Business Plan0910 290909:Layout 1.qxd - Ceop

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Business Plan0910 290909:Layout 1.qxd - Ceop

Business Plan

2009-2010

Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre

Making every child matter ... everywhere


Contents

Chairman’s foreword 5

1. The CEOP Centre – history, remit, structure and overview 7

2. Key business risks and issues 10

3. Strategic assessment and control strategy 11

4. Objectives and targets 2009-10 14

5. Budget and resource allocation 24

6. Structure and function in detail 25

Intelligence Faculty

Harm Reduction Faculty

Specialist Operational Support Faculty

Business Areas and Corporate Services

B U S I N E S S P L A N

7. Governance, partnership, audit and risk 30

Further information 31

Appendix A: Glossary 33

Appendix B: CEOP’s governance summary of roles and responsibilities 34

Appendix C: CEOP board members 35

Appendix D: List of partners 36

Appendix E: Objective 2 (outstanding performance measures 2008-09) 37

Appendix F: Performance indicator definitions 39

3


Chairman’s foreword

This Business Plan sets out goals for the Child Exploitation and Online Protection

(CEOP) Centre’s fourth year. It builds on three successful years where it has

delivered exceptional results – more than 340 children safeguarded; over 700

offenders arrested; more than 4.5 million children have received our CEOP

Thinkuknow education programme and nearly 8,000 child protection professionals

have attended our specialist training courses.

While these numbers are impressive for an organisation of around 100 staff, it is the

collective understanding of the problem, coupled with the flexible and multi agency

business model which enables delivery of real results and efficiencies (or economies

of scale when it comes protecting children and young people and tackling child

sex offenders). By using the knowledge gained through analysis of reports, operational activity and contemporary

research, children and young people can be empowered to identify and manage the risks in the converged

environment for themselves. The understanding of behaviour in both children and offenders allows CEOP to provide

child protection specialists and law enforcement staff with the skills, products and services they need to better

protect children and deal effectively with offenders.

This Business Plan focuses on 2009-10 but the CEOP Board and I are working with government and senior

managers from CEOP to develop a vision which provides a clear and stable future for CEOP. A future that builds on

the skills and capabilities already evident in the organisation and to see how this should be applied to others areas of

protecting children where CEOP’s experience, expertise and knowledge of technology can be harnessed to improve

public confidence in the safety of their children and help deliver better outcomes for the children themselves. CEOP

has firm foundations through it’s now well tested innovative business model. The time is now right to increase

resilience across the organisation which has seen a continual growth in demand for its services and to use its skills

and capabilities to provide benefits and efficiencies across a wider range of child protection focused services.

CEOP works extensively with the police service and the children’s workforce throughout the UK. The new

performance landscape for both the police service and local authorities is focused on increasing confidence in

communities and improving the level of satisfaction with services. This approach has been fully embraced by

CEOP and is reflected in a suite of new performance measures included in this Plan. Over the next few years CEOP

hopes to be able to better evidence the satisfaction levels of users of its services so that it can continually improve

and develop.

Janet Paraskeva

Chair, CEOP Board

B U S I N E S S P L A N

5


CEOP was established in April 2006 in response to growing concern about child abuse predominantly online but

also to provide co-ordination and support for investigations into online and offline offenders.

The aim of the organisation is:

to play a decisive part, with government departments, police forces and other law enforcement agencies, offender

managers, children's services and other stakeholders, in protecting children, young people, families and society from

paedophiles and sex offenders; in particular those who use the internet and other new technologies in the sexual

exploitation of children.

CEOP’s remit is defined 1 as:

to provide a single 24/7 point of contact for the reporting of online child abuse for the public, law enforcers,

industry and other organisations;

to offer information and advice to victims and potential victims of abuse and parents;

to receive, assess and disseminate international and domestic intelligence coming into the UK on online and

offline offenders, including paedophiles and other serious sex offenders;

to support, co-ordinate and assist national and international investigations into suspects and victims of online

child abuse;

to provide – in the medium to longer term – specialist forensic services, including forensic support to forces;

to undertake some proactive investigations into online child abuse;

to identify and recover criminal assets from those profiting from online child abuse;

to deliver proactive crime prevention and crime reduction strategies to reduce the harm caused by online

child abuse;

to commission and undertake research; this includes research into the nature of the crime, criminal and

environment;

to deliver and contribute to comprehensive and effective educational programmes;

to maintain and manage the national database of child abuse images (ChildBase) and implement and manage

appropriate links to VISOR and other relevant systems;

to collect, maintain and manage information on serious sex offenders (the so-called ‘serious sex offenders

register’);

to provide the secretariat to the Virtual Global Taskforce; and

B U S I N E S S P L A N

1. The CEOP Centre – history, remit, structure and values

to provide specialist guidance and good practice to police forces and child protection agencies and enhance

the opportunities available from the creation of a new Centre. This might include, for example, taking forward

relevant recommendations from the Bichard Inquiry, recent HMIC inspections and other reviews. It might also

include providing specialist advice and support to forces on child protection cases.

1 Letter from Parliamentary Under Secretary of State Home Office May 2005.

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8

B U S I N E S S P L A N

1. The CEOP Centre – history, remit, structure and values

From April 2007, CEOP received additional funding from the Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) to deliver

a child focused approach to child trafficking complementing the work of the UK Human Trafficking Centre (UKHTC).

This funding followed the delivery of a child trafficking scoping report written by CEOP on behalf of the Home Office

and Immigration and Nationality Directorate (now UK Borders Agency).

CEOP is an affiliate of the Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA). This means that it is ultimately accountable

to the SOCA Board but enjoys full operational independence. From inception, the CEOP model was based on

partnership. Partner organisations contributed some £2.8m in 2008-09 in resourcing, through staff secondments,

financial donations, technical support and other means. This approach continues in 2009-10.

CEOP is divided into three major faculties, with smaller teams providing an array of cross-business functions and

support services, some of which are delivered through SOCA. This division is mostly for organisational purposes,

as the business is in fact run on matrix management principles providing the ability to flex to meet new challenges.

Figure A: Organisational Structure

Head of

Intelligence

CEOP’s values are:

Deputy Chief

Executive

(unfunded)

Head of

Specialist

Operational

Support

Head of

Governance

Head of

Harm

Reduction

Focus Ensuring every child matters everywhere.

Chief

Executive

Head of

Business

Development

Head of

Corporate

Communications

& Public Affairs

Head of

Safeguarding &

Child Protection

Head of

Partnerships

Chief

Operating

Officer

Team based Ensuring a team based approach where everyone is respected and empowered and internal and

external diversity valued.

Smart Making the right things happen, capitalising on our ability to flex to enable us to meet fresh

challenges and demands.

Corporate

Services

In tune Maintaining a contemporary understanding of the environment by listening to and respecting the

views of stakeholders, in particular children and young people.

Surprising Doing things in an unexpected way, considering different perspectives, encouraging ethical

challenge, adopting innovative tactics and creative solutions.


CEOP has in between 105 and 120 staff posts at any one time. The staff make up is diverse and the actual number

of staff is flexible owing to a changing number of staff attached free of charge from other organisations and the

nature and duration of funding gained from external sources for project based initiatives. Through our affiliated

status, many of our core staff are employed on SOCA contracts, however a number are seconded from other

organisations, often police forces in England and Wales, at CEOP’s expense and others are fully or part funded by

external project funding. Around 30 staff at any one time are attached to CEOP for free from partner organisations,

government agencies or foreign law enforcement; the remainder are agency staff. The staff breakdown across

the different areas of the business is illustrated in Figure B with the staff composition in terms of funding shown

in Figure C.

