

distress phase, 743.2

do not pass to air defence radar, 812.3

domestic flight data messages, 261

domestic transborder flight data messages, 262

duplicate flight plan data, 422

E

EDI command, 412.10

electronic counter measures (ECM), 846

ELT signals, 745

emergency, 700

aircraft in distress, 701.2

search and rescue services, 701.3

emergency - local or national, 134

2006-07-20


emergency signals and bomb threats, 710, 711,

712

coordination, 713

estimated time en route, 315

example, 102.2

explanatory material, 102

F

FDPN, 450

general, 451

keyboard functions, 452

template functions, 453

fix field, 319

flight data entry, 300

aircraft identification, 303

aircraft speed, 306

aircraft type, 304

altitude field, 308

category of flight plan, 302

custom field, 316

departure point field, 310

destination field, 312

estimated time en route, 315

fix field, 319

flight plan time field, 307

general, 301

local/remote field, 313

RDPS activation time field, 309

route identification field, 311

route information, 318

SELCAL field, 317

SRC field, 314

SSR code, 305

flight data information, 201.1

flight data system to RDPS link format, 323

flight data transfer, 260

domestic, 261

domestic transborder, 262

flight itinerary procedures, 214

responsable person, 214.1

flight plan filing - general, 223

flight plan filing - IFR, 224

flight plan time field, 307

ATOS IND-3

flight planning duties, 200

IFR alerting, 201.2

VFR alerting, 201.2

flight planning position, 122.2

flight planning priority, 221

air traffic services, 221.3

flight plan information, 221.3

medevac, 221.3

prime minister, head of state, 221.5

foreign air carriers, 112.1

forms - purpose, 142

G

GAATS, 600

communications subsystem, 607

data transmission, 608

display and data entry subsystem, 604

general, 601

hardware, 602

operating parameters, 609

peripheral control subsystem, 606

processor subsystem, 603

strip and console printer subsystem, 605

GAATS flight data states, 670

GAATS flight progress strip production and format,

630

domestic flight progress strips, 633

flight progress strip production, 631

oceanic flight progress strips, 634

planner and planner assigned strips, 632

strip management messages, 635

GAATS interface, 470

acknowledgement message, 471.11, 471.12,

471.13

automatic processing, 471.10

CNL command, 471.16, 471.17

CNL message, 471.14

EDM, 471.6

EFP, 471.3

EFP, EDM, PFP, EST and XFP, 471.1

error occurrence, 471.5

EST, 471.8

GAATS terminal, 471.2

manual processing, 471.9

PFP, 471.7

2006-07-20


to GAATS, 471.4

XFP, 471.15

GAATS operational command descriptions, 623

GAATS operational commands, 620

GAATS operational support functions, 640

conflict prediction, 644

fix time calculations, 643

function of the ras program, 654

general, 641

ICAO reserved airspace, 652

met model, 642

minimum time track calculations, 655

OTS reserved airspace, 653

reserved airspace, 650

time based function descriptions, 662

time based functions, 660

GAATS support commands, 622

GAATS system functions, 610

GAATS data links, 614

GAATS major data flow, 612

operational requirements, 611

user system interface, 613

GAMES - GAATS AFTN message extractor system,

460

Browse menu, 467

GAATS MSVs, 464

main screen, 462

Print menu, 468

procedures/characteristics, 461

processing pages, 463

system MSV, 465

AERO EDM, 465.16

AFTN TID, 465.32

AFTN VSP, 465.28

Alarm Tone, 465.21

AUTO ACID, 465.10

Auto EFP, 465.9

CPL and FPL VSP, 465.3

CPL Source, 465.30

CPL VSP, 465.24

DIRECT OCN, 465.26

DOM FIX, 465.11

DOM/50W, 465.25

ATOS IND-4

EAST NAR, 465.4

ETA, 465.14

FPL VSP, 465.8

GAMES ID, 465.23

General VSP, 465.19

MSG Drop, 465.29

MSV MENU, 465.1

NA Entry, 465.12

Non Jet AC, 465.13

print MSG, 465.6

REM DESIGN, 465.22

Route Direc, 465.5

RVSM MNPS, 465.7

TIME EDM, 465.15

TX, 465.31

VSP menus, 465.2

VSP table, 465.20

W-E FIX, 465.27

West NAR, 465.17

YQX FIR, 465.18

transmit menu, 469

Address button, 469.5

NEW, 469.2

Rx_OLD, 469.4

SEND, 469.6

transmit, 469.1

Tx_OLD, 469.3

gross navigational errors, 920

aircraft occurrence report, 921

investigation and reporting, 921

guicelines for the investigation of ATC operating

irregularities, 1062

H

handling and reporting incidents, 1063

aircraft accident, 1063.5

aircraft occurrence, 1063.6

handling of documentation for investigations,

1064

headings

degrees magnetic, 105.9

degrees true, 105.9

2006-07-20


I

ICAO and canadian domestic flight plans, 1100

data entry units, 1103

flight data entry rules, 1104

instructions for entering ATS data, 1102, 1105

instructions for transmissions of filed flight plan

data, 1107

supplementary ATS data, 1106

ICAO phonetic alphabet, 105.1

ice patrol aircraft, 116

IFR alerting, 201.2

IFR flight plan, 224

INREQ message, 722.4, 723.3

interphone - acceptable messages, 233

acceptable messages, 233.1

breaking transmissions, 235

calling, answering and completing contacts,

236

connecting and disconnecting, 237

interphone operating technique, 234

K

knots, 105.10, 107.4

knowledge verification requirements, 1042

L

language identification on flight data strips, 781

lateral transfers, 1051

legal responsibility of employees, 136

legal responsibility of NAV CANADA, 137

LFP command, 412.11

link failure procedures, 321

link message bypass, 321.1

link procedures - other, 322

local or national emergency, 134

local/remote field, 313

locations without operating towers or FSS,

224.1

departure message, 251.1

IFR flight plan, 224

ATOS IND-5

log on/off, 403

M

malfunction, 157.1, 157.2

manager, 103.2

mandatory briefings, 152

may, 103.1

meal and relief breaks, 125

MEDEVAC

identification, 112.1

military, 113.2

message distribution, 252

current flight data, 252.2

domestic, 252.1

ICAO, 252.1

IFR flight data, 252.4

VFR flight data, 252.3

messages on flights outside controlled airspace,

263

messages on international flights (ICAO), 259

mile, 103.1

military and coast guard identification, 113

military operations on air refuelling (AR) tracks,

845

military training routes, 844

minimum navigation requirements, 770

CMNPS application, 772

CMNPS tracks, 773

NADS utilization, 774

missing aircraft notice, 215, 734

MOD command, 412.15

MUL command, 412.16

N

NADIN format for the transmittal of flight plan

data, 1110

message format, 1112

remarks format, 1114

route format, 1113

NADS utilization, 774

2006-07-20


NAMES

NAMES adjust and conversion tables, 440

^A adjust tables, 441

A/C type conversion, 441.4

ACID field lead character, 441.2

AFTN address definitions, 441.6

category field, 441.8

default look ahead time, 441.15

DEP/DEST convert exceptions, 441.3

DEP/DEST identifier conversion table,

441.13

emergency recognition, 441.5

NFDPS timeout count, 441.9

password protection, 441.14

recall buffer depth, 441.10

route conversion table, 441.12

route truncation symbol, 441.11

user address definitions, 441.7

NAMES characteristics, 431

NAMES display 1 lower window, 433

NAMES system time, 433.2

NAS, 433.1

RID field, 433.1

NAMES display presentation 1, 432

AFTN queue, 432.6, 432.8

departure times, 432.9

emergency message, 432.13

link F/P message, 432.5

message suspense file, 432.11

NFDPS login, 432.4

NFDPS queue, 432.7

NAMES display presentation 2, 434

NAMES online help commands, 436

adjust table menu, 436.11

AFTN message, 436.2

asterisk symbol, 436.6

broadcast message, 436.12

browse menu, 436.7

emergency message, 436.4

NAMES automation level, 436.1

print menu, 436.8

route conversion table, 436.14

VSP menu, 436.10

NAMES online help display 2, 437

^C key, 437.3

ATOS IND-6

^R key, 437.4

^S key, 437.1

duplicate flight plan, 437.2

NAMES online help window, 435

NAMES VSP menu, 438

NAMES/NFDPS, 122.1, 400

nautical miles, 107.4

NAVAID identification, 118

NFDPS commands, 410

ADH, 412.1

AMI, 412.2

APF, 412.3

BRO, 412.4

BYE, 412.5

CAN, 412.6

CFP, 412.7

DEV, 412.8

EDI, 412.10

FNO, 412.12

LFP, 412.11

LIS, 412.13

LOG, 412.14

MOD, 412.15

MUL, 412.16

REP, 412.17

RES, 412.18

SHO, 412.19

STA, 412.20

STR, 412.21

VFR/FNO, 412.22

NFDPS entry commands, 420

ADHOC entry, 421

CFP processing commands, 423

duplicate flight plan data, 422

fix generation, 425

route processing, 424

NFDPS/NAMES/FDPN operation, 400

general, 401

north american routes, 680

changes to NAR, 682

clearances, 683

NAR route selection, 681

oceanic control, 684

note, 102.1

2006-07-20


notification of RCC, 743

alert phase, 743.2

distress phase, 743.2

uncertainty phase, 743.2

O

on-job training, 1020

OJI training for ATS staff, 1023

responsibilities, 1022

operating initials, 124.4

operational condition report (OCR), 143

operations bulletins, 151.1

operations letters, 151.1

other link procedures, 322

overdue aircraft, 211.7

P

performance standards, 1040

knowledge verification tests, 1042

proficiency of operational personnel, 1041

photographic survey flights, 265

phraseology, 104

phonetics and numbers, 105

PIREP priority, 222

position descriptions, 122

position report messages, 264

position responsibility, 123

OJI, 123.2

trainee, 123.2

preferred routes and structured airspace, 267

preparation for and completion of duty, 124

procedures flight itinerary, 214

proficiency of operational personnel, 1041

provision of (alerting) service, 212

Q

QALQ message, 722.2, 723.1

ATOS IND-7

R

RDPS activiation time field, 309

RDPS route delimiters, 324

reference, 102.3

refresher training, 1030

REP command, 412.17

repetitive flight plan, 227.1

repetitive flight plans, 1120

ATS messages on individual RPL flights, 1126

data completion, 1132

flight plan cancellation, 1129

flight plan modification, 1130

implementation of RPL procedures, 1123

operator and pilot liaison, 1131

permanent RPL changes, 1127

procedures for submission by operators, 1122

storage and processing of RPL data, 1124

suspension of RPL procedures, 1125

temporary RPL changes, 1128

reporting of safety hazards, 135

request for acceptance - originating unit, 275

RES command, 412.18

responsibility (alerting service), 213

CVFR - IFR/VFR, 213.1

VFR and DVFR flights, 213.1

VFR/IFR, 213.1

route identification field, 311

route information, 318

route processing, 311

S

search and rescue services, 211.1

search documentation, 733

search operations, 730

communication search, 740

coordination with searchmaster, 732

ELT signals, 745

missing aircraft notice, 734

notification of RCC, 743

notification to the operator, 744

search area, 731

search documentation, 733

2006-07-20


unsuccessful search, 742

search procedures, 720

assisting unit, 724

communication search, 721

destination unit, 722

originating unit, 723

SELCAL field, 317

shall, 103.1

Shanwick OACC FDP link, 614.1

SHO command, 412.19

special flight handling, 750

dangerous goods, 752

direction finding DF service, 754

fuel dumping, 751

parachute descents, 753

special interest flights, 813.2

speed

knots, 105.10

mach number, 105.10

SRC field, 314

SSR code, 305

staff memos, 151.1

star, 101.2

statistics

data gathering, 153

successive points of departure, 224.2

suggestions, 141

supplementary procedures for control in a bilingual

environment, 780

symbols, 101

system links, 320

T

TC and canadian military VIP flights, 269

tour of duty, 124.3

training, 1000

truncated route, 318.4

ATOS IND-8

U

U.S. special military flights, 850

USAF bomber cell flights, 851

USAF tanker celestial navigation training, 852

uncertainty phase, 721.3, 743.1

unit directives, 151

unit equipment, 157

unit identification, 111

unit log, 124.2

unit of measurement, 107

unit operations, 150

unit visitors, 154

unsuccessful search, 742

urgent PIREP processing, 222.2

V

vertical separation, 225.2

VFR alerting, 201.2

VFR flight data transfer, 270

application, 272

general, 271

transmission of, 272.3, 272.4

VFR with stopover, 271.1

VFR flights, 269.2

VIP military identification, 115

visibility, 107.4

visits to other units, 155

VSP menu, 438

AFTN queue timeout, 438.8

AFTN-ND1, 438.6

AFTN-ND2, 438.7

auto edit ACID, 438.4

auto edit DEP/DEST, 438.3

ICAO RMKS, 438.11

L/R field, 438.5

NAMES automation level, 438.12

NAS RMKS, 438.10

NFDPS queue timeout, 438.9

NFDPS system type, 438.12

terminal mode, 438.2

2006-07-20


W

weight category, 104.2

wind speed, 105.7, 107.2

word meanings, 103

ATOS IND-9

words and phrases, 106

Z

ZULU, 103.1


100 _ INTRODUCTION

PART 1 — GENERAL

101 SYMBOLS

102 EXPLANATORY MATERIAL

103 WORD MEANINGS

104 PHRASEOLOGY

105 PHONETICS AND NUMBERS

106 WORDS AND PHRASES

107 UNITS OF MEASUREMENT

108 ALTIMETER INFORMATION

110 _ IDENTIFICATION

111 UNIT IDENTIFICATION

112 CIVIL AIRCRAFT IDENTIFICATION

113 MILITARY AND COAST GUARD IDENTIFICATION

114 OPEN SKIES TREATY

115 VIP IDENTIFICATION

116 ICE PATROL AIRCRAFT

117 CIVIL AIR SEARCH AND RESCUE ASSOCIATION (CASARA) AIRCRAFT

118 NAVAID IDENTIFICATION

119 AIRWAY AND AIR ROUTE IDENTIFICATION

120 _ ATOS ORGANIZATION

121 GENERAL

122 POSITION DESCRIPTIONS

123 POSITION RESPONSIBILITY

124 PREPARATION FOR AND COMPLETION OF DUTY

125 MEAL AND RELIEF BREAKS

130 _ ATOS RESPONSIBILITIES

131 GENERAL

132 RESPONSIBILITIES

133 CERTIFICATION

134 LOCAL OR NATIONAL EMERGENCY

135 REPORTING OF SAFETY HAZARDS

136 LEGAL RESPONSIBILITY OF EMPLOYEES

137 LEGAL RESPONSIBILITY OF NAV CANADA

140 _ ATOS ADMINISTRATION

141 SUGGESTIONS

142 FORMS — PURPOSE

143 OPERATIONAL CONDITION REPORT (OCR)

ATOS 1-1

2004-09-30


150 _ UNIT OPERATIONS

151 UNIT DIRECTIVES

152 MANDATORY BRIEFINGS

153 STATISTICAL DATA GATHERING

154 UNIT VISITORS

155 VISITS TO OTHER UNITS

156 CORRESPONDENCE

157 UNIT EQUIPMENT

INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

ATOS 1-2

2004-09-30


PART 1 — GENERAL

100 INTRODUCTION

101 SYMBOLS

101.1

A symbol inserted in the text indicates that

explanatory material appears in the right hand

column. These symbols and their meaning are

as follows:

A. (P) — phraseology

B. (N) — note

C. (E) — example

D. (R) — reference

E. (D) — diagram

101.2

A star “H” preceding a paragraph or subparagraph

on an amended page indicates that

a revision has been made. (N)

102 EXPLANATORY MATERIAL

102.1

A note is a fact or explanation relating to the

application of a directive.

102.2

An example is an illustration of a directive.

102.3

A reference draws attention to related

materials.

102.4

A diagram is a visual representation of a

directive or organization.

ATOS 1-3

101.2 Note:

Pages are marked either “Original” or with the

effective date of the last amendment on that page

(e.g. 1999-01-28). A paragraph that has been

renumbered only, because of the insertion of new

material preceding it, will not be identified with a

star. The accompanying blue ATOSD pages explain

the intent of the change, background and rationale,

and give instructions for inserting the amended

page.

Original


103 WORD MEANINGS

103.1

As used in this manual, the following words

have the meaning stated:

A. “Shall” means application is mandatory.

B. “Should” means application is

recommended.

C. “May” or “need not” means application is

optional.

D. “Mile” means nautical mile unless otherwise

stated.

E. “Days” means calender days unless

otherwise stated.

F. “Aircraft” means the airframe, crew

members or both.

G. “ZULU” means Coordinated Universal Time.

H. “Will” means futurity, not a requirement for

application.

I. “Altitude” means altitude above sea level,

flight level, or both.

103.2

The generic term manager has been used

throughout this document wherever possible.

Individual regions may determine the

appropriate manager to assign to a task.

Authority may be delegated to a subordinate

level unless otherwise specified in this

document or by regional direction.

103.3

In this Manual, nouns of common gender such

as, manager, controller, team leader, specialist,

supervisor, director and singular pronouns that

refer to common gender nouns in the same

paragraph in either the feminine or masculine

format, may have a feminine or masculine

meaning as appropriate. In addition, a singular

word includes the plural and a plural word

includes the singular.

ATOS 1-4

Original


104 PHRASEOLOGY

104.1

Use the phraseology contained in this manual

whenever possible. If a situation arises for

which phraseology is not provided: (N)

A. use words and phrases from 106.1; or

B. if words and phrases in 106.1 are not found

to be suitable, use language that is clear

and concise.

104.2

Use the handbook entitled “Air Traffic

Designators” to determine an aircraft's wake

turbulence category. (N)(R)

104.3

Apply the rules and procedures contained in

this part in the composition and handling of ATC

messages. (N)

ATOS 1-5

* 104.1 Note:

Any phraseology that is used on a recurring basis

must be approved by the Manager, ATS Standards

and Procedures. Anyone wishing to introduce new

phraseology or change existing phraseology is

expected to forward a suggestion to Head Office

through normal channels.

104.2 Note 1:

The handbook entitled “Air Traffic Designators” is

the primary aircraft weight category reference for

NAV CANADA purposes.

104.2 Note 2:

United States weight groups are described as

heavy, large, and small, and are NOT consistent

with these categories.

104.2 Reference:

Heavy Aircraft; Definitions

Medium Aircraft; Definitions

Light Aircraft; Definitions.

104.3 Note:

These rules and procedures are applied by

personnel of other agencies when using ATC

interphone facilities.

2006-04-13


105 PHONETICS AND NUMBERS

105.1

If it is necessary to clearly identify a station or

spell a word in a message, use the ICAO

phonetic alphabet as follows: (N)

A — ALFA AL fah

B — BRAVO BRAH VO

C — CHARLIE CHAR lee

D — DELTA DELL tah

E — ECHO ECK oh

F — FOXTROT FOKS trot

G — GOLF GOLF

H — HOTEL hoh TELL

I — INDIA IN dee ah

J — JULIETT JEW lee ETT

K — KILO KEY loh

L — LIMA LEE mah

M — MIKE MIKE

N — NOVEMBER no VEM ber

O — OSCAR OSS cah

P — PAPA pah PAH

Q — QUEBEC keh BECK

R — ROMEO ROW me oh

S — SIERRA see AIR ah

T — TANGO TANG go

U — UNIFORM YOU nee form

V — VICTOR VIK tah

W — WHISKEY WISS key

X — X-RAY ECKS RAY

Y — YANKEE YANG key

Z — ZULU ZOO loo

105.2

Clearly enunciate numbers used in

transmissions. Use the following pronunciation

if there is any likelihood of misunderstanding:

(N)

0 — ZERO 5 — FIFE

1 — WUN 6 — SIX

2 — TOO 7 — SEV en

3 — TREE 8 — AIT

4 — FOW er 9 — NIN er

ATOS 1-6

105.1 Note:

The syllables printed in capital letters in this list and

in 105.2 are to be stressed. For example, the 2

syllables in “BRAH VOH” are given equal emphasis,

whereas the first syllable in “FOW er” is given

emphasis.

105.2 Note:

It is important that you pronounce 5 and 9 as

indicated for all:

A. altimeter settings; and

B. altitude assignments.

2006-04-13


105.3

Express all numbers by pronouncing each digit

separately except as provided in 105.4, 105.5,

105.6 and 105.7. (E)

105.4

Express whole thousands by pronouncing each

digit in the number of thousands followed by the

word “thousand”. (E)

105.5

You may express altitude above sea level in the

thousands plus hundreds of feet. Use separate

digits to express flight levels. (E)

105.6

You may express aircraft identification flight

numbers and aircraft type numbers in group

form, provided there is no likelihood of

misunderstanding. (E)

105.7

You may express wind speed and cloud height

in group form. (E)

105.8

Except when giving altimeter settings, express

numbers containing a decimal point with the

word “decimal” in the appropriate sequence.

However, in giving VHF or UHF frequencies,

you may omit the decimal point provided the

omission is not likely to cause any

misunderstanding. (E)

ATOS 1-7

105.3 Example:

01 Zero One.

10 One Zero.

75 Seven Five.

100 One Zero Zero.

583 Five Eight Three.

38143 Three Eight One Four Three.

105.4 Example:

5000 Five Thousand.

11000 One One Thousand.

105.5 Example:

2700 Two Thousand Seven Hundred.

13200 One Three Thousand Two Hundred.

FL265 Flight Level Two Six Five.

FL200 Flight Level Two Zero Zero.

105.6 Example:

CDN620 Canadian Six Twenty.

ACA1240 Air Canada Twelve Forty.

L101 Lockheed Ten Eleven.

DC10 DC Ten.

105.7 Example:

WIND TWO SEVEN ZERO AT TEN.

WIND TWO THREE ZERO AT TWENTY GUSTING

TO THIRTY.

BKN035 — MEASURED THIRTY FIVE HUNDRED

BROKEN.

105.8 Example:

118.1 One One Eight Decimal One.

119.4 One One Nine Four.

Original


105.9

Express headings as 3-digit numbers in

degrees magnetic except in the Canadian

Northern Domestic Airspace where headings

are expressed in degrees true. Use “heading

360” to signify a north heading. (N)(E)

105.10

Express speed by pronouncing each digit

separately followed by “knots” or by

pronouncing each digit of the mach number

preceded by “mach”. (E)

106 WORDS AND PHRASES

106.1

Use the following words and phrases, if

practicable, in interphone communication:

ACKNOWLEDGE: “Let me know that you have

received and understood this message”

AFFIRMATIVE: “Yes” or “Permission granted”.

BREAK: “I hereby indicate the separation

between portions of the message”. (N)

CORRECTION: “An error has been made in

this transmission. The correct version is ...”.

GO AHEAD: “Proceed with your message”.

HOW DO YOU READ: Self-explanatory.

I SAY AGAIN: Self-explanatory.

NEGATIVE: “No”, or “Permission not granted”,

or “That is not correct”.

OUT: “This conversation is ended and no

response is expected”.

OVER: “My transmission is ended and I expect

a response from you”.

READ BACK: “Repeat all of this message back

to me”.

ROGER: “I have received all of your last

transmission”. (N)

ATOS 1-8

105.9 Note:

The word degrees and magnetic are omitted with

reference to magnetic heading and only the word

true follows the number where references are to

true headings.

105.9 Example:

005

magnetic

degrees Heading Zero Zero Five.

030

magnetic

degrees Heading Zero Three Zero.

360 degrees Heading Three Six Zero.

magnetic

040 degrees true Heading Zero Four Zero True.

180 degrees true Heading One Eight Zero True.

105.10 Example:

90 knots Speed Nine Zero Knots.

250 knots Speed Two Five Zero Knots.

Mach 1.3 Mach One Decimal Three.

Mach 0.82 Mach Decimal Eight Two.

106.1 Note 1:

This word is intended to be used where there is no

clear distinction between the text and other portions

of the message.

106.1 Note 2:

This word is used to acknowledge receipt and is not

intended to be used for other purposes.

Original


SAY AGAIN: Self-explanatory.

SPEAK SLOWER: Self-explanatory.

STAND-BY: Self-explanatory.

THAT IS CORRECT: Self-explanatory.

VERIFY: Check coding, check text with

originator, and send correct version.

WORDS TWICE: As a request:

“Communication is difficult. Please say every

word twice”.

As information: “Since communication is

difficult, every word in this message will be said

twice”.

107 UNITS OF MEASUREMENT

107.1

Give altimeter settings in inches of mercury, to

the nearest hundredth of an inch.

107.2

Give the wind speed and direction according to

the OIDS-R display. During gusty wind

conditions, give the fluctuations of wind

direction and speed of peak gusts. (N)

107.3

Unless otherwise specified, indicate time in

terms of the 24-hour clock system and in UTC.

Use the time group 0000Z to indicate midnight.

Transmit time checks as follows:

A. Analog clock — to the nearest 15 seconds.

B. Digital clock — the readout value.

* 107.4

Use knots or Mach-number to indicate speed,

nautical miles to indicate distance. (N)

* 107.5

Report visibility in statute miles by enunciating

the word VISIBILITY followed by separate

digits. (E)

108 ALTIMETER INFORMATION

108.1

Express altimeter setting information as follows:

ATOS 1-9

107.2 Note:

OIDS-R wind direction and speed are determined

from the normal direction indicator and

anemometer. The wind direction is presented in

multiples of 10 degrees and the wind speed is

presented in multiples of 2 knots.

107.4 Note:

At locations where there is international traffic, the

ATOS is expected to include the word “knots”

following the wind speed.

* 107.5 Example:

15 VISIBILITY ONE FIVE

2006-01-19


A. State the word “altimeter” followed by the 4

separate digits of the setting. (P)(R)

B. Identify the setting by the name of the

station to which it applies except if: (E)

1. the setting applies to the station at which

the ATC unit is located; and

2. there is no possibility of

misunderstanding.

C. State the setting twice if it is either 31.00

and higher, or 28.99 and lower. (P)

D. Include the time of the report if the setting is

obtained from a weather report that is 1

hour or more old. (P)

E. Identify the setting as “QNH” if an aircraft

asks which type of setting is being provided.

(N)

108.2

Use the altimeter setting indicators installed in

ATC units as the primary instrument for

obtaining the local altimeter setting. (R)

ATOS 1-10

108.1 A. Phraseology:

(Name) ALTIMETER (setting).

108.1 A. Reference:

Phonetics and Numbers; 105.

Altimeter Setting Indicator; 424, ATSAMM.

108.1 B. Example:

Gander ACC issuing setting for Stephenville —

STEPHENVILLE ALTIMETER TWO NINER SEVEN

TWO.

Edmonton ACC issuing setting for Vermilion and

Edmonton —

VERMILION ALTIMETER TWO NINER SIX SIX,

EDMONTON ALTIMETER TWO NINER SIX

THREE.

108.1 C. Phraseology:

(Name) ALTIMETER (setting), I SAY AGAIN

(setting).

108.1 D. Phraseology:

(Name) ALTIMETER AT (time) WAS (setting).

108.1 E. Note:

An altimeter on a QNH setting will display the height

above sea level. In Canada, the height above

aerodrome elevation or relevant runway threshold

(QFE) is not available.

108.2 Reference:

Altimeter Setting Indicator; 424, ATSAMM.

2006-01-19


110 IDENTIFICATION

111 UNIT IDENTIFICATION

111.1

Identify ATS units and their functions in

interphone communications as follows:

A. Operation Support: (name) (function) (E)

B. Airport Control Service:

Airport Control (name) TOWER

Ground Control (name) GROUND

Clearance Delivery (name) CLEARANCE

DELIVERY

C. Terminal Control Service:

Terminal Control (name) TERMINAL

Arrival Control (name) ARRIVAL

Departure Control (name) DEPARTURE

D. Area Control Service:

All Sectors (name) CENTRE

E. Flight Service Station:

All Services (name) RADIO

112 CIVIL AIRCRAFT IDENTIFICATION

112.1

Identify Canadian and Foreign civil aircraft by

using one of the following methods: (R)

A. Canadian Air Carriers with radiotelephony

designators: (E)

1. the operator's radiotelephony

designator;

2. the flight number or last four characters

of the registration;

3. the word “HEAVY” if applicable; and

4. the priority term “MEDEVAC” if

applicable. (R)

B. Foreign Air Carriers with radiotelephony

designators: (E)

1. the operator's radiotelephony

designator;

ATOS 1-11

111.1 A. Example:

MONCTON FLIGHT PLANNING.

112.1 Reference:

Part II — Aircraft Operating Agency Designators;

“Air Traffic Designators”.

* 112.1 A. Example:

AIR CANADA 620.

ABBY AIR FOXTROT ALFA BRAVO CHARLIE

MEDEVAC.

112.1 A. 4 Reference:

MEDEVAC; Definitions.

112.1 B. Example:

UNITED 672.

SPEEDBIRD GOLF ALFA BRAVO CHARLIE

DELTA.

2002-07-11


2. the flight number or full aircraft

registration;

3. the word “HEAVY” if applicable; and

4. the priority term “MEDEVAC” if

applicable.

C. Private Aircraft and Canadian or Foreign Air

Carriers without radiotelephony designators:

1. the full aircraft registration;

2. the word “HEAVY” if applicable; and

3. the priority term “MEDEVAC” if

applicable.

112.2

Use phonetics if the call-sign consists of the

aircraft's registration.

112.3

Do not omit the priority term MEDEVAC for

medical evacuation flights.

113 MILITARY AND COAST GUARD

IDENTIFICATION

113.1

Identify military and Coast Guard aircraft by

using one of the following:

A. Canadian Forces:

1. The radiotelephony designator

“CANFORCE” followed by the flight

number or the last four digits of the

aircraft registration number. (N)(E)

ATOS 1-12

113.1 A. 1 Note:

Some aircraft registrations consist of only 3

numbers.

113.1 A. 1 Example:

CANFORCE SEVEN ONE TWO.

CANFORCE FIVE ONE THREE THREE.

2. The tactical call-sign. (N)(E) 113.1 A. 2 Note:

In these cases the call-sign has no relationship to

the operating agency, registration, or flight number.

113.1 A. 2 Example:

HAWK ONE FOUR.

BANJO EIGHT ONE.

KILO NOVEMBER THREE THREE.

B. Canadian Coast Guard:

1. The radiotelephony designator

“CANADIAN COAST GUARD” followed

by three numbers. (E)

C. Foreign:

113.1 B. 1 Example:

CANADIAN COAST GUARD THREE ZERO FIVE.

2002-07-11


1. The prefix of the service name followed

by the flight number or the last four or

five digits of the aircraft registration

number. (N)(E)

ATOS 1-13

113.1 C. 1. Note:

The number of characters is limited to a total of 7

due to the capacity of automated equipment such

as NFDPS and RAMP.

113.1 C. 1 Example:

US NAVY FIVE FIVE TWO TWO THREE.

REACH SEVEN EIGHT FIVE SIX TWO.

US MARINE FOUR TWO TWO ONE FIVE.

2. The tactical call-sign. (E) 113.1 C. 2 Example:

STONE ONE THREE.

HINGE FOUR EIGHT FOUR.

113.2

Apply the terms “HEAVY”, “MEDEVAC” and

“AIREVAC” to military and coast guard flights, in

the same manner as with civil flights. (N)

113.3

Do not abbreviate military and Coast Guard

aircraft identifications.

114 OPEN SKIES TREATY

114.1

Identify Open Skies Treaty flights using the

radio- telephony designator OPEN SKIES

followed by two digits to identify the country of

origin and one letter suffix for the type of

mission. (N)(E)(R)

114.2

Use the designator OSY for Open Skies Treaty

flights.

114.3

Use the following one-letter suffixes to identify

the type of mission:

A. “F” for observation flights;

B. “D” for demonstration flights; and

113.2 Note:

The term AIREVAC may be used by military aircraft

on flight plans and in radiotelephony call-signs to

signify that ATS priority handling is required. It will

only be used for flights involved in a declared natural

disaster situation, i.e. flood, fire, hurricane.