Figure B: Staff Breakdown by Faculty and Business Area

* This includes senior management (CEO and COO) and staff from Safeguarding and Child Protection, Partnerships,

Governance, Business Development and internal corporate and business support.

Figure C: Staff Breakdown by Funding Source

* FTE = full time equivalent post

B U S I N E S S P L A N

1. The CEOP Centre – history, remit, structure and values

Communications and Public Affairs

3% Support and Development*

24%

Harm Reduction

24%

Specialist Operational Support

23%

Posts funded by partners FTE*

26%

Project funded posts FTE*

7% Core funded posts FTE*

67%

Intelligence

26%

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B U S I N E S S P L A N

2. Key corporate risks and issues

Economic Climate – The current credit crunch is likely to impact on CEOP in many ways. These include

availability of central government funding; withdrawal of funding or in kind benefit from partners; uncertainty

of exchange rates and the ability of CEOP to generate its own income.

People – Ensuring that CEOP has suitable numbers of staff to meet demand and ensuring the health, welfare,

safety and morale of these people is paramount for CEOP. The risk is that if any of these is not assured,

achievement of our aims and objectives is threatened and is likely to manifest in sickness, grievance reports

and low morale which may result in staff leaving the organisation. The corrosive nature of the material dealt with

by some members of staff means that proper systems need to be in place to ensure staff are best equipped to

cope. The ability of CEOP to be able to recruit the right staff at the right time and ensure these staff are suitable

and fit for the roles they need to perform is also critical in managing this risk. Processes for ensuring staff

development and ensuring we can succession plan in a meaningful way are also vital.

Infrastructure – There is a risk to achievement of our aims and objectives if the organisation’s infrastructure and

services do not provide the necessary level of support. Without the correct levels of resources and support

structures and systems CEOP will be unable to operate effectively.

Compliance – CEOP must be compliant with the law, best practice and guidance. This compliance must be

reflected in both operational and back office functions and appropriate resources need to be applied to ensure

and check compliance.

Planning for the medium term – From the outset CEOP’s ability to plan effectively for the medium term has

been hampered by a lack of clarity around governance and funding. The CEOP Board are working with the

Government and senior managers to define a vision for the future which will provide more resilience for the

organisation in order to provide more benefits for the community as a whole and ensure a more stable

governance and funding platform.


3. Strategic Overview and Control Strategy

CEOP is responsible for the production of two Strategic Intelligence Overviews annually. These are the CEOP

Strategic Overview (published September 09) which covers offending behaviour both online and offline and the

Child Trafficking Strategic Threat Assessment 2008-09 (published April 09). Key trends from each document are set

out below.

The key trends identified in the CEOP Strategic Overview are as follows:

increase in reports of online grooming;

there appears to be an increase in terms of both absolute numbers and in terms of range of applications of image

distribution occurring through P2P (peer-to-peer) networks;

increase in the complexity and convergence of online technologies (both software and hardware) presents different

opportunities for offenders and means that CEOP must ensure that children and young people are protected in

whichever applications they are using; and

there appears to be diffusion in the number of countries that are hosting pay per view child sexual abuse websites.

Key trends identified from the 2009 Child Trafficking Strategic Threat Assessment are as follows:

inconsistency in the identification and recording of that data in relation to victims of suspected or confirmed

child trafficking across key services;

from data collected over a 12 month period in 2007-2008, the numbers of children who have been trafficked

or potentially trafficked are similar to the numbers stated in the scoping study of child trafficking completed in

2007, which covered an 18 month period. This indicates a growing problem, or indeed, growing awareness and

reporting of this crime; and

trends, themes and patterns are consistent with the previous scoping report, however there are key concerns

regarding children from Afghanistan and of trafficked Chinese minors.

Current strategic operational priorities for CEOP, the police service and the wider law enforcement community are set

out in a restricted control strategy. To enable CEOP to work more effectively, four key strategic themes have been

identified which provide the framework between the control strategy and CEOP’s objectives. These strategic themes

will help to reinforce the intelligence-led focus of CEOP, whilst identifying the specialist support CEOP can provide and

demonstrate how knowledge from all areas of the business and the relevant external environment feed the intelligence

picture, which drives business activity and delivers public confidence through child protection.

The strategic themes framework is set out below.

B U S I N E S S P L A N

Theme Activity Rationale Links to CEOP

Objectives

A. Improving Knowledge

Flows

Enhancing tasking, support

and co-ordination:

internally

Enhancing support and

co-ordination:

national and international

level

Internal intelligence working

group

More focused workforce

Clear links to objectives

and control strategy

Formal debriefs increase

knowledge and learning

Better use of resources

and expertise

Economies of scale

Formal debriefs increase

knowledge and learning

Improved contemporary

understanding of

intelligence picture

Ensures efficiency in

intelligence gathering

Objective 1

Objective 4

Objective 1

Objective 4

Objective 2

Objective 4

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B U S I N E S S P L A N

3. Strategic Overview and Control Strategy

Theme Activity Rationale Links to CEOP

Objectives

B. Improving contemporary

understanding of the

environment

Knowledge gathering from

children and young people to

understand their behaviour

and their use of the internet

and related technologies

Working with industry to

understand new products

Working with industry to learn

from their knowledge of

contemporary environments

Working with perpetrators to

better understand behaviour

and profile of offenders

Creates new opportunities

for knowledge

Enhances understanding

of environment

Ensures CEOP stays

‘ahead of the game’

Scopes potential threats

and opportunities

Creates new knowledge

Enhances current

knowledge

Ensures CEOP stays

‘ahead of the game’

Creates new knowledge

Enhances current

knowledge

Supports law enforcement

in their investigations of

offenders/offences

Provides improved

understanding for

formation of social policy

recommendations

Objective 1

Objective 2

Objective 1

Objective 5

Objective 3

Objective 1

Objective 5

Objective 3

Objective 1

Objective 4

Theme Activity Rationale Links to CEOP

Objectives

C. Using and sharing

knowledge

Better gathering and

co-ordination of knowledge

from across CEOP and

external sources to feed the

strategic picture and drive

activities

Gathering and sharing

strategic knowledge and

learning with stakeholders:

industry

children’s charities

government

law enforcement through

ACPO

Providing specialist

knowledge, support and

services to law enforcement

agencies and child protection

professionals

Increases corporate

understanding

More focused workforce

Clear links to objectives

and control strategy

Increased stakeholder

engagement in CEOP

Increases corporate

understanding

Broadens knowledge

Increases awareness in

stakeholders

Makes the best use of

shared learning and

feedback

Makes the environment

safer

Reinforces CEOP as

national centre

Provides improved

understanding for

formation of social policy

recommendations

Increasing capability and

capacity

Economies of scale

Enhanced operational

effectiveness

Bring to justice offenders

Disruption and deterrence

of offenders

Objective 1

Objective 2

Objective 3

Objective 4

Objective 1

Objective 2

Objective 3

Objective 5

Objective 1

Objective 4


3. Strategic Overview and Control Strategy

B U S I N E S S P L A N

Theme Activity Rationale Links to CEOP

Objectives

D. Understanding the

constraints and risks

Gain a better understanding of

how technical developments

affect the legal picture and

scope the constraints these

present in delivering

enforcement activity in relation

to online and offline behaviour

Understanding the technical

constraints to delivering

enforcement activity in relation

to online behaviour

Better use of resources

and expertise

Scopes potential threats

and opportunities

Better use of resources

and expertise

Clear links to objectives

and control strategy

Objective 5

Objective 5

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B U S I N E S S P L A N

4. Objectives and targets for 2009-10

During 2008-09, CEOP has re-examined its performance management regime and owing to its strong relationship

with the police service, taken the opportunity to take account of changes in the policing performance landscape.

Many of these changes were inspired by the Green Paper (From the Neighbourhood to the National: Policing our

Communities Together) and the Police and Crime Bill. These include citizen focused policing (CFP) and increased

emphasis on public confidence.

CEOP’s objectives and indicators are also designed to dovetail with broader government ambitions. They link to the

Government’s vision stated in the PSA Delivery Agreements published in April 2008.

PSA Delivery Agreement 13: Improve children and young people’s safety

The Government aims to make the country the best place in the world for children and young people to grow up.

Every child, whatever their background or circumstance should have the support they need to:

be healthy;

stay safe;

enjoy and achieve;

make a positive contribution; and

achieve economic well being.

PSA Delivery Agreement 23: Make communities safer

The Government’s vision is that building on the significant reductions in crime achieved over recent years, fewer

people are victims of crime, especially the most serious crime – violent, drug and alcohol related crime – and the

public are protected from the most harmful of offenders.

Objectives and Supporting Targets

All CEOP’s operational performance indicators are aligned to its five objectives. The indicators are divided into two

levels ‘Headline’ or Strategic Performance Indictors (SPI) and Key Diagnostic Indicators (KDI). In each case, the

‘Headline’ indicator(s) is/are the main measure with the key diagnostic indicator providing more context to it/them.

For each objective, the indicator is set out together with information about how data to support the indicator will be

measured. Definitions of key terms are also provided in Appendix F. Indicative costs of delivering against each

objective are also included. These costs include both the frontline resources (pay and non-pay) and a relevant

percentage of back office support costs. CEOP is made up of a number of small teams within each Faculty and our

matrix management approach allows the flexible and agile use of resources to respond to our greatest needs or

risks. The costs shown are therefore indicative only.

The following tables set out CEOP’s performance indicators for 2009-10.


4. Objectives and targets for 2009-10

Objective 1

B U S I N E S S P L A N

To identify, locate and protect children and young people from sexual exploitation and online abuse

– both in the UK and overseas.

Indicator 1 Level of satisfaction in stakeholders with CEOP’s tactical and strategic

intelligence products

Level of indicator

Target

Data provider

Data set used

Baseline

Frequency of reporting

Quality assurance

Headline indicator or SPI

No target for 2009-2010 as baseline needs to be established for future improvements

in satisfaction

CEOP Intelligence Faculty, CEOP Harm Reduction Faculty

Survey(s) of stakeholders including police forces, industry representatives and children’s

charities in UK only

Establish baseline in 2009-10

Annually for strategic products – included are CEOP Strategic Overview and Child

Trafficking Strategic Threat Assessment.

Twice annually for tactical products

External quality assurance (partner or police force)

Indicator 1a The number of children and young people subject to safeguarding activity

as a result of CEOP activity

Level of indicator

Target

Data provider

Data set used

Baseline

Frequency of reporting

Quality assurance

Key diagnostic indicator or KDI

No target suggested for this as a target may be viewed as perverse in these

circumstances. CEOP has no direct influence over the numbers of children and young

people subject to safeguarding activity but this indicator demonstrates the level of risk

caused to them by offenders and suspected offenders who are subject of intelligence

disseminations and/or operational activity by CEOP. However, this data has been

collected and reported for the past three years and so is available for comparative

purposes

CEOP Intelligence, Specialist Operational Support Faculties and the Behavioural Analysis

Unit based on feedback from police forces

Information received from police forces following the dissemination of intelligence and/or

the deployment of CEOP resources

Children Safeguarded:

2006/07 – 66 children safeguarded;

2007/08 – 131 children safeguarded; and

2008/09 – 139 children safeguarded

Quarterly

Internal quantitive and qualitative review

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B U S I N E S S P L A N

4. Objectives and targets for 2009-10

Indicator 1b The number of specific child protection interventions resulting from CEOP

initiated activity

Level of indicator

Target

Data provider

Data set used

Baseline

Frequency of reporting

Quality assurance

Key diagnostic indicator or KDI

Resource used in this objective £2.54 million

No target suggested for this as a target may be viewed as perverse in these

circumstances. CEOP has no direct influence over the numbers of children and young

people subject to safeguarding activity but this indicator demonstrates the level of risk

caused to them by offenders and suspected offenders who are subject of intelligence

disseminations and or operational activity by CEOP. However, this data has been

collected and reported for the past two years and so is available for comparative

purposes

CEOP Intelligence, Specialist Operational Support Faculties and the Behavioural Analysis

Unit based on feedback from police forces

Information received from police forces following the dissemination of intelligence and/or

the deployment of CEOP resources

Children Protected:

2006/07 – No data;

2007/08 – 72 children subject of specific child protection activity; and

2008/09 – 74 children subject of specific child protection activity

Quarterly

Internal quantitive and qualitative review


4. Objectives and targets for 2009-10

Objective 2

B U S I N E S S P L A N

To engage and empower children, young people, parents and the community through the provision

of information and education.

Note: Targets set in the Business Plan 2008-09 are aligned to academic years and therefore run until July 09.

In this section the new full year targets are set out below with the continuing targets from last years Plan but

current until July 09 are shown in Appendix E.

Indicator 2 Children and young people have confidence to be safe online including

how to recognise and deal with risks online, as well as to appropriately

report problems, concerns or issues

Level of indicator

Target

Data provider

Data set used

Baseline

Frequency of reporting

Quality assurance

Headline indicator or SPI

No target for 2009-2010 as baseline needs to established for future improvements in

confidence

CEOP

Data derived from a survey of a representative sample of children and young people who

have received CEOP Thinkuknow training during the last academic year

To be established in 2009-2010

Annually after baseline established

Education Advisory Board

Indicator 2a Level of satisfaction of users with CEOP Thinkuknow products

Level of indicator

Target

Data provider

Data set used

Baseline

Frequency of reporting

Quality assurance

Key diagnostic indicator or KDI

No target for 2009-2010 as baseline needs to established for future improvements

in satisfaction

CEOP

Data derived from a survey of a representative sample of: children and young people

who have received CEOP Thinkuknow training during the last academic year,

ambassadors, trainers and registrants who are trained, accredited or registered to

deliver CEOP Thinkuknow products and parents who have accessed products

To be established in 2009-2010

Twice annually after baseline established

Education Advisory Board

Resource used in this objective £0.96 million

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B U S I N E S S P L A N

4. Objectives and targets for 2009-10

Objective 3

To provide specialist information and support to child protection professionals and industry.