114.1 Note:

The Open Skies Treaty is based on territorial

openness and quotas of annual flights equipped

with sensors to gather information about military

forces and activities. Canada will accept 12

observation flights per year and, through portions of

its airspace, a number of transit flights destined for

the U.S. The types of flights that may be conducted

are transit, observation and demonstration flights.

Observation and demonstration flights shall be

given flight priority by ATC.

114.1 Example:

OPEN SKIES NINE ONE FOXTROT.

114.1 Reference:

Flight Planning Priority; 221.

Designators for Aircraft Operating Agencies,

Aeronautical Authorities and Services, ICAO Doc.

8585.

2004-09-30


C. “T” for transit flights.

115 VIP MILITARY IDENTIFICATION

115.1

Canadian Military aircraft carrying VIPs will be

identified as follows: (N)(R)

A. ROYAL 01 to 09 — Members of the Royal

family; (N)

B. CANFORCE 3701 — the Governor General;

C. CANFORCE 01 — the Prime Minister; and

D. CANFORCE 02 to 19 — other heads of

state or government. (N)

* 115.2

Transport Canada aircraft carrying VIP will be

identified as follows: (R)

* A. TRANSPORT 01 – Prime Minister; and

* B. TRANSPORT 02 – the Governor General.

116 ICE PATROL AIRCRAFT

116.1

Identify ice patrol aircraft on flight plans, flight

progress strips and in automated systems by

the designator “CNICE” and use the

radiotelephony call-sign “CANICE” plus the

flight number.

117 CIVIL AIR SEARCH AND RESCUE

ASSOCIATION (CASARA) AIRCRAFT

117.1

CASARA aircraft participating in Search and

Rescue (SAR) missions organized and

managed by the DND will identify their flight by

the designator RSCU and radiotelephony

“RESCUE” followed by an appropriate flight

number assigned by DND. (N)

ATOS 1-14

115.1 Note:

The primary method of informing ATS that a VIP is

on board is the aircraft call-sign although the flight

plan may contain additional remarks concerning

VIPs.

115.1 Reference:

Flight Planning Priority; 221.

115.1 A. Note:

ROYAL 10 designates a pre-positioning flight

associated with Royal Visits.

115.1 D. Note:

CANFORCE 20 designates a pre-positioning flight

associated with the Prime Minister or other heads of

state or government.

* 115.2 Reference:

Flight Planning Priority; 221.

117.1 Note 1:

For statistical purposes the civil registration is

required for all CASARA aircraft at the departure

point, any en route stops and destination whenever

there is an ATS unit located at any of the sites.

117.1 Note 2:

Although CASARA aircraft engaged in SAR

missions are under the direction of the DND, this

does not preclude the requirement to adhere to all

CARs and ATS procedures.

2004-09-30


117.2

CASARA aircraft participating in SAR training

exercises on initial contact with an ATS unit, will

identify their flight by their civil registration

followed by the term CASARA. (N)

118 NAVAID IDENTIFICATION

118.1

Identify radio NAVAIDs, in ATS

communications, as follows: (E)

* A. the plain language name or, if the name is

difficult to pronounce, the coded designator

with mandatory use of phonetics; and

B. the type of NAVAID.

119 AIRWAY AND AIR ROUTE

IDENTIFICATION

119.1

Identify all designated airways and air routes by

pronouncing the letter(s) designator in

accordance with the ICAO phonetic alphabet,

except for JET airways where the designator

“JET” is used. (E)(R)

INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

ATOS 1-15

117.2 Note:

CASARA aircraft that will be participating in SAR

training exercises will identify themselves as

CASARA aircraft with their intentions in the remarks

section of their flight plan.

* 118.1 Example:

YARMOUTH VOR

TRENTON TACAN

KANGIQSUJUAQ/YANKEE KILO GOLF NDB

119.1 Example:

G1: GOLF ONE

AR2: ALFA ROMEO TWO

J500: JET FIVE ZERO ZERO

119.1 Reference:

Phonetics and Numbers; 105.

2006-07-20


120 ATOS ORGANIZATION

121 GENERAL

121.1

The Air Traffic Operations Specialty (ATOSY) in

each Area Control Centre is normally made up

of:

A. an Air Traffic Operations Specialty Manager

(ATOSM) or the designated person;

B. Air Traffic Operations Specialty Team

Leaders (ATOTL); and

C. Air Traffic Operations Specialists (ATOS).

121.2

The ATOSM or the designated person reports

to the Manager, Area Control Centre

Operations, and is responsible for the operation

and administration of the ATOSY.

121.3

The ATOSTL, under the direction of the ATOSM

or the designated person, is responsible for the

daily operation of the ATOSY.

121.4

The ATOS shall carry out the duties of their job

description under the supervision of the

ATOSTL.

122 POSITION DESCRIPTIONS

122.1

An ATOSY in an ACC normally consists of a

combination of the following operating

positions: (N)

A. landline flight planning and IFR and VFR

alerting;

B. NAMES/NFDPS/FDPN flight data entry;

C. GAMES/GAATS flight data processing;

D. OIDS, AMIS, MIDS, monitoring and

updating;

E. estimate handling;

F. NOTAM handling;

G. flight data message and communication

handling;

H. RDPS entry and modification;

I. mission plotting/mission coordinator;

ATOS 1-16

122.1 Note:

Positions may be expanded or combined as staffing

and traffic volume dictate.

2006-07-20


J. team leader position;

K. data systems specialist; and

L. other non-control duty positions as required.

122.2

The ATOS on duty at the flight planning position

will:

A. respond to incoming landline messages;

B. process incoming flight plan data by

verifying and correcting the filed data;

C. provide VFR and IFR alerting service;

D. process ADCUS requests; and

E. perform other duties as may be assigned to

the position.

122.3

The ATOS on duty at the flight data entry

position will:

A. receive and verify flight plans to be entered

into flight data processing systems;

B. process flight plan data on a timely basis for

the production of control strips; (N)

C. ensure that entered data is accurate, correct

and conforms to other automated system

requirements;

D. process flight data received on the flight

data processing system link according to

specified procedures; (R)

E. make any amendments and corrections, as

necessary, to maintain the integrity of the

flight data; and

F. perform other duties, as required.

122.4

The ATOS assigned to the OIDS, AMIS, MIDS

position is responsible, as appropriate, to:

A. monitor the OIDS, AMIS, MIDS to ensure

that automatically sensed and manually

entered information is correct and updated

as necessary;

B. ensure that all information is disseminated

to the required positions;

ATOS 1-17

122.3 B. Note:

The recommended priority for the processing of

flight data is:

A. live flight data;

B. MEDEVAC proposed within the current hour;

C. flights becoming active within the current hour;

D. flight requiring special handling; and

E. others, as required.

122.3 D. Reference:

Flight Data System to RDPS Link Format; 323.

Original


C. notify users of any system problems and

ensure the proper distribution of required

information during systems failures;

D. notify the team leader, DSC, or technician of

system failures that are not correctable in a

reasonable time period;

E. ensure that special information is distributed

to required sectors; (N)

F. provide information to NORAD; and

G. perform other duties, as required.

122.5

The ATOS assigned to the communications

positions shall: (N)

A. be responsible for the processing of

incoming and outgoing teletype messages;

B. ensure that all outgoing messages are

correctly formatted and addressed;

C. distribute incoming messages to the

appropriate personnel or unit;

D. inform the appropriate personnel of any

equipment problems; and

E. perform other duties, as required.

123 POSITION RESPONSIBILITY

123.1

The ATOSM or the designated person is

responsible to ensure:

A. that guidelines are provided for ATOS to

follow at the time of transfer of position

responsibility; and

B. a check list is developed for each

operational position to be used at the time of

transfer of position responsibility. (N)

123.2

An ATOS is responsible for all operations of that

position, whether he is working alone or as an

on-the-job instructor (OJI) with a trainee. The

monitoring OJI shall be able to: (N)

ATOS 1-18

122.4 E. Note:

SIGMETs, AIREPs, NOTAMs, RSC/CRFIs,

AIRMETs, etc.

122.5 Note:

Communications positions include but are not

limited to:

A. AFTN;

B. interphone;

C. fax;

D. GAATS; etc.

123.1 B. Note:

The following items may be included in the check

list, as appropriate:

A. Equipment status.

B. Any new or changed operations letters and

mandatory briefings.

C. Flow restrictions.

D. Special use airspace.

123.2 Note:

Positions used for on-the-job training must provide

the OJI with the capability of:

A. monitoring and overriding all landlines; and

B. monitoring and correcting all data inputs.

Original


A. assume operation of the position at any time

without requiring the trainee to provide any

details of the operation; and

B. recognize situations where the trainee's

involvement has to be temporarily restricted

if safety may be jeopardized or position

workload may become congested.

123.3

The ATOSTL shall assign qualified ATOS to

operating positions on an equitable basis.

124 PREPARATION FOR AND

COMPLETION OF DUTY

124.1

Maintain a neat and conventional appearance

during working hours. (R)

124.2

Before assuming any operating position in an

ATOSY personnel shall familiarize themselves

for assigned duties by:

A. Signing the attendance register.

B. Reading and initialing the unit log and

operational data as appropriate. (N)

C. Ensuring that all pertinent equipment is

operating normally and, if necessary,

reporting any malfunctions to the

appropriate authority. (R)

D. Becoming familiar with the work being

performed at the position concerned.

ATOS 1-19

124.1 Reference:

Personnel; 202, ATSAMM.

124.2 B. Note 1:

Locally developed forms may be used to indicate

that you have read the unit log and operational data,

such as NOTAM, operations letters, operations

bulletins, mandatory briefing items, and staff

memos.

124.2 B. Note 2:

ATOSY personnel are expected to inform the

ATOSM or his designated representative of any

publication discrepancies or inaccuracies of which

they become aware.

124.2 C. Reference:

Unit Equipment - General; 421, ATSAMM.

124.3

On completion of a tour of duty, ATOSY

personnel shall perform the following activities,

as required:

A. Brief relieving personnel.

B. Complete and initial unit log. (R) 124.3 B. Reference:

Unit Log - General; 241, ATSAMM.

Original


C. Complete any personal notes to unit files on

observations or data not included in reports.

D. Check personnel schedule for the next tour

of duty.

E. Sign attendance register.

124.4

The General Manager, IFR Operations is

responsible for ensuring:

A. that operating personnel are assigned twoletter

operating initials; and

B. that there is no duplication of initials within

the unit.

124.5

ATOSY personnel shall use operating initials,

except if a signature is required, for:

A. operating forms;

B. interphone contacts; and

C. all other record purposes.

125 MEAL AND RELIEF BREAKS

125.1

Team leaders shall follow unit guidelines which

provide direction in the event personnel must

vacate an operating position for relief purposes.

125.2

Team leaders should provide meal and relief

breaks to operating personnel subject to

operational requirements. (N)

125.3

Team leaders may give personnel periods of

relief by combining operating positions

provided:

A. current and anticipated workload permits;

and

B. the employee can be quickly recalled.

125.4

Team leaders should also provide relief from

positions entailing heavy workload by rotating

the employee to a less active operating

position.

ATOS 1-20

125.2 Note:

To the extent that staffing and workload permit,

personnel will be given time away from operating

positions for:

A. brief periods of rest; and

B. a reasonable lunch period.

Original


130 ATOS RESPONSIBILITIES

131 GENERAL

131.1

ATOSY personnel are expected to be familiar

with all parts of this manual and to have an indepth

knowledge of those provisions that

pertain to their management, supervisory and

operating position responsibilities as

appropriate.

131.2

ATOSMs or the designated person and

ATOSTLs are expected to use their best

judgment for the resolution of a situation for

which direction is not provided.

132 RESPONSIBILITIES

132.1

Immediately report to the ACC Shift Manager or

the Unit Manager, as applicable, any incident

that may require investigation. (N)(R)

ATOS 1-21

132.1 Note:

An “incident” is any abnormal occurrence that is

significant.

132.1 Reference:

Handling and Reporting Incidents; 230, ATSAMM.

132.2

Do not discuss operations or any incident that

comes to your attention by reason of your

employment except:

A. when requested to do so by an authorized

NAV CANADA official; or

B. as otherwise excepted in ATSAMM. (R) 132.2 B. Reference:

Release of Information; 115, ATSAMM.

132.3

Avoid gossip or criticism reflecting on users of

air traffic services or on other ATS units or

personnel. ATOS should, however, provide

advice and feedback through normal channels

for action. (N)(R)

132.4

No employee of the Air Traffic Services

Department shall participate in any operational

function: (N)

A. within 8 hours after the consumption of any

alcoholic beverage;

132.3 Note:

As representatives of NAV CANADA in direct

contact with the public, all personnel are expected

to exercise a high degree of tact and good

judgment.

132.3 Reference:

Air Traffic Services — General; 801.01 (1), CARs.

132.4 Note:

For the purposes of this paragraph “operational

function” means control, advisory, operational

support, provision of flight information services, or

any other duties associated with the movement of

air traffic.

2005-07-07


B. while under the influence of intoxicating

liquor; or

C. while under the influence of a drug that

impairs the ability to carry out his duties.

133 CERTIFICATION

133.1

ATOS may not take over an operating position

unless:

A. in possession of a unit certification

endorsement or a letter of authority covering

the operating position; and

B. qualified on the equipment to be used.

134 LOCAL OR NATIONAL EMERGENCY

134.1

In the event of a local or national emergency

affecting NAV CANADA facilities, all employees

are expected to: (R)

A. be available for duty as soon as possible;

and

B. act in accordance with any local unit

directive that may be in force.

135 REPORTING OF SAFETY HAZARDS

135.1

ATOSY personnel who notice, or are aware of,

a hazard to the safety of aviation, should

immediately bring the matter to the attention of

their team leader. (R)

136 LEGAL RESPONSIBILITY OF

EMPLOYEES

136.1

ATS personnel may be held liable as a result of

performing their duties on behalf of

NAV CANADA and acting within the scope of

employment for the provision of air traffic

services. In such cases, NAV CANADA would

also be held liable. However, before

NAV CANADA can be sued for the acts of one

of its employees, the employee must have

committed an act or omission that is considered

to be a negligent act or omission.

ATOS 1-22

134.1 Reference:

Local or National Emergency; 116, ATSAMM.

135.1 Reference:

Reporting of Safety Hazards; 118, ATSAMM.

2005-07-07


136.2

Personnel responsible for the provision of Air

Traffic Services must do so in accordance with

the applicable provisions of the Canadian

Aviation Regulations. (R)

137 LEGAL RESPONSIBILITY OF

NAV CANADA

137.1

NAV CANADA could be liable in tort for

damages as if it were a private person of full

age and capacity. It could be liable for the

actions of a NAV CANADA employee causing a

tort breach of contract, or breach of the laws or

regulations of Canada. (N)(R)

137.2

The relevant proceedings that can arise out of

an incident involving aircraft being provided with

air traffic services by ATS personnel in the

course of their duties are:

A. an action for damage brought against

NAV CANADA directly; or

B. an action for damage brought against the

employee personally.

137.3

If an action is brought against NAV CANADA

directly, legal counsel retained by the

company's insurer will conduct the defence.

137.4

If an action is brought against the employees

personally:

A. NAV CANADA shall provide legal advice

and assistance to the employee who is

required to appear before a coroner's

inquest, magisterial-judicial inquiry, or who

is a party to civil legal action, arising out of

the performance of their duties as an air

traffic controller; or

B. in the case of other NAV CANADA

employees, NAV CANADA will, in the

ordinary course defend an employee who is

sued as a result of events occurring while

the employee acted within the scope and

course of employment. (N)

ATOS 1-23

136.2 Reference:

Legal Responsibility of Employees; 113, ATSAMM.

Air Traffic Controller Licences and Ratings; 402,

CARs.

Medical Requirements; 404, CARs.

Air Navigation Services; Part VIII, CARs.

137.1 Note:

A “tort” is basically an injury or wrong done to

another. The tort most likely to occur in the provision

of ATS services is one attributable to negligence.

137.1 Reference:

Legal Responsibility of NAV CANADA; 114,

ATSAMM.

137.4 B. Note:

In most instances it is in the employer's interest to

provide this defence since negligence of fault

attributed to an employee acting within the scope

and course of employment normally imposes civil

liability on the employer as well.

Original


137.5

If judgement is awarded against an employee, it

is usually paid out of NAV CANADA funds. (N)

137.6

Personnel should arrange through their

immediate team leader for legal advice if they

are summoned to appear at a Coroner's

Inquest or court action to give evidence relating

to their duties.

INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

ATOS 1-24

137.5 Note:

The only case in which NAV CANADA may refuse to

accept liability is when the employee is judged guilty

of gross negligence or willful misconduct.

Original


140 ATOS ADMINISTRATION

141 SUGGESTIONS

141.1

Submit suggestions arising directly from day-today

duties to your team leader or to the

appropriate manager. If required, you should

put these suggestions in writing. (R)

142 FORMS — PURPOSE

142.1

ATOS are required to prepare correspondence,

papers, and so on according to appropriate

direction. (R)

142.2

In addition to the direction contained in this

section, all ATOS are required to prepare

correspondence, papers, and so on, relative to

their position of duty.

143 OPERATIONAL CONDITION REPORT

(OCR)

143.1

ATOS should know the purpose of OCRs and

process them according to specified

procedures. (R)

INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

ATOS 1-25

141.1 Reference:

Interpersonal Communications; 132, ATSAMM.

142.1 Reference:

Forms; 140, ATSAMM.

143.1 Reference:

Operational Condition Report (OCR); 133,

ATSAMM.

Original


150 UNIT OPERATIONS

151 UNIT DIRECTIVES

151.1

ATOS shall follow the specified procedures

used with the following systems for issuing

direction and information required for the

efficient administration and operation of the unit

in the form of: (N)(R)

A. operations letters, for long term items

related to:

1. the provision of air traffic service

(control, coordination, communication, or

equipment operating procedures;

emergency procedures applicable to

each sector or position of operation); or

2. the operation of aircraft (unique aircraft

operating characteristics and so on);

B. operations bulletins, for short term items

related to: (N)

1. the same subjects as in A. 1. and A. 2.;

or

2. the amendment of current operations

letters; and

C. staff memos for items of a non-operational

nature (staff relations, unit housekeeping,

administrative practices, and so on).

152 MANDATORY BRIEFINGS

152.1

ATOS shall follow the specified procedures

used for a particular item of new information

that has an operational effect in the service

provided by a unit and identified as a

mandatory briefing item by specified persons.

(R)

ATOS 1-26

151.1 Note:

Operations letters may supplement, but not

contradict, ATC MANOPS, FS MANOPS, ATOS

MANOPS or ATSAMM.

151.1 Reference:

Unit Directives: 204, ATSAMM.

151.1 B. Note:

An operations bulletin should normally remain valid

for not more than 60 days. If the content is required

beyond this time period, incorporate it into an

operations letter. They may include the directions

and instructions that have been developed in

agreements.

152.1 Reference:

Mandatory Briefings; 205, ATSAMM.

Original


153 STATISTICAL DATA GATHERING

153.1

Statistical records shall be gathered and

compiled according to specified direction.

(N)(R)

154 UNIT VISITORS

* 154.1

You may accept NAV CANADA and

government officials, pilots, dispatchers, and

operational personnel having a direct interest in

the functions of ATS, to visit an ATSOY

provided: (N)(R)

A. a manager authorizes each such visit;

B. Head Office has not issued instructions to

the contrary;

C. their presence in no way interferes with the

efficient operation of the unit;

D. there is no breach of security regulations;

and

E. unit personnel are available to conduct a

tour.

154.2

Managers may authorize other persons

(individuals or small groups) to be given a brief

conducted tour of the unit provided security and

the operation of the unit permit.

155 VISITS TO OTHER UNITS

155.1

Personnel making unit visits to U.S. offices or

NORAD sites shall follow specified

authorization and coordination procedures. (R)

156 CORRESPONDENCE

* 156.1

Correspondence shall be conducted in

accordance with policies and directives set forth

by Head Office. (R)

ATOS 1-27

153.1 Note:

The information derived from these statistical

reports are used for a variety of purposes including

unit classification, unit opening and closing times,

and staffing standards. It is essential that the data

be as accurate and reliable as possible.

153.1 Reference:

Recording Aircraft Movements; 206, ATSAMM.

* 154.1 Note:

Visitors to a unit may not perform operational duties

unless authorized by the appropriate manager.

154.1 Reference:

Visitors; 119, ATSAMM.

155.1 Reference:

Visitors: 119, ATSAMM.

156.1 Reference:

Correspondence; 145, ATSAMM.

Original


157 UNIT EQUIPMENT

157.1

ATOS detecting an equipment malfunction

shall: (R)

A. immediately report the malfunction to the

team leader; or

B. immediately report the malfunction to the

technical personnel responsible for

corrective action; and (N)

C. not use the equipment if it is apparent that

the malfunction could create a hazardous

situation.

157.2

ATOS shall follow specified procedures to

coordinate release of equipment for routine

maintenance with appropriate technical

personnel. (R)

ATOS 1-28

157.1 Reference:

Unit Equipment; 420, ATSAMM.

157.1 B. Note:

An agreement or memorandum of understanding

may define more detailed procedures for notifying

technical personnel on a priority basis for the

different categories of malfunctions.

157.2 Reference:

Unit Equipment; 420, ATSAMM.

Original


200 _ FLIGHT PLANNING DUTIES

PART 2 — FLIGHT PLANNING

201 GENERAL

210 _ ALERTING SERVICE

211 GENERAL

212 PROVISION OF SERVICE

213 RESPONSIBILITY

214 PROCEDURES - FLIGHT ITINERARY

215 MISSING AIRCRAFT NOTICE (MANOT)

220 _ OPERATIONS

221 FLIGHT PLANNING PRIORITY

222 PIREP PRIORITY

223 FLIGHT PLAN FILING — GENERAL

224 FLIGHT PLAN FILING — IFR

225 DIRECTION OF FLIGHT

226 COMPOSITE FLIGHT PLANS

227 CENTRE STORED FLIGHT PLAN PROGRAM (CSFP)

230 _ COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS

231 GENERAL

232 AUTHORIZED COMMUNICATIONS

233 INTERPHONE — ACCEPTABLE MESSAGES

234 INTERPHONE — OPERATING TECHNIQUE

235 BREAKING TRANSMISSIONS

236 CALLING, ANSWERING, AND COMPLETING CONTACTS

237 CONNECTING AND DISCONNECTING CIRCUITS

240 _ AERONAUTICAL FIXED SERVICES

241 GENERAL

242 AFTN MESSAGE PRIORITY

243 AFTN MESSAGE ADDRESSING

244 AFTN MESSAGE PREPARATION

250 _ AIR TRAFFIC SERVICES MESSAGES

251 GENERAL

252 MESSAGE DISTRIBUTION

253 TYPES OF MESSAGES

254 CATEGORIES OF MESSAGES

255 METHODS OF MESSAGE EXCHANGE

256 MESSAGE FORMATS

257 SUPPLEMENTARY DATA AND ICAO MESSAGE EXCHANGE

258 CUSTOMS NOTIFICATION (ADCUS) SERVICE

259 MESSAGES ON INTERNATIONAL FLIGHTS (ICAO)

ATOS 2-1

2002-04-18


260 _ FLIGHT DATA TRANSFER

261 DOMESTIC FLIGHT DATA MESSAGES

262 DOMESTIC TRANSBORDER FLIGHT DATA MESSAGES

263 MESSAGES ON FLIGHTS OUTSIDE CONTROLLED AIRSPACE

264 POSITION REPORT MESSAGES

265 PHOTOGRAPHIC SURVEY FLIGHTS

266 CIRVIS MESSAGES

267 PREFERRED ROUTES AND STRUCTURED AIRSPACE

268 COMPANY ROUTES OR APPROACHES

269 TC AND CANADIAN MILITARY VIP FLIGHTS

270 _ VFR FLIGHT DATA TRANSFER

271 GENERAL

272 APPLICATION

273 COMMUNICATIONS

274 ACCEPTANCE — DESTINATION UNIT

275 REQUEST FOR ACCEPTANCE — ORIGINATING UNIT

276 CHANGE MESSAGES

277 ARRIVAL MESSAGES

278 CHANGE IFR TO VFR

INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

ATOS 2-2

2002-04-18


PART 2 — FLIGHT PLANNING

200 FLIGHT PLANNING DUTIES

201 GENERAL

201.1‘

ATOSY personnel assigned to the flight

planning position are responsible for the

accurate, expeditious and efficient processing

of flight data information to all concerned

control sectors, units and agencies.

201.2

Flight planning duties include, but are not

restricted to, the following:

A. IFR alerting;

B. VFR alerting;

C. dissemination of incoming flight data

messages;

D. distribution of flight data as required for

alerting and other services;

E. handling of landline communications;

F. dissemination of flight information as

required;

G. operation of such equipment as necessary

to perform flight planning duties; and

H. performing any other duties that may be

assigned to the flight planning position.

INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

ATOS 2-3

Original


210 ALERTING SERVICE

211 GENERAL

211.1

The objective of the alerting service is:

A. to notify appropriate organizations of aircraft

that need:

1. search-and-rescue services (SAR);

* 2. aircraft rescue and fire fighting (ARFF);

or

3. medical attention, ambulance or other

safety assistance; and (N)

B. to assist such organizations as required.

211.2

Alerting service may be provided by ACC

control personnel or by the ATOSY as directed

by unit or regional management.

211.3

Provide as much assistance as possible to

organizations providing emergency or searchand-rescue

services.

211.4

Comply with any national, regional, or local

directive that covers the employment of

emergency services.

211.5

Alert rescue services, ECC, ambulance or other

emergency services if they are required. (N)(R)

211.6

The ACC functions as a central point within the

FIR for:

A. collecting information about an aircraft

experiencing an emergency; and

B. forwarding pertinent information to the

appropriate RCC.

ATOS 2-4

211.1 A. 3. Note:

Other safety assistance may include coordination

with Emergency Coordination Centres (ECC), First

Aid or other services.

211.5 Note:

At controlled airports the control tower is

responsible for notifying the appropriate agencies.

At other locations a flight service station or other

agency notifies the appropriate agency.

211.5 Reference:

Agreements and Arrangements — General; 301,

ATSAMM.

Original


211.7

Forward reports regarding overdue aircraft

within another FIR to the ACC concerned.

212 PROVISION OF SERVICE

212.1

Provide alerting service to:

A. known IFR and CVFR aircraft operating

within your FIR; and

B. known VFR aircraft for which you are

responsible.

212.2

An airport or terminal controller is responsible

to immediately report to the appropriate ACC,

and any other agency concerned, all

information regarding:

A. an aircraft accident;

B. an aircraft in distress; or

C. a lost or overdue aircraft.

213 RESPONSIBILITY

213.1

Alerting service shall be provided for aircraft

that are operating on flight plans or flight

itineraries on file with an ATS unit, as follows:

A. VFR and DVFR flights:

1. the originating unit is responsible until

receipt of an acceptance message from

the destination unit; and

2. thereafter, the destination unit is

responsible; and

B. CVFR, IFR/VFR and VFR/IFR flights:

1. for CVFR or IFR segments — the

appropriate ACC is responsible;

2. for VFR/IFR flights — the originating unit

is responsible until receipt of an

acceptance message from the

destination unit and thereafter the

destination unit is responsible for the

VFR segment; and

3. for IFR/VFR flights — once the flight

commences the VFR segment, the

destination unit, having acknowledged

the departure message from the ACC, is

responsible.

ATOS 2-5

2006-04-13


C. FLIGHT ITINERARIES:

1. the appropriate ACC is responsible for

the IFR portion. (N)

ATOS 2-6

213.1 C. 1. Note:

Companies may file Company Flight Itineraries.

Alerting service is not provided for these flights.

D. NON STANDARD IFR:

1. the appropriate ACC is responsible. (N) 213.1 D. 1. Note:

A non-standard IFR shall be defined, for alerting

purposes only, as one in which a pilot has specified

a SAR time other than 60 minutes. This definition is

for ATC purposes only.

213.2

Alerting service for flights which are the ATOS

responsibility, shall be retained until:

A. an arrival time at destination is received;

B. the aircraft is under IFR control and will be

completing the flight within controlled

airspace; or

C. another agency assumes alerting

responsibility. (E)

214 PROCEDURES - FLIGHT ITINERARY

214.1

Provide flight progress strips for each IFR

portion of an FITN as required by unit

procedures: (N)

A. produce an ATOS alert strip for each FITN.

B. ensure that the abbreviation FITN is

inserted at the beginning of the route field of

flight progress strip.

C. provide alerting service for each FITN.

214.2

FITNs entering another FIR:

A. the ATOS unit receiving the initial flight

itinerary shall re-transmit complete FITN

copy to each ACC in whose FIR the FITN

will operate;

B. distribute any change to a FITN to each

ACC in whose FIR the FITN will operate;

* C. distribute or retransmit a FITN to an adjacent

ACC via AFTN. (N)

214.3

IFR flight itinerary:

213.2 C. Example:

Company FITN, FSS, pilot cancels IFR or indicates

flight plan is closed.

214.1 Note:

It may be necessary to compute an estimated time

for producing control strips using the FITN proposed

time and en route stopover times.

* 214.2 C. Note:

Should the AFTN be unavailable as the primary

communication system, the FITN may be

transmitted to an adjacent ACC via telephone or

facsimile.

2006-04-13


A. produce a flight progress strip. For alerting

service purposes enter pilot closing time

and requested SAR and place into pending

file;

B. obtain departure time and activate FITN by

placing in active file if the FITN is entirely

within your AOR or by sending a departure

message to each FIR along the route of

flight as well as to the unit responsible for

destination alerting. Obtain an acceptance

message from the ACC responsible for the

destination;

C. if no departure message is received within

60 minutes of proposed departure and you

are unable to confirm status of the proposed

flight using normal ATC communications,

activate the FITN by an assumed departure

and process as in 214.1 above; (N)

D. the destination unit will acknowledge

acceptance of the alerting service;

E. provide alerting service to all active FITNs in

your AOR as per 214;

F. send an acceptance message to the unit

from which you received the activation

message.

214.4

VFR flight itinerary:

A. apply the procedures for IFR FITN alerting

to VFR FITNs for which you have VFR

alerting responsibility.

B. pass the complete flight itinerary to the unit

responsible for the departure point.

C. for VFR FITNs within your AOR:

1. produce an alerting strip and place in the

pending file;

2. obtain departure message and transmit

FITN and departure message to the unit

responsible for destination alerting; or

3. if no departure is received within 60

minutes of proposed departure and you

are unable to confirm the status of the

flight, send the FITN and departure

message to the unit responsible for

destination alerting and indicate

“assumed departure” in remarks.

ATOS 2-7

214.3 C. Note:

Indicate that the flight was activated using assumed

departure by putting ”assumed departure” in

remarks.

2002-04-18


214.5

Composite IFR/VFR FITNs:

A. IFR first (last leg VFR):

1. produce IFR control strips as required;

2. obtain departure time and transmit FITN

and departure message to unit

responsible for destination alerting;

3. if no departure is received within 60

minutes of proposed departure and you

are unable to confirm the status of the

flight, send the FITN and departure

message to the unit responsible for

destination alerting and indicate

”assumed departure” in remarks.

B. IFR last:

1. produce an alerting strip and enter pilots

requested closing time and SAR time.

2. upon activation, place alerting strip in

active file and provide alerting service as

per 214.

215 MISSING AIRCRAFT NOTICE

(MANOT)

215.1

An initial MANOT, identified by a reference

number and the name of the RCC originating

the message, will contain information on the

missing aircraft, such as:

A. identification;

B. type;

C. color;

D. markings;

E. date;

F. intended route;

G. emergency radio equipment; and

H. particulars of the search area.

215.2

A final MANOT, issued when the search is

terminated, will be identified by the same

reference number and originator as the initial

MANOT.

ATOS 2-8

2002-04-18


220 OPERATIONS

221 FLIGHT PLANNING PRIORITY

221.1

Give priority to items that affect the provision of

control services. Make every effort to provide

the other services to the fullest extent possible.

221.2

Maintain close coordination at all times

between positions of operation within ATC units

and between these positions and other ATS

units, and other concerned agencies.

221.3

Normally, provide air traffic services on a “first

come, first served” basis. Process flight plan

information in the order in which it is received.

However, give priority to the following:

A. Medical evacuation flights within imminent

activation. (N)(R)

B. A change to an existing flight plan that is

already active or about to activate.

C. A flight plan that will activate in 30 minutes

or less.

D. Open Skies Treaty flights identified as

observation and demonstration flights.

(E)(R)

E. Military aircraft departing on operational air

defence flights or planned and coordinated

air defence exercises unless an emergency

condition prevails or may be caused by the

departure.

221.4

Give priority to military aircraft proceeding to an

ALTRV except in the interest of flight safety or

higher priority flights.

ATOS 2-9

221.3 A. Note 1:

U.S. Military AIREVAC and MEDEVAC flights must

request priority.

221.3 A. Note 2:

In the United States, civil air ambulance flights use

the designator LIFEGUARD.

221.3 A. Reference:

MEDEVAC; Definitions.

221.3 D. Example:

OSY12F

OSY12D

221.3 D. Reference:

Open Skies Treaty; 114.

Original


221.5

Give priority to aircraft carrying the Prime

Minister, Heads of State, or Foreign Heads of

Government over other aircraft, except those

specified in 221.3, to the extent that flight safety

and the expeditious flow of traffic will permit.

222 PIREP PRIORITY

222.1

Give priority to Urgent PIREPs and forward

them as soon as possible to the appropriate

ATC sector/unit by flashing a message on

OIDS-R or by direct hard copy delivery if

necessary. (N)(R)

222.2

Urgent PIREPs will be processed as follows:

A. FSS are responsible to forward Urgent

PIREPs to MSC, the ACC and Towers via

the quickest means available; and

B. ATC personnel are responsible to pass

Urgent PIREPs to other ATC and FSS

sectors/units via hotline, interphone or

telephone.

223 FLIGHT PLAN FILING — GENERAL

223.1

Ensure the method by which an arrival report is

to be filed is clearly understood by all

concerned before accepting a flight plan or

flight notification.

223.2

You may accept one flight plan from the flight

leader of the formation flight. (R)

ATOS 2-10

222.1 Note:

Urgent PIREPs contain information on hazardous or

potentially hazardous flight conditions and timely

relay is of the utmost importance.

222.1 Reference:

Urgent PIREP; Definitions.

* 223.2 Reference:

Formation Flight Planning Procedures; RAC

12.13.2, TC AIM.

Original


224 FLIGHT PLAN FILING — IFR

224.1

If accepting a proposed IFR flight plan

departing from a location with no operating

airport control tower or flight service station,

request the pilot to inform ATS if the flight will

not commence within 60 minutes of the

proposed departure time. Advise pilots that if

they have not established contact with ATC

authorities within 60 minutes of their proposed

ETD, search and rescue action will be initiated.

(N)(R)

224.2

You may accept consecutive IFR flight plans for

an itinerary of intermediate stops when all

departure points are within airspace controlled

by Canada provided: (N)

A. proposed departure times fall within one 24

hour period; and

B. the following information is obtained for

each segment of the flight from the second

and successive points of departure:

1. in all cases:

a. point of departure;

b. altitude;

c. route;

d. destination;

e. proposed departure time;

f. estimated elapsed time;

g. alternate; and

h. fuel on board; and

2. if required:

a. true air speed;

b. number of persons on board; and

c. method of filing arrival report.

224.3

You may accept a consecutive IFR flight plan for

a departure point within FAA controlled

airspace provided:

A. the procedures in 224.2 A. and B. are

followed;

B. the first flight originated in Canadian

controlled airspace;

ATOS 2-11

224.1 Note 1:

The ACC will notify the RCC if the aircraft has not

reported within 60 minutes of the proposed

departure time. If practicable, conduct a

communications search prior to notifying the RCC.

224.1 Note 2:

IFR units may stipulate in stored flight plan

agreements a requirement that ATC is to be advised

if a flight will not commence within 60 minutes of the

proposed departure time.

224.1 Reference:

Air Traffic Services Messages — General; 251.

224.2 Note:

Regions may develop procedures for their flight

planning offices:

A. to record information detailed in paragraph

224.2B.; and

B. to ensure the required flight plan data is

available at each point of departure.

2006-01-19


C. only one flight plan for departure from FAA

controlled airspace is accepted; and

D. the flight plan information is passed to the

appropriate FAA ARTCC and FSS, as

required.

225 DIRECTION OF FLIGHT

225.1

Ensure that a pilot files an altitude appropriate

to the aircraft track as set out in the Cruising

Altitudes and Cruising Flight Levels regulation.

Controllers must assign altitudes appropriate to

direction of flight EXCEPT as specified in ATC

MANOPS. (N)(R)

225.2

Aircraft will be separated vertically by using one

of the following minima:

A. within RVSM airspace:

1. 1,000 feet between certified aircraft;

2. 2,000 feet between non certified aircraft;

or

3. 2,000 feet between a certified and non

certified aircraft.

B. outside RVSM airspace:

1. 1,000 feet - FL290 and below; or

2. 2,000 feet - above FL290.

226 COMPOSITE FLIGHT PLANS

226.1

Include the following data in the texts of

proposed composite flight plan messages: (R)

A. type of flight (VFR/IFR, IFR/VFR);

B. aircraft identification;

C. type of aircraft and NAV/COM/

transponder equipment;

D. true airspeed;

E. point of departure;

F. flight altitude/level and route including

changeover point;

G. destination;

H. proposed time of departure;

I. estimated time en route;

ATOS 2-12

225.1 Note:

The Cruising Altitudes and Cruising Flight Levels

regulation includes a Schedule showing appropriate

altitudes for direction of flight and information

concerning exceptions to the order. The exceptions

are contained in the Designated Airspace

Handbook.

225.1 Reference:

Direction of Flight; 432, ATC MANOPS.

Cruising Altitudes and Cruising Flight Levels;

602.34, CARs.

226.1 Reference:

Planning; Part C2, Canada Flight Supplement.

2006-01-19


J. fuel on board; and

K. other information. (E) 226.1 K. Example:

A. method of obtaining a clearance;

B. method of cancelling IFR.0

226.2

For IFR/VFR flights the ATOS shall:

A. send a copy of the proposed flight plan to

the departure ACC and the destination unit;

(E)

B. upon departure, send a departure message

to the destination unit;

C. obtain an acceptance message from the

destination unit; and

D. ensure any changes in flight status are

passed to all affected agencies.

226.3

For VFR/IFR flights, the ATOS shall:

A. send a copy of the proposed flight plan to

the departure and destination units;

B. obtain an activation time for the IFR portion

of the flight;

C. notify the destination unit of the change in

status and send an acceptance message;

and (N)

D. confirm the status of the flight if an IFR

activation time is not received within a

reasonable time.

226.4

Instruct an aircraft that has filed a VFR/IFR

composite flight plan to contact the appropriate

ATC unit for clearance prior to the point where

the IFR portion of the flight begins.

227 CENTRE STORED FLIGHT PLAN

PROGRAM (CSFP)

227.1

The ICAO Repetitive Flight Plan (RPL) format is

used to maintain the Centre Stored Flight Plan

Program, as supplemented by the following: (R)

ATOS 2-13

226.2 A. Example:

Edmonton ACC copies an IFR/VFR CYWG to

CYYQ. Edmonton ACC is responsible for

forwarding the flight plan to both WG ACC and YYQ

FSS.

226.3 C. Note:

When confirmation is received that the aircraft is

under IFR control, the ACC assumes responsibility

and forwards an acknowledgement to the

destination unit.

227.1 Reference:

Use of Repetitive Flight Plan (RPLs), Rules of the

Air and Air Traffic Services, PANS-RAC Doc4444-

RAC/501.

Original


A. Item G (Supplementary Data) include

direction to users that if this information

acquisition cannot be guaranteed, it will be a

requirement that the pilot file the information

prior to the commencement of the flight. (R)

B. Item H (Entry type), use letter “C” to indicate

a change from a previous submission.

* C. Item M (Type of Aircraft and Wake

Turbulence Category), use categories for

light, medium and heavy aircraft as

contained in RAC 4.1.1, TC AIM.

D. Item O (Route), use “MTT NOT STORED”

for those flights that have their routes filed

daily from dispatch office computer-derived

information.

227.2

The MACCO is responsible to ensure that

detailed procedures for notifying the

appropriate ACC of temporary, day-to-day

changes to the RPL are specified in an

agreement. (N)

227.3

The detailed procedures for notifying the

appropriate ACC of temporary published

alternate routes to the RPL due to NAVAIDs

shutdowns are specified in an agreement. (N)

INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

ATOS 2-14

227.1 A. Reference:

Items required in a Flight Plan is a Part C2 Planning

- Canada Flight Supplement.

227.2 Note 1:

To be eligible for inclusion in the CSFP, a flight must

be scheduled to operate at least once weekly with

minimum variations in the flight planned route.

227.2 Note 2:

The individual air carrier is responsible for notifying

the appropriate ACC at least 30 minutes prior to the

proposed departure time, of any changes to the

flight plans other than a change of less than one

hour in the proposed departure time.

227.3 Note:

It is expected that when alternate routes are not

published, the ACC will coordinate with the users

the alternate route to be utilized

Original


230 COMMUNICATION SYSTEMS

231 GENERAL

231.1

Normally, transmit ATS messages via the

following communication systems:

A. ATC Interphone — for IFR and CVFR

movement and control messages.

B. AMIS Interphone/Teletype — for Air

Movement Data messages and for

coordinating airspace reservations and

other military operations.

C. AFTN Teletype. (R) 231.1 C. Reference:

AFTN Message Priority; 242.

231.2

If primary communication systems are

congested or not available, use an alternative

message system as follows:

A. Transmit IFR and CVFR movement and

control messages via the most expeditious

means available. (N)

B. You may transmit VFR and DVFR movement

messages that require immediate action via

ATC interphone.

C. You may transmit AMIS messages via AFTN

teletype.

D. Facsimile.

E. Other available means may include

requesting CYAAMCFA (National Systems

Control Centre (NSCC)) to relay information

to a facsimile.

232 AUTHORIZED COMMUNICATIONS

232.1

Limit messages to those required for the

provision of Air Traffic Services.

ATOS 2-15

231.2 A. Note:

For example, long distance telephone may be used

at NAV CANADA expense for urgent movement and

control messages if no other suitable means of

communication is available.

Original


233 INTERPHONE — ACCEPTABLE

MESSAGES

233.1

Except for emergency communication, use the

ATC interphone system only for the

transmission of messages related to the control

or safety of aircraft as listed in the following

order of priority: (N)

A. Distress messages (including ESCAT).

B. Urgency messages.

C. IFR, controlled VFR, and special VFR,

movement and control messages.

D. CIRVIS messages.

E. Search and rescue messages.

F. Communications search messages.

G. DVFR and VFR movement messages,

including flight notification messages.

H. Approval request messages concerning

long-range IFR flight and altitude

reservation messages.

I. Messages concerning the malfunction of

NAVAIDs.

234 INTERPHONE — OPERATING

TECHNIQUE

234.1

In all telephone communications, employ:

A. proper phraseologies;

B. phonetics as necessary; and

C. correct procedures for the transmission of

numbers.

234.2

Identify the station calling and use the words

“THIS IS” unless there is no likelihood of

misunderstanding as to the source of the

message. (E)

ATOS 2-16

233.1 Note 1:

The primary purpose of this system is the exchange

of the IFR air traffic control messages.

233.1 Note 2:

The ATC and AMIS interphone systems consist of a

network of circuits radiating from each area control

centre. These circuits permit rapid communication

between the centre and appropriate NAV CANADA,

FAA, military, and air carrier operational offices.

233.1 Note 3:

Although procedures outlined in this Part apply only

to the use of the NAV CANADA interphone systems,

they correspond closely to those of the FAA and are

used whenever transborder circuits are

interconnected.

234.2 Example:

QUEBEC RADIO THIS IS MONTREAL CENTRE

FLIGHT PLAN.

Original


234.3

Make all transmissions as clearly and concisely

as possible in order to avoid any

misunderstanding by the recipient.

234.4

Make transmissions at a speed that will permit

easy copying by the recipient if the message is

to be recorded.

234.5

Do not use repeated manual signalling except

for an “emergency” communication. (N)

234.6

If voice signalling is used and a call is not

answered immediately, you may make a second

call after a short pause. Make full use of such

terms as “emergency”, “control”, “clearance”,

“arrival report”, “call back when possible”, and

so on that will assist the called station to

determine the relative importance of various

duties. (N)

235 BREAKING TRANSMISSIONS

235.1

Use the word “emergency” or “control” to break

the transmission of lower priority messages and

to seize a circuit for the handling of emergency

or control messages.

235.2

Estimate the relative importance and priority of

the communication being handled before

breaking a transmission. (N)

236 CALLING, ANSWERING, AND

COMPLETING CONTACTS

236.1

Identify each office served by NAV CANADA

interphone facilities by the name of the location,

spoken in full, followed by the name of the

facility or operating position as appropriate. (E)

ATOS 2-17

234.5 Note:

When a signal is received by a centre, certain lights

and buzzers are set in operation, and this operation

continues until the call is answered. More than one

manual signal to a centre, therefore, serves no

useful purpose.

234.6 Note:

The probable cause of the delay in answering is that

the called station personnel are engaged in duties

that cannot be interrupted immediately.

235.2 Note:

All controllers have operational jurisdiction and are

expected to resolve any question of priority that may

arise.

236.1 Example:

TORONTO FLIGHT PLANNING.

EDMONTON AMIS.

2006-01-19


236.2

Use operating initials to identify yourself on the

interphone systems. (N)(R)

236.3

Before a message is transmitted, both the

calling and answering offices shall identify

themselves, and the calling office shall state the

type of message to be transmitted.

236.4

Transmit the text of the message, pause slightly,

and then terminate the interphone conversation

in the following manner:

A. The person originating the call shall state

his initials to indicate completion of the

message.

B. The recipient shall state his initials to

indicate that the message has been

received and understood.

ATOS 2-18

236.2 Note:

Each office maintains a record of the operating

initials used by personnel of that unit. Normally, the

operating initials will be the initials of the operator's

name.

236.2 Reference:

Preparation for and Completion of Duty; 124.

Unit Administration - Personnel; 202, ATSAMM.

236.5

You should incorporate the highest possible

intelligibility in each message by using the

following speech transmitting techniques:

A. Enunciate each word clearly and distinctly.

B. Maintain an even rate of speech. (N) 236.5 B. Note:

If a message is to be recorded, the rate of speech

must be slow enough to allow the person to copy

the transmission verbatim and to avoid requests for

repeats.

C. Pause slightly before and after numbers. (N) 236.5 C. Note:

This technique makes numbers easier to copy.

D. Maintain speaking volume at a constant

level.

E. Be familiar with interphone operating

techniques. (N)

F. Suspend speech temporarily if it becomes

necessary to turn your head away from the

handset mouthpiece.

236.5 E. Note:

For example, you must maintain a constant distance

from the handset if a modulator with a constant level

is not used.

2006-01-19


236.6

Relay messages in plain language or approved

phrases without altering the sense of the

message in any way.

237 CONNECTING AND

DISCONNECTING CIRCUITS

237.1

Switching equipment is installed in

communications stations near control area

boundaries to permit circuits from 2 or more

IFR units to be interconnected. (N)

237.2

On completion of communication, the sector/

unit responsible for having the circuits

connected shall ensure that the circuits are

disconnected, either manually or automatically.

INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

ATOS 2-19

237.1 Note:

Circuits may be connected manually by an operator

at the communications station or automatically by

dialling a “connect” sequence.

Original


240 AERONAUTICAL FIXED SERVICES

241 GENERAL

241.1

The Aeronautical Fixed Telecommunications

Network (AFTN) interconnects Canadian

ACCs, FSSs and other aeronautical facilities.

241.2

The Aeronautical Fixed Telecommunications

Network (AFTN) is part of the AFS, and

provides for the exchange of messages

between aeronautical stations within the

network.

241.3

The Canadian AFTN is connected to

international AFTN centres in the U.S. (Atlanta

and Salt Lake City), the U.K. (London), Iceland

(Reykjavik) and Greenland (Sondrestrom); and

serves as the entry, exit and relay point for all

European, North Atlantic and North American

aeronautical message traffic.

241.4

Control of the domestic AFTN is exercised by

the Ottawa National Systems Control Centre

(CYAAMCFA) according to specific ICAO rules

for the acceptance, transmission and delivery of

messages.

241.5

Messages addressed to aeronautical stations

not directly connected to the domestic AFTN

are automatically routed to the nearest

connected aeronautical facility for further relay.

241.6

Do not divulge contents of any communications

except through authorized channels. (N)

241.7

Limit messages to those required for the

provision of Air Traffic Services.

ATOS 2-20

241.6 Note:

Revealing the contents of communications to any

unauthorized person is prohibited under the NAV

CANADA Code of Conduct.

Original


242 AFTN MESSAGE PRIORITY

242.1

Assign priority indicators to ATC messages for

transmission via AFTN circuits as follows: (N)

A. Distress and Urgency Message. SS

B. Flight Safety Messages:

1. Movement and control messages

except delay, arrival and

cancellation messages.

2. Movement and Control messages

only for delay, arrival and

cancellation; Meteorological

messages; Flight Regularity

messages; and Aeronautical

Administrative messages.

3. Reservation messages, and

general aircraft operating agency

messages.

C. If justified by a requirement for special

handling, messages in B. should be

assigned — DD — a higher priority.

(N)

FF

GG

KK

ATOS 2-21

242.1 Note 1:

Order for priority for the transmission on AFTN is as

follows: SS, DD, FF, GG and KK.

242.1 Note 2:

Unless special circumstances dictate otherwise, the

FF priority indicator may be used for most of the

messages normally sent from an ACC.

* 242.1 Note 3:

International standards require that the SS priority

messages require acknowledgment for reception of

original messages and signature of the person

authorizing the use of this priority. The ACC use of

the SS priority implies appropriate authorization and

therefore a signature is not required.

* 242.1 C. Note 1:

DD priority messages require the signature of the

person authorizing the use of this priority. The

ACC use of the DD priority implies appropriate

authority and therefore a signature is not required.

242.1 C. Note 2:

MEDEVAC messages are normally assigned DD

priority.

Original


243 AFTN MESSAGE ADDRESSING

243.1

The AFTN message address shall consist of a

sequence of Addressee Indicators, one for

each address to whom the message is to be

delivered.

243.2

Each Addressee Indicator shall consist of an

eight-letter sequence in the following order:

A. the ICAO four-letter Location Indicator

assigned to the destination; (R)

B. 1. the ICAO three-letter designator

identifying the aeronautical authority,

service or aircraft operating agency; or

2. where no designator has been assigned,

one of the following: (R)

YXY—for military addressees;

ZZZ — for an aircraft in flight; and

YYY — for all other messages.

C. 3. the letter X; or

4. the one-letter designator identifying the

department or division of the

organization addressed.

243.3

The following three-letter designators shall be

used when addressing ATS messages to ATS

units:

A. ZQZ — for messages to a Canadian ACC

relevant to an IFR flight;

B. ZFZ — for messages to a Canadian ACC

relevant to a VFR flight;

C. ZTZ — for messages to an Aerodrome

Control Tower;

D. YFY — for a FSS; or

E. ZPZ — for messages to an Air Traffic

Services Reporting Office.

243.4

The filing time shall consist of a six-digit datetime

group indicating the date and time of filing

the message for transmission with the

aeronautical fixed station concerned.

ATOS 2-22

243.2 A. Reference:

Location Indicators; ICAO Doc 7910.

243.2 B. 2. Reference:

Designators for Aircraft Operating Agencies,

Aeronautical Authorities and Services; ICAO Doc

8585.

Original


243.5

The Originator Indicator shall consist of an

eight-letter sequence, similar to an Addressee

Indicator, identifying the place of origin and the

organization originating the message.

243.6

Address messages:

A. for civil airports in the USA, to the FSS or

FSS tie-in facility serving the destination

airport; and (N)

B. for U.S. military bases, to the Base

Operations (BASEOPS) office. (N)

243.7

Address DVFR messages for Alaska to

Anchorage ARTCC, in addition to the

destination. (E)

243.8

If a U.S. destination address is unknown,

transmit the message to the nearest U.S. FSS,

including in remarks “Tie-in station unknown —

request you acknowledge and relay”.

244 AFTN MESSAGE PREPARATION

244.1

Air traffic services messages shall be prepared

and transmitted with standard texts in a

standard format and in accordance with

standard data conventions, as described in Part

11.

ATOS 2-23

243.6 A. Note:

FAA tie-in facilities and Military Base Operations

identifiers are listed in the FAA Location Identifiers

Handbook (FAA 7350).

243.6 B. Note:

If military BASEOPS offices are closed, the

message will automatically be rerouted to the

appropriate FAA tie-in facility.

243.7 Example:

PAZAZQZX.

Original


250 AIR TRAFFIC SERVICES MESSAGES

251 GENERAL

251.1

IFR, CVFR, and SVFR movement and control

messages include the following: (N)

A. Air traffic clearances.

B. Departure report messages.

C. Position report messages.

D. Control messages concerning flights

requiring approval prior to departure.

E. Arrival messages.

F. Flight plan and flight itinerary messages.

251.2

DVFR and VFR movement messages include

the following:

A. DVFR flight plan and defence flight itinerary

messages.

B. DVFR position report messages (flight plan

or flight itinerary).

C. VFR flight plan and flight itinerary

messages.

D. VFR position report messages.

E. Arrival report messages.

251.3

A verbal acknowledgement shall constitute

evidence of receipt of the message. No other

confirmation is required.

252 MESSAGE DISTRIBUTION

252.1

Address flight data messages (FPLs) as

follows:

A. domestic flight data:

ATOS 2-24

251.1 Note:

The following is the normal sequence of

communications required for an IFR flight:

A. The pilot files a flight plan with a flight plan

office.

B. The flight plan office forwards the flight plan

message to the appropriate ACC.

C. The pilot obtains an ATC clearance before take

off.

D. After departure, a departure message is

forwarded to the ACC.

E. En route position report messages and requests

for further clearances are forwarded to the ACC.

F. After arrival, an arrival message is forwarded to

the ACC.

Original


1. to the ACC in the FIR from which the

flight departs;

2. to any ACCs which are affected by

changes to previously filed FPLs.

B. ICAO flight plans:

to all ATS units providing air traffic control

services or concerned with flight along part

or whole of the route to be flown. (N)

252.2

Process current flight data messages (CPLs),

using domestic flight data exchange systems

(NFDPS link and NADIN) as follows:

A. for Canadian domestic flights — to the next

adjacent Canadian ACC at least 30 minutes

prior to the flight entering the adjacent ACC

airspace; and

B. for Canada to U.S. — to the first adjacent

U.S. ARTCC the flight will enter at least 30

minutes prior to the flight entering U.S.

airspace.

252.3

Address VFR flight plan messages as follows:

A. proposed flight plans to the ATS unit which

has the AOR for the departure.

B. departures:

1. to the destination or the unit which has

the AOR for the destination; and

2. changes in previously filed flight plans to

any units affected by the change.

252.4

Forward an IFR flight plan message to the

adjacent area control centre if normal intercentre

coordination will not be accomplished.

ATOS 2-25

252.1 B. Note 1:

Within the NAT regions, FPLs on turbojet aircraft

transiting the control areas of Gander Oceanic, New

York Oceanic, Reykjavik, Santa Maria Oceanic,

Shanwick Oceanic and Sondrestrom (south of 70

degrees) within 90NM of the control area boundary,

shall be addressed to the adjacent ACC to provide

lateral separation. For all other aircraft, a 120NM

proximity shall apply.

252.1 B. Note 2:

For automatic distribution to affected Domestic

European Centres, forward flight plan information to

EBBDZMFP and LFPYZMFP.

2002-04-18


252.5

Originate and distribute other flight plan

messages as necessary to meet special

requirements. (N)

253 TYPES OF MESSAGES

253.1

The types of flight data messages consist of the

following:

A. domestic IFR flight plans on flights:

1. from Canadian ACC to Canadian ACC;

and

2. between Canadian ACCs and U.S.

ARTCCs (Continental U.S. and Alaska).

B. ICAO flight plans on flights:

1. originating in Canada;

2. overflying Canada and terminating in

Continental U.S.A. and Alaska; and

3. overflying Canada and terminating

outside Continental U.S.A. and Alaska.

C. VFR flight plans on flights:

1. that originate and end in Canada;

2. that originate outside Canada and end in

Canada; and

3. that originate in Canada and end outside

Canada.

254 CATEGORIES OF MESSAGES

254.1

The categories of flight plans consist of the

following:

A. FPL — a flight plan that is filed prior to flight

departure and relayed by the originator to all

concerned FIRs prior to departure;

B. CPL — a flight plan that is filed prior to

departure and is relayed by the departure

ACC to the next ACC and then by each

subsequent ACC as the flight progresses;

C. RPL — a repetitive flight plan (centrestored)

submitted by an operator for

regularly operated individual flights for

retention and repetitive use by ATS units;

ATOS 2-26

252.5 Note:

By local written agreement, the responsibility for the

origination of flight plan messages on international

flights may be delegated to the operator or his

representative by an area control centre or flight

service station responsible for such origination.

2002-04-18


D. ALR — messages that refer to aircraft in a

state of emergency and transmitted to any

ATS unit that may be concerned with the

flight and to associated RCCs;

E. DLA — message transmitted when the

departure of an aircraft, for which a flight

plan has been sent, is delayed by more than

30 minutes after its proposed departure

time;

F. CHG — shall be transmitted when any

change is made to the basic flight plan data

contained in a previously transmitted FPL or

RPL data. The CHG message shall be sent

to those recipients of basic flight data that

are affected by the change;

G. CNL — message shall be transmitted when

a flight, for which basic flight data has been

previously distributed, has been cancelled.

The ATS unit serving the departure

aerodrome shall transmit the CNL message

to ATS units which have received the basic

data;

H. DEP — message immediately transmitted

after the departure of an aircraft for which

basic flight data has been previously

distributed, unless regional air navigation

agreements otherwise prescribe; and

I. RIF — is notification of the potential that the

pilot of an aircraft may request reclearance

in flight to another destination and the route

to be flown to the new destination.

255 METHODS OF MESSAGE EXCHANGE

255.1

The lead-time requirements of air traffic control

and flow control procedures shall determine the

method of message exchange to be used for

the exchange of ATS data.

255.2

The method of message exchange shall also be

dependent upon the following:

A. availability of adequate communications

channels;

B. function to be performed;

C. types of data to be exchanged; and

ATOS 2-27

Original


D. processing facilities at the units concerned.

255.3

Flight plan data submitted in advance of flight

shall be updated by time, level and route

changes and other essential information as

may be necessary.

255.4

Basic flight plan data necessary for air traffic

control purposes shall be provided to the first

en route ACC at least 30 minutes in advance of

the flight, and to each successive ACC at least

20 minutes before the aircraft enters that ACC's

area of jurisdiction, in order for it to prepare for

the transfer of control.

255.5

The second en route ACC and each successive

ACC shall be provided with current data,

including updated basic flight plan data,

contained in a current flight plan message or in

an estimate message supplementing already

available updated basic flight plan data.

255.6

In areas where automated systems are utilized

for the exchange of flight plan data and where

these systems provide data for several area

control centres, approach control units and/or

airport control towers, the appropriate

messages shall not be addressed to each

individual ATS unit, but only to these automated

systems. (N)

256 MESSAGE FORMATS

256.1

With the exception of flight data to the U.S., use

the ICAO or the Canadian Domestic flight plan

format, as applicable, to send proposed flight

plans. (R)

ATOS 2-28

255.6 Note:

Further processing and distribution of the data to its

associated ATS units is the internal responsibility of

the receiving system.

256.1 Reference:

Instructions for Insertion of COM Data; 1102.

Original


256.2

Use the NAS or ICAO format, as applicable, to

send flight data to the U.S. (E)(R)

256.3

If ADCUS service is requested, include in

remarks:

A. the abbreviation “ADCUS”; and

B. the following information:

1. the number of U.S. citizens on board;

2. the number of non-U.S. citizens on

board; and

3. the pilot's name.

* 256.4

If a flight plan contains the notation “Do not

pass to aerospace defence radar” or “NOPAR”,

include “NOPAR” immediately before the

aircraft identification in all AFTN or interphone

transmissions of flight data.

256.5

Use the ICAO format to transmit a departure

message by AFTN and include the following

items: (E)

A. abbreviation “DEP”;

B. aircraft identification;

C. departure aerodrome;

D. time of departure; and

E. destination.

257 SUPPLEMENTARY DATA AND ICAO

MESSAGE EXCHANGE

257.1

When basic flight plan data or supplementary

flight plan data are required, an ATOS shall

send request messages to the ATS unit which is

most likely to have access to the required data.

These units may include:

A. the transferring unit which originated an

update message on a previously filed

message;

B. the previous unit along the route of flight;

ATOS 2-29

256.2 Example:

VFR flight plan to the U.S.:

VFR CGOMF PA28 YQX BOS 2040 $RMKS

IFR ADCUS message to the U.S.:

IFR CFABC C172 YVR SEA 1930 $ADCUS 3NON

JONES

256.2 Reference:

NADIN Message Format; 1112.

256.5 Example:

(DEP-CGABC-CYCB1730-CYFB)

Original


C. the air traffic services reporting office at the

departure aerodrome; or

D. the air traffic services unit specified in a

flight plan message.

257.2

An ATOS receiving a request message for basic

flight plan data or supplementary flight plan

data shall forward any requested information

available to the unit making the request.

257.3

Flight data messages are interchanged in the

international air traffic control system in the

following modes:

A. the “step-by-step” mode, wherein the ACC/

ARTCC responsible for the departure airport

enters the initial flight plan data into an

automated flight processing system

(NFDPS/NADIN) and each ACC/ARTCC

sends forward, as the flight progresses, full

current (updated) flight data (CPL)

information;

B. the “simultaneous” mode, wherein the flight

plan data (FPL) is sent simultaneously to all

ATS units along the route of flight. In this

mode, only amendments to the FPL, plus

necessary control information, are

forwarded from centre to centre.

258 CUSTOMS NOTIFICATION (ADCUS)

SERVICE

258.1

Provide ADCUS service, on request, to nonscheduled

flights between Canada and the

United States if the point of first intended

landing is a United States International Airport

or a United States Landing Rights Airport, and

notification to U.S. Customs is available. (N)

* 258.2

Flights from Canada to the United States: On

receipt of a request for ADCUS service, the

ACC shall send a message to the appropriate

tie-in facility. (N)

ATOS 2-30

* 258.1 Note:

When the ADCUS service request is accepted by

NAV CANADA, the responsibility to transmit the

ADCUS information to the U.S. is assumed by NAV

CANADA.

258.2 Note:

This information is available in the FAA publication

entitled Airport/Facility Directory.

Original


258.3

Flights from United States to Canada: all

ADCUS messages are the pilots' responsibility

to coordinate with the CANPASS program. The

ACC receiving an ADCUS message should

inform pilots to make their own customs

arrangements directly with the CANPASS

program.

259 MESSAGES ON INTERNATIONAL

FLIGHTS (ICAO)

259.1

The ACC in whose area an international flight

will depart shall forward a flight plan message in

ICAO format, and in accordance with ICAO

procedures, to: (N)

A. ACCs serving each flight information region,

including Oceanic ACCs, that will provide air

traffic control service or be otherwise

concerned with the flight along a part of, or

the whole, route to be flown; and (R)

B. not more than 3 other addresses as

specified by the operator or his designated

representative.

259.2

Enter the SELCAL, as required, to enable

selective calling of an aircraft through

international frequencies using other than voice

transmission. (N)

ATOS 2-31

259.1 Note:

The responsible ACC may make arrangements with

Air Carriers who have direct AFTN input, in which

the company is delegated responsibility for the

dissemination of international flight plans.

259.1 A. Reference:

Message Distribution; 252.

259.2 Note:

A single SELCAL consists of a combination of four

pre-selected audio tones that are transmitted to an

aircraft that will activate a light or chime in the

cockpit of the aircraft.