Indicator 3 Overall level of satisfaction in students with CEOP’s training courses

Level of indicator

Target

Data provider

Data set used

Baseline

Frequency of reporting

Quality assurance

Headline indicator or SPI

No target for 2009-2010 as baseline needs to established for future improvements

in satisfaction

CEOP

A composite analysis of survey(s) of delegates and students immediately after training

event and follow up with focus groups to understand levels of satisfaction six months

after event

To be established in 2009-2010

Twice annually after baseline established

Training Advisory Board

Indicator 3a Level of satisfaction with CEOP training courses immediately after event

Level of indicator

Target

Data provider

Data set used

Baseline

Frequency of reporting

Quality assurance

Key diagnostic indicator or KDI

90%

CEOP

Measured through feedback sheets used at the conclusion of each training event

Maintain current standard of 90% satisfaction

Quarterly

Training Advisory Board

Indicator 3b Level of satisfaction with CEOP training courses six months after event

Level of indicator

Target

Data provider

Data set used

Baseline

Frequency of reporting

Quality assurance

Key diagnostic indicator or KDI

Baseline to be established

CEOP

Measured through satisfaction focused surveys, interviews and analysis at post training

events

To establish baseline in 2009-2010

Twice yearly

Training Advisory Board

Resource used in this objective £0.88 million


4. Objectives and targets for 2009-10

Objective 4

B U S I N E S S P L A N

To provide specialist support and services that enables offenders to be brought to justice and deters

future offending.

Indicator 4 Level of satisfaction with CEOP specialist support and services

Level of indicator

Target

Data provider

Data set used

Baseline

Frequency of reporting

Quality assurance

Headline indicator or SPI

No target for 2009-2010 as baseline needs to established for future improvements

in satisfaction

CEOP and police forces

Data derived from a survey of a representative sample of police forces and overseas

law enforcement agencies who have received support or specialist services from

CEOP. These include covert investigation, victim identification, offender management,

behavioural analysis, financial investigation and tactical support and guidance

To be established in 2009-2010

Annually

External quality assurance (police force or other)

Indicator 4a The number of arrests made by another agency following the dissemination

of intelligence by CEOP

Level of indicator

Target

Data provider

Data set used

Baseline

Frequency of reporting

Quality assurance

Key diagnostic indicator or KDI

No target as arrests based on the prioritisation and deployment of local force

resources

CEOP

Information sought and received from police forces following the dissemination

of intelligence

2008/09 – 67

Quarterly

CEOP Head of Business Development

Indicator 4b The number of arrests made by other agencies following the dissemination

of intelligence by CEOP and supported by the deployment of CEOP resources

Level of indicator

Target

Data provider

Data set used

Baseline

Frequency of reporting

Quality assurance

Key diagnostic indicator or KDI

No target for 2009-2010 as baseline needs to established for future improvements

in confidence

CEOP

Information received from police forces following the dissemination of intelligence and

the deployment of CEOP resources

2008/09 – 267

Quarterly

CEOP Head of Business Development

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20

B U S I N E S S P L A N

4. Objectives and targets for 2009-10

Indicator 4c Number of arrests (defined at 4b above) which lead to offenders being

brought to justice

Level of indicator

Target

Data provider

Data set used

Baseline

Frequency of reporting

Quality assurance

Key diagnostic indicator or KDI

No target for 2009-2010 as baseline needs to be established. Time delays between

arrest and prosecution will mean that numbers recorded for offenders brought to justice

within a particular recording period will not be a percentage of those arrested during the

same time period

CEOP

Data derived from CEOP systems and feedback from police forces and overseas law

enforcement on the outcome of investigations following arrests, which have resulted

from the dissemination of intelligence by CEOP and the deployment of CEOP resources

To be established in 2009-2010

Twice annually

Resource used in this objective £3.28 million

CEOP Head of Business Development


4. Objectives and targets for 2009-10

Objective 5

B U S I N E S S P L A N

To protect children and young people from the misuse of technology by those who would seek to

harm them, through supporting the development of a safer online environment for them to inhabit.

Indicator 5 To demonstrate through the production of case studies and analysis CEOP’s

contribution to protecting children and young people from the misuse of

technology by those who would seek to harm them, through supporting

the development of a safer online environment for them to inhabit

Level of indicator

Target

Data provider

Data set used

Baseline

Frequency of reporting

Quality assurance

Headline indicator or SPI

No target – Qualitative indicator only

CEOP

A range of CEOP case studies which demonstrate the work and where possible, the

outcomes of CEOP’s activity in this area. This activity will include both protective work

to enable and empower children and young people and the contributions CEOP makes

to the development of a safer online environment including those made within the UK

Council for Child Internet Safety (UKCCIS), G8 and the Virtual Global Taskforce (VGT)

None

Twice yearly

CEOP Board

Resource used in this objective £0.75 million

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B U S I N E S S P L A N

4. Objectives and targets for 2009-10

Corporate Targets

The following measures around corporate health are linked to the internal objective set out below.

Corporate Health Objective – to ensure an effective and efficient organisation through the development, maintenance

and assurance of systems and controls which meet recognised standards.

A. Budget Management

Level of indicator

Target

Data set used

Baseline

Frequency of reporting

Quality assurance

B. Partnerships

Level of indicator

Target

Data set used

Baseline

Frequency of reporting

Quality assurance

C. Risk Management

Level of indicator

Target

Data set used

Baseline

Frequency of reporting

Quality assurance

D. Staff Health and Well Being

Level of indicator

Target

Data set used

Baseline

Frequency of reporting

Quality assurance

KDI

Budget outturn is within agreed limits

SOCA Finance data

N/A

Quarterly

SOCA Finance, Internal and External audit

KDI

Delivery of strategic reports which demonstrate the achievement of objectives and the

mutual benefits for CEOP and individual partners

Objectives, achievements and benefits contained within partnership agreements and

subsequent reports

N/A

Twice yearly

CEOP Board

KDI

To maintain risk structures throughout the organisation which include appropriate

reporting and escalation

CEOP Risk information

N/A

Quarterly

SOCA Risk Group and Internal audit

KDI

To demonstrate the provision of systems and structures which ensure staff welfare and

health and safety

Staff sickness information together with more qualitative data which demonstrates

provision of staff welfare appropriate to the environment. This will be provided by formal

reports from SOCA Occupational Health and Welfare and the clinical psychologist

Average no. of days sickness per staff member per year:

2006/07 – no data available;

2007/08 – 4.2; and

2008/09 – 4.7

Twice yearly

CEOP Board


4. Objectives and targets for 2009-10

Summary of Objectives

1. To identify, locate and protect, children and young people from sexual exploitation and online abuse

– both in the UK and globally.

2. To engage and empower children, young people, parents and the community through the provision

of information and education.

3. To provide specialist information and support to child protection professionals and industry.

4. To provide specialist support and services that enables offenders to be brought to justice and deters

future offending.

5. To protect children and young people from the misuse of technology by those who would seek to harm them,

through supporting the development of a safer online environment for them to inhabit.

Overview of Resource by Objectives

The chart below in Figure D provides an indication of the level of resource used to deliver against each objective.

These costs include both the frontline resources (pay and non-pay) and a relevant percentage of back office support

costs. CEOP is made up of a number of small teams within each Faculty and our matrix management approach

allows the flexible and agile use of resources to respond to our greatest needs or risks. The costs shown are

therefore indicative only.