Original


260 FLIGHT DATA TRANSFER

261 DOMESTIC FLIGHT DATA MESSAGES

261.1

Apply the formats indicated for the following

domestic flight data messages:

A. IFR within Canada — use the ICAO or

Canadian Domestic format; and

B. IFR originating in Canada and proceeding to

the continental U.S. — use the ICAO or NAS

format. (R)

261.2

All flight plan messages (FPLs) for aircraft

departing from or overflying Canadian airspace

and entering airspace outside Canada and the

Continental U.S.,will be processed using the

ICAO flight data format. (R)

261.3

VFR flight plan data will be sent using the ICAO

or Canadian Domestic format.

262 DOMESTIC TRANSBORDER FLIGHT

DATA MESSAGES

262.1

Do not accept VFR flight plans with a stopover

at a U.S. airport of entry. If necessary, inform

the pilot that a flight plan for a destination

beyond the airport of entry may be filed with an

FAA flight service station. (N)

262.2

If ADCUS service is requested, obtain the

following information:

A. the number of U.S. citizens on board;

B. the number of non-U.S. citizens on board; or

C. the pilot's name.

262.3

Forward ADCUS messages to the appropriate

U.S. tie-in-facility when ADCUS service has

been requested. (R)

ATOS 2-32

261.1 B. Reference:

Instructions for Insertion of COM Data; 1102.

261.2 Reference:

Instructions for Insertion of COM Data; 1102.

262.1 Note:

This procedure is necessary to prevent initiation of

alerting service that might otherwise occur due to

delays in clearing customs.

262.3 Reference:

Message Formats; 256.

Original


262.4

If processing transborder flight plans requesting

ADCUS, include in the “other information”

section, the following items:

A. the abbreviation ADCUS;

B. the number of U.S. and non-U.S. citizens;

and

C. the pilot's name. (N) 262.4 C. Note:

If the pilot's name is not included in the flight plan as

received and cannot be obtained from the source, it

is expected you will include in the other information,

“pilot's name not available”.

262.5

If the U.S. location address is unknown, forward

the IFR flight plan message to the nearest U.S.

FSS and indicate in remarks “address

unknown-request you acknowledge and relay”.

263 MESSAGES ON FLIGHTS OUTSIDE

CONTROLLED AIRSPACE

263.1

If an IFR flight will not be flown entirely within

controlled airspace beyond an adjacent centre's

FIR, the ACC within whose FIR the flight

originates shall forward the IFR flight plan

message addressed to each ACC within whose

FIR the flight will operate. (N)

263.2

The ACC in whose FIR the destination

aerodrome is located shall forward an IFR flight

plan message to the destination aerodrome if:

(R)

A. normal notification of the estimated time of

arrival is not provided to the destination

aerodrome by the IFR controller; and

B. communications that are available to ATC

allow the transmission of such message

without charge.

263.3

The ACC within whose FIR an IFR aircraft has

landed shall forward an arrival report via

teletype to the ACC within whose FIR the

aircraft departed unless:

ATOS 2-33

263.1 Note:

FIR boundaries are depicted on LO/HI Charts (GPH

206).

263.2 Reference:

IFR Unit - Tower and Flight Service Station; 493,

ATC MANOPS.

2006-04-13


A. the flight was conducted entirely within

controlled airspace and voice

communication was used to coordinate

transfer of control of the entire flight; or

B. it was otherwise positively determined that

transfer of responsibility for the aircraft was

accepted by each centre concerned for

each part of the flight.

263.4

Use the ICAO format and include the following

items in an arrival message: (E)

A. abbreviation “ARR”;

B. aircraft identification;

C. arrival aerodrome; and

D. time of arrival.

264 POSITION REPORT MESSAGES

264.1

Forward all IFR and CVFR position reports to:

A. the control sector which has responsibility

for the aircraft to which the position report

refers; or

B. the appropriate ACC which has the

responsibility for the flight if the aircraft is not

in your FIR.

264.2

Forward all DVFR position reports made within

an air defense identification zone to the

appropriate ACC. (N)

265 PHOTOGRAPHIC SURVEY FLIGHTS

265.1

Forward flight plan information on photographic

survey flights that will operate wholly or partly in

Class D, E or F airspace, to the Responsible

Unit from within whose AOR the flight will

depart in addition to any other flight plan

message coordination that may be required. (N)

265.2

An ACC unit manager is responsible for the

distribution of Photography Flight Planning FIR

plotting charts as required.

ATOS 2-34

263.4 Example:

(ARR-CGABC-CYOJ1515)

264.2 Note:

VFR position reports are not normally passed to the

ACC but are retained by the communications

agency with which the report was made.

265.1 Note:

For purpose of flight plan information on

Photographic Survey Flights which may be VFR,

CVFR or IFR, the Responsible Unit and AOR

coincide with those established for VFR flight

planning and alerting service.

2006-04-13


265.3

Airspace planners and ATOSTLs shall be

familiar with the provisions of the document

“Pilot Procedures Photographic Survey Flights”.

They will also ensure that this document is

made available to controllers required to

provide a service to Photographic Survey

Flights.

265.4

For a photographic mission, the photo area

should be defined in the flight plan by:

A. photo blocks based on the modified National

Topographic System (NTS) for grid mapping

and filed at least one hour in advance of

expected departure; or

B. a topographical map of adequate scale

(1:500,000 or 1:1,000,000) with the

applicable flight lines depicted; at the

specific request of the ACC, this map should

be received by the unit 72 hours in advance.

265.5

If you receive flight plan information as

described in this section and the aircraft will be

departing from within your AOR: (N)

* A. plot the area of photographic survey activity

and identify the various AORs, ACCs or

control zones with control towers within

whose airspace the activity will occur; and

B. prior to departure transmit the following

information on AFTN or by ATS landlines to

each affected Responsible Unit, ACC and

control tower: (N)

1. type of flight;

2. aircraft identification;

3. aircraft type;

4. nature of flight followed by the

photographic survey area defined as

either:

a. a radius from a fixed point or

dimensions at a distance from a

reference point; or

ATOS 2-35

265.5 Note:

At controlled airports where the FSS is the

Responsible Unit the FSS is required to request the

tower controller to advise of the departure time. At

uncontrolled airports the FSS is required to request

the appropriate ATC Unit to advise of the departure

time if the FSS does not originate the message.

265.5 B. Note:

It is expected that the ATOS will request departure

messages for affected flights from within their AOR

from the appropriate sector or tower and will, if they

receive a message on a flight that will operate within

their FIR, inform the appropriate sectors.

2005-07-07


. a flight line, or dimension of flight

lines, stating the distance from a

reference point and also the nature of

the flight line(s); (R)

5. altitude(s); and

6. date and time of beginning and end.

265.6

Process messages concerning VFR flights in

accordance with section 1100. (N)

266 CIRVIS MESSAGES

266.1

Forward any CIRVIS report received to the

appropriate ACC shift manager or his

designate.

266.2

ACCs are responsible to forward any CIRVIS

report received to the Senior Director at the

appropriate sector (Canada East or Canada

West) of the Canadian NORAD Region.

267 PREFERRED ROUTES AND

STRUCTURED AIRSPACE

267.1

Process preferred IFR routes according to the

requirements and procedures for establishing

and reviewing preferred IFR routes. (R)

267.2

ATOS should be familiar with the rules

governing the implementation of structured

airspace — one-way traffic flow; especially how

this structure impacts on flight planning

procedures. (R)

268 COMPANY ROUTES OR

APPROACHES

268.1

Process company routes and approaches

according to specified procedures. (R)

ATOS 2-36

265.5 B. 4. b. Reference:

Flight Line; Definitions.

265.6 Note:

The responsible unit with respect to VFR flight

services may be a flight service station, FIC or an

ACC depending upon the area involved.

267.1 Reference:

Preferred IFR Routes; 321, ATSAMM.

267.2 Reference:

Structured Airspace — One-Way Traffic Flow; 323,

ATSAMM.

268.1 Reference:

Company Routes and Company Instrument

Approaches; 322, ATSAMM.

2005-07-07


268.2

A Company Route or Approach Procedure for

any IFR flight may be used, provided: (N)(R)

A. the aircraft requests it; or

B. the information is specified in the flight plan.

269 TC AND CANADIAN MILITARY VIP

FLIGHTS

269.1

Forward messages on individual TC, Coast

Guard and military flights if specifically

requested to do so by the pilot. (N)(E)

269.2

Except as specified in 269.1, do not divulge

information concerning VIP flights. Refer

persons requesting information to National

Defence Coimmand Centre in Ottawa (613)

992-6698.

INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

ATOS 2-37

268.2 Note:

Controllers are not expected to determine which

operator may use a specific route or approach. Air

Traffic Services considers that a flight plan or en

route request to operate on a Company Route or

Approach is evidence of Transport Canada

authorization.

268.2 Reference:

Company Instrument Approach Procedure;

Definitions.

Reference Material; 261, ATSAMM.

269.1 Note:

These messages may be passed to any address as

requested by the pilot. Notify Flight Dispatch

(AAFDA) Ottawa via CYOWTGOX with FF priority

for TGO aircraft.

269.1 Example:

(DEP-TGO200-CYYC1730-CYOW)

(ARR-TGO200-CYXD1830)

2005-07-07


270 VFR FLIGHT DATA TRANSFER

271 GENERAL

271.1

You may accept a VFR flight plan or itinerary

with a stopover provided it is not a DVFR flight

plan or itinerary. (N)

272 APPLICATION

272.1

ATOSY personnel shall apply the appropriate

rules and procedures for transferring VFR flight

plan, flight itinerary data and for providing

alerting service for VFR flights. (N)

272.2

Use the message formats contained in these

procedures, as applicable.

272.3

Transmit active flight plan or itinerary

messages, on departure, to the destination unit.

272.4

Transmit any proposed flight plans or

itineraries, filed with your unit for a departure

point outside your unit's AOR to:

A. the originating unit for the point of departure;

and

B. if applicable, to the unit with which the pilot

will activate the flight plan.

272.5

Units may develop supplementary VFR flight

plan or itinerary data transfer procedures, as

necessary. They shall be included in an

Agreement, if they involve or affect another unit.

273 COMMUNICATIONS

273.1

For flight data messages, use:

A. AFTN normally;

B. interphone, by agreement between the units

concerned;

C. facsimile; or

ATOS 2-38

271.1 Note:

A pilot will indicate each intermediate stop by

repeating the name of the stopping point in the

“route” and indicate the duration of each stop in the

“other information”.

272.1 Note:

These procedures do not cover messages

concerning CVFR and composite flight plans that

may be required for coordination with other IFR

units.

2005-07-07


D. public telephone.

273.2

For alerting service messages, use:

A. AFTN and interphone; or

B. public telephone.

273.3

Use interphone or long-distance telephone for

messages to the U.S.A., if you know of, or

suspect, an outage in U.S. teletype circuits. (N)

273.4

When use of long-distance telephone is

authorized, to the extent practicable:

A. use toll free if it serves the location being

called; or

B. ask the responsible unit nearest to the

location being called to make the call.

274 ACCEPTANCE — DESTINATION UNIT

274.1

Transmit an acceptance message, for a flight

plan or itinerary, within 30 minutes of receipt of

a departure message or before the ETA,

whichever is earlier. (N)(E)

275 REQUEST FOR ACCEPTANCE —

ORIGINATING UNIT

275.1

Transmit a “request acceptance” message to

the destination unit if you have not received an

acceptance within the time specified in 274.1.

(E)

275.2

Contact the destination unit, by interphone or

public telephone, if you have not received a

reply to your REQ R message within 30

minutes or before the ETA, whichever is earlier.

ATOS 2-39

273.3 Note:

The FAA does not issue notices for failures of

circuits, terminals, etc.

274.1 Note:

Acknowledgement is not required for proposed flight

plans or itineraries.

274.1 Example:

Message Format: R CFABC.

275.1 Example:

Message Format: REQ R CFABC.

Original


276 CHANGE MESSAGES

276.1

Transmit an acceptance message to the former

destination unit, if you receive a change

message with a new destination in your unit's

AOR. (N)(E)

277 ARRIVAL MESSAGES

277.1

Transmit an arrival message to the destination

unit, if you receive an arrival report for a

destination which is not in your unit's AOR. (E)

277.2

If transmitting an arrival message to a FAA

destination unit, include the remarks “CLOSE

FP” following the time of arrival.

ATOS 2-40

276.1 Note:

No acknowledgement is required for a change in

ETA.

276.1 Example:

Change message:

FF CZQMZFZX

201907 CYFCYSYX

CHG VFR CFAOK C182 YSL YQM 1915 OLD

DEST YSJ.

Acceptance message:

FF CYSJYSYX

201910 CZQMZFZX

R CFAOK.

277.1 Example:

(ARR-CFABC-CYQX1532)

Original


278 CHANGE IFR TO VFR

* 278.1

Upon receipt of notification of an aircraft

changing from an IFR flight to a VFR flight,

obtain the aircraft identification, destination,

ETA and SAR time. (N)

* 278.2

Obtain an arrival report, as requested by the

controller, for a flight that has “cancelled IFR”

without closing the flight plan.

* 278.3

If informed that the pilot has requested

changing an IFR flight plan to a VFR flight plan:

* A. forward the abbreviated VFR flight plan

information to the unit responsible for the

destination alerting service; and

* B. provide the aircraft with alerting service until

an acceptance of the transfer of alerting

service is received from another unit. (R)

* 278.4

Compile and retain all flight plan data using

normal retention methods.

ATOS 2-41

* 278.1 Note 1:

When notified that an aircraft intends to “cancel IFR”

and proceed to destination without closing the flight

plan, the controller, while retaining the IFR alerting,

may:

* A. obtain an arrival report directly from the pilot;

* B. obtain specified information and transfer the

responsibility to obtain an arrival report to the Air

Traffic Operations Specialist; or

* C. transfer the responsibility to obtain an arrival

report to the appropriate FSS/FIC.

* 278.1 Note 2:

Upon notification that a pilot wishes to change an

IFR flight plan to a VFR flight plan, the controller or

flight service specialist will:

* A. confirm that the pilot wishes to continue to

destination on a VFR flight plan;

* B. confirm the destination, ETA and SAR time with

the pilot; and

* C. forward the information to the Air Traffic

Operations Specialist for processing.

* 278.3 B. Reference:

Alerting Responsibility — Responsibility; 213.

2006-07-20


PART 3 – GENERAL FLIGHT DATA ENTRY

300 _ FLIGHT DATA ENTRY

301 GENERAL

302 CATEGORY OF FLIGHT PLAN

303 AIRCRAFT IDENTIFICATION

304 AIRCRAFT TYPE

305 SSR CODE

306 AIRCRAFT SPEED

307 FLIGHT PLAN TIME FIELD

308 ALTITUDE FIELD

309 RDPS ACTIVATION TIME FIELD

310 DEPARTURE POINT FIELD

311 ROUTE IDENTIFICATION FIELD

312 DESTINATION FIELD

313 LOCAL/REMOTE FIELD

314 SRC FIELD

315 ESTIMATED TIME EN ROUTE

316 CUSTOMS FIELD

317 SELCAL FIELD

318 ROUTE INFORMATION

319 FIX FIELD

320 _ SYSTEM LINKS

321 LINK FAILURE PROCEDURES

322 OTHER LINK PROCEDURES

323 FLIGHT DATA SYSTEM TO RDPS LINK FORMAT

324 RDPS ROUTE DELIMITERS

INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

ATOS 3-1

Original


PART 3 - GENERAL FLIGHT DATA ENTRY

300 FLIGHT DATA ENTRY

301 GENERAL

301.1

Use the following procedures and formats for

the entry of all flight plan data into flight data

processing systems that will affect adjacent

ACCs.

301.2

The unit within whose area a flight originates or

in whose area a flight first enters Canadian

Airspace, shall be considered the unit

responsible for the entry of required flight data

into the flight data processing system as soon

as it is received or as soon as system

parameters allow.

301.3

The unit responsible for flight data entry shall

enter all flight data, subject to system

parameters, as required for its own use, as well

as is required by other units.

302 CATEGORY OF FLIGHT PLAN

302.1

On mechanically produced strips, a two letter

code indicates the category of flight plan as

follows: (E)

ATOS 3-2

302.1 Example:

“AR” - ad-hoc RDPS

“PR” - pre-printed RDPS

“CR” - centre-stored RDPS

“FR” - full route clearance RDPS

A. first letter indicates:

1. “A” - ad-hoc;

2. “C” - centre-stored;

3. “F” - full route clearance; (N) or 302.1 A. 3 Note:

Full route clearance (F) indicates that the aircraft's

originally filed route or centre-stored route differs

from that printed on the strip and the controller must

issue the entire route, as printed, to the aircraft.

4. “P” - pre-printed.

B. second letter indicates:

1. “R” - entered in RDPS; or

2. blank - indicates not sent to RDPS.

Original


302.2

ATOS who change the pilot's originally filed

route or centre-stored route and indicate the

change with an “F” in the category of flight plan,

shall also indicate the change to the controller.

(N)(E)

303 AIRCRAFT IDENTIFICATION

303.1

Enter a minimum of three and a maximum of

seven alphanumeric characters for aircraft

identification. (N)

* 303.2

Enter the following information as part of the

Canadian flight identification if the flight is a

MEDEVAC: (N)

* A. “-M” appended to the aircraft identification of

5 or less characters and include

“MEDEVAC” in the “RMKS” field;

* B. “M” appended to the aircraft identification of

6 characters and include “MEDEVAC” in the

“RMKS” field; and

* C. “MEDEVAC” in the “RMKS” field for aircraft

identification of 7 characters.

303.3

For Canadian Air Carriers use:

A. the operator's company designator followed

by the flight number; or (R)

ATOS 3-3

302.2 Note:

ATOS should not change any filed flight data unless

authorized to do so and ensure that all changes

and/or corrections are disseminated to anyone who

will be affected by the changes and/or corrections.

302.2 Example:

FRC to “last point of route change”.

303.1 Note:

Precede a two character aircraft identification with

the letter Z.

* 303.2 Note:

U.S. Civil Registration aircraft prefix the aircraft

identification with the character "L”. This may or

may not be a MEDEVAC requiring priority control

handling. The priority will be determined by the

appropriate controller.

303.3 A. Reference:

Air Traffic Designators.

Designators for Aircraft Operating Agencies, Aeronautical

Authority and Services (ICAO Doc 8585).

B. the civil five letter aircraft registration. (N) 303.3 B. Note:

This requires the addition of the letter “C” to precede

the normal civil registration if a pilot files a four letter

aircraft civil registration as identification.

303.4

For Foreign Air Carriers use:

A. the operator's company designator followed

by the flight number; or (R)

B. the full civil aircraft registration.

303.4 A. Reference:

Designators for Aircraft Operating Agencies,

Aeronautical Authority and Services (ICAO Doc

8585).

Original


303.5

For Canadian Private Aircraft use the five letter

civilian registration. (N)

303.6

For Foreign Private Aircraft use the full aircraft

registration.

303.7

For Canadian Military Aircraft use:

A. the Canadian military designator followed by

the flight number; or

B. the tactical call-sign, abbreviated to four

letters, followed by the flight number, with

the full call-sign in “RMRKS” if necessary.

(N)(R)

303.8

For Canadian Coast Guard use the Canadian

Coast Guard designator, followed by the flight

number.

303.9

For Foreign Military Aircraft use:

A. the prefix of the service name, followed by

the flight number, or the last four or five

digits of the aircraft registration number; or

(N)

B. the tactical call-sign, abbreviated to four

letters, followed by the flight number, with

the full call-sign in “RMRKS” if necessary.

(N)

303.10

Enter the terms “HEAVY”, “MEDEVAC” and

“AIREVAC” to military and coast guard flights, in

the same manner as with civil flights. (N)

304 AIRCRAFT TYPE

304.1

Enter the type of aircraft as follows:

A. the number of aircraft if more than one; (E) 304.1 A. Example:

“2M/CF18”.

ATOS 3-4

303.5 Note:

This requires the addition of the letter “C” to precede

the normal civil registration if a pilot files a four letter

aircraft civil registration as identification.

303.7 B. Note:

If the tactical call-sign is not part of the military

abbreviation list, it may be necessary to put the full

call-sign in “RMRKS”, to ensure that the correct callsign

is used.

303.7 B. Reference:

DND Flight Information Publication; GPH 204.

303.9 A. Note:

The number of characters is limited to a total of 7

due to the capacity of automated equipment such

as NFDPS.

303.9 B. Note:

If the tactical call-sign is not part of the military

abbreviation list, it may be necessary to put the full

call-sign in “RMRKS”, to ensure that the correct callsign

is used.

303.10 Note:

The term AIREVAC may be used by military aircraft

on flight plans and in radiotelephony call-signs to

signify that ATS priority handling is required. It will

only be used for flights involved in a declared natural

disaster situation, i.e. flood, fire, hurricane.

Original


B. the symbol: (N) 304.1 B. Note 1:

Except for the “heavy” aircraft wake turbulence

category aircraft, ATOS are only expected to enter

the wake turbulence category aircraft only as filed

via the flight plan as directed in unit procedures.

304.1 B. Note 2:

For flight data that is forwarded to the U.S., ATOS

may be required to remove all wake turbulence

1. “L/”, if filed by the pilot, for a light wake

turbulence aircraft. (N)(E)

ATOS 3-5

category information except for “heavy” aircraft.

304.1 B. 1. Note:

TCAS information may still be required for FAA

systems.

304.1 B. 1. Example:

“L/C172”.

2. “M/”, if filed by the pilot, for a medium

wake turbulence aircraft.

3. “H/” must be entered for all heavy wake

turbulence aircraft.

4. “M/” for the B75 series aircraft. (N) 304.1 B. 4. Note:

NFDPS is currently programmed to display the “/M”

for only the B75 series aircraft on the controller

C. the approved designator for the aircraft type;

and (R)

D. suffixed by “/” and only one appropriate

Radio Communication, Navigation and

Approach Aid Code. (N)

304.2

Use the following in order of priority, to indicate

the appropriate communication, navigation and

approach aid: (E)(R)

A. W – RVSM certification;

B. X – MNPS certification;

C. Y – CMNPS certification;

D. R – RNP type certification;

E. G – GNSS capability;

F. J – data link capability;

G. E – Flight Management System;

H. S – standard equipment (VHF, ADF,

VORand ILS; or

I. N – no COM/NAV/Approach aid

equipment for route to be flown.

304.3

Enter only the suffix of highest priority to

indicate the appropriate Radio Communication,

Navigation and Approach aid capability of that

aircraft. (N)

C.

display.

304.1 C. Reference:

Air Traffic Designators.

Aircraft Type Designator (ICAO Doc 8643).

304.1 D. Note:

If other codes are filed, the information may be

included in “RMRKS” as necessary.

304.2 Example:

“H/B747/X”.

* 304.2 Reference:

Equipment; RAC 3.16.4, TC AIM.

304.3 Note:

The ICAO code determines the minimum separation

standard that can be used by air traffic controllers in

specified airspace.

2002-04-18


304.4

For aircraft that have filed air-ground data link

capability (AGCS) enter the abbreviation

“AGCS” in the “RMRKS” field.

305 SSR CODE

305.1

Enter the assigned code as received from other

agencies.

305.2

If no assigned code is received, enter:

A. a “/” for a system assigned internal code;

B. a “+” for a system assigned external code;

or

C. a “N” for a non-functioning transponder or

an aircraft without a transponder.

306 AIRCRAFT SPEED

306.1

Enter the aircraft speed as follows:

A. filed true airspeed in knots; or (E) 306.1 A. Example:

“480”

B. filed Mach-number, written as “M” followed

by:

1. a decimal point and 2 figures; or (E) 306.1 B. 1. Example:

“M.82”

2. “M” followed by 3 figures. (E) 306.1 B. 2. Example:

“M082”

307 FLIGHT PLAN TIME FIELD

307.1

Enter the time in four figures UTC as follows:

A. the proposed departure time;

B. the time at which the flight plan is to be

activated; or

C. the actual time of departure if the flight plan

is active. (N)

ATOS 3-6

307.1 C. Note:

Unit procedures should include a process to notify a

controller that a flight plan is active and which

agency has alerting service responsibility.

2002-04-18


308 ALTITUDE FIELD

308.1

Normally, enter the initial or flight planned

altitude that will be in effect in your FIR.

308.2

For a departing aircraft, enter the altitude as

requested on the flight plan.

308.3

For an en route aircraft, enter or update the

altitude as assigned by another unit.

308.4

Indicate altitudes and flight levels in hundreds

of feet as follows: (E)

A. altitudes using 2 or 3 numbers; and

B. flight levels using 3 numbers.

C. 2 characters to indicate that a filed altitude is

not available as follows:

1. “01” for an eastbound flight; and

2. “02” for a westbound flight.

309 RDPS ACTIVATION TIME FIELD

309.1

If the RDPS activation time is different from the

proposed departure or system activation time,

enter the activation time in the RDPS activation

time field. (N)

310 DEPARTURE POINT FIELD

310.1

Enter the point of departure using the approved

location designator in four characters, the first

alphabetic and the remainder alphanumeric.

(R)

* 310.2

If the location indicator is unknown or not in a 4

character format, enter “ZZZZ” as the point of

departure and enter the full name of the

location in the “RMRKS” field.

ATOS 3-7

308.4 Example:

60 - to indicate six thousand feet.

170 - to indicate one seven thousand feet.

190 - to indicate flight level one nine zero.

65 - to indicate six thousand five hundred feet.

01 – to indicate no altitude filed eastbound.

02 – to indicate no altitude filed westbound.

309.1 Note:

NFDPS will not accept a RDPS activation time that

is prior to the proposed departure or system

activation time.

310.1 Reference:

Canada Flight Supplement.

Water Aerodrome Supplement.

Location Indicators (ICAO Doc 7910).

Location Identifiers (FAA 7350).

2006-01-19


311 ROUTE IDENTIFICATION FIELD

311.1

Enter a RID that will best produce the correct

route, as filed, from a unit database that

contains a listing of RIDs and their

corresponding routes. (R)

311.2

If there is no usable RID, enter a “N” to signal to

NFDPS that nothing will be entered and that the

route field and fix field will be manually

completed.

311.3

Each unit RID database should include a

remote RID for each route as coordinated

between ACCs, whenever possible, to ensure

maximum efficiency of automated systems.

311.4

If the RID includes a remote route identification

number, it must represent a reasonable

facsimile of the entire route that is to be passed

to an adjacent unit.

311.5

In the event that the remote RID does not

represent a reasonable route, the remote RID

field should be left blank whenever possible to

prevent the relay of inaccurate information.

312 DESTINATION FIELD

312.1

Enter the destination using the approved

location indicator in 4 characters, the first

alphabetic and the remainder alphanumeric.

(R)

312.2

If the location indicator is unknown or not in a 4

character format, enter “ZZZZ” as the

destination and enter the full name of the

location in the “RMRKS” field.

ATOS 3-8

311.1 Reference:

Abbreviations.

312.1 Reference:

Canada Flight Supplement.

Water Supplement.

Location indicators (ICAO Doc 7910).

Location Identifiers (FAA 7350).

2006-01-19


313 LOCAL/REMOTE FIELD

313.1

Enter a “L” (local) in the L/R field for a flight

originating within the FIR. (N)

313.2

Enter a “R” (remote) in the L/R field for a flight

originating outside the FIR.

* 313.3

Leave the L/R field blank for a flight originating

within your FIR's civilian terminal control area.

314 SRC FIELD

314.1

Enter “CD” (civil domestic) in the SRC field for a

civil aircraft whose flight originates and

concludes inside the area encompassed by

Canada, the Continental U.S.A., and Alaska.

(N)

314.2

Enter “CI” (civil international) in the SRC field

for a civil aircraft whose flight originates or

concludes outside Canada, the Continental

U.S.A., or Alaska.

314.3

Enter “MD” (military domestic) in the SRC field

for a military aircraft whose flight originates and

concludes inside the area encompassed by

Canada, the Continental U.S.A., and Alaska.

314.4

Enter “MI” (military international) in the SRC

field for a military aircraft whose flight originates

or concludes outside Canada, the Continental

U.S.A., or Alaska.

315 ESTIMATED TIME EN ROUTE

315.1

Enter the Estimated Time En Route into the

ETE field in four figures as filed. (R)

ATOS 3-9

313.1 Note:

The L/R field is used by NFDPS to generate

statistical data within specific categories.

314.1 Note:

The data entered into the SRC field identifies the

type of flight to NFDPS for statistical purposes.

315.1 Reference:

Abbreviations.

2006-04-13


316 CUSTOMS FIELD

316.1

Do not enter any data, except for local use, into

the customs field. (N)

317 SELCAL FIELD

317.1

Enter the filed SELCAL code, if filed, into the

SLCL field for all flights, with the exception of

flights that will be operating entirely within radar

coverage in the Southern Domestic Airspace.

(R)

318 ROUTE INFORMATION

318.1

Enter the route information or the applicable

condensed portion of the route by:

A. using the RID to enter route information

from the unit route database, and modifying

the information as required, to enter the

correct route as filed; or

B. manually entering the route from filed

information.

318.2

The ACC making the initial entry of a domestic

flight plan into the flight data processing

systems will enter the entire route, subject to

the route field capacity.

318.3

The ACC making the initial entry of an ICAO

flight plan into the flight data processing

systems will enter route information as follows:

A. Northwestbound:

from departure or the point immediately

prior to entering the FIR, until ANC, FAI,

longitude 150W, or vicinity as filed; or as

much data as system capacity allows;

B. Westbound:

from departure or the point immediately

prior to entering the FIR, until the

destination or as much data as system

capacity allows; and

ATOS 3-10

316.1 Note:

The customs field is currently being used by some

units to transmit remote FRN information to NADS.

317.1 Reference:

Abbreviations.

2006-04-13


C. Eastbound:

from departure or the point immediately

prior to entering the FIR, until landfall in

Europe or as much flight plan data as

system capacity allows.

318.4

Indicate a truncated route by placing a “//” at the

end of the route to indicate that the route has

been truncated after that point. (N)

318.5

Enter en route speed and altitude changes by

inserting an en route request after the point

where that change is requested, as follows:

(N)(E)

A. speed in knots expressed as “/N” followed

by 4 figures and Mach number expressed as

“/M” followed by 3 figures, rounded to the

nearest hundredth unit of Mach; and

B. altitudes in hundreds of feet expressed as

“A” followed by 3 figures or flight levels

expressed as “F” followed by 3 figures.

318.6

Use square brackets “[...]” around the portion of

the route that is not to be transmitted on the

system link, in order to avoid passing the

portion of the route that is not required by

subsequent ACCs.

318.7

Units entering data into the route using the

RDPS format, will continue the RDPS format to

the conclusion of the route. (N)

318.8

When “NRP” is filed in a flight plan: (N)

A. enter “NRP” in the “RMRKS” field of the

flight progress strip; and

ATOS 3-11

318.4 Note:

Route truncation symbols are necessary to signal to

the controller and to adjacent units that more route

than is indicated on the control strip or sent on the

system link has been filed, and that further action

may be necessary to ensure that an aircraft

receives the correct route clearance.

318.5 Note:

RDPS format requires that an en route change be

entered as both speed and altitude, even if one is

unchanged.

318.5 Example:

“/N0180A050”

“/N0460F350”

“/M080F350”

318.7 Note:

It is important that geographical coordinates, speed

and altitude changes and other route information

maintain a consistent format throughout the entire

route.

318.8 Note:

The North American Route Program (NRP) allows

an aircraft to file a minimum time track and expect to

receive a clearance allowing the aircraft to remain

on the filed route with no changes.

2006-07-20


B. include “NRP” in the “RMRKS” field when

transmitting the data to adjacent units.

319 FIX FIELD

319.1

Ensure that flight data information is passed to

an adjacent unit on a timely basis. (N)

INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

ATOS 3-12

319.1 Note 1:

Units may use FIR boundary time, less one hour or

a time established by mutual agreement, as the

standard for link message activation.

319.1 Note 2:

You may use time or distance switches in the fix

field, to activate the flight data transfer at the

appropriate time and route segment.

2006-07-20


320 SYSTEM LINKS

321 LINK FAILURE PROCEDURES

321.1

A system link failure will generate a “Link

Message Bypass” (LMB) message. When a

system link message is bypassed, the sending

unit will re-transmit the F/P message via the

AFTN or other available means with “LMB” (link

message bypass) in text.

321.2

A unit whose system link has failed or shut

down, and normal restart procedures are

unsuccessful shall immediately notify the

receiving unit that the link has failed or shut

down and will coordinate procedures to

exchange required flight data information, until

the link has been restored to service.

321.3

Units will coordinate regular scheduled shutdowns,

by notifying affected adjacent units of

the shut-down time and duration, and

coordinate procedures for the exchange of

required flight data until the link is restored.

322 OTHER LINK PROCEDURES

322.1

Flight plans requiring special handling, e.g.,

photo flights, military missions, airspace

reservations, ice survey, flight itineraries etc.,

should not be passed on the system link, but

transmitted via the AFTN or facsimile.

* 322.2

Use the “RMRKS” field to relay other

information to controllers pertinent to the flight.

(E)

322.3

Relay information which may be required by

other units, to clarify or expand flight data

information, by using other communication

facilities such as AFTN, ICCS/VSCS, facsimile,

telephone, etc.

ATOS 3-13

* 322.2 Example:

ADCUS, CUSAD, BOISE, CFM RTE, Departure and

Arrival requests, etc.

Original


323 FLIGHT DATA SYSTEM TO RDPS LINK

FORMAT

323.1

RDPS format requires that departure and

destination entries consist of four characters.

323.2

Geographic coordinates in the route must be in

the ICAO format. (N)(E)

323.3

Use of RADIAL/DME must be in the approved

format. (E)

323.4

Use only approved published designators, fix

names, intersection names, arrival names,

route names, airway identifiers, pseudo fixes for

RDPS, etc. in the route.

324 RDPS ROUTE DELIMITERS

324.1

Use exclamation marks to allow supplemental

RDPS route parsing data to be entered in the

route, with the following results: (E)

A. exclamation marks and all text between

them are not printed on the strip;

B. exclamation marks are not passed to RDPS

but all text between them is passed; and

C. exclamation marks and all text between

them are not passed on the NFDPS link.

324.2

Use a single colon (:) to “stop” parsing, with the

following results: (E)

A. the colon will not be printed on the strips but

subsequent text will be;

B. the colon will be passed to RDPS with all

subsequent text; and

ATOS 3-14

323.2 Note:

The ICAO format consists of seven or eleven

alphanumeric characters without slashes.

323.2 Example:

5208N09000W

48N050W

323.3 Example:

YBR085095.

324.1 Example:

System route field !V316 J509! YOW J546 YSO

V37

Printed strip YOW J546 YSO V37

RDPS link V316 J509 YOW J546 YSO V37

System link YOW J546 YSO V37

324.2 Example:

System route field YOW YYZ CLE : ORD

Printed strip YOW YYZ CLE ORD

RDPS link YOW YYZ CLE : ORD

System link YOW YYZ CLE ORD

Original


C. the colon will not be passed on the NFDPS

link with all subsequent text.

324.3

Use the colon (:) to indicate to RDPS the

portion of a route field that is not to be parsed. It

is a stop-start toggle, in that any route

information between colons will not be parsed

by RDPS, with the following results: (N)(E)

A. the colon will not be printed on the strips but

all text between them will be;

B. the colon and all text between them will be

passed to RDPS but not parsed; and

C. the colon will not be passed on the system

link but all text between them will be.

324.4

Use parentheses “(...)” to highlight remarks in

the route field, with the following results: (E)

A. the parentheses and all text between them

will be printed on strips;

B. the parentheses and all text between them

will not be passed to RDPS, and

C. the parentheses and all text between them

will be passed on the NFDPS link.

324.5

Use face brackets “{...}” to selectively pass a

portion of system route data to RDPS and to

print only the selected route data on a strip, with

the following results: (N)(E)

A. only the portion of the route enclosed by the

face brackets is printed on the strips, the

face brackets and any portion of the route

outside the face brackets are not printed;

ATOS 3-15

324.3 Note:

A single “:” in the route will stop RDPS parsing from

that point to the end of the route field.

324.3 Example:

System route field YUL:YOW096:YOW J546 YSO

V37 YYZ

Printed strip YUL YOW096 YOW J546 YSO

V37 YYZ

RDPS link

-YUL:YOW096:YOW J546 YSO

V37 YYZ

System link YUL YOW096 YOW J546 YSO

V37 YYZ

324.4 Example:

System route field YJN YMX (3APP YMX) YJN

Printed strip YJN YMX (3APP YMX) YJN

RDPS link YJN YMX YJN

System link YJN YMX (3APP YMX) YJN

324.5 Note:

The system route field capacity will be expanded to

150 characters by the use of face brackets “{...}”.

324.5 Example:

System route field V316 {J509 YOW J546 YSO}

V37 YYZ

Printed strip J509 YOW J546 YSO

RDPS link J509 YOW J546 YSO

System link V316 J509 YOW J546 YSO

V37 YYZ

Original


B. only the portion of the route enclosed by the

face brackets is passed to RDPS, the face

brackets and any portion of the route

outside the face brackets are not passed to

RDPS; and

C. all portions of the route are passed on the

system link, the face brackets are not

passed on the system link.

324.6

Use square brackets “[...]” to identify system

route data that is not to be passed on the

system link, with the following results: (N)(E)

A. all route information is printed on the strip,

the square brackets are not;

B. all route information is passed to RDPS, the

square brackets are not; and

C. all route information outside the square

brackets is passed on the system link, the

route information enclosed by the square

brackets and the square brackets are not

passed on the system link.

324.7

Use asterisks to highlight portions of a route,

that may need to be confirmed by the controller,

with the following results: (N)(E)

A. asterisks and all data in between them will

be printed on strips;

B. asterisks will not be passed to RDPS, all

text in between the asterisks will be passed

to RDPS; and

ATOS 3-16

324.6 Note:

If square brackets are used in conjunction with face

brackets, the square brackets must be wholly within

the face brackets.

324.6 Example:

System route field [V316 J509 YOW J546] YSO

V37 YYZ

Printed strip V316 J509 YOW J546 YSO

V37 YYZ

RDPS link V316 J509 YOW J546 YSO

V37 YYZ

System link YSO V37 YYZ

324.7 Note:

Asterisks indicate to a controller that a portion of a

route may be in question and that the information

should be confirmed.

324.7 Example:

System route field *V316 J509 YOW J546 YSO*

V37 YYZ

Printed strip *V316 J509 YOW J546 YSO*

V37 YYZ

RDPS link V316 J509 YOW J546 YSO V37

YYZ

System link V316 J509 YOW J546 YSO V37

YYZ

Original


C. asterisks will not be passed on the system

link, all text in between the asterisks will be

passed to the system link.

ATOS 3-17

2006-01-19


PART 4 — NFDPS/NAMES/FDPN/GAMES

400 _ NFDPS/NAMES/FDPN OPERATION

401 GENERAL

402 DATA ENTRY

403 LOG ON/OFF

410 _ NFDPS COMMANDS

411 COMMAND FORMATS

412 NFDPS COMMAND DESCRIPTIONS

420 _ NFDPS ENTRY COMMANDS

421 ADHOC ENTRY

422 DUPLICATE FLIGHT PLAN DATA

423 CFP PROCESSING COMMANDS

424 ROUTE PROCESSING

425 FIX GENERATION

430 _ NAMES PROCEDURES

431 NAMES CHARACTERISTICS

432 DISPLAY PRESENTATION 1

433 DISPLAY 1-LOWER WINDOW

434 DISPLAY PRESENTATION 2

435 ONLINE HELP WINDOW

436 ONLINE HELP COMMANDS - ONLINE HELP DISPLAY 1

437 ONLINE HELP DISPLAY 2

438 VSP MENU

440 _ NAMES ADJUST AND CONVERSION TABLES

441 ^A - ADJUST TABLES

442

450 _ FDPN

AUTO EDITING FIELDS

451 GENERAL

452 FDPN KEYBOARD FUNCTIONS

453 FDPN TEMPLATE FUNCTIONS

460 _ GAATS AFTN MESSAGE EXTRACTOR SYSTEM - GAMES

461 GAMES PROCEDURES/ CHARACTERISTICS

462 MAIN SCREEN

463 PROCESSING PAGES

464 GAATS MSVS

465 SYSTEM MSV

466 FLOPPY DISK UTILITIES

467 BROWSE MENU

468 PRINT MENU

469 TRANSMIT MENU

470 _ GAATS INTERFACE

471 GENERAL

INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

ATOS 4-1

2006-01-19


PART 4 — NFDPS/NAMES/FDPN/GAMES

400 NFDPS/NAMES/FDPN OPERATION

401 GENERAL

401.1

ATOSY personnel are responsible for the timely

and accurate provision, updating and

dissemination of either new or changes to

existing data.

401.2

All data entry that will affect adjacent ACCs

shall follow established National Procedures for

the entry of flight plan data. (N)(R)

401.3

NFDPS is an automated computer based flight

data processing system and is the primary

system used to disseminate flight data

information to controllers via flight progress

strips and to adjacent ACCs via the NFDPS

link. This system is in use in all Canadian ACCs

except Gander and Moncton.

401.4

NAMES is a computer based system used to

semi-automate the process of entering AFTN

derived flight plans into NFDPS by translating

AFTN messages into a format suited to NFDPS

and passing the message to NFDPS on

operator command.

401.5

FDPN is a LAN based system used to receive

and disseminate flight plan data to controllers

and adjacent units via FDPN links such as

NFDPS, NAS, AFTN, etc.

402 DATA ENTRY

402.1

ATOS are responsible for ensuring that all flight

plan data is correctly entered into NFDPS.

ATOS 4-2

401.2 Note:

Inter-unit agreements may be used to expand on

National Procedures.

401.2 Reference:

Flight Data Entry; 300.

2006-01-19


402.2

Any ATOS doing flight plan data entry shall

verify all flight plan data for completeness and

accuracy and, if necessary, verify the data by

contacting the originating station, the pilot or

the controller responsible for the flight

concerned.

402.3

Flight data errors that can not be corrected,

must be identified, on a timely basis, to the

controller that will have responsibility for the

flight when it first enters the ACC's AOR. (N)

402.4

Any changes or corrections made to flight plan

data already in NFDPS must be passed to all

sectors and adjacent ACCs affected by the

change or correction.

402.5

Process any change or correction to flight plan

data in a timely manner so that changes or

corrections will be made in sufficient time to

keep flight plan data as correct and up-to-date

as possible.

403 LOG ON/OFF

403.1

ATOSY personnel shall log on/off upon

assuming or leaving a operating position.

ATOS 4-3

402.3 Note:

Local procedures to advise controllers of flight data

error may include verbal contact or using the

message distribution system of NFDPS.

2006-01-19


410 NFDPS COMMANDS

411 COMMAND FORMATS

411.1

The following are some of the formats for the

initial input line of NFDPS commands used to

enter, modify, edit or display flight data and

system operations. Error messages are

generated if appropriate and the cursor is

positioned within the initial parameters input.

Command processing does not start until the

operator has valid initial inputs. The initial input

line may not be subsequently modified during

command processing. Parentheses “()”

indicate optional fields. (N)

COMMAND FORMAT EXAMPLE

ATOS 4-4

411.1 Note:

Other system commands are not required for

normal operations and are listed in the NFDPS

User's Handbook.

ADHoc ADH_ACID ADH_ACA123

AMIs AMI_ACID AMI_CGABC

APF APF(activate pre-filed) APF

BROcast BRO_(A for all devices) BRO_A

or (P for printers) BRO_P

or (C for consoles) BRO_C

or (list of devices) BRO_PF1_PXX

BYE BYE (to log off and idle console) BYE

CANcel CAN_ACID CAN_ACA123

CFP CFP CFP

or CFP_(TYPE=...) CFP_TYPE=DC9

or CFP_(CO=...) CFP_CO=ACA(123)

or CFP_S...(print entire CFP) CFP_S

or CFP_(search parameters),S CFP_(TYP=EA32)

DEVice DEV DEV

DISplay DIS_ACID, DIS_SSR DIS_ACA123, DIS_1234

EDIt EDI_ACID EDI_ACA123

FNO FNO_ACID FNO_CFABC

LFP LFP(function key) (function key)

LISt LIS_filename LIS_CFP

LOGin LOG_user ID (+ language) LOG_OSS(,language indicator)

MODify MOD_ACID MOD_ACA123

MULti MUL_ACID MUL_ACA123

REAssign REA_(printer name)=(printer name) REA_PF3=PF1

REPrint REP_starttime\endtime,(printer) REP_1000\1015,PF1

REStrip RES_ACID RES_ACA123

or (,printer) RES_ACA123,PF1

SHOw SHO_filename SHO_MFP

FILENAME(,search key (,sort key)) SHO_MFP,CO=ACA,SSR=1100\2400

STAtus STA_(filename) STA_CFP

VFR VFR_ACID VFR_CFABC

2006-01-19


412 NFDPS COMMAND DESCRIPTIONS

412.1

The “ADH” command enters a flight plan into

the CFP file. The system displays a template of

flight plan data fields and the cursor will be

positioned under the “TYPE” field awaiting

further input. The RID and FRN default to “N”

on the initial template. (N)

ATOS 4-5

412.1 Note:

After the initial input format (ADH_ACID) the system

stays in the ADH command mode until an ESC is

entered.

412.2

The “AMI” command is used to enter AMIS

flight plans which are not permanently stored in

the system. The entry format is the same as

“ADH” with the ACID and route fields

mandatory except that: (N)

A. the ident may be a minimum of 2 characters; 412.2 Note 1:

The AMIS flight plan will remain on the screen to

allow changes to any field or to accommodate

subsequent flights.

412.2 Note 2:

AMI flight plan data will not be sent to RDPS.

B. first character must be alpha; and

C. second or subsequent character may be

alphanumeric or “#”.

Regardless of the time entered, the strips will

be printed immediately.

412.3

The “APF” command is used to insert pre-filed

flight plans into the CFP file. “APF” will cause

the system to prompt for a pre-filed “ACID” after

which the flight plan will be displayed allowing

for required changes prior to entry. “ESC” will

exit the command. (N)

412.4

The “BRO” command permits messages to be

sent from any console to all or selected devices.

Entering “BRO” will cause the system to list any

addressed devices that are off line and then

prompt for the message that is to be sent. (N)

412.5

The “BYE” command logs the user off the

system and the console is placed in an idle

position. Any subsequent use of the console

will require a login command.

412.3 Note:

After the flight plan has been entered into the CFP,

the flight plan will be erased allowing another ACID

to be entered if required.

412.4 Note:

“BRO” capacity may be expanded to five lines of text

sent to printers using the BRO_X,(printer

name)_(printer name).

Originall


412.6

The “CAN” command removes a flight plan from

the CFP file and sends a message to “remove

strips” to each strip printer on which strips have

been printed. If more than one flight plan exists

for the specified ACID, the system will prompt to

select the correct one for cancellation.

412.7

The “CFP” command provides the capability to

list and show flight plan information from the

Current Flight Plan file using specified search

parameters with the output sorted based on

time. Each flight plan will include ACID, DEP,

DES, TIME, ALT, SSR and limited route.

412.8

The “DEV” command is used to assign a

physical device unit number to a logical

mnemonic name. If no assignment is specified,

the current device configuration will be

displayed in the invoking console. A unit may

be:

3

A. turned “ON” or “OFF”; (N) 412.8 A. Note:

B. selected by printer (“A” - ASL printer; “B”

BOCA printer; “I” - ITOH printer; “E” - ESD

printer; “X” - generic printer); or

C. inhibited by using “NIU” (not in use) for

specified printers.

412.9

The “DIS” command displays all data on a

specified flight in the CFP file to the console

from which the command is entered. If more

than one flight plan exists for the specified ACID

or SSR code, all flight plans will be displayed.

ATOS 4-6

If a console, on which an operator is logged on, is

specified as the logical device, a warning message

will be activated. The warning may be overridden to

complete the command and the current operator is

then logged off as per the BYE command.

Original


412.10

The “EDI” command allows editing of data in

the CFP file, except for the “STATE” and “LINK

STAT” fields, and will position the cursor in the

first field that may be edited. Any edition of the

data will result in a “remove strips” message

and a new strip being sent for any previously

printed strip. An edited strip will NOT show the

fields highlighted, however any change to

centre-stored ACID, type, departure point,

destination or route fields will cause the flight

plan category to be changed to ADHOC. (N)

412.11

The “LFP” command accesses the next link

flight plan, which has been received, and allows

the user to verify, change and enter it into the

CFP file. The system displays a template of the

link flight plan, and if no RID is present,

positions the cursor in the “RID” field for further

input. If a RID is present the user is prompted to

“CONFIRM FLIGHT PLAN [Y/N]”.

412.12

The “FNO” command allows for quick printing of

flight strips for VFR departures and arrivals.

The flight plan template is displayed on screen

and the user enters data into the desired fields.

The system will not insert the current time in

NFDPS if the user does not enter any data in

that field; however, the time is transferred to

RDPS.

412.13

The “LIS” command prints, on the line printer,

the contents of any system database files

according to specified “search and sort keys”.

Information in specified files may be listed

according to company, departure, destination,

RID or FRN, etc. Parameters are separated by

commas and ranges are indicated by a

backslash (\). If no search numbers and ranges

are listed, the entire field is printed.

ATOS 4-7

412.10 Note 1:

If more than one flight plan exists for the specified

ACID, the user will be prompted to select the correct

one for editing.

412.10 Note 2:

The “EDI” command on a previously link flight plan

will be processed on the link as a “MOD” command.

Original


412.14

ATOS must log on to the system prior to

execution of NFDPS commands. The “userid” is

verified by the system and any previous user is

logged off. The operator may choose the

console output language by entering the

following letters:

A. E - English;

B. F - French; or

C. B - Bilingual.

If no letter is entered, the system will default to

the site default language.

412.15

The “MOD” command allows modification of

data in the CFP file, except for the “STATE” and

“LINK STAT” fields, and will position the cursor

in the first field that may be edited. Any

modification of the data WILL be highlighted on

subsequent strips and a “remove strips”

message and new strip, with modifications

highlighted, will be sent for any previously

printed strip. Any change to centre-stored ACID,

type, departure point, destination or route fields

will cause the flight plan category to be

changed to ADHOC and highlighted on the

strip.

412.16

The “MUL” command displays a flight plan

already in the CFP or allows the entry of a new

flight plan and keeps the flight plan on the

screen after entry. All data fields, except the

“STATE” can be changed and re-entered as a

new flight plan allowing a user to enter flight

plans with different ACIDs having common

information or an ACID with multi-legged flight

plans into the CFP file. (N)

412.17

The “REP” command provides the capability to

reprint strips for specified printers over a

specified time period. Any strips that were

originally printed within the specified time

period will be reprinted as well as strips for any

printers that have been reassigned to the

specified printers. (E)

ATOS 4-8

412.16 Note:

The cursor will be positioned under the “TYPE” field

awaiting further input. The “RID” and “FRN” default

to “N”.

412.17 Example:

REP 1200\1230, PWG.

Original


412.18

The “RES” command provides the capability to

reprint strips for a specified aircraft on all

printers or particular printers as specified in the

“RES” command. If more than one flight plan

exists for the specified ACID, the user will be

prompted to select the correct one for

restripping.

412.19

The “SHO” command displays, on the source

console, the contents of any system database

files according to specified “search and sort

keys”. Information in specified files may be

listed according to company, departure,

destination, RID or FRN, etc. Parameters are

separated by commas and ranges are indicated

by a backslash (\). If no search numbers and

ranges are listed, the entire field is displayed.

412.20

The “STA” command displays the status of

items in a specified file on the source console.

Some of the files that may be displayed include

logical devices, logged-on users, current VSP

values, current flight plans, strip queues or

RDPS queues. (N)

412.21

The “STR” command forces an immediate

printing of the flight strip for a specific flight for

which the VSP had prevented printing. The time

that his command is executed will be the new

time displayed on the first flight strip printed.

412.22

The “VFR” or “FNO” command allows for the

immediate printing of strips for VFR or Flight

Notification departures or arrivals. The flight

plan template is displayed and the desired

fields are entered. The system will not insert the

current system time in NFDPS if a time is not

entered, however, the current time is passed to

RDPS.

ATOS 4-9

412.20 Note:

A “STA_DEV” or “STA_FIL” or “STA_STR” entry will

cause the displayed information to be updated

periodically until “ESC” is entered.

Original


420 NFDPS ENTRY COMMANDS

421 ADHOC ENTRY

421.1

For ADHOC, the flight plan template, the default

category, and the ACID are displayed. The

remaining fields are entered. Error messages

are generated for invalid data and correction

input is solicited. Input is solicited until a valid

flight plan has been entered. The RDPS

proposed time will be set to the NFDPS time if it

is not entered.

422 DUPLICATE FLIGHT PLAN DATA

422.1

When entering a flight plan into NFDPS, if the

aircraft identification and departure point of the

flight plan match data on a flight plan already in

the CFP and:

A. the proposed times are identical, NFDPS

will generate a “DUPLICATE — CONTINUE

[Y/N]” message; or

B. the proposed times are within the system

time check VSP, NFDPS will generate a

“POSSIBLE DUPLICATE — CONTINUE [Y/

N]”.

422.2

For a “DUPLICATE — CONTINUE [Y/N]”

message: (N)

A. a “N” response will abort the last flight plan

information without updating the CFP; or

B. a “Y” response will display the previous flight

plan and solicit a response under ACID.

After the duplicate is resolved in one or

more of the three identified fields, a

“CONFIRM THIS FLIGHT — [Y\N]”

message will appear. A “Y” will enter the

modified flight plan data as another flight

plan into the CFP.

422.3

For a “POSSIBLE DUPLICATE — CONTINUE

[Y/N]” message:

A. a “N” response will abort the entry without

further updating the CFP; or

ATOS 4-10

422.2 Note:

A change must be made to either ACID, time or the

departure point.

Original


B. a “Y” response will enter the possible

duplicate into the CFP as a new flight plan

without any further changes needed.

423 CFP PROCESSING COMMANDS

423.1

The CANcel, REStrip, STRip, MULti, MODify or

EDIt commands may generate one or more of

the following NFDPS responses:

A. for more than one flight plan with the same

ACID, the system will display the flight plan

reference number, ident, departure,

destination, time (earliest first), SSR and the

first part of the route for each flight plan. The

operator would select the desired option by

the flight plan reference number; (E)

B. if the selected flight plan is already

accessed, NFDPS will generate a “FLIGHT

ALREADY ACCESSED” message requiring:

1. ESCape key to exit the previous

command;

2. ENTER to try the same flight plan again;

or

3. enter a new flight plan reference number

if another flight plan is in the system.

C. any flight plan that has been modified or

edited will be rechecked for “DUPLICATE” or

“POSSIBLE DUPLICATE” flight plans.

424 ROUTE PROCESSING

424.1

The route may be entered by:

A. a route identification number (numeric or

alphanumeric) to specify a route as stored in

a system route database; (N)

B. “N” to signal that the route will be a manual

input; or

C. “S” to indicate a selective display of routes.

424.2

“S” displays and allows route selection by: (N)

ATOS 4-11

423.1 A. Example:

“1 CFABC CYVR CYYJ 1200 5555 V338”

“2 CFABC CYVR CYYJ 1430 4444 V338”

“3 CFABC CYYJ CYVR 1600 1212 J338”

424.1 A. Note:

NFDPS will indicate a modification to the stored

route by placing a “*” following the route

identification number.

424.2 Note:

Route search may be aborted at any time by the

“ESCAPE” key after the flight plan is redisplayed

and the cursor moves to the RID field.

Original


A. clearing the flight plan template and

displaying as many routes as possible, and

if more routes are available than can be

displayed on one screen, the system will

generate a “ADDITIONAL ROUTES [Y/N]”

in which:

1. “Y” will display additional routes until no

more routes are available; or

2. “N” will redisplay the flight plan and the

cursor will prompt another input.

B. indicating no more route selection with

“END OF ROUTE SELECTION [Y/N]” in

which;

1. “Y” will redisplay the flight plan and the

cursor will prompt a RID entry; (N)

2. “N” will re-initiate the search process.

424.3

Routes which are longer than 58 characters are

printed on 2 lines of the strip. When such routes

are entered, the system will ensure that the

route can be split at a space. If the route cannot

be split properly, an error message is generated

and the operator must adjust the route

accordingly. (N)

425 FIX GENERATION

425.1

A system stored route normally includes a fix

reference number which will be system entered

into the fix reference number field to produce

the fixes for a particular route. The fixes may

then be manually adjusted to suit the route as

required. A valid fix reference number may also

be manually entered into the fix reference field

to override a system entered fix statement.

ATOS 4-12

424.2 B. 1 Note:

The operator must remember the RID from the

displayed routes that may be used in the RID field

after the flight plan is redisplayed.

424.3 Note:

Route adjustment is accomplished by making the

route shorter or adjusting the route so that a space

will appear at the split.

Original


430 NAMES PROCEDURES

431 NAMES CHARACTERISTICS

431.1

NAMES is a semi-automated system capable of

entering AFTN derived messages into NFDPS

by translating messages from up to 2 serial

teletype ports into a format suited to NFDPS.

The translated flight plan is passed to NFDPS

via one of the NFDPS terminal ports upon

operator command.

431.2

NAMES consists of two operator controlled

displays:

A. a split screen which displays the incoming

teletype message on the upper half and its

translation (which can be edited) on the

lower half; and (N)

B. a second display mode which implements a

full NFDPS terminal that allows all normal

NFDPS functions.

431.3

Incoming flight plan formats that can be

translated by NAMES include:

A. regular NAS;

B. no-code NAS; and

C. ICAO format.

431.4

Formats that are not acceptable to NAMES

must be manually processed on the split screen

mode by entering the information received on

the upper screen into the lower screen before

proceeding with normal NAMES flight plan

processing.

431.5

Once the lower screen information has been

entered, either automatically by NAMES or

manually by the operator, NAMES will, on

operator command, translate this format into a

format suited to the NFDPS ADH command

and “type” this command and its corresponding

data into NFDPS.

ATOS 4-13

431.2 A. Note:

See figure in 431.9 for example of NAMES

presentation of incoming and translated split screen

display.

Original


431.6

All received teletype messages are time/date

stamped and stored on hard disk for one month

before being overwritten by new messages. All

stored messages can be reviewed with the

“browse” utility and may also be printed as

required.

431.7

NAMES incorporates a number of tables and

VSPs which may be operator or site adjusted to

allow certain NAMES characteristics such as

MEDEVAC recognition, route conversion

definitions etc. to meet local requirements.

431.8

Emergency messages such as MEDEVAC

flights produce a visual and audible alarm when

received and are given processing priority.

431.9

The figure below is an example of a NAMES

split screen display with the incoming message

displayed on the upper half and the lower

window showing the translation of that

message suitable for entry into NFDPS. (D)

Received AFTN Msg #32

ATOS 4-14

431.9 Diagram:

TBL521 212021

FF CYYZZGZR

212021 KZCPZQZX

P239 FP ACA116 H/B767/R 7360 0461 SSM281035 E2121 410 YVR./.DLH

.J140.SSM.J588.DANNY.BORDN4.YYZ: AIR CANADA

____AFTN Queue: 12___________>>>>___________NFDPS Queue: 2_________

ACID TYPE SSR SPEED TIME ALT RTIME

ACA116 H/B767/R_ 7360 461_ 2121 410 2121

DEP

CYVR

RID DEST

N_____ CYYZ

L/R

L

SRC

CI

ETE

____

CUSTOMS

________

SLCL

____

RMKS: AIR CANADA_________________________ RMDLM: A

ROUTE: DLH J140 SSM J588 DANNY BORDN4_______________________

15:08 ^O - Online help

Original


432 DISPLAY PRESENTATION 1

432.1

The top window is labelled at its top right corner

as “Received AFTN Msg #n” with the messages

sequentially numbered by NAMES as they are

received. This number is reset to “1” for the first

message received after midnight (one minute

past 23:59) on the NAMES system clock and

incremented until the following midnight. (N)

432.2

If an AFTN message is too long to fit into the

top window an operator can use the PgUp and

PgDn keys to scroll the message.

432.3

The bottom of each received AFTN message is

stamped with the current NAMES time and date

along with the port or particular AFTN line on

which it was received. The designator “ND1”

and “ND2” refers to the NAMES hardware port

with the AFTN circuit on which the message

was received depending on the actual circuit

connected to the specific port. This information

can only be read using the “browse” command

(^B).

432.4

The NFDPS login, enclosed by square

brackets, is appended as the top line of every

AFTN message and may only be seen with

“browse” or when messages are printed. (N)

432.5

NAMES displays any LINK FP messages on

the top line of display presentation 1 (as well as

on presentation 2).

432.6

The top window is labelled on the bottom line

with “AFTN Queue: n” which indicates the

number of AFTN messages that have been

received but not actioned, and indicates a count

of the backlog or queue of AFTN messages. As

messages are received this count goes up and

as they are processed or deleted the number

goes down. (N)

ATOS 4-15

432.1 Note:

The NAMES system clock should usually be set to

the NFDPS system clock so that message times are

consistent with NFDPS processing times.

432.4 Note:

The login will be displayed on recovered messages

when NAMES is rebooted, which allows the

operator to quickly identify recovered messages.

432.6 Note 1:

Messages that will not be processed may be

deleted by the “^D” or “^X” keys.

432.6 Note 2:

Messages that are deleted are erased from the split

screen and placed onto the system hard disk for up

to one month and may be recalled or displayed and

printed.

Original


432.7

The bottom line of the top window also shows

the “NFDPS Queue” which indicates the

number of translated messages the operator

has edited then removed from the AFTN queue

and placed in the NFDPS queue. As messages

are sent by NAMES the number goes up and as

NFDPS processes the message, the number

goes down. (N)

432.8

When all AFTN messages have been

processed or erased, the top window displays

the advisement “The AFTN Queue is empty”

and the bottom window is blank.

432.9

Messages with departure times too early to be

immediately processed, may be temporarily

held in a “HOLD” queue using the “^L” key. The

number of messages being held is displayed in

the bottom line of the top window.

432.10

All received AFTN messages are stored on

NAMES hard disk for one month after which

they are overwritten by incoming messages.

Any of the stored messages may be read from

the “browse (^B)” command and may also by

printed using the “print (^P)” command.

* 432.11

A message suspense file, defined by a system

VSP, of erased (^D/^X) and NFDPS processed

messages, is also maintained by NAMES.

These messages may be recalled and

transferred to the front of the AFTN queue by

the “^R” key and will be displayed as an

incoming AFTN message. (N)

432.12

Messages are normally presented one at a time

in the top window in their received order. When

the current message is erased or put onto the

NFDPS queue, the next message from the top

of the AFTN queue becomes the current

message and is presented in the top window.

ATOS 4-16

432.7 Note:

A background task in NAMES automatically uploads

the NFDPS queue one entered message at a time

which allows the operator to continue to process

subsequent messages without waiting for NFDPS to

complete processing of a previous message.

432.11 Note:

Only up to a VSP maximum of the last messages

received may be recalled.

Original


432.13

If an emergency message, as defined in a

system VSP, is received it will be placed at the

top of the AFTN queue, where it is immediately

available, a visual flag is presented and an

audible alarm will sound. An operator may

choose not to finish the current message but

can immediately select the emergency

message with the command “^E”, process the

emergency message, and automatically return

to the former current message. More than one

emergency message will recycle the

emergency process until all emergency

messages are serviced.

433 DISPLAY 1-LOWER WINDOW

433.1

The NAMES lower window displays a message

format similar to the NFDPS template with the

following results:

A. for a NAS with code format message, the

cursor is placed at the RID field awaiting

further entry;

B. for a NAS no code or an ICAO format, the

cursor is placed at the SSR field; and:

1. entry of “+” or “/” immediately moves the

cursor to the RID field;

2. entry of a 4 digit code or if the cursor is

at the first column, entering a “LEFT

ARROW” will move the cursor to the RID

field; or

3. for a message format not recognized by

NAMES, the lower window fields will be

left blank and the cursor will be placed at

the SSR field awaiting further input.