Figure D: Resources by objective 2009-10

Objective 4

£3.28 million

Objective 4

£0.75 million

Objective 3

£0.88 million

B U S I N E S S P L A N

Objective 1

£2.54 million

Objective 2

£0.96 million

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B U S I N E S S P L A N

5. Budget and resource allocation

The total ‘red circled’ grant received from the Home Office as an element of the SOCA allocation is £5.79 million and

this includes a £28,000 uplift for last year. CEOP’s relatively small capital needs are provided for by SOCA following

agreement with the Home Office in compliance with the protocol agreed between the three organisations. CEOP will

also receive an additional £555,000 from the Government following a successful business case to the Home Office

last year.

The European Commission Safer Internet programme provided £639,000 over two years from July 2007 to June

2009, supporting CEOP’s education project. This sum was match funded by CEOP from its core budget mainly

by staffing. From July 2009, funding has been provided for 18 months by the European Commission Safer Internet

Programme, again to support CEOP’s education programme of which £505,000 is expected to be received during

2009/10. In addition, as part of this programme, CEOP has entered a consortium agreement with the Internet Watch

Foundation (IWF) and the NSPCC (Childline) to provide a hotline and helpline respectively. This provides a holistic

approach to providing services and protecting children and young people online. In addition, the European

Commission have provided funding of l427,000 for a 14 month project for CEOP to lead the European Financial

Coalition (£240,000 of this expected to be received during 2009/10).

Other income is primarily generated through CEOP’s training programme and the projection for this financial year

is £820,000. This is considered realistic, as additional training resources have been identified and new courses are

planned. Efficiencies will be achieved mainly in reduction in overtime, travel and subsistence, income, direct

sponsorship and efficiencies are added to the basic grant, resulting in a net resource budget of £8.43 million.

Core Funding

Core SOCA Budget

Additional Home Office Funding

Additional funding through budget transfer

Total Core Funding £6,416,000.00

Other Funding

Training Income £820,000.00

EU Funding £883,720.00

Contactpoint

Home Office – DCG Training

ACPO Support Post

Income from ACPO Conference

Income from UK Government Partners £215,085.00

Visa Funding Deferred from 08/09

NSPCC

Cash Income from Partners £39,754.00

Total Other Funding £1,958,559.00

Total Funding £8,433,559.00

Figure E – Budget Overview

Training income

£820,000

Income from government partners

£215,085

EU funding

£883,720

Cash income from partners

£39,754

Core funding

£6,416,000


6. Structure and function in detail

Intelligence Faculty

The largest of CEOP’s three frontline faculties, the Intelligence Faculty is the organisational hub, receiving and

processing all reports of allegations of child sexual abuse. Analysed intelligence may be passed to local police forces

or other child protection agencies for action or referred internally to another faculty but all information collected

will be used to develop CEOP’s evolving picture of online child abuse. The faculty also houses the Offender

Management function. The teams in this area take an intelligence-led strategy to locating missing child sexual

offenders both at home and abroad and work with other agencies and jurisdictions to minimise the risk posed

by such individuals. Thirdly, the Intelligence Faculty undertakes strategic analysis, preparing an annual Strategic

Overview and other intelligence products.

Ambitions for 2009-10:

Closer working with industry specifically through partnership with BT to scope a bespoke industry reporting

mechanism.

Improvement of the referrals desk function specifically the automated workflow.

Closer relationships with Regional Intelligence Units to deliver more comprehensive intelligence requirements

to police forces and improve intelligence collation.

Focus on quality – setting standards and developing best practice.

Improved information processing and analysis through partnership working with Detica.

Harm Reduction Faculty

B U S I N E S S P L A N

Through utilising the products of the Intelligence and Specialist Operational Support faculties and our knowledge

of how children and young people operate online, the Harm Reduction Faculty aims to create a safer environment

for children. It does this through a number of means.

It delivers an extensive programme of educational support in the form of nationally consistent training and

materials for frontline practitioners such as teachers, police officers and child protection workers, designed to

empower children and young people by ensuring they are aware of the benefits using the internet brings, but

also the risks posed and how to deal with them. This work is informed by our Youth Advisory Panel (YAP) and

is co-funded by the European Commission.

The provision of a range of training courses for professionals such as police officers, public protection officers

and social workers. Many of these courses now form part of a programme accredited by the University of

Central Lancashire (UCLAN) which enables participants to gain a Postgraduate Certificate in Forensic

Behavioural Analysis. It is hoped that this will become the foundation of a learning path in this discipline,

which will culminate in a Masters degree.

Working with industry and other sectors to ‘build in’ technical and other improvements to the environment for

the enhanced online safety of children and young people, in particular the ‘CEOP Report’ facility.

Working with a range of UK government departments and child protection agencies, including the UK Council

for Child Internet Safety (UKCCIS) and to provide a secretariat function for the CEO’s ACPO Child Abuse

Investigations, Travelling Sex Offenders and Child Trafficking portfolios.

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B U S I N E S S P L A N

6. Structure and function in detail

Developing relationships with foreign agencies and jurisdictions in order to build capacity abroad and ensure

maximum co-operation and synergy. This work includes co-ordinating the continuing development of the Virtual

Global Taskforce (VGT) and support to the Home Office on European and G8 child protection work strands.

Provision of child focused expertise which will deliver CEOP’s annual Strategic Threat Assessment on the

problem of child trafficking and provide child protection expertise in the development of policy and practice in

this area.

Develop a greater understanding of the behaviour and motivation of sex offenders who offend against children

and assist police forces with interview strategies and other advice and guidance in the interviewing of sex

offenders.

Ambitions for 2009-2010:

Support to the newly created UK Council for Child Internet Safety Council (UKCCIS), through membership of the

Executive Board and relevant working groups.

Ensure that CEOP contributes to policy development across government nationally and internationally in the

arenas of safeguarding and the application of technology.

Deliver a harm reduction strategy to tackle the rise in the use of peer to peer applications in the sexual abuse

and exploitation of children and young people.

Promote the IYAC charter as a tool that helps inform the application of the UN Convention of the Rights of the

Child (UNCRC) by Governments across the world.

Initiating a programme of Behavioural Analysis Unit led research projects that improve understanding

of the risk from child sexual predators.

Support the development of CEOP's profiles at both EU and international levels.

Improve knowledge and deliver further guidance and advice on tackling child trafficking, working with key

stakeholders at national and local level.

Ensure a smooth and effective transfer of functions to the next chair and secretariat of the VGT.

Introduce three new training courses: Understanding and Managing the risk from Travelling Sex Offenders;

Child Sex Offenders – Profiling and Risk Indicators for Surveillance Officers; and Online Moderators, as well as

refresh and revise the existing courses, including the Senior Investigating Officer’s Strategies and Sexual

Offences Act course.

Deliver the next round of funding for the Safer Internet Plus programme and establish a structure that caters for

the partnership with IWF and the NSPCC.

Implement the funded programme of work for the next round of the Safer Internet Plus programme.

Deliver an evaluation of the CEOP Thinkuknow campaign for 11-16 year olds and consider evaluations relating

to other components of the programme.


6. Structure and function in detail

Specialist Operational Support

Formerly known as the Operations Faculty, it has now been renamed the Specialist Operational Support Faculty.