C. the RID entry requires an appropriate

alphanumerical value and: (N)

1. an “*” to indicate that the flight plan will

require further operator intervention from

the NFDPS mode terminal to enter the

flight plan into NFDPS; or

2. the alphanumerical value only to indicate

that the flight plan will be entered into

NFDPS without further operator

intervention provided that all NFDPS

entry parameters are met.

ATOS 4-17

433.1 C. Note:

This applies to NAMES “high” automation only.

Original


D. any other field can also be edited as

necessary using standard cursor movement

and editing commands.

E. when the translation of data from the upper

window to the lower window is correct, the

operator uses the “Enter“ key to remove the

message from the AFTN queue and place it

in the NFDPS queue. (N)

433.2

The bottom line of the lower window contains:

A. the NAMES system time; and

B. the online help window.

434 DISPLAY PRESENTATION 2

434.1

The display presentation 2 is the Goodwood

terminal emulation mode. NAMES looks and

behaves like a Goodwood terminal in this mode

with one extra line at the bottom that shows the

current NAMES time, in 24 hour format, on the

left and the string “^O - Online help”. (N)

435 ONLINE HELP WINDOW

435.1

The online help window displays a list of all

NAMES commands which are available for

Display Presentation 1. The window is activated

and deactivated by typing “^O”. Once the

window is opened, specific fields may be

accessed by the listed commands.

ATOS 4-18

433.1 E. Note:

The “^N” key may be used instead of “Enter” to

place the message for NFDPS processing ahead of

any other queued messages already in the NFDPS

queue.. If the NFDPS queue is empty, there is no

difference between the “Enter” and “^N” commands.

434.1 Note 1:

The NAMES time on the bottom of the screen can

be readily compared to the NFDPS time on the top

and the two times should be kept identical so time

stamps on messages stored in NAMES will agree

with NFDPS times.

434.1 Note 2:

An operator can set the NAMES time and date

equal to the NFDPS time and date whenever

Display Presentation 1 is active by means of the

“^T” command.

Original


435.2

Illustrated is a diagram of the help menu that

may be displayed on NAMES display

presentation 1. (D)

435.3

Illustrated is a diagram of the help menu that

may be displayed on NAMES display

presentation 2. (D)

436 ONLINE HELP COMMANDS - ONLINE

HELP DISPLAY 1

436.1

The ^S key switches between display

presentations 1 and 2. When display

presentation 2 is active (terminal mode) the ^S

key can be used at any time to switch to display

presentation 1. When display presentation 1

(AFTN message mode) the ^S key will switch to

display presentation 2 only when one of the

following is true:

A. the background processing is inactive

because the NFDPS queue is empty;

B. the background processing is inactive as

indicated by a blinking “NFDPS Queue”

advisement either:

ATOS 4-19

435.2 Diagram:

^S - Switch displays

^D or ^X - Delete a message

^R - Recall a message

^E - select Emergency message

^N - NFDPS priority action key

* - use RID* for manual mode

^B - Browse a message file

^P - Print a msg or sys param

^T - Time menu

^V - VSP menu

^A - Adjust tables

^L - Hold msg window

^Arrow Keys - Move BC msg

PgUp and PgDn - Scroll AFTN msg

Esc or Esc - Exit the VSP or

Table menus with NO change

^O - Online help toggle

435.3 Diagram:

Online help

vers 2.2

Online help

^S - Switch Displays

^D - mod command

^C - exchange fields (MOD cmd)

^R - dswap Route fields only

Esc - delete message

^O - Online help toggle

2002-04-18


1. NFDPS has found a faulty field that will

require manual correction;

2. an asterisk was encountered in a RID

field; or

3. the NAMES automation level (VSP 11)

was set to “LOW”; or

C. if an attempt is made to switch to terminal

mode while the background is active, the

advisement window will be displayed to

indicate the display will switch, but not until

the current NFDPS message has been

processed. (E)

436.2

The ^D and the ^X keys both delete the current

AFTN message. The current message at the

top of the AFTN queue will become the new

current message, displayed and translated if in

the proper format. If there are no messages,

then the advisement “The AFTN queue is

empty” will be displayed. (N)

436.3

The ^R key will recall VSP number of deleted or

processed AFTN messages. Once the table

value number of messages have been recalled

this key will do nothing until at least one of the

recalled messages has been processed or

deleted. If background processing of a NFDPS

flight plan stops because of a condition as listed

in 436.1 B., the ^R command will recall the

corresponding AFTN message to allow the

operator to inspect the raw message to the

“stuck” message. Once the “stuck” message

has been cleared, the ^R function will return to

normal operation. (N)

ATOS 4-20

436.1 C. Example:

Shown is an example of the advisement window.

Will Switch to Terminal Mode

when the current message

clears the NFDPS queue

436.2 Note 1:

The ^D key is active in display presentation 1 but

initiates a MOD command in display presentation 2.

436.2 Note 2:

The ^X key is active in display presentation 1 only, it

does nothing in display presentation 2.

436.3 Note 1:

Any recalled messages must be cleared in the same

manner as an incoming AFTN message; either by

deleting or processing each recalled message.

436.3 Note 2:

A recalled message that has already been

processed, will display “already processed” in an

advisement window.

2002-04-18


436.4

The ^E key allows an operator to immediately

select an emergency message as the current

message. When an emergency message is

received a blinking visual alarm is displayed in

the top right hand corner of the upper window

and an audible alarm is sounded. The ^E key

will stop the alarm and replace any current

messages with the emergency message that

can then be processed. Once the emergency

message has been processed or erased,

NAMES reverts back to the original message.

The pending emergency will also be

automatically selected as the current message

by first completing the current message. (N)

436.5

The ^N key is used to send translated flight

plans to the NFDPS queue and place them at

the top of the queue for processing instead of

placing them at the bottom of the queue as the

normal “Enter” key would. This allows an

operator to process a current flight plan

message ahead of any other messages already

in the NFDPS queue. (N)

436.6

The asterisk symbol placed immediately after

the RID number in the RID field is used to

prevent NAMES from automatically processing

the corresponding message. The background

task will stop and the operator will have to

switch to display presentation 2 and manually

process the message. This feature is used

when the NAMES Automation Level is set to

“HIGH” and the operator may wish to do some

checking or manual processing of a flight plan

before it is sent to NFDPS. (N)

ATOS 4-21

436.4 Note 1:

If the AFTN queue is empty when an emergency

arrives, the message will immediately become the

current message and an audible alarm will sound

once.

436.4 Note 2:

This key is active only for display presentation 1 and

does nothing in display presentation 2.

436.5 Note:

The ^N key is only active when display presentation

1 is active. It is inactive in display presentation 2.

436.6 Note:

An operator may wish to set the NAMES

Automation Mode to “LOW” thus eliminating the

need for an asterisk to prevent NAMES from

automatically processing each flight plan.

Original


436.7

The ^B brings up the BROWSE MENU allowing

an operator to review a file of received AFTN

messages by entering a number from 1 to 31 or

hitting “Enter” to default to the current day. Any

number entered that is higher than the current

day will refer to days of the previous month.

Further manipulation within the review display

may be done with the “Alt A” menu to find a

specifiable string, the PgUp and PgDn keys, the

keyboard asterisk, the arrow keys, the Home

and End keys and the Plus and Minus keys. (N)

436.8

The ^P command brings up a PRINT MENU

which allows an operator to print any stored

AFTN message or the current status of all

NAMES VSP and Table parameters. The

PRINT MENU will prompt the entry of the

desired day and message number, or numbers

if more than one message, to be printed. The

operator will find the NAMES message

numbers from reviewing the stored messages

using the BROWSE MENU. (N)(E)

436.9

The ^T command will bring up the SET DOS

SYSTEM TIME MENU in a window on top of

display presentation 1 and allow the operator to

set the NAMES time to the NFDPS date and

time. Normally the two system times should be

the same so that incoming AFTN messages are

stored in files based on the NFDPS time.

ATOS 4-22

436.7 Note:

The ^B key is only active in display presentation 1.

436.8 Note:

The ^P is only active in display presentation 1.

436.8 Example:

The following is an illustration of the PRINT MENU

and the prompts to enter the specific information.

Entry into the first menu will result in the display with

further prompts as in the second illustration.

PRINT MENU

Print AFTN message for what day?

Enter the DAY as a number 1...31

(default is today (n) : _

Enter “P” for Table/VSP Params

Enter “C” to Cancel printing

Enter “Q” to quit this menu

PRINT MENU

Select Message Number (s) for day (n)

Enter the message number 1...34

(format can be: 4, 8, 10...15, 2, etc)

(default is (34) ): _

Enter “C” to Cancel printing

Enter “Q” to quit this menu

Original


436.10

The ^V key brings up the VSP MENU which

allows an operator to adjust the various NAMES

VSPs. The up and down arrow keys or the

“Enter” keys select a particular VSP, and the

space bar will select the desired value of the

VSP. Select “DONE” and “Enter” to exit the VSP

MENU.

436.11

The ^A key is used to display the “Adjust Table”

menu which allows an operator to set the

various system parameters for the listed tables.

A desired table is selected, the fields edited as

desired then selecting “DONE” to save the

changes and exit the table.

436.12

A NFDPS generated “BROadcast” message is

sent to display presentation 2, however a

window with the “BRO” message appears in

display presentation 1 if it is the active display.

The ^Arrow keys are used to move this window

to a desired spot on display presentation 1. (N)

436.13

The PgUp and PgDn keys are used to scroll the

current AFTN message that is too long to fit in

the top window of display presentation 1. These

keys are active only in the display presentation

1 upper window.

436.14

The “Esc” key can be used to exit or close

either the VSP menu or any of the TABLE

menus without recording any changes with the

exception of the ROUTE CONVERSION TABLE

where any entry that has been deleted, added

or edited, the Esc key will close the table but

changes will be recorded. For tables where

multiple entries are allowed, the key must be

struck twice to exit.

436.15

The ^F key allows the system parameters to be

saved or recalled to/from a floppy disk. The

Password parameter is the only parameter not

stored or recalled from the floppy disk.

ATOS 4-23

436.12 Note:

The “ACK” key will remove the “BROadcast”

message.

Original


437 ONLINE HELP DISPLAY 2

437.1

The ^S key is used to switch between display

presentation 1 and 2. When display

presentation 2 is active, ^S will switch to display

presentation 1 at any time.

437.2

NFDPS will display the message “DUPLICATE

— CONTINUE [Y/N]” when NAMES attempts to

enter a duplicate flight plan. The ^D key in

display presentation 2 will cause NAMES to

issue a “MOD” command to NFDPS which in

turn causes NFDPS to display the flight plan

already in the system. NAMES then responds

by displaying the latest received data, but in

inverse video allowing the operator to compare

the old data from NFDPS with the latest data

from the AFTN link. Specific fields may then be

updated as desired either through manual

means or by using the “exchange fields” or

“swap route fields only” commands.

437.3

The ^C key is used in conjunction with the

“MOD” command and then only while the

“MOD” command is in process. The key

exchanges the current and old data fields

during the execution of the “MOD” command as

described in 437.

437.4

The ^R key will cause the local route to be

interchanged with the received flight plan route

fields any time display presentation 2 is active

and the local route is being displayed. The ^R

key does nothing if the local route is not

currently being displayed. (N)

ATOS 4-24

437.4 Note:

The ^R key is inoperative in the link flight plan

mode.

Original


438 VSP MENU

438.1

The selection of the VSP menu as described in

438.10 will display the menu, as shown in the

diagram, followed by explanations of the menu

items. (D)

1. Stay in Terminal Mode after

entering a msg to NFDPS: NO

2. Auto edit DEP/DEST fields: YES

3. Auto edit the ACID field: YES

4. Default value for L/R field: R

5. Enable AFTN_ND1 (port P1): YES

6. Enable AFTN_ND2 (port P2): YES

7. ACK Transmit (port P1): YES

8. ACK Transmit (port P2): NO


438.2

The “Stay in Terminal Mode after entering a

msg to NFDPS” mode has two values that are

activated when switching from display

presentation 1 to display presentation 2 to

manually intervene in a flight plan message that

is being processed into NFDPS. They are:

A. “YES” which will leave display presentation

2 as the active display after the flight plan

has been entered into NFDPS; or

B. “NO” which will automatically return to

display presentation after the flight plan has

been entered into NFDPS.

438.3

The “Auto edit DEP/DEST fields” allow and

disallow automatic editing of the DEP and

DEST fields. If “NO” is selected no editing of the

fields will take place. If “YES” is selected then

automatic editing of the fields takes place as

follows:

A. If the identifier appears in the “DEP/DEST

IDENTIFIER CONVERSION TABLE” it will

be translated as per that table.

VSP MENU

DONE

ATOS 4-25

438.1 Diagram:

9. AFTN Queue Time-Out (mins): 15

10. NFDPS Queue Time-Out (mins): 15

11. Transfer NAS RMRKS to FP: YES

12. Transfer ICAO RMRKS to FP: YES

13. NFDPS System Type: RDPS

14. NAMES Automation Level: LOW

15. Message Selection Filter: NONE

16. Remove/M /L Weight Symbols: YES

Original


B. If the 3 character identifier contains only

alpha characters and if the left character is a

“Y” and the identifier is not an exception as

noted in the “DEP/DEST CONVERT

EXCEPTIONS” table, then the letter “C” will

be added to the identifier, else the letter “K”

will be added to the identifier.

C. If the 3 character identifier contains one or

more numerics then if the left and middle

characters are alpha and the right is

numeric, the letter “C” will be added to the

identifier, else the letter “K” will be added to

the identifier.

438.4

The “Auto edit the ACID field” allows (“YES”)

and disallows (“NO”) the automatic dropping of

the first character of ACID fields whose first

several characters are defined in the table

“ACID FIELD LEAD CHAR” in the following

manner:

A. if the VSP is set to “NO” then no action is

taken; or

B. if the VSP is set to “YES” and the first

characters if the ACID match one of the

strings contained in the table, the lead

character of the ACID will be discarded.

438.5

The “Default value for L/R field” has allowed

values of “L”, “R” and empty field. This VSP

defines the default value for the L/R field.

438.6

The “AFTN_ND1 (port P1)” enables (“YES”) or

disables (“NO”) the receiving of messages on

port P1, which correspond to the AFTN_ND1

port.

438.7

The “AFTN_ND2 (port P2)” enables (“YES”) or

disables (“NO”) the receiving of messages on

port P2, which correspond to the AFTN_ND2

port.

ATOS 4-26

Original


438.8

The “AFTN Queue Time-Out (mins)” VSP

defines the time of “5”, “10”, “15”, “20”, “25” or

“30” minutes before an audible alarm sounds to

indicate that no message has been removed

from the AFTN queue. The alarm will stop and

the time-out will be reset when a message is

deleted or moved to the NFDPS queue by an

action key. The alarm will not activate if the

AFTN queue is empty unless NAMES is left in

any of the VSP or Table menus, the BROWSE

menu or PRINT menu for the VSP time period.

438.9

The “NFDPS Queue Time-Out (mins)” VSP

defines the time of “5”, “10”, “15”, “20”, “25” or

“30” minutes before an audible alarm sounds to

indicate that no message has been removed

from the NFDPS queue, i.e. there is a “stuck”

NFDPS message which needs attention. The

alarm will stop and the time-out will be reset

when the stuck message is manually processed

or deleted. The alarm will not activate if the

NFDPS queue is empty unless NAMES is left in

any of the VSP or Table menus, the BROWSE

menu or the PRINT menu.

438.10

The “Transfer NAS RMRKS to FP” VSP is used

to transfer (“YES”) or not transfer (“NO”) the

“RMRKS” portion of a NAS flight plan to

NFDPS as follows:

A. “YES” will transfer the RMRKS portion of the

flight plan to the NFDPS RMRKS field; and

B. “NO” will not transfer the RMRKS portion of

the NAS flight plans to the NFDPS RMRKS

field, however the RMRKS portion of the

incoming NAS flight plan will be highlighted

in inverse video.

438.11

The “Transfer ICAO RMRKS to FP” VSP is used

to transfer (“YES”) or not transfer (“NO”) the

“RMRKS” portion of an ICAO flight plan to

NFDPS as follows:

A. “YES” will transfer the registration portion of

the RMRKS of the flight plan to the NFDPS

RMRKS field; and

ATOS 4-27

Original


B. “NO” will not transfer the RMRKS portion of

the ICAO flight plans to the NFDPS RMRKS

field.

438.12

The “NAMES Automation Level” allows a

“HIGH” or “LOW” level of NAMES transferring a

message to NFDPS with the following results:

A. in the “HIGH” level, NAMES will transfer the

flight data to NFDPS and if no asterisk has

been added to the RID and all NFDPS flight

data fields are correct, the flight plan will be

entered into NFDPS without further operator

intervention; and

B. in the “LOW” level, NAMES will transfer the

flight data to NFDPS but the operator must

switch to display presentation 2 and

manually confirm each message to allow it

to be entered into NFDPS.

ATOS 4-28

Original


440 NAMES ADJUST AND CONVERSION

TABLES

441 ^A — ADJUST TABLES

441.1

The adjust table, as shown in the diagram, will

display the selection of the contained data

tables. (N)(D)

441.2

The “ACID FIELD LEAD CHARACTER” table,

as shown in the diagram, allows five strings of 1

to 4 characters to be defined enabling the VSP

to discard the first character of any ACID whose

lead characters match a string in this table. (D)

ATOS 4-29

441.1 Note:

The selection of any of the tables contained in the

diagram below will allow the addition and deletion of

the specific data to be translated by NAMES and if

the VSP table is active will perform as described in

the following paragraphs.

441.1 Diagram:

SELECT A TABLE TO ADJUST

ACID FIELD LEAD CHAR

DEPT/DEST CONVERT EXCEPTIONS

A/C TYPE CONVERSIONS

EMERGENCY RECOGNITION

AFTN ADDRESS DEFINITIONS

USER ADDRESS DEFINITIONS

FLIGHT PLAN CATEGORY FIELD

NFDPS TIME OUT COUNT

RECALL BUFFER DEPTH

ROUTE TRUNCATION SYMBOL

ROUTE CONVERSION TABLE

DEPT/DEST IDENTIFIER CONVERSION TABLE

PASSWORD MENU

DEFAULT LOCK AHEAD TIME

DONE

441.2 Diagram:

Select with ↑↓press Enter

The first character of any ACID

beginning with one of the following

strings will be dropped unless the

ACID contains a numeric character.

(spaces are ignored)

Str1: _CF

Str2: CG

Str3:

Str4:

Str5:

DONE

Use ↑ ↓

Original


441.3

The “DEPT/DEST CONVERT EXCEPTIONS”

table, as shown in the diagram, defines the

exceptions to the auto editing of departure and

destination fields. (D)

441.4

A/C TYPE CONVERSIONS table define the

translation of AFTN received data to NFDPS

suitable format, as shown in the diagram. (D)

441.5

The “EMERGENCY RECOGNITION” table

defines the entries that are allowed in this table

and where the recognition conditions are

looked for to indicate a priority flight, as shown

in the diagram. (D)

ATOS 4-30

441.3 Diagram:

441.4 Diagram:

a/c Types will be converted as follows

(spaces are ignored)

FROM TO FROM TO FROM TO

BA31 JSTA BA41 JSTB BE02 B190

BE90 BE9L BH06 B06 CL65 CARJ

CV58 CVLT DH6 DHC6 DH8 DHC8

EA32 A320 FK28 F28 HS74 A74B

LR35 LJ35 PAYE P31T SW3 SW4

T114 CL41

DONE

The following DEPART/DEST identifiers

beginning with “Y” will have a leading “K”

added. Normally “C” is added to “Y” alpha

alpha designators (spaces are ignored)

YAK YFF YIP YKM YKN

YNG YRK YUM

441.5 Diagram:

DONE

(Use ↑ ↓ ← → )

Strings defining an Emergency Condition

(spaces are ignored)

IN ACID ONLY ANYWHERE IN THE

LEFT RIGHT ANYWHERE FP MESSAGE

LN /M # MEDEVAC

MEDIVAC

LIFEGUARD

DONE

(Use ↓ ↑ ← → )

Original


441.6

The “AFTN ADDRESS DEFINITIONS” table, as

shown in the diagram, allows up to six

addresses to be independently defined for each

of the two AFTN ports available on NAMES.

Only messages with recognized addresses will

be processed by NAMES, other messages will

be dropped. (D)

441.7

The “USER ADDRESS DEFINITIONS” table,

as shown in the diagram, allows up to 6 eight

character User Addresses to be entered which

allows AFTN messages with the addresses as

listed to be processed by NAMES. (D)

441.8

The table, as shown in the diagram, defines the

default value for the CAT (category) field. Any 1

or 2 letter designator can be defined with the

table. A null entry or space entry can also be

defined. (D)

441.9

The “NFDPS TIME OUT COUNT” table, as

shown in the diagram, allows a time-out value

of between 1 and 140 seconds that determine

how long the background task will wait before

assuming the current message being

processed by NFDPS is “stuck”. If this

processing time is longer than the table value,

the “NFDPS Queue” begins to blink and the

operator can switch to display presentation 2

and resolve the problem. (D)

ATOS 4-31

441.6 Diagram:

Valid AFTN Addresses are as follows:

(enter “***” for all addresses)

AFTN_ND1 (P1) AFTN_ND2 (P2)

TBL

TAD

*** ***

441.7 Diagram:

441.8 Diagram:

441.9 Diagram:

DONE

(Use ↓ ↑ ← → )

Valid USER Addresses are as follows:

Entries must be 8 alpha characters

(“********” enables all addresses)

********

DONE

(Use ↓ ↑ ← → )

Flight Plan CATEGORY Field

Enter the Category Field default value: AR

(Alphas or Spaces or Null Only)

Set the time in seconds to wait

for NFDPS to process a message

Time Out (secs) : 16

use or to choose use

to exit

Original


441.10

The “RECALL BUFFER DEPTH” table, as

shown in the diagram, defines the number of

deleted or processed AFTN received messages

that can be recalled by the ^R command. The

buffer may be set from 1 to 40 messages. (D)

441.11

The “ROUTE TRUNCATION SYMBOL” table, as

shown in the diagram, defines the symbol that

will be added to the beginning of the NFDPS

route field if the “./.”appears at the beginning of

the NAS received route. (N)(D)

ATOS 4-32

441.10 Diagram:

Select the number of erased or processed

messages which can be recalled

Number of Msgs: 10

use or to choose

use to exit

441.11 Note:

The “./.” symbol must appear at the start of the route

in the NAS message before the symbol defined by

this table is inserted at the start of the NFDPS route.

441.11 Diagram:

Set the beginning of route

truncation string or symbol

(Enclose the string in double quotes)

String is: “ ”

use to exit

Original


441.12

The “ROUTE CONVERSION TABLE”, as

shown in the diagram, allows specified routes

or portions of AFTN received routes to be

translated into NFDPS acceptable formats. The

selected string to be translated must exactly

match the “FROM STRING” and must be at

least 1 character long. The “TO STRING” may

be blank, with a total of 64 characters that may

be distributed between the two strings in any

manner. (D)

441.13

The “DEPT/DEST IDENTIFIER CONVERSION

TABLE”, as shown in the diagram, allows up to

32 entries to be made which will convert 3-letter

AFTN identifiers to 4-letter ICAO designators.

All alpha or numeric characters are allowed.

The “Auto edit DEP/DEST field” VSP must be

activated before this table is used. (D)

ATOS 4-33

441.12 Diagram:

ROUTE CONVERSION TABLE

F10 will DELETE the selected entry

(sorted Alphabetically) F11 will ADD an entry

F12 will EDIT the selected entry

Route Segment >>> Converted Segment

ECK1633030 >>> :ECK 1633020: V450

SSM J140 >>> SSM: J140

YQO262049 V33T >>> :YQO262049: V337

YQO264049 V337 V450 >>> YQO264049 V337: V450

YSO YSO254 YSO254067 V308 >>> YSO :YSO254 YSO254067: V308

Select using: Arrows, Home, End

Page Up/Dn,

Reverse Arrow Keys

Note: Can also use First Letter

use to Exit

441.13 Diagram:

DEPT/DEST Identifiers will be converted as follows

(spaces are ignored)

FROM TO FROM TO FROM TO FROM TO

ACA MMAA CUN MMUN ZBA CZBA

DONE

(Use ↓ ↑ ← → )

“FROMs” are

alphabetical


Original


441.14

Password protection is provided so that an

operator must enter a password before gaining

access to either the VSP or Table menus. Any

alphanumeric password listed in the

“PASSWORD DEFINITIONS MENU” is valid

and will be remembered by NAMES if the

system is “booted” from the hard disk. If

NAMES is “booted” from the floppy disk, the

password will default to the default password

“NAMES”. The password protection can be

disabled by entering a null string in the

password definition menu and hitting the

“ENTER” key.

441.15

The “DEFAULT LOOK AHEAD TIME” menu, as

shown in the diagram, is used to define a

default value for the “look ahead time” which

NAMES uses when calculating a Recall time for

messages put into the Hold Queue. The default

Look Ahead time must be in the range 0100 to

1200 and four digits are required for the entry.

(D)

442 AUTO EDITING FIELDS

442.1

The “AUTO EDITING” of the DEP and DEST

fields is controlled by VSP 2 “AUTO EDIT DEP/

DEST”. When the VSP is enabled, the

following occurs:

A. the “DEPT/DEST IDENTIFIER

CONVERSION TABLE” is examined and if a

match is found the translation is performed;

or

B. if no match is found in the above and the

identifier contains 3 characters, further

processing is done in the “DEPT/DEST

EXCEPTIONS” table.

ATOS 4-34

441.15 Diagram:

DEFAULT LOOK AHEAD TIME

This entry defines the Default Look Ahead Time

and so determines the initial Recall Time

which appears in the HOLD MESSAGE WINDOW.

Note: Recall Time = FP time – Look Ahead

Time. Valid entries are in the

range 0100 to 1200.

Default Look Ahead Time 0600

use to Save and Exit

use to Exit (no save)

Original


442.2

The AUTO EDITING of the TYPE field

translates the last two characters of the TYPE

field from “/A” or “/U” to “/S”. This action occurs

along with the a/c type translation as defined by

the “A/C TYPE CONVERSIONS”.

442.3

The AUTO EDITING of the SRC field occurs if

both the DEP and DEST fields begin with a “C”

or a “K” and are 4 characters long, then the

SRC field is set to “CD”, otherwise the field is

set to “CI”.

442.4

The table, as shown in the diagram, indicates

the automatic conversion processes that

NAMES provides for lat/long identifiers. (D)

MESSAGE

TYPE

POSITION

IDENTIFIER

442.5

The RMRKS and ROUTE fields accept longer

strings than NFDPS allows with the excess

highlighted in reverse video to facilitate editing.

(N)

INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

ATOS 4-35

442.4 Diagram:

AFTN

FORMAT

NAS 9 Character nnnn/mmmm

ex 4247/8435

NAS 10 Character nnnn/mmmm

ex 4247/08435

NAS 12 Character

nnnna/mmmmb

ex 4247N/8435W

NAS 12 Character nnnna/mmmmmb

ex 4247N08435W

NAS or ICAO 11 Character nn00aMMM00b

ex 5600N03000W

Note 1

If a Converted format turns out to be the NAS or ICAO

11 character format then a second conversion to 7 char

format will occur.

Note 2

Explanation of lower case letters:

n-oneof0..9

m - one of 0..9

a-oneofNorS

b-oneofEorW

CONVERTED

FORMAT

nnnnN0mmmmW

ex 4247N08435W

nnnnNmmmmmW

ex 4247N08435W

nnnna0mmmmb

ex 4247N08435W

nnnnammmmmb

ex 4247N08535W

nnammmmmb

ex (7 char)

442.5 Note:

The “End of Field” key sequentially moves the

cursor through long routes at the split position (44

characters), 58 character position, 103 character

position, end of field, etc.

Original


450 FDPN

451 GENERAL

451.1

FDPN is a PC LAN system that semi automates

the receiving, processing and dissemination of

control data via a series of communication

links.

451.2

FDPN data links include:

A. U.S. ARTCCs;

B. NFDPS; (N) 451.2 B. Note:

FDPN is the front end processor for NFDPS.

C. AFTN;

D. RDPS; etc.

451.3

Each ATOS workstation within the ACC

consists of a personal computer linked to a

LAN. (N)

451.4

Each workstation can operate as a standalone

console or it can be connected to the server

and take part in the task sharing of messages

on the LAN.

451.5

The FDPN server acts as the hub of the

network system by communicating with each

connected workstation and governs all

transactions between the system components.

ATOS 4-36

451.3 Note:

As each LAN message is opened by a workstation,

it is removed from the LAN and accessible only to

that workstation.

451.6

The FDPN is made up of the following modules:

A. Redirector - Archive Playback (RAP);

B. Decoders and encoders; (N) 451.6 B. Note:

These applications adapt incoming and outgoing

messages into predetermined formats which are

circuit specific and designed for the message format

expected from the circuit to which it is attached.

C. In-queue and out-queue;

D. Databases;

E. Database manager; and

F. ATOS workstation.

Original


452 FDPN KEYBOARD FUNCTIONS

452.1

The FDPN has the following flight plan template

keyboard functions keys that are in addition to

the conventional Windows keyboard functions:

A. + keys is used to leave the

current application without rebooting the

workstation computer.

B. The arrows (↑ ↓ → ←) move the cursor up

or down on line or to and upper or lower field

or move the cursor on position right or left

within a field.

C. The tab (←→) moves the cursor to the next

field on the same line or to the first field of

the next line.

D. + keys move the cursor to the

preceding field on the same line or to the

last field of the preceding line.

E. moves the cursor to the beginning

of the current field.

F. moves the cursor to the end of the

current field.

G. activates the action button at the

cursor position. (N)

H. Spacebar activates the action button at the

cursor position. (N)

452.2

Template functions, which cannot be activated

in a current operating mode, are dimmed. When

an active function button is selected, a darker

frame around it highlights it.

453 FDPN TEMPLATE FUNCTIONS

453.1

General — The template contains various

functions that can be activated from the FDPN

template window. Functions that are not

available are dimmed.

453.2

Template Functions:

ATOS 4-37

452.1 G. Note:

This key acts as a linefeed when in the text mode.

452.1 H. Note:

This function inserts a space when in the text mode.

Original


A. The Details Function provides the operator

information about the status of the NFDPS

links, the INPUT and OUTPUT queues, the

RAP and circuits. The Details Function lists

PFX.

B. The NETWORK function allows the operator

to look at messages that are waiting to be

processed by the system. The “cancel”

button closes the window.

C. The LOCAL function shows messages that

are specific to the workstation. The

processing for each message that is specific

to the workstation must be completed before

another message can be admitted from the

NETWORK queue. (N)

D. The ADMIT function admits another

message from the NETWORK queue with

the following conditions:

1. The top line in the TEXT window

indicates which decoder was used to

decode the message. If non of the

decoders was able to decode the

message, it is identified as an

“unresolved message” and the operator

must take the appropriate action to

manually handle this message.

2. A message that has been admitted via

the ADMIT function followed by a

RECALL, RETRACE or NEW FLIGHT

PLAN action, is moved to the LOCAL

queue.

3. The message reappears after the

RECALL, RETRACE or NEW FLIGHT

PLAN action is completed.

4. The NETWORK queue function key

changes to SEND FP for a flight plan has

been admitted using the NETWORK

function.

E. The FLIGHT PLAN function allows the

operator to manually enter a flight plan into

the FDPN for processing.

F. The SUPPL function allows the operator to

view or enter supplementary data that is

sent with an ICAO flight plan.

G. The ROUTE/FIXES function allows the

operator to:

1. Enter the appropriate RID number;

ATOS 4-38

453.2 C. Note:

If the workstation or the system fails, all messages

in the LOCAL queue are lost.

Original


2. to search for and enter the appropriate

route/fix by using the dialogue box that

opens if the RID field is blank or contains

“N”. (N)

3. Use the “↑↓” key to swap the LOC RTE

and ROUTE fields.

H. The ZOOM function allows the operator to

display the contents of the LOC RTE,

ROUTE and FIXES fields in the text window.

Data in this window can not be edited. (N)

I. The RAW function undoes the ZOOM

function and returns the text window to the

normal mode.

J. The RECALL function recalls a flight plan by

entering the aircraft identification. Using the

recall function will change the RECALL

button to a RETURN button. (N)

K. The RETURN button, as activated in 1.2.10,

allows the operator to action the flight plan

to NFDPS as a modification, edition or

cancellation.

L. The RETRACE function lists the history of

all actions on a flight plan processed

through the system with the following

conditions: (N)

1. The RETRACE function can be initiated

entering the aircraft identification or the

word “MESSAGE”. (N)

2. The RETRACE function will open a

secondary window that lists all the

actions taken on the selected flight plan

from which the operator can select the

appropriate message. (N)

3. Messages are archived in the system

based on a moving 24 hour window. The

operator must ensure that the message

selected is from the current day. (N)

M. The SEND FP function is enabled by

processing a flight plan admitted from the

NETWORK queue or when processing a

new FLIGHT PLAN. (N)

N. The following conditions apply to the SEND

FP function:

1. The SEND FP action will send the

information shown in the flight plan

template section of the FDPN screen.

ATOS 4-39

453.2 G. 2. Note:

The operator may change the ENTRY and/or EXIT

fields without affecting the DEP/DEST fields in the

flight plan template.

453.2 H. Note:

This feature is useful to display routes and fixes that

are too long to be fully displayed in the normal

window mode.

453.2 J. Note:

For more than one flight plan under the same

aircraft identification, the system will open another

window listing all the flight plans and allowing the

operator to select the desired flight plan.

453.2 L. Note:

All flight plan actions processed through the system

are archived in the Redirector-Archiver Playback

(RAP).

453.2 L. 1. Note:

When retracing a flight plan by entering the word

“MESSAGE”, the operator must recognize the

appropriate message by the time of the message

was sent.

453.2 L. 2. Note:

The latest or most current message is at the bottom

of the list.

453.2 L. 3. Note:

Messages that come in while the system is not

operating will not be archived.

453.2 M. Note:

The ADMIT button changes to a SEND FP button.

Original


2. The SEND FP action will open a

secondary window listing the links or

AFTN addresses that can be selected as

message destinations.

3. The link or AFTN address selected will

direct the system to encode the

message in the appropriate format for

the selected destination.

4. The route field is expanded from 102

characters sent to 150 characters sent

by the use of face brackets {} to identify

the portion of route to be sent.

5. Supplementary data may be sent by

selecting the Supplementary box on the

template.

O. The TEXT feature allows the operator to

format and send a message on the AFTN

circuit. The LOAD feature is used to change

addresses on messages.

P. The SEND MSG feature is enabled when

using the TEXT feature. The ADMIT button

changes to SEND MSG when entering data

into the TEXT window with the following

conditions:

1. The SEND MSG window will send the

data shown in the TEXT window.

2. The message addresses must be

selected from the addresses available in

the TEXT window address listing.

3. The ADIS window will allow the operator

to format a message as if using a normal

AFTN system.

Q. The VALIDATE function allows the operator

to have FDPN send a message to the

NFDPS for data validation before using the

SEND FP to process the message to the

NFDPS.

R. The PRINT function allows the operator to

make a hard copy of a flight plan or

message by sending the message to the

system printer.

ATOS 4-40

Original


460 GAATS AFTN MESSAGE EXTRACTOR

SYSTEM - GAMES

461 GAMES PROCEDURES/

CHARACTERISTICS

461.1

GAMES is a windows operated PC system

which accepts AFTN messages that it reads

from the AFTN network and is able to format

messages for automatic input to the GAATS

system. GAMES also has the ability to send

messages on the AFTN network and store

data.

461.2

GAMES consists of two operator controlled

displays:

A. the GAMES editor (or main screen) which

displays the incoming AFTN message at the

top and the GAMES translation (if any) at

the bottom; and

B. the GAATS Terminal or split screen which

displays the incoming AFTN message at the

top and a GAATS screen at the bottom.

461.3

Flight plans or estimates that GAMES cannot

translate successfully due to errors must be

manually processed. The processing can occur

in one of two ways:

A. correcting the data on the main screen that

GAMES extracted and then entering the info

into GAATS; or

B. entering all the info manually into GAATS via

the split screen mode.

461.4

All received AFTN messages are time/date

stamped and stored on hard disk for one month

before being overwritten by new messages. All

stored messages can be reviewed with the

“Browse” menu and may also be printed as

required.

ATOS 4-41

Original


461.5

GAMES incorporates a number of tables and

VSPs which may be operator or site adjusted to

allow certain GAMES characteristics to meet

local requirements.

461.6

Priority messages such as MEDEVAC flights,

SS messages, CPLs, etc. produce a visual and

audible alarm when received and are given

processing priority.

461.7

The figure below is an example of a GAMES

editor display with the incoming AFTN message

displayed on the upper window and the lower

window showing the translation of that

message suitable for entry into GAATS.

(FPL-COA063-IS

-DC10/H-SGHRWXY/C

-LEMD1005

-N0497F290 NVS UA43 AMR/N0491F310 UN733 STG DCT

45N010W/M084F310 50N020W/M0840F330 NAT F

CYMON N142B ALLEX DCT ALB V213 SAX DCT

-KEWR0731 KPHL

-EET/RGGX0103 020W0207 CZQX0257 040W0341

050W0429 CYMON0458 CZQM0532 KZBW0620 REG/

N13067 SEL/HMDG COM/TCAS RMK/AGCS DOF/000420 )

EFPW COA063

DC10/* LEMD 1005 084 33 207 F CYM NA142B :FPR

CYMON N142B ALLEX ALB V213 SAX: KEWR

462 MAIN SCREEN

462.1

The main screen consists of the Taskbar, AFTN

Status, Message number, Alarm Indicators,

System Time and Processing Pages.

462.2

The taskbar enables fast action to VSPs and

common system utilities such as message

handling/transmission utilities.

ATOS 4-42

Original


462.3

The AFTN Status Bar is located below the

Taskbar. When the connection to AFTN is

online , the light is green and reads “AFTN

Online”. When the connection is off-line, the

light is red and reads “AFTN Offline”. When the

connection is on-line but there has been no

activity for 2 minutes the light is red and reads

“AFTN not polling”.

462.4

The message number shows the number for

the message that is being displayed. Each

message is assigned a message number when

it is received. The first message to arrive on a

day is message number one, the second is

number two and soon.

462.5

All messages that have an Alarm Indicator

associated with it must be processed manually.

The messages in the manual queue are sorted

by message type with the following priority:

A. EMG messages (special condition i.e.

MEDEVAC;

B. DPSN messages (Departing soon);

C. CPL messages (eastbound estimates); and

D. all other messages (including FPLs).

462.6

Emergency messages contain one of these

strings: (N)

A. “(EMG” , “/#” , or “MEDEVAC” or

B. have a priority indicator of “SS” or “DD”.

When Games receives an EMG message the

message is put directly into the manual queue,

the EMG button will flash between yellow and

red, and an alarm beeping sound will be made.

462.7

Departing Soon messages: (N)

A. are of FPL type;

B. are Gander FIR departures; and

ATOS 4-43

462.6 Note 1:

The alarm beeping sound can be adjusted to the

desired frequency for optimum hearing. The volume

cannot be adjusted.

462.6 Note 2:

Clicking on the EMG button when it's flashing brings

up the first message in the manual queue and

makes the button stop flashing.

462.7 Note:

Clicking on the DPSN button when it's flashing

brings up the first message in the manual queue

and makes the button stop flashing.

Original


C. have a departure time less than one hour

from the current GAMES system time.

When GAMES puts a DPSN message into the

manual queue the DPSN button will toggle

between yellow and red and the alarm beeping

sound will be made. (N)

462.8

When there are one or more CPL messages in

the manual queue, the CPL button will be red.

Clicking on the CPL button when it is red brings

up the first message in the manual queue.

462.9

GAMES System Time is shown on the lower

right-hand corner of the screen. The GAMES

system clock should usually be set to the

GAATS system clock so that message times

are consistent with GAATS processing times.

462.10

The Processing Pages contain all of the

components applicable to receiving, translating,

sending, filtering and editing messages for

GAATS.

463 PROCESSING PAGES

463.1

The Processing Pages consist of the Manual

Processing, Auto Processing, Recall Messages

and AFTN Link Pages.

463.2

The manual Message Processing Page

provides buttons and fields for manual message

processing. A database Navigator Bar is used

to navigate through the Manual queue. To the

left of the Navigator Bar the status, message

count and current message are displayed along

with the Extract button. (N)

463.3

The Automatic Message Processing page

normally requires no user interaction and is

provided so the automatic message processing

can be monitored. CPLs are placed ahead of

FPL and CNL messages.

ATOS 4-44

463.2 Note:

Use the Extract button to retranslate the current

message. Pressing the button forces a translation

even if the message was not originally translated. If

the message type is not recognized, then the

message is translated as an FPL.

Original


463.4

The Recall Message Page is used to recall a

message from the recall queue. A database

Navigator Bar resides under the AFTN

Message window which lets the user navigate

through the Recall Queue.

463.5

Message count and current message number

are displayed on the information bar. The

message count refers to the total number of

messages that meet the current filter

conditions. The current message refers to the

current number within the entire recall queue. A

status display next to the navigator bar displays

the status of the current message.

463.6

If the message displayed on the Recall

Message page is not the message you require

then you can “look” for the message from this

page in one of two ways:

A. look through the recall buffer using the

navigator bar to move forward or back; or

B. input the text string (or portion of) in the

“Search For” box and then push the search

button. (N)

463.7

The “Move to Manual” button will transfer the

current message (the message that is being

displayed) to the Manual Queue. The message

can then be processed by returning to the

Manual Processing page. (N)

463.8

The “Move to Auto” button will transfer the

current message to the Auto Queue. These

messages will be processed automatically. If an

error is encountered during processing of an

automatic message it will be sent to the Manual

Queue.

463.9

There are 2 drop-down list boxes which provide

message filters:

ATOS 4-45

463.6 B. Note:

In doing a search the user should always go to the

top of the file first. To go to the top of the file you

have to press the “first” button in the navigator bar. If

you are not at the top of the file the search will start

from the message that is currently being displayed.

463.7 Note:

If the button is focused then holding down the 'enter'

button will cause messages to be continuously sent

to the Manual Queue, allowing a large number of

messages to be transferred.

Original


A. the queue filter allows messages to be

filtered

according to which queue they came from:

AUTO/MANUAL - messages from both

queues

AUTO - messages from the Auto Queue

only

MANUAL - messages from the Manual

Queue

B. the type filter allows messages to be filtered

according to their type:

ALL MSGS - any type of message

CPL - CPL messages

FPL - FPL messages

EMG - messages marked as EMG type

CNL - cancellation messages

463.10

The AFTN Link page shows the message

received from the AFTN. This component is

read-only and is provided so that the line can

be monitored.

464 GAATS MSVS

464.1

The GAATS MSVs are accessible through the

Taskbar. When the GAATS MSV button is

clicked, the GAATS MSV menu is displayed and

the Manual GAATS terminal becomes visible.

The GAATS MSVs that can be accessed

through this menu are:

A. Review/Update North Atlantic track data;

B. Set DOS system time;

C. Update the table of NARS; and

D. Update the table of FIXES.

464.2

The Review/Update North Atlantic Track Data

table displays the result of the last North

Atlantic Track update. This is the current status

of the GAMES NAT data. The time of the last

update is shown.

ATOS 4-46

Original


464.3

When “Update the NAT data from GAATS” is

clicked, it will cause OTMN and OTMD

commands to be issued on the Manual GAATS

terminal display. An advisement dialog box is

displayed while the operation continues. To exit

this menu click on “close”.

464.4

The data received from GAATS is examined by

GAMES and four types of tracks are identified

and stored, namely:

A. All eastbound tracks which lie at or north of

54N at 50W.

B. All eastbound tracks which lie at or south of

45N at 50W or which lie south of 43N at

60W.

C. All westbound tracks containing a 60W

coordinate.

D. All westbound tracks outside the ADT limits.

464.5

The track data can be seen on the display as it

is received. Click the “OK” to exit.

464.6

The purpose of identifying these particular

tracks is to aid GAMES in extracting flight plans

or in issuing an EDM command as follows:

A. For all eastbound flights at or north of 54N

at 50W, the flight level specified at 60W will

be used or the point prior to 50W if 60W is

not available.

B. For eastbound flights south of 45N at 50W

or at south of 43N at 60W an EDM

command will be issued.

C. For all westbound flights containing a 60W

coordinate, only the first domestic Fix is

needed, any additional fixes are discarded.

D. Westbound flights outside the ADT limits

must always be translated but westbound

flights inside the limits are to be translated

only if VSP “translate Inside ADT Limits” is

enabled. If certain tracks have been

successfully identified then they will be

listed as being westbound tracks outside the

ADT limits.

ATOS 4-47

Original


464.7

If no tracks are identified then the comment

“None...No tracks specified” will appear. Finally,

if an OTM command fails (GAATS has no tracks

defined or the link from GAMES to GAATS has

failed) then the advisement “None...OTMN

command failed” will be presented.

464.8

Update the GAMES track table using the NAT

Data menu whenever the tracks are changed in

GAATS.

464.9

The set time menu allows the operator to set

the system clock to the current GAATS time and

date. The time can be set using the GAATS

time by clicking “update time from GAATS” or

manually by clicking “update time manually”.

(N)

464.10

The “Update the table of NARS” option is used

to update the GAMES table of NARS from

GAATS. Selecting this option causes a “Help

NAR” command to be issued in the Manual

GAATS terminal display. (N)

464.11

The “update the Table of Fixes” option is used

to update the GAMES table of fixes from

GAATS. Selecting this option causes a “Help

Fix” command to be issued in the Manual

GAATS terminal display. (N)

465 SYSTEM MSV

465.1

GAMES has a series of tables and forms which

are used during the translation of flight plan

messages and in its interaction with GAATS

and the AFTN network. All tables are accessed

through the MSV button. The MSV MENU

allows you to select and view any table. (N)

465.2

The MSV MENU is divided into the following

VSP menus:

A. CPL and FPL VSPs;

ATOS 4-48

464.9 Note:

It is recommended that the GAMES time be

updated using the “update time from GAATS”

option. When using this option the ATOS will be

prompted with a choice of either “Use Last Report”

or ”Use Next Report”. It is more accurate to use the

“next report”.

464.10 Note:

The “Update the Table of NARS” option should

always be used following a reboot.

464.11 Note:

The “update the Table of Fixes” option should

always be used following a reboot.

465.1 Note:

A hint indicating the button's full name appears

underneath it when the mouse cursor is placed over

it.

Original


B. FPL VSPs;

C. GENERAL VSPs;

D. CPL VSPs; and

E. AFTN VSPs.

Each of the above menus have been further

divided into tables.

465.3

The “CPL and FPL VSP” menu contains the

following tables:

A. 2 Fix Easterly NAR Definitions (EAST NAR

button);

B. Aerodromes for Route Direction (ROUTE

DIREC button);

C. Enable/Disable Printer Messages (PRINT

MSGS button); and

D. RVSM/MNPS Menu (RVSMMNPS button).

465.4

The EAST NAR table defines NARs or airways

to be used for eastbound FPLs or CPLs

containing direct routes and for which no NAR

has been specified. (N)

465.5

The Route Direc table is used in determining

the route direction for domestic flights. The

entries in this table must be listed according to

location. (N)

465.6

The Print MSGs table lists the types of error

messages which can be configured to be

printed, or not, as desired.

465.7

The RVSMMNPS table defines the characters

in the ICAO field 10 of FPLs which GAMES will

replace with either a W, X, or * in the type field

of the message sent to GAATS, in accordance

with the equipment.

465.8

The “FPL VSP” menu contains the following

tables:

A. automatic EFP menu (Auto EFP button);

B. Table of ACIDs for Automatic EFPs (AUTO

ACIDs button);

ATOS 4-49

465.4 Note:

The fixes must be listed such that FIX2 is the fix

east of FIX1. Up to 1,000 NARs can be defined.

465.5 Note:

The order is west to east, with the west most entries

at the top of the table and the east most at the

bottom. Each designator is 4 characters.

Original


C. Table of Gander Domestic Fixes (DOM

FIXES button);

D. Aerodrome to NA Entry Point Times (NA

Entry button);

E. Table of Non-Jet Aircraft Types (Non Jet AC

button);

F. Departure Aerodromes Use Table for ETA

Times (ETA Time button);

G. Departure Times for EDM Command (Time

EDM button);

H. Departure Aerodromes for EDM Command

(AERO EDM button);

I. Two Fix Direct Westerly NAR Definitions

(WEST NAR button); and

J. Gander FIR Table (YQX FIR button).

465.9

The Auto EFP table allows selection of the type

of FPL flights that will be processed

automatically in AUTOFPL mode.

465.10

The AUTO ACIDs table is used to define ACIDs

of FPL that are known to have few errors for

automatic EFP processing. Only flights which

have ACIDs that are in this table will be

processed automatically by the AUTOFPL

process. (N)

465.11

The DOM FIX table is used to define Gander

domestic fixes. These fixes are used to

determine whether a westerly FPL should have

a NAR assigned to it. (N)

465.12

The NA Entry table is used to estimate the time

to be entered in the ETA field when:

A. the FPL's departure is in the “Departure

Aerodromes Use Table for ETA Time”, or

B. suitable information is not available in the

EET string of the AFTN message.

465.13

The Non Jet AC table defines the aircraft types

which GAMES recognizes as being non-jet

aircraft. (N)

ATOS 4-50

465.10 Note:

The use of the symbol “*” indicates that all flights will

be processed automatically.

465.11 Note:

If an FPL does not contain a NAR but does contain

a fix defined in the Gander Domestic Fix table then

an attempt will be made to assign a NAR from the

Westerly NAR Definition table.

465.13 Note:

GAMES extracts “knots” for aircraft speed if the

aircraft type is in the table. If not, then GAMES uses

“mach” for speed.

Original


465.14

The ETA Time table defines departure

aerodromes for flights which will obtain their

ETA time from the “Aerodrome to NA Entry

Point Times” table rather than from the EET

string.

465.15

The TIME EDM table allows a time interval to

be defined for easterly flights. If the departure

time of an easterly flight falls within the defined

interval, an EDM command will be

automatically issued after the flight plan has

been entered into GAATS if the flight is oceanic.

465.16

The AERO EDM table contains a list of

departure aerodromes which will cause an

EDM command to be automatically issued

when a flight plan has been entered into

GAATS. (N)

465.17

The West NAR table defines NARs or airways

to be used for westbound FPLs with direct

routes (Fix1 dct Fix2) and for which no NAR has

been specified. The flight must also contain a

Gander domestic fix as specified in the “Table

of Gander Domestic Fixes”. The “dct”

separating the fixes is optional on westbound

flights. (N)

465.18

The YQX FIR table contains a list of

aerodromes that are marked with “FIR DEPT”

status when a FPL is received with a departure

from those aerodromes. (N)

465.19

The General VSP menu contains the following

tables:

A. System VSPs (VSP button);

B. ALARM Tone (Alarm Tone button);

C. Beginning of Remarks Symbol (REM

Design button); and

D. Machine Name (GAMES ID button).

ATOS 4-51

465.16 Note:

This table overrides the “Departure Times for EDM

Command” table.

465.17 Note:

The fixes must be listed such that Fix1 is the fix west

of Fix2.

465.18 Note:

Scheduled Gander departures are an exception,

they are not marked as “FIR DEPT”. Scheduled

Gander departures are defined as flights for which

the leftmost 3 characters of the ACID are one of:

ARN, CME, LAL or SPR.

Original


465.20

The VSPs table allows for the enabling or

disabling of various settings:

A. the Translate low level VSP determines

whether or not flight plans below 27

thousand feet will be automatically

translated;

B. the Translate inside ADT Limits VSP

determines whether or not Westbound flight

plans inside ADT limits will be automatically

translated;

C. the Enable Auto PFP command VSP

determines whether or not a PFP command

will be issued automatically. The command

is issued after the EDM command is used;

D. the Enable Auto EDM command for West

flights outside ADT limit VSP allows the

EDM command to be automatically issued

for westbound FPLs outside the ADT limit;

E. the MSG Filter allows for the inclusion or

exclusion of messages received from the

AFTN. The “ALL” button allows for all

messages to be processed; the “ODD”

button allows for only odd numbered msgs

to be processed; the “EVEN” button allows

for only even numbered msgs to be

processed; and the “NONE” button excludes

all msgs from being processed; (N)

F. the CPL AUTO button allows for CPL

messages to be processed automatically;

(N)

G. the FPL auto button allows for FPL

messages to be processed automatically.

(N)

465.21

The Alarm Tone can be adjusted with the slide

bar. The user can only adjust the frequency and

not the volume.

465.22

The REM DESIGN button allows for the

definition of what GAATS will recognize as the

beginning of flight plan remarks. (N)

ATOS 4-52

465.20 E. Note 1:

Except those messages disallowed by the

“Message types to be dropped” table.

465.20 E. Note 2:

One purpose of this VSP is to provide a convenient

means of dividing the workload of data entry

between two systems. During busy times one

system can be set to “EVEN” and a second to

“ODD”.

465.20 F. Note:

If the attempt to enter a CPL automatically fails, the

message is sent to the manual queue.

465.20 G. Note:

If the attempt to enter a FPL automatically fails, the

message is sent to the manual queue.

465.22 Note:

In Gander the remarks symbol is “;”.

Original


465.23

The GAMES ID button allows for the numbering

of the various GAMES machines at the

workstation. The machine name will be

included with printed error messages to

indicate on which machine the error occurred.

465.24

The CPL VSPs menu contains the following

tables:

A. Domestic Fixes and 50W Points (DOM/50W

button);

B. Direct Routes to Ocean Fix Table (Direct

OCN button); and

C. West-East Fix Table (W-E FIX button).

465.25

The DOM/50W table is used in the decoding of

CPL messages to determine a 50W point when

the flight is oceanic but no oceanic route has

been included in the message. (N)

465.26

The DIRECT OCN table is used in the decoding

of CPL messages to determine a NAR when:

A. no NAR has been provided in the message;

and

B. no NAR can be found using the NAR lookup

table (created using “UPDATE THE TABLE

OF NARS”); and

C. no NAR can be found by using the “TWO

FIX DIRECT EASTERLY NAR

DEFINITIONS” table; and

D. the domestic fix must be west of the

estimate fix as determined by entries in the

WEST-EAST FIX table. (N)

465.27

The W-E FIX table is used in the decoding of

CPL messages to note when the last domestic

fix is west of the entry point fix. For this situation

the DIRECT ROUTES TO OCEAN FIX table

can then be used to find a NAR. (N)

465.28

The AFTN VSPs menu contains the following

tables:

ATOS 4-53

465.25 Note:

The table is indexed by the last domestic fix

provided in the CPL message to obtain a 50W point

for inclusion as the ocean route portion of the EFP.

465.26 D. Note:

The route is determined using the estimate fix and

the 50W coordinate.

465.27 Note:

Entries must be made with the fixes ordered from

west to east, west being at the top of the table.

Original


A. Message types to be dropped (Msg Drop

button);

B. Table of Valid CPL Source Addressed (CPL

Source button);

C. Table of Transmit Addresses Menu (Tx

Address button);

D. AFTN Transmission Identifiers (AFTN TIDs

button).

465.29

The MSG Drop table allows the ATOS to drop

certain message types. Some messages are of

no interest to the ATOS so this table allows for

these message types to be dropped. (N)

465.30

The CPL Source table allows the ATOS to

identify only those addresses that it wishes to

receive CPLs for automatic processing. All

others will be placed in the manual queue. The

status box will be red and will read “BAD CPL”.

465.31

The TX Address table is used to define

commonly used transmit addresses. The

addresses shown in the table will be the

addresses which can be selected from a list of

addresses when preparing a message for

transmission on the AFTN network. (N)

465.32

The AFTN TIDs table is used to identify the

AFTN switch (or computer), the station

(Gander) and the AFTN circuit for each port. In

order to receive and transmit messages. The

TID values shown in the AFTN Transmission

Identifiers menu (TIDs) must agree exactly with

the actual values used by the AFTN circuit

connected to the AFTN port.

466 FLOPPY DISK UTILITIES

466.1

You may access the Floppy Disk Utilities menu

by clicking on the “Floppy Disk” button on the

main screen. The Floppy Disk Utilities are:

A. Save AFTN Messages to Floppy Disk;

ATOS 4-54

465.29 Note:

The message types that can be dropped are : DEP;

POS; DLA; CHG; COR; CNL; MIS; RPE; and CPL.

As well as these message types, it is possible to

drop all messages destined for address:

CYQXZZZX.

465.31 Note:

Because up to three addresses can be added per

line, it makes it possible to enter commonly used

combinations of addresses.

Original


B. Save Current System Parameters to Floppy

Disk;

C. Recall AFTN Messages from Floppy Disk;

D. Recall System Parameters from Floppy

Disk.

The first and third lines of this menu allow day

files of AFTN messages to be stored and

retrieved from floppy disk. The current GAMES

status (the current settings for all tables and

VSPs) can also be saved and later recalled

from floppy using the second and fourth lines of

the menu.

467 BROWSE MENU

467.1

You use the Browse menu to view messages

that have been sent or received for the selected

day. (N)

468 PRINT MENU

468.1

The Print menu provides two print options. The

first option is to print user-selected messages

from any “day file” of received AFTN messages,

the second is to invoke the “print screen”

function.

469 TRANSMIT MENU

469.1

The Transmit Message menu provides access

to functions connected with the preparation and

transmission of AFTN messages. The following

options are available in the transmit message

menu:

A. NEW;

B. Rx_Old;

C. Tx_Old.

ATOS 4-55

467.1 Note:

The Rx and Tx messages will be displayed by

launching wordpad and the message file can be

searched, saved, etc using the wordpad features.

The file being viewed is a copy of the day file for the

selected day, so making changes and clicking on

save will not affect the actual file.

Original


469.2

By choosing the NEW button a window will

appear that is blank except for the message

priority (FF is the default) and the DTG and

senders address. The ATOS then fill in the body

of the message along with the address the

message has to be sent to. (N)

469.3

Upon selecting the Tx_OLD button you will be

asked to select a transmit message for a day.

You may use the day field to enter a day of the

month and then press the “LOAD DAY” button.

If a file exists for that day, a window will open

with a default message loaded. If the day

chosen is the current day, then the initial

message loaded will be the current message in

the manual queue. If the day chosen is some

other day, or the manual queue is empty, then

the day loaded will be the last message for the

day chosen. As well, other messages for the

day chosen can be selected by using the spin

box and pressing the LOAD MSG button. (N)

469.4

By selecting the Rx_OLD button, a window

similar to the Transmit An Old Transmitted

Message window opens. The same steps apply.

469.5

The Address button is used to bring up the

Address Selection form. It contains the list of

addresses in the Table of Transmit Addresses.

Addresses can be selected by clicking on them

or by moving the current position with the arrow

up/down keys and selecting/deselecting items

with the “spacebar”. When the “OK” button is

clicked, the selected addresses are added to

the message. (N)

469.6

Pressing the SEND button will send the

message to the AFTN.

ATOS 4-56

469.2 Note:

Clicking the “TO AFTN” button on the manual page

brings up the same form that appears for the editing

of a new message, only with the currently displayed

message filled in.

469.3 Note:

The same editing functions are available as in the

Edit A New Transmit Message editor box.

469.5 Note:

If the message had addresses in it which appear in

the address list, which are not selected when the

“OK” button is clicked, they are removed. Any

duplicate addresses are also removed.

Original


470 GAATS INTERFACE

471 GENERAL

471.1

GAMES can issue several types of commands

to GAATS, namely: EFP, EDM, PFP, EST, and

XFP. (N)

471.2

GAMES provides keys to control the passing of

messages between the various GAATS

terminal positions.

A. For the GAATS terminal, these keys are

mapped as follows:

F1 Queue 1

F2 Queue 2

F3 Queue 3

F4 Queue 4

F11 View MSG

F12 Ack MSG

DEL Clear MSG

END Prev MSG

PAGE DOWN Next MSG

B. Other keys used by the GAATS terminals

are:

ACTION INSERT

CARRIAGE RETURN ENTER

C. The three radio buttons shown on the

bottom of the manual page: SLOW,

NORMAL and FAST, refer to the GAATS

manual terminal speed. It may be necessary

to adjust this speed to match the speed at

which GAATS is responding at a given time.

471.3

The EFP command is issued either by the

Automatic Process or the Manual process for

an FPL AFTN message. (N)

ATOS 4-57

471.1 Note:

The EST command is issued while processing CPL

messages and may require EFP or EFP/NEW

commands as well.

471.3 Note:

GAMES processes FPL messages automatically by

issuing EFP, XFP (if applicable) and EFP/NEW

commands to GAATS.

Original


471.4

When a message is in the Manual queue it can

be edited in the GAMES editor window. After

editing is completed press the “TO GAATS”

button or the ACTION(INSERT) key to have the

message sent to GAATS.

471.5

For Automatic processing no operator

interaction is needed. The steps taken by

GAMES are essentially the same as for the

manual mode, however, if an error occurs the

message is placed in the manual queue to

await manual intervention.

471.6

The EDM command will be issued for:

A. westbound FPLs if:

1. The plan is outside the ADT limits and

VSP “Enable Auto EDM Command for

West Flts Outside ADT limit” is enabled;

or

2. The departure aerodrome appears in the

“Departure Aerodrome for EDM

Command” table.

B. eastbound FPLs if:

1. The arrival aerodrome does not start

with “CY”; and

a. the flight passes at or south of 43N at

60W;

b. the flight passes south of 45N at 50W;

or

c. the departure time is in the range

specified in the “Departure Time for

EDM Command” table; or

2. The departure aerodrome appears in the

“Departure Aerodromes for EDM

Command” table.

471.7

The PFP command will be issued after an EDM

command if both the following conditions are

met:

A. The flight plan is westerly outside the ADT

limits; and

B. The VSP “Enable Auto PFP Command” is

set to “YES”. (N)

ATOS 4-58

471.7 B. Note:

This command is now automated in both Automatic

and Manual processing and cannot be aborted.

Original


471.8

The EST command can be issued either by the

Automatic process or the Manual process for a

CPL AFTN message. The translation of the

CPL in the GAMES editor window is formatted

for an EST command. GAMES also prepares

an EFP command which it will use in the event

no flight plan has been entered into GAATS for

the flight.

471.9

For manual processing the following steps

apply: (N)

A. If necessary, edit the EST command fields

shown in the GAMES editor;

B. Press the “TO GAATS” button or the

“ACTION” key. The data is then

automatically typed into GAATS;

C. If GAATS has no flight plan it will build one

from the CPL using the EFP or EFP/NEW

command. GAMES will then re-issue the

EST command.

D. If there are multiple flight plans, GAMES

automatically selects the one with the same

Dept and Dest as the CPL message. If one

cannot be found with the same Dept/Dest

then it is considered as no flight plan and

step C. is followed.

ATOS 4-59

471.9 Note 1:

If GAATS has no flight plan it will build one from the

CPL using the EFP or EFP/NEW command.

GAMES will then re-issue the EST command.

471.9 Note 2:

If there are multiple flight plans, GAMES

automatically selects the one with the same Dept

and Dest as the CPL message. If one cannot be

found with the same Dept/Dest then it is considered

as no flight plan and 471.9 Note 1. is followed.

471.9 Note 3:

During the EST command GAMES confirms that the

filed flight plan ocean route is the same as the EST

route. If they differ the EST command completes

and the comment “NOT FPR” and the CPL route are

added to the EST remarks.

471.9 Note 4:

When the first attempt to issue an EST command

completes, GAMES sends an acknowledge

message via AFTN back to the address which

originated the CPL.

471.9 Note 5:

GAMES automatically switches back to display the

message editor and deletes the message just

processed.