This change in title reflects the relationship it has developed supporting the UK's child protection services. This

Faculty provides support particularly to police forces, international law enforcement agencies and non-governmental

organisations, ultimately disseminating intelligence (often to an evidential standard) leading to the safeguarding

intervention activity, protecting children, whilst holding offenders to account.

The Faculty provides the following distinct functions:

The Covert Operations Team which infiltrates networks of paedophiles with a strong emphasis in the online

environment.

The Financial Investigation Team which investigates the commercial distribution of abuse images. This work

involves liaising with partners and other stakeholders to develop an enhanced understanding of the offending

environment, informing and influencing industry involvement whilst undertaking target investigations. The team

also produces tactical lifestyle analysis and enhances offender management risk assessment.

The Image Analysis and Victim Identification Team works predominantly with the police service, investigating

contemporary child abuse captured in still and video images. This role is delivered through crime investigation,

safeguarding children strategies, maintenance of ChildBase and national/international co-ordination.

The Faculty has a small computer forensic data recovery service. This resource can strengthen existing force

capability.

Whilst providing these key support services, the Faculty also performs roles that include tactical advising (including

Senior Child Protection Advisors) and field intelligence officers.

As the Faculty continually addresses new child protection policing challenges, it is designed to flex to demand,

drawing in external specialists as appropriate.

Ambitions for 2009-10:

Develop closer working with industry through participation within the European Financial Coalition.

Focus on quality, improving operational administrative systems.

Develop a platform to provide greater operational flexibility.

Strengthen our computer forensic capability.

Strengthen the safeguarding approach within operational risk assessment.

Business Areas and Corporate Services

B U S I N E S S P L A N

To provide support to the faculties, CEOP has a number of small business areas. Each of these key strategic areas

is led by a member of the Chief Executive’s Management Team and supported by a small number of staff. These

business areas include Safeguarding and Child Protection, Corporate Communications and Public Affairs,

Partnerships, Governance and Business Development.

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28

B U S I N E S S P L A N

6. Structure and function in detail

Safeguarding and Child Protection

CEOP continues to hold the fundamental principle that all children and young people have a right to protection and

that their welfare should be considered as paramount at all times. As such, Safeguarding and Child Protection has

a key role in the management team and is fundamental to the way services and activities are continually developed

and reviewed to meet this principle. Standards are monitored to ensure they are based on current good practice and

informed by contemporary legislation, guidance and evidence from research and experience drawn from extensive

child protection and safeguarding activities, with wide-ranging organisations providing protective action for children.

Clear procedures for staff to report child safeguarding and welfare concerns are in place and CEOP continues to

ensure that parents, children and young people, victims and survivors views are actively taken into account in our

policies, procedures and service development. CEOP constantly strives to improve the way it can safeguard and

promote the welfare of children, recognising that this is crucial to improving outcomes for children. Many of the child

protection practitioners in CEOP are provided through the partnership with the NSPCC. These members of staff are

fully integrated into the three faculties providing professional child protection advice and guidance across the range

of CEOP’s functions.

As the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child states ‘all children have the right to be protected from abuse and

exploitation’. In addition, CEOP believes that:

all children and young people should be encouraged to fulfil their potential and inequalities should be challenged;

everybody has a responsibility to support the care and protection of children; and

all organisations, including CEOP, have a duty of care to children and young people with whom they come

into contact.

Corporate Communications and Public Affairs

As child protection continues to occupy a high and sensitive profile at the top of public consciousness, key opinion

formers, parents, their children and the public need to see, hear and be reassured by the measures being taken to

protect children from abuse. The Corporate Communications team plays an integral role in the overall purpose

of the organisation, by ensuring that across all relevant sectors there is a consistent, co-ordinated and balanced

understanding of both the services that CEOP offers as well as the ways in which the UK is leading the way in

tackling the sexual abuse of children.

Typically this involves utilising a range of media to inform parents and young people about online safety, giving advice

and guidance to practitioners on the ‘tactical advisor’ role of the organisation and helping to reassure and educate

wider audiences about the measures being developed to track and bring offenders to account. It also involves direct

deterrent campaigns aimed specifically at perpetrators of the crime.

Corporate Services

Most of CEOP’s corporate services are provided by SOCA at a cost to them of approximately £3.4million. Of these,

ICT service support is mainly funded from within the SOCA iSM budget, even though the staff are embedded at

CEOP and direct responsibility for the delivery of the services provided falls to the CEOP Chief Operating Officer.

Finance and Human Resources staff from SOCA are also embedded at CEOP, with their line management remaining

within the professional group at SOCA. In other cases, for example, the provision of recruitment support,

occupational health and general welfare, security advice and vetting and health and safety, CEOP calls upon

services provided from within SOCA's Corporate Support teams. SOCA Human Resources also provides a specific

and tailored psychological welfare service to CEOP. Delivery of these services is based upon agreed service levels

and is facilitated and co-ordinated by the CEOP Chief Operating Officer and his staff, who also provide a corporate

service management and reception service.


6. Structure and function in detail

Both systems and the service support relationship between CEOP and SOCA Corporate Services continue to evolve

and mature. Greater responsibility for budget management, health and safety management etc is being devolved to

the CEOP CEO by the Accounting Officer and from him on to the faculty and business area levels, supported by

appropriate professional support. CEOP continues to benefit from the wide range of support services provided

by SOCA, especially as these become increasingly specifically focused on meeting CEOP's needs.

Corporate support services ambitions for 2009-10 include building on the progress made during 2008/09, for

example, business continuity and business recovery arrangements, financial and resource management, compliance

with key standards and risk management. Further enhancement of the Occupational Health and welfare provision,

especially with regard to the psychological health of CEOP staff will continue to ensure that corporate support

service more effectively and efficiently support delivery of business objectives.

Information Management

CEOP has its own suite of operational, intelligence and business support systems and has responsibility for

a considerable volume of sensitive data. CEOP has an internal function which is responsible for the management

of these systems and the data held therein, as well as the development of new and enhanced systems to better

support the work of the organisation. Compliance and accreditation work in this area is done where appropriate in

close cooperation with SOCA. CEOP also has a key role in the support of child protection focused work on national

information management systems such as the Police National Database and the use of information systems to

facilitate appropriate international sharing of knowledge on operational child protection issues.

Partnerships

CEOP is a unique organisation, with a partnership approach that is a departure from conventional practice in UK

government. CEOP is committed to developing and maximising partnerships with all sectors – government, industry

(especially the online and mobile industry) and the voluntary sector – to enable it to deliver a truly holistic approach

to child protection. Partnerships enhance all areas of CEOP’s work and provide a continuous flow of expertise,

experience and resources into the organisation.

All partnerships are based on mutual benefit and built on ethical foundations with the sole intention of enhancing

child protection. By engaging with appropriate partners, the Partnerships Team aims to: maximise CEOP’s reach and

impact; ensure a coordinated approach; obtain valuable expertise and resources; and increase the success of

CEOP’s work and create opportunities for growth.

Governance

CEOP’s Head of Governance works closely with colleagues at SOCA to administer the CEOP Board (see section 7).

In addition, the Head of Governance provides the secretariat for all CEOP’s strategic meetings, is responsible for

the delivery of strategic risk management and the structure and management of CEOP policies and procedures and

liaises with SOCA around the audit and risk programme and local management of auditors when on site (see section

7). The governance area also includes a small legal team, offering specialist support in legal issues associated with

child protection.