Original


E. During the EST command GAMES confirms

that the filed flight plan ocean route is the

same as the EST route. If they differ the

EST command completes and the comment

“NOT FPR” and the CPL route are added to

the EST remarks.

F. When the first attempt to issue an EST

command completes, GAMES sends an

acknowledge message via AFTN back to

the address which originated the CPL.

G. GAMES automatically switches back to

display the message editor and deletes the

message just processed.

H. The next message is now ready for

processing.

471.10

For Automatic processing no operator

interaction is required. The steps taken by

GAMES are essentially the same as for manual

mode except there is no chance for an ATOS to

correct errors which may occur. The steps are:

A. GAMES will go through the steps in 471.9

with no ATOS intervention needed, and

B. Once GAMES returns it begins processing

the next message if there is one.

471.11

GAMES issues an acknowledge message via

AFTN for every CPL message it receives. The

response is sent back to the address where the

CPL message originated. The only exception is

when GAMES is operated in manual mode and

an ATOS deletes a CPL message before it has

been processed by GAMES.

471.12

Only one acknowledge message is issued per

CPL message. (R)

471.13

If the message is successfully transmitted to

AFTN the message is stored to disk.

ATOS 4-60

471.12 Reference:

The CPL and ACP messages are described in the

ON LINE DATA-INTERCHANGE (OLDI) document

“NAT SPG OLDI v1.2 Oct 94”.

Original


471.14

When a CNL message comes in, the ACID,

Departure and Destination are extracted from it.

If Auto FPL processing is enabled, GAMES will

send the CNL message to the automatic queue,

otherwise it will send it to the manual queue.

471.15

GAMES will check that the flight exists and is in

a valid state to be cancelled. If the flight is found

to be in a valid state, then GAMES will issue an

XFP (cancel flight plan) command to delete the

flight plan.

471.16

If the CNL command encounters an error

during auto processing, it sends the message

to the manual queue.

471.17

If the CNL command encounters an error

during manual processing, the contents of the

terminal are left on the screen. The message

will then have to be erased manually.

ATOS 4-61

Original


PART 5 — RESERVED

INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

ATOS 5-1

2005-09-29


PART 6 — GANDER AUTOMATED AIR TRAFFIC SYSTEM

600 _ GAATS

601 GENERAL

602 GAATS HARDWARE

603 PROCESSOR SUBSYSTEM

604 DISPLAY AND DATA ENTRY SUBSYSTEM

605 STRIP AND CONSOLE PRINTER SUBSYSTEM

606 PERIPHERAL CONTROL SUBSYSTEM

607 COMMUNICATIONS SUBSYSTEM

608 DATA TRANSMISSION

609 OPERATING PARAMETERS

610 _ SYSTEM FUNCTIONS

611 OPERATIONAL REQUIREMENTS

612 GAATS MAJOR DATA FLOW

613 USER-SYSTEM INTERFACE

614 GAATS DATA LINKS

620 _ OPERATIONAL COMMANDS (GAATS-2/1)

621 OPERATIONAL COMMANDS

622 SUPPORT COMMANDS (GAATS-2/2)

623 OPERATIONAL COMMAND DESCRIPTIONS

630 _ FLIGHT PROGRESS STRIP PRODUCTION AND FORMAT

631 FLIGHT PROGRESS STRIP PRODUCTION

632 PLANNER AND PLANNER ASSIGNED STRIPS

633 DOMESTIC FLIGHT PROGRESS STRIPS

634 OCEANIC FLIGHT PROGRESS STRIPS

635 STRIP MANAGEMENT MESSAGES

640 _ OPERATIONAL SUPPORT FUNCTIONS

641 GENERAL

642 MET MODEL

643 FIX TIME CALCULATIONS

644 CONFLICT PREDICTION

650 _ RESERVED AIRSPACE

651 GENERAL

652 ICAO RESERVED AIRSPACE

653 OTS RESERVED AIRSPACE

654 FUNCTIONS OF THE RAS PROGRAM

655 MINIMUM TIME TRACK CALCULATIONS

660 _ TIME BASED FUNCTIONS

661 GENERAL

662 TIME BASED FUNCTION DESCRIPTIONS

670 _ GAATS FLIGHT DATA STATES

671 GENERAL

ATOS 6-1

Original


680 _ NORTH AMERICAN ROUTES (FOR NORTH ATLANTIC TRAFFIC) (NAR)

681 NAR ROUTE SELECTION

682 CHANGES TO NAR

683 CLEARANCES

684 OCEANIC CONTROL

INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

ATOS 6-2

Original


PART 6 — GANDER AUTOMATED AIR TRAFFIC SYSTEM

600 GAATS

601 GENERAL

601.1

The GAATS is designed to aid Air Traffic

Controllers with the control of trans-oceanic

aircraft over the North Atlantic, by:

A. storing flight plans for each aircraft;

B. producing flight progress strips as required;

and

C. using a weather model to calculate fix times

and conflict predictions.

601.2

Data links join GAATS to: (N)

A. Prestwick, Scotland;

B. associated ATS systems such as NFDPS,

RDPS, IFSS;

C. the Canadian Meteorological Centre (CMC)

Montreal;

D. local radar systems;

E. air-ground network;

F. AFTN;

G. AMIS;

H. the Flow Management Unit in London,

England and Brest, France; and

I. ACTS at the Time Standard Laboratory in

Ottawa.

601.3

Positions within the Air Traffic Control Centre

are equipped with a display terminal and

keyboard used for automatic routing and on-line

updating of information within GAATS.

ATOS 6-3

601.2 Note:

The system is expandable to provide future data link

connections with other data banks and networks for

automatic retrieval of required data.

Original


602 GAATS HARDWARE

602.1

Because of the high availability requirements of

the system, a dual processor arrangement is

used with three (3) dual ported disks for mass

data storage. A peripheral control subsystem

allows manual reconfiguration of the system

peripherals in event of failure of a processor.

602.2

The GAATS hardware consists of five

subsystems:

A. Processor subsystem;

B. Display and Data Entry subsystem;

C. Strip and console printer subsystem;

D. Peripheral Control subsystem; and

E. Communications subsystem

603 PROCESSOR SUBSYSTEM

603.1

The processor subsystem consists of two

processors equipped with 16 megabytes of

memory and connected to each other by

interface cards. Each processor has two

removable disks, one internal disk drive, and

one cartridge tape drive.

603.2

A total of 6, 16 line multiplexors are interfaced

to the peripheral changeover unit (PCU) and

each processor to provide connections for the

strip printers, the display and data entry

equipment, and the external communication

links. (N)

604 DISPLAY AND DATA ENTRY

SUBSYSTEM

604.1

A total of 38 positions are equipped with

display-keyboard units connected to the

processor sub-system via the PCU.

ATOS 6-4

603.2 Note:

The PCU allows the peripherals to be switched

automatically from one processor to the other.

Original


605 STRIP AND CONSOLE PRINTER

SUBSYSTEM

605.1

Strip and console printer subsystem consists

of:

A. a sector printer at each operational position

for printing flight progress strips;

B. a printer for printing low-level ocean-related

progress strips; and

C. 2 console (keyboard) printers to provide the

GAATS Support Terminals (GST's) which

are used for GAATS background and utility

functions.

606 PERIPHERAL CONTROL

SUBSYSTEM

606.1

The peripheral control subsystem consists of

six 16 line peripheral control units providing a

number of configuration capabilities as well as

built in test facilities. Any combination of the

peripherals connected to the peripheral control

subsystem may be switched between either

processor. (N)

607 COMMUNICATIONS SUBSYSTEM

607.1

The communications subsystem controls a

number of connections from the processor

subsystem to external communications facilities

such as those listed in 601.2. These data links

consist of a mixture of private lines and

switched network circuits at various data rates

and types of connections.

608 DATA TRANSMISSION

608.1

All peripherals using interfacing via the

peripheral control subsystem will use the

standard 7 bit ASCII code with space parity.

Only the speeds (baud rate) will be different.

ATOS 6-5

606.1 Note:

In the event of a processor failure, all peripherals

will be switched to the other “working” processor. A

full patch panel capability exists with the peripheral

control unit to allow cross patching and/or loopback

of signals providing maximum flexibility for manual

reconfiguration, even in event of failure of the

peripheral control subsystem.

Original


609 OPERATING PARAMETERS

609.1

The GAATS system processes flights that are

operating inside the airspace bounded to the

north by latitude 67N, to the south by latitude

20N, to the west by a set of domestic fixes, and

to the east by a set of landfall fixes.

609.2

The system accepts flights operating in the

speed range of Mach 0.1 to Mach 3.5 or 85 to

2,000 knots and the altitude range of flight level

FL010 or 1,000 feet to FL690.

ATOS 6-6

Original


610 SYSTEM FUNCTIONS

611 OPERATIONAL REQUIREMENTS

611.1

GAATS operational requirements are to: (N)

A. have the ability to respond positively to new

operational requirements as they arise;

B. produce flight progress strips on a timely

basis;

C. provide updated fix times based on accurate

met forecast data;

D. produce minimum time tracks (MTT);

E. store oceanic fixed tracks and NMA routes;

F. provide conflict prediction:

1. for all oceanic flights;

2. for all flights;

G. provide conflict resolution:

1. for eastbound flights;

2. for all flights;

H. provide adequate storage of flight plans;

I. display flight information for planning and

control purposes;

J. automatically display progress reports at the

appropriate ocean sector;

K. provide and display inter-sector flight data

exchange;

L. provide Automatic Data Transfer as listed in

602.2;

M. provide the ability to sectorize and

consolidate, with automatic routing of data;

N. provide identification of all personnel using

the system;

O. identify system component failures;

P. provide statistical data;

Q. provide recording of all system inputs; and

R. provide the ability to accommodate future

changes in operations.

ATOS 6-7

611.1 Note:

The operational requirements listed include those

already met by GAATS as well as those not

currently met.

Original


612 GAATS MAJOR DATA FLOW

612.1

The GAATS is built around one major file, the

“flight record” file. This file is constructed mainly

from flight plans, with additional data from the

organized track table, named fix table, North

American routes table, airways and other

configuration and recorded data. The flight

records are maintained in this file until they are

deleted.

612.2

A flight record consists of:

A. a flight plan;

B. historical data, such as actual route flown;

C. computed information, such as estimates for

reporting points; and

D. flight state which is a dynamic unit of

information describing what condition a

flight record is in.

612.3

The flight record file is built from 6 major

sources:

A. flight plan entry, mainly at data entry;

B. estimates, clearances and position reports

at controller positions;

C. estimates received from Prestwick data link;

D. computed fix times based on meteorological

data;

E. secondary surveillance codes as received

from the radar systems; and

F. other information, such as organized tracks,

from ancillary files.

612.4

Output generated from the flight record file:

A. flight strips and clearance chits, as a result

of a state change;

B. display output to all positions;

C. flight plans and estimates to Prestwick via

the data link;

D. flight plan information to the radar systems

via data links;

E. clearance information to data link equipped

aircraft via the AGCS data link; and

ATOS 6-8

Original


F. various files, such as statistics, and audit

trail.

613 USER-SYSTEM INTERFACE

613.1

The user interacts with the system through:

A. Commands:

1. “Operational Commands” as described

in the Operational Commands document

GAATS-2/1; and

2. “Support Commands” as described in

the Support Commands document

GAATS-2/2.

B. Flight progress strips as described in the

Strip Production and Format document

GAATS-2/10.

614 GAATS DATA LINKS

614.1

SHANWICK OACC FDP LINK — is described

as follows:

A. Used to exchange air traffic control

information, daily track assignments and

estimated track times which affect both

Gander and Prestwick control centres.

B. Gander is responsible to forward information

on eastbound flights that cross 30W and

enter Prestwick's control area.

C. Prestwick is responsible to forward

information on westbound flights that cross

30W and enter Gander's control area.

D. The data link allows automatic exchange of

ATS flight data and control information using

the following types of messages:

1. CLEARANCE — to exchange a flight's

oceanic clearance;

2. FLIGHT CANCELLATION — to cancel a

flight plan previously sent via a CLR

message;

3. MISCELLANEOUS — transmits plain

language and elapsed time messages;

4. NORTH ATLANTIC TRACK — transmit

and receive North Atlantic Track

information;

5. REPEAT — request the repeat of a

message; and

ATOS 6-9

Original


6. TECHNICAL ACKNOWLEDGEMENT —

acknowledgement receipt of a valid

message type and Data Transfer

Number.

E. The Data Transfer Number on each

message consists of a two-letter directional

indicator followed by a three-letter sequence

number that allow for system checks and

future reference.

614.2

AFTN DATA LINK — allows text messages to

be sent between GAATS and any other AFTN

site. Any message type can be sent over the

AFTN link to any other facility on the network.

614.3

AMIS DATA LINK — provides automated

transfer of GAATS-stored flight plan information

to AMIS. Flight plans which may be of interest

to AMIS can be forwarded: (N)

A. automatically by GAATS on a timely basis;

or

B. manually initiated by operational

commands.

614.4

IFSS DATA LINK — is the primary method of

flight data message exchange between GAATS

and oceanic air traffic. The following are the

messages that can be initiated on the GAATS-

IFSS link: (N)

A. by the IFSS:

RCL: Request for clearance;

POS: Position report;

RPE: Revise position estimate;

MIS: Miscellaneous;

SVC: Service information; and

RBK: Readback of aircraft instructions.

B. by GAATS and IFSS:

EMG: Emergency;

ATC: Air Traffic Control; and

MSG: Flight data.

ATOS 6-10

614.3 Note:

The AMIS link is one-way only and information

transmitted by GAATS is never acknowledged.

614.4 Note:

The IFSS acts as a relay between the aircraft and

GANDER ACC. The communication medium

between GAATS and the IFSS is the data link while

the communication is air to ground between the

IFSS and the aircraft.

Original


614.5

AGCS DATA LINK — permits the automatic

exchange of ATS control data with an airborne

aircraft. It is used primarily for eastbound highlevel

oceanic aircraft that have AGCS capability.

GAATS relays an oceanic clearance to the

aircraft on the link and the pilot acknowledges

the message by retransmitting the message to

the sender which allows for confirmation of the

information sent and message received. (N)

614.6

RDPS DATA LINK — permits the automatic

transfer of flight data between GAATS and the

radar processing system. This allows the

automatic correlation and subsequent radar

display of an aircraft's filed flight data entered

into GAATS and the flight data that the aircraft

transmits to the radar system via its

transponder in response to the radar system

query. (N)

614.7

NFDPS INTERFACE — permits the exchange

of flight data between GAATS and NFDPS

which is the flight data processing system used

by adjacent Canadian ACCs. (N)

614.8

COMMON TIME SOURCE LINK — is the link to

the Time Standards Laboratory at the National

Research Council in Ottawa. This link is used

by GAATS to synchronize its internal time base

with UTC by automatically requesting the time

from the CTS system at system startup and

periodically during system operation, to ensure

that the time base remains accurate.

ATOS 6-11

614.5 Note:

The clearance issued is entered into GAATS

database when the controller issues the CLR

command.

614.6 Note:

The following types of messages may by transmitted

from GAATS to RDPS:

CPL: Enter Flight Plan

CNL: Cancel Flight Plan

MOD: Modify Flight Plan

RFC: Flight Plan Refresh Complete

RQX: Request Flight Plan Position Report

614.7 Note:

Messages exchanged between the systems

include:

CPL: Current Flight Plan

MOD: Modify Flight Plan

CNL: Cancel Flight Plan

SSM: Service Status

LAM: Logical Acknowledgement

Original


614.9

FLOW MANAGEMENT UNIT DATA LINK — is

the link that sends flight data information to the

Air Traffic Flow Management Unit in London,

England in order to divert excess oceanic traffic

to the holding areas North or South of the NAT

region. The information flow is one-way only

and is initiated by a GAATS operational

command or by a request from another linked

flight data system. (N)

ATOS 6-12

614.9 Note:

The general criteria for sending a Flow Notification

Message are:

A. the FMU data link is OPEN;

B. the flight is eastbound, oceanic; and

C. the flight transitions to the CLEARED state or an

FMU-related field of a CLEARED flight is

modified.

Original


620 OPERATIONAL COMMANDS

(GAATS-2/1)

621 OPERATIONAL COMMANDS

621.1

The following is a list of operational commands

available to the system user (controller or

ATOS) to interact with the system. Error

messages are generated as appropriate.

COMMAND FORMAT EXAMPLE

ART Assign route ART acid term ART ACA104 ed

CLR Clearance Delivery CLR acid term CLR ACA 104

DMT Display Met Times DMT cr DMT cr

EDM Enter Departure Message EDM term EDM AFR604 1805 ed

EFP Enter Flight Plan EFP (/NEW) (EIW) EFP NEW E ACA104 ed

acid term

EPX Enter Position Report EPX acid (..) time1 fl (..)

time2 (..) term

EST Estimate EST acid term

FMG Forward Message FMG addr term FMG 89 ed

FRU Flight Record Utility

HELP Display command entry HEL (filename) term

instructions

LCC Link Control Command LCC (link/site) ed

LFA List Filed Aircraft LFA (search parameters) LFA /ABV 280

LOG Login/Logout to Position LOG (user id) term

LRA List RAZ Authorizations LRA (parm) term LRA AC

LRZ List Reserved Air Zones LRZ (parameters) (/P) LRZA

MFP Modify Flight Plan MFP acid term MFP ACA803 ed

OTM Organized Track Message OTM (NID) (P) term

PCC Print Clearance Chit PCC (parm) term PCC ACA803 ed

PES Print Eastbound Strip PES (spd tim rte) term PES 0840 37 1830 X ed

PWS Print Westbound Strip PWS (spd tim rte) term PWS 0820 37 1820 NA42 ed

PFP Print Flight Plan PFP term PFP O ACA803 ed

REA RAZ Entry Authorization REA (AIR) raxid acid REAA ZONE6 TOM1 ed

REV Revise Westbound Flight

Record

REV acid term

RMG Recall Message RMG ed

RPK Request Repeat from

RPK snw term

Prestwick

SAM Send to AMIS SAM (parameters) term

SDB Show Database SDB table cr

SEC Enter Sectorization SEC (L! (HD/LD/O/P) tr

ATOS 6-13

Original


COMMAND FORMAT EXAMPLE

SHO Show Flight Plan

Information

SHO acid term SHO ACA101 ed

SMG Send Message SMG addr term SMG 89 ed

SPK Send Message to

Prestwick

SPK (acid/address) ed

TCT Traffic Count Totals TCT (parameters)

TPB Trial Probe TPB acid term

TRK Track Activation TRK (D/N/X) term TRKN ed

XFA Cancel Flight

Assignment

XFA term XFA KLM612 ed

XFP Cancel Flight Plan XFP term XFP KLM612 ed

622 SUPPORT COMMANDS (GAATS-2/2)

622.1

The GAATS-2/2 document describes in detail a

set of commands available only at the GAATS

Support Terminals. Some operational

commands can be input from the support

terminals. Error messages are generated as

appropriate. The following is a list of

commands:

COMMAND FORMAT EXAMPLE

EOT Enter Organized Tracks EOT (ED/EN/MD/MN/MT) cr EOTED

LDB Load Database Table

MET Meteorological Data Utility MET (parameters) cr

MSV Modify System Variable MSV (sysvar (value)) cr

MTT Minimum Time Track MTT (parameters) cr

PORT Assign Port Connection PORt (port) (POS) cr

POS Define Position Function POS (pos (/pos) func) cr

PTT Print Track Times PTT (parameters) cr

STS Save Statistics STS VMS-file cr

TIM Set Time TIM (START) (STOP) cr

XRZ Cancel Reserved Air Zone XRZ razid XRZ RAZ19

ATOS 6-14

Original


623 OPERATIONAL COMMAND

DESCRIPTIONS

623.1

ASSIGN ROUTE — command is used to

assign an oceanic clearance to an eastbound

flight. The command is valid only if the aircraft is

in the DEPARTED, ACTIVE or SUSPENDED

state.

623.2

CLEARANCE DELIVERY — command is used

in the process of oceanic clearance delivery to

eastbound aircraft. It is only valid when an

aircraft is in the PLANNED state.

623.3

DISPLAY MET TIMES — command prints out

on the terminal the time periods for the weather

in the system model. The command causes a

display of the times for the weather in the

system.

623.4

ENTER DEPARTURE MESSAGE — command,

valid for both east and westbound flights in the

FILED state, permits entry of a departure time

into a flight plan. An error in a field causes the

cursor to be repositioned under that field for

correction. The database update occurs when

the ENTER key is struck, causing the flight

record state to change to DEPARTED. (N)

623.5

ENTER FLIGHT PLAN — command is used to

enter a flight plan into the system. It is valid for

both east and westbound flights. (N)

623.6

ENTER POSITION REPORT — command is

used to update position information in a flight

record and check if the updated flight record

conforms to its expected route. It is valid only

for flights in the CLEARED state. Any field error

produces an error message and repositions the

cursor under the field in error for correction. (N)

ATOS 6-15

623.4 Note:

If a westbound flight contains a NAR, prohibited

area routing is checked. If domestic strips are

printed, a message for the radar system is

generated.

623.5 Note:

The (/NEW) qualifier indicates a new flight plan is to

be entered for the ACID even if one already exists.

623.6 Note:

If the flight contains a NAR, prohibited area

rerouting is checked.

Original


623.7

ESTIMATE — command allows entry of an

estimate for the first fix en route for both east

and westbound flights. For a westbound flight,

an aircraft conflict check is also performed

between the modified flight record and all flights

in the CLEARED state. The two formats are:

(N)

A. Eastbound

1. acid type dept dest (agcs)

2. frf (ssr) speed

3. (dr)

4. (or/or1)

5. (rem)

B. Westbound

1. acid type dept dest

2. frf (ssr) speed

3. (or1)

4. (dr)

5. (rem)

623.8

FLIGHT RECORD UTILITY — command is

designed to enable the user to effectively

monitor and manipulate the data in the flight

record database. There are eight (8) functions

with this utility. The most common function for

the ATOS is FRU SHO. This command presents

a snapshot of the flight record for the selected

aircraft. (N)

623.9

FORWARD MESSAGE — command forwards

the message in the viewing area to the IFSS or

another GAATS position. It is valid for all

GAATS positions equipped with message

viewing. (N)

623.10

HELP — command may be used to provide the

user with a list of all the commands that can be

performed from that position. The HELP

command can also display any text file.

Normally these files contain a brief set of

instructions for the use of any operational

command.

ATOS 6-16

623.7 Note:

A P-strip is printed if there is at least one ocean fix

and domestic strips are printed if there is at least

one posting fix.

623.8 Note:

The input is FRU SHO (ACID) {page} and where:

A. (ACID) - is the aircraft ident; and

B. {page} - identified the desired data display page.

This is the letter A, B or C. If none is specified, A

is the default.

623.9 Note:

The “addr” parameter determines the destination

address with the only valid addresses being:

A. a GAATS operational position which has

message handling and at least one private

message queue;

B. the data entry shared queue;

C. the IFSS; and

D. a specific FSS position in the IFSS.

Original


623.11

LINK CONTROL — command is used to

request the status of a link. The link condition

output displays are detailed in the following

order: (N)

A. AFTN link;

B. AGCS link;

C. AMIS link;

D. CTS link;

E. FMU link;

F. IFSS link;

G. NFDPS link;

H. OTHB link;

I. Prestwick link; and

J. RDPS link.

623.12

LIST FILED AIRCRAFT — command is used to

list aircraft on a display based upon

identification. The aircraft identification search

parameter will search all flights unless the

search parameter is further refined by: (N)

A. 1. entering “/E” for eastbound flights; or

2. entering “/W” for westbound flights.

B. an altitude parameter using:

1. “/ABV” (alt); or

2. “/BLW” (alt).

C. “/CO” for flight plans entered with known

aircraft to aircraft conflicts.

623.13

LOGIN/LOGOUT — command allows

authorized users to enter commands at

operational positions. When a valid userid is

entered a new user is logged into the position.

A user logs out of a position by entering a blank

userid. All commands except the LOG

commands are rejected unless a user is logged

into the position.

623.14

LIST RAZ ENTRY AUTHORIZATIONS —

command is used to display the reserved air

zone entry authorization for selected aircraft.

The list may display all authorized aircraft “LRA”

or particular aircraft idents “LRA (acid)”.

ATOS 6-17

623.11 Note:

If a data link is comprised of several sites, the link

control command provides a capability to display

and control the sites on an individual basis.

623.12 Note:

The flight plans for all matching aircraft are

displayed on the initiating terminal in alphabetical

order.

Original


623.15

LIST RESERVED AIR ZONES — command is

used to display or print a list of reserved air

zones which are in the system. The list consists

of the space, identification and time reserved

for each RAZ. The optional parameters that

may be used include active, pending or expired

RAZs.

623.16

MODIFY FLIGHT PLAN — command is used to

change specified fields of a flight record. The

command is valid for any flight state except

SUSPENDED. The total flight plan is presented

with the modifiable fields identified. (N)

623.17

ORGANIZED TRACK MESSAGE — causes a

display or hard copy of the organized tracks in

the system. The possible display or display and

print parameters are:

A. active tracks;

B. day tracks; or

C. night tracks.

623.18

PRINT CLEARANCE CHIT — command

causes the clearance chit of an aircraft to be regenerated

from its flight record. This command

is valid for eastbound flights in the PLANNED or

CLEARED states.

623.19

PRINT EAST/WESTBOUND STRIP —

command causes printing of strips without

aircraft identification, aircraft type, departure

point, destination, or strip sequence number.

Input consists of speed, flight level, ETA at first

point on route and remarks. Strips are printed

at printers as appropriate.

623.20

PRINT FLIGHT PLAN — command causes the

production of a strip using the current

information for a flight. Any ACID not found or

invalid strip type causes an error message to be

displayed and the cursor to be re-positioned

under the field requiring correction.

ATOS 6-18

623.16 Note:

GAATS 2/1 — 28 Table 6.5 lists the fields of a flight

plan that can and cannot be modified dependant on

its state.

Original


623.21

RAZ ENTRY AUTHORIZATION — command is

used to assign or remove the authorization for

aircraft to fly within a reserved air zone. The

command format:

A. “REAA” entered to assign entry

authorization to an aircraft; and

B. “REAR” entered to remove entry

authorization to an aircraft.

623.22

REVISE WESTBOUND FLIGHT RECORD —

command, valid only in the CLEARED state, is

used to change certain fields of a westbound

flight record. The command also checks the

revised flight plan against:

A. all other flights in the CLEARED state; and

B. reserved air zones.

623.23

RECALL MESSAGE — command recalls any

messages stored in the audit trail. Several lines

of data prompts appear allowing the user to

specify the following search parameters:

A. message source (address);

B. message destination (address);

C. flight identification (ACID);

D. time window (time) (time);

E. order (forward) (reverse);

F. format (brief) (full); and

G. print (Y) (N).

623.24

REQUEST REPEAT FROM PRESTWICK —

command is used to request Prestwick to

retransmit a specific message identified by the

westbound message number. If the link is

closed, the message is rejected.

623.25

SEND TO AMIS — command is used to: (N)

A. identify a GAATS flight plan as being a

special flight requiring AMIS processing;

B. identify a GAATS flight plan for exemption

from AMIS communication; or

ATOS 6-19

623.25 Note 1:

NOPAR flights are exempted from automatic

transfer on the AMIS data link.

623.25 Note 2:

The PADRA parameter is normally only used to

reverse the NOPAR identification of a flight plan.

Original


C. format and send an AMIS message.

623.26

SHOW DATABASE — command is used to

display an on-line GAATS database as follows:

A. PNAR table contains a list of westbound

NARs that are available for auto NAR

assignment. These routes take precedent

over routes associated with NAT tracks.

B. NARX table contains a list of aircraft

identification prefixes of airlines for which

auto NAR should not be done.

C. NARR table contains a list of NARs affected

by a temporary prohibited area.

D. DB table option displays the location of the

primary and secondary databases.

623.27

ENTER SECTORIZATION — command is used

to enter a sectorization map into GAATS which

defines the division of airspace to create

bounded areas of responsibility and provide the

following functionality:

A. assign airspace to a sector or sectors;

B. list the current sector definitions; or

C. define position and function fallbacks.

623.28

SHOW FLIGHT PLAN INFORMATION —

command, valid for any ACID in the system, is

used to:

A. display a formatted version of a specified

aircraft's flight record;

B. display the entire route of flight;

C. display all fixes before the first displayed fix;

and

D. show the current flight state for the aircraft.

623.29

SEND MESSAGE — command sends a new

text message to a designated position, normally

another GAATS position or to the IFSS.

623.30

SEND MESSAGE TO PRESTWICK —

command is used to send a miscellaneous

message to Prestwick by using:

ATOS 6-20

Original


A. ICAO ACID if the message is about a

particular aircraft;

B. “/ASUP” if the message requires the

attention of the ATC supervisor; or

C. “/NA1” if the message refers to

communication management problems.

623.31

TRAFFIC COUNT TOTALS — command

produces a display of traffic counts over

specified coast-out/in fixes and flight levels for

both east and westbound flights.

623.32

TRIAL PROBE — command has the following

purposes:

A. trying route assignments without initiating

them;

B. managing provisional flight profiles i.e.

updating a flight record. This results in an

“A”, “O” and/or “D” strips being generated;

C. issuing ATC clearances to IFSS;

D. co-ordinating profile changes to adjacent

OAC's.

The functions available through the TPB

command depend on the direction and state of

the flight.

623.33

TRACK ACTIVATION — command is used to

activate and deactivate organized tracks.

Activate/deactivate parameters include day,

night or current tracks. If the track being

activated conflicts with any reserved air zone,

an error message is generated.

623.34

CANCEL FLIGHT ASSIGNMENT — command

causes a flight to become non-assigned and

enter a SUSPENDED state. It can be used for

eastbound flights in the PLANNED stage and

for east and westbound flights in the CLEARED

state. When the assignment of a west bound

flight is cancelled, the associated provisional

profiles are deleted. (N)

ATOS 6-21

623.34 Note:

If the Prestwick data link is OPEN, the XFA

command also causes the transmission of a CNL

message, if applicable.

Original


623.35

CANCEL FLIGHT PLAN — command causes

the deletion of a flight record and all associated

provisional profiles. The flight record enters the

DELETED state directly and is not saved for

statistical purposes. If the data links are open,

the following messages are generated: (N)

A. CNL message to Prestwick;

B. CNL message to RDPS;

C. CNL message to NFDPS; and

D. drop message to AMIS.

INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK

ATOS 6-22

623.35 Note:

The XFP command is available at all positions with

the restriction that at Data Entry and Estimate Copy,

it is only valid on flights that have not had strips

produced.

Original


630 FLIGHT PROGRESS STRIP

PRODUCTION AND FORMAT

631 FLIGHT PROGRESS STRIP

PRODUCTION

631.1

The five types of flight progress strips produced

by the system:

A. planner assigned flight progress strips

eastbound (A);

B. domestic flight progress strips (D, T);

C. planner flight progress strips (P);

D. ocean flight progress strips (O); and

E. REV/AMIS flight progress strips westbound

(A).

631.2

The flight progress strips are printed on seven

strip printers: (N)

A. high-level domestic strip printer (DP);

B. low-level domestic strip printer (DP);

C. high-level ocean strip printer (OP);

D. low-level ocean strip printer (LP);

E. planner strip printer (PP);

F. terminal strip printer (TP); and

G. REV/AMIS strip printer (AP).

632 PLANNER AND PLANNER ASSIGNED

STRIPS

632.1

The A (eastbound) and P strips are intended for

the planner. High-level A and P strips are

printed on the PP printer. Low-level A and P

strips are printed on the LP printer.

632.2

A planner strip (P strip) is printed on a planner

sector printer or on the low ocean printer.

632.3

A planner assigned strip (A strip) is printed:

A. eastbound — on a planner sector printer or

low ocean printer; and

ATOS 6-23

631.2 Note:

Strip management messages are also printed at

each of these printers.

Original


B. westbound — on the REV/AMIS sector

printer or the low ocean printer for the AMIS

operator.

633 DOMESTIC FLIGHT PROGRESS

STRIPS