Business Development

B U S I N E S S P L A N

This area of CEOP is responsible for business planning, the performance management regime and the oversight

and management of CEOP’s portfolio of development projects and programmes of work. This business area works

closely with all CEOP’s faculties and business areas to balance the need for development against the capacity

and capability of the resources, as well as the management of risk and achieving value for money.

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B U S I N E S S P L A N

7. Governance, partnership, audit & risk

Governance

As an affiliate of SOCA, CEOP’s governance arrangements are unconventional. They entail relationships and

responsibilities which span CEOP itself, SOCA and the Home Office. These have been summarised in Appendix B.

More details are available in the CEOP Protocol which is available on the website.

CEOP reports to the CEOP Board which is established as a committee of the SOCA Board. The CEOP Board is

chaired by a SOCA non-executive director. The CEOP Chief Executive is appointed by the Home Secretary and is

operationally independent. There is a separate relationship with the Home Office which addresses matters of central

funding and planning.

The membership of the CEOP Board is set out in Appendix C.

Partnership

Partnership is fundamental to CEOP’s design. This model recognises that the problem of child abuse is a complex

one, best addressed by all sectors working together to improve child protection. CEOP benefits hugely through its

network of partners, in terms of direct support, secondments, advice and influence. Appendix D to this plan includes

a list of formally documented partnerships.

This partnership approach is not without risk so, in order to understand and control this, CEOP has in place

a Partnerships Policy. At the heart of this policy is the Partnerships Committee which consists of independent

members who advise on the adoption (or otherwise) of new partnerships, after due consideration of the ethical

and mutual benefits of each partnership and other factors.

Audit & Risk

CEOP does not have formal accounts of its own, as these are subsumed within SOCA’s system. However, it does

have its own internal audit programme and risk management system. The former is agreed in consultation with the

SOCA Head of Corporate Assurance. Audit and risk issues are reported to SOCA’s Audit Committee as necessary

and, more routinely, to the Chief Executive’s Management Team and the CEOP Board. CEOP has a local Audit and

Risk Group, which includes independent external membership and meets on a monthly basis.


Further information

The CEOP Centre is an open organisation. We will make as many of our policies, plans and decisions available

to the public as we can. We have only just begun this process, but interested parties are encouraged to visit

our website.

For specific queries relating to this document, please contact Nicki Tinkler:

Email: nicki.tinkler@ceop.gsi.gov.uk

Telephone: +44 (0)870 000 3344

Post: Nicki Tinkler

Head of Business Development,

CEOP Centre,

33 Vauxhall Bridge Road,

London,

SW1V 2WG,

United Kingdom

For general queries about the CEOP Centre, please contact:

Main switchboard: +44(0)870 000 3344

Website: www.ceop.police.uk

Post: CEOP Centre,

33 Vauxhall Bridge Road,

London,

SW1V 2WG,

United Kingdom

B U S I N E S S P L A N

31


Appendix A

Glossary

ACPO Association of Chief Police Officers

ACPO(S) Association of Chief Police Officers for Scotland

APA Association of Police Authorities

BECTA British Education Communications and Technology Agency

CEO Chief Executive Officer, CEOP

CEOP Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre

CETS Child Exploitation Tracking System

CFP Citizen Focused Policing

DCSF Department for Children, Schools and Family

DG Director General SOCA

EC European Commission

EU European Union

GCHQ Government Communications Headquarters

HMIC HM Inspectorate of Constabulary

HMRC HM Revenue and Customs

ICT Information and Communications Technology

IM Information Management

IYAC International Youth Advisory Congress

KDI Key Diagnostic Indicator

NCS (former) National Crime Squad

NCIS (former) National Criminal Intelligence Service

NGO Non-Governmental Organisation

NSPCC National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children

PSA Public Service Agreement

SOCA Serious Organised Crime Agency

SPI Strategic Performance Indicator

VGT Virtual Global Taskforce

UCLAN University of Central Lancashire

UK United Kingdom

UKCCIS UK Council for Child Internet Safety

UN United Nations

UNCRC United Nations Convention of the Rights of the Child

YAP Youth Advisory Panel

B U S I N E S S P L A N

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B U S I N E S S P L A N

Appendix B

CEOP’s governance: summary of roles and responsibilities

The Home Office is responsible for:

determining strategic priorities;

determining the ring-fenced element of the CEOP budget;

the appointment, appraisal and discipline of the CEO/CEOP (and delegating aspects of this function to the

DG/SOCA);

working directly with CEOP in developing strategic priorities, budgets, business planning and performance

regimes; and

the agreement of CEOP Business Plans.

SOCA is responsible for:

overall statutory accountability to the Home Office for CEOP;

establishing a CEOP Board to fulfil this role;

incorporating CEOP into its mainstream audit arrangements, whereby CEOP reports to the SOCA Audit

Committee; and

setting the overall policy framework for CEOP (exceptions will be agreed with the DG/SOCA).

The DG/SOCA is responsible for:

the Accounting Officer’s role for CEOP;

the delegation of powers and budgets to the CEO/CEOP;

assisting the Home Office in the appointment and management of the CEO/CEOP;

the agreement of any CEOP policies departing from the SOCA policy framework; and

agreeing processes for the appointment and management of senior CEOP staff.

The CEOP Board is responsible for:

the strategic control of CEOP;

the monitoring of performance and expenditure; and

the submission of CEOP Business Plans to the Home Office.

CEOP is responsible for:

reporting to the Home Office through the CEOP Committee;

all operational matters within its remit;

compliance with SOCA policies save where bespoke arrangements have been agreed with the DG/SOCA; and

establishing its own advisory groups to assist it in fulfilling its role.

The CEO/CEOP is responsible for:

the full operational control of CEOP;

reporting to the CEOP Board on performance, business plans and expenditure;

agreeing any bespoke CEOP policies with the DG/SOCA; and

working with the Home Office on the development of policy on strategic priorities, budgets, business planning

and performance issues.


Appendix C

CEOP board members

Janet Paraskeva (Non-executive board member, SOCA) – Chairman

Matthew Bishop (Business and Marketing Officer, Microsoft)

Chris Blairs (Head of Organised and Financial Crime Unit, Home Office)

Malcolm Cornberg (Director of Corporate Services, SOCA)

Wes Cuell (Director of Services to Children and Young People, NSPCC)

Jim Gamble (Chief Executive, CEOP)

Brian Greenslade (Association of Police Authorities) – nominee

Bill Hughes (Director General, SOCA)

Ken Jarrold (Non-executive board member, SOCA)

Paul Minton (ACPO) – nominee

Trevor Pearce (Executive Director Enforcement, SOCA)

B U S I N E S S P L A N

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B U S I N E S S P L A N

Appendix D

List of partners

The following organisations are currently signed up as CEOP partners. In addition to these partners, CEOP works

proactively with many other organisations in industry, government and the voluntary sector. We are extremely grateful

to all of them for their continued support.

Strategic Partners

Microsoft

National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC)

Serco

Visa Europe

Partners

ACS International Schools

Axios

Becta

BT

Churches’ Child Protection Advisory Service

Crimestoppers

Detica

The Foundation for Social Improvement

Google

Hector’s World

Intuitive Media

Miss Dorothy

O2

PayPal

Virgin Media

Vodafone UK

World Check

A partner is defined by CEOP as:

providing at least a 1 year commitment;

assisting in progressing CEOP’s work in at least one area;

embedding staff or resources within CEOP either ongoing or project-based;

providing specialist knowledge to CEOP; and/or

sponsoring events, publications or initiatives.

Government Partners

Australian Federal Police

Becta

DCSF

UK Border Agency

HMRC

GCHQ


Appendix E

Objective 2 (outstanding performance measures 2008-09)

B U S I N E S S P L A N

To engage and empower children, young people, parents and the community through information and education.

Target A Lead Faculty: Harm Reduction

During the academic years 2007/08 and 2008/09 3.5m UK children and young people aged between 7-16 will have

the CEOP Thinkuknow programme delivered to them.

Commentary:

This indicator was new in 2007 and covers two academic years (September 07 to July 09). It reflects our work which

spans both primary and secondary schools. This work is part funded (50%) by the European Commission as part of

their Safer Internet programme. CEOP uses its knowledge of offender’s behaviour and the way children and young

people use both the internet and converged technology to build education packages suited to three different age

ranges. These education packages are delivered by CEOP trained volunteer trainers, such as police officers, child

protection workers and teachers and use a range of resources which can either be downloaded or sent to schools.

These resources are regularly updated and include films, posters, lesson plans etc. Through a network of trained

trainers, CEOP is able to ensure that credible and contemporary information around online safety and security is

available to children and young people but delivered by local professionals to provide local reassurance on their

community’s safety.

Previous performance:

2006-07

In the 2006-07 academic year our target was to reach one million children through our education programme.

This was achieved.

2007-08

Between September 07 and March 08 626,000 children and young people received the Thinkuknow education

package.

Target B Lead Faculty: Harm Reduction

By the end of July 2009, CEOP to have provided every UK primary school [21,968] with CEOP Thinkuknow

resources underpinned by a framework of appropriate online and offline advice and support.

Commentary:

This indicator was new last year and covers two academic years (September 07 to July 09). It reflects our work

in primary schools. This work is part funded (50%) by the European Commission as part of their Safer Internet

programme. CEOP has used its knowledge of offender’s behaviour and the way children use both the internet

and converged technology to build education two packages suitable for children in key stage 1 and key stage 2.

These education packages CyberCafé for 8-10 year olds (key stage 2) and Hectors World for 5-7 year olds (KS1)

have been specifically designed to help children identify and manage risks online. Packages are available to CEOP

trained trainers to deliver these packages to children as part of the school programme.

Previous performance:

2006-07

N/A

2007-08

N/A

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B U S I N E S S P L A N

Appendix E

Target C Lead Faculty: Harm Reduction

During 2007/08 and 2008/09, CEOP will deliver a public awareness campaign aimed at engaging with 5 million UK

parents and carers about online safety of children and young people. This will be achieved through working with

relevant partners and stakeholders and by using a range of media, both online and offline.

Commentary:

This package was developed and delivered in 2007-08. However, this year work will be carried out to capture the

impact and effectiveness of this work. Again the Purely for Parents package is available to be downloaded from our

website www.ceop.police.uk

Previous performance:

2006-07

N/A

2007-08

See above


Appendix F

Performance indicator definitions

Definition of Key Terms – Objective 1

Safeguarding and promoting the welfare of children is: the process of protecting children from abuse or neglect,

preventing impairment of their health and development and ensuring that they are growing up in circumstances

consistent with the provision of safe and effective care that enables children to have optimum life chances and enter

adulthood successfully.

Child protection is: the process of protecting individual children identified as either suffering, or at risk of suffering

significant harm as a result of abuse or neglect. It is a part of safeguarding and promoting welfare and is the activity

that is undertaken to protect specific children.

Strategic intelligence products: this includes the Strategic Overviews and any other related strategic products

provided to external bodies including those which are restricted or confidential and not in the public domain

i.e. control strategy.

Tactical intelligence products: an intelligence package which is a recognised intelligence form (form A) containing

assessments of the original information from the person making the report.

Deployment of CEOP resource: the documented and auditable involvement of a CEOP resource in an external

operation. This may be the physical presence of an individual(s) or resource or the use of CEOP expertise in an

advisory capacity in support of an external operation, or CEOP capability to provide added value to the desired

operational outcomes.

Definition of Key Terms – Objective 2

Children and young people: those children or young people (under 18 years) who have received the CEOP

Thinkuknow education programme at key stage 1 (aged 5-7), key stage 2 (aged 8-10) or key stage 3 (aged 11-16).

TUK Ambassador: is an individual who has attended CEOP’s Thinkuknow full day Ambassador Course to learn how

to cascade Thinkuknow training. This person must be a CRB cleared professional working in education, child

protection, policing or youth sectors and is in contact with colleagues working directly with young people and

falls into one or more of the following categories:

Strategic role – for example, within a police force, local authority or school

Training – for example, training colleagues within environments described above

Working directly with children and young people

B U S I N E S S P L A N

The TUK Ambassador facilitates and delivers the half day TUK Training to other professionals working directly

with young people.

TUK Trainer: is an individual who has attended CEOP’s Thinkuknow half day Training Course to learn how to deliver

CEOP’s Thinkuknow education programme to children and young people, primarily those in the secondary school

age group. This person is a CRB cleared professional working in the education, child protection, policing or youth

arena and is in direct professional contact with children and young people young people.

TUK Registrant: is a professional who works directly with children and young people and registers to access CEOP’s

Thinkuknow standalone products, such as primary school and Safer Internet Day materials, provided they agree to

CEOP’s validation process.

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B U S I N E S S P L A N

Appendix F

Performance indicator definitions

Definition of Key Terms – Objective 3

CEOP training courses: have been specifically designed to help frontline child protective services practitioners and

managers better understand the nature of child sexual offending, including where technology plays a part in abuse

and to impart the knowledge and skills that can better equip these professionals to deal with the very difficult and

distressing nature of this crime. The training courses, lasting between one and three days, are developed and

delivered by specialists in their field; this includes forensic behaviour analysts, barristers and senior investigating

police officers, all who have a wealth of practical experience in dealing with offenders and victims alike.

CEOP Academy: as part of the training offered by CEOP, delegates can chose to enrol on the CEOP Academy and

undertake the Postgraduate Certificate in Behavioural Forensic Psychology, which is run in conjunction with the

University of Central Lancashire (UCLan). The Postgraduate certificate is an academic qualification for specialists

involved in dealing with child sex offenders and child abuse.

Delegate: a frontline child protective services practitioner or manager who attends CEOP training.

Student: a child protective services practitioner or manager who is participating in the CEOP Academy.

Definition of Key Terms – Objective 4

Deployment of CEOP resource: the documented and auditable involvement of a CEOP resource in an external

operation. This may be the physical presence of an individual(s) or resource or the use of CEOP expertise in an

advisory capacity in support of an external operation or CEOP capability to provide added value to the desired

operational outcomes.

Offender brought to justice: means that the offence resulted in a caution, conviction or penalty notice. It also

includes those offences admitted by the offender, who asked for the offence to be taken into consideration by the

court (TIC) and signed a TIC acceptance form. Cautions include reprimands and final warnings to juveniles where

a caution would previously have been given and conditional cautions.


Child Exploitation and Online Protection Centre

33 Vauxhall Bridge Road, London, SW1V 2WG

www.ceop.police.uk

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