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round lake history - Pioneer Press Communities Online

ROUND LAKE LEADERSHIP

CENTENNIAL MESSAGE

FROM THE MAYOR

One hundred years ago, there were no I-Pods,

MP3 players, cell phones, hybrid cars and text

messages. One hundred years ago, the Village

of Round Lake was a sleepy hamlet where ice

blocks were chopped from Round Lake and sent to the

“Big City.”

Today the Village of Round Lake is a progressive village

that is home to more than 17,000 residents. And although

Round Lake has grown in size, it still maintains its friendly,

homey atmosphere. I always see people I know whenever

I shop, whether it’s at the gas station, the bakery or a

local restaurant. The charm of 100 years ago still remains!

I know the village is improving in every way, and in this

next century, the changes will be as unimaginable as they

were to the founding fathers of Round Lake in 1908.

It is my pleasure to serve as Mayor of the Village during

our 100th anniversary. I hope this book captures some of

the vibrant energy that Round Lake has had for the last

100 years.

Sincerely,

MAYOR BILL GENTES

Niche Publications:

Michelle Weiss Niche Publications Manager

Tammy Matthews Special Sections Editor

Project Designer

Alexandra Kassel Cover Design

Joe Shuman Photography

Evan Schwartz Marketing Intern

Justin Murray Graphic Designer

Advertising:

Andrea Sonnenberg Director of Advertising

Brad Hanahan Sales Executive

Tammy Marchetta Sales Executive

Appreciations:

Centennial Logo: Courtesy of the collaborative efforts of John

Tomusiak of Artreagous Custom Engraving LLC. and John

Wondrasek of Wondrasek Creative, Inc. Artwork compliments of

John Wondrasek.

Additional Photos: Compliments of Digital Artifacts

Published August 2008, by Pioneer Press, 3701 W. Lake Ave., Glenview, IL 60026. Every effort has been made

to ensure the accuracy of the information in this book. The Publishers cannot guarantee the correctness of all

the information available to them and assume no liability arising from error or omission. Comments concerning

this book should be sent to: Village of Round Lake, 442 N. Cedar Lake Rd., Round Lake, IL 60073

and/or 3701 W. Lake Ave., Glenview, IL 60026. nichepublications@pioneerlocal.com Copyright© 2008 Pioneer

Press and Village of Round Lake. All Rights Reserved. Reproducing any part of this book by photocopying, by

electronic storage and retrieval or by any means is prohibited.

MAYORS OF ROUND LAKE

AMARIAS

WHITE

1909 – 1911

WILLIAM

ROSING

1911 – 1917

WILLIAM

WILMINGTON

1917 – 1921

1923 – 1937

BEN

PETERKORT

1921 – 1923

HENRY

HONEMAN

1937 – 1941

CHARLES

BRAINERD

1941 – 1949

ROUND LAKE CENTENNIAL 1908-2008

MAYOR BILL GENTES

2001 – present

Village of Round Lake

442 N. Cedar Lake Road

Round Lake, IL 60073

(847) 546-5400

www.eroundlake.com

LEO

HENDEE

1949 – 1953

GEORGE

ANTTONEN

1953 – 1961

DOUGLAS

MACGILLIS

1961 – 1965

DELBERT

AMANN

1965 – 1981

RUDY

MAGNA, SR.

1981 – 1989

JAMES

LUMBER

1989 – 2001

3


VILLAGE OFFICIALS

CENTENNIAL CELEBRATIONS

4

Jeanne Kristan

Village Clerk

Don Newby

Trustee

Michael Blum

Trustee

Sherry Perkowitz

Trustee

Feb. 23, 2008 Ice House Festival Mar. 15, 2008 Egg Hunt

Feb. 23 Ice House Festival

1-4 p.m. @ the village hall

Mar. 14 Flashlight Egg Hunt

8 p.m. @ Hart’s Woods

Mar. 15 Egg Hunt

11 a.m. @ Hart’s Woods

(Collaboration with RLA Park District)

Apr. 19 Arbor Day

10 a.m. @ the village hall

June 27-28 Streets of Summer

Goodnow & Avilon Streets

Brian Brubaker

Trustee

Dale Multerer

Trustee

Aug. 16 Ice Cream Social &

Movie Night

7:30 p.m. @ Police & Public

Works building

Sept. 6 Founder’s Day Ball

6 p.m. @ Maravela’s in Fox Lake

Nov. Food Drive

supports various local

food pantries

Dec. 5 Tree Lighting

6 p.m. @ the village hall

ROUND LAKE CENTENNIAL 1908-2008

Robert Del Prato

Trustee

CENTENNIAL COMMITTEE

Co-Chairs: Kate Kristan

Kathy Multerer

Members: Connie Kraly

Rich Hermann

Jeanne Kristan

Don Newby


ARMOUR’S ICE HOUSE

In 1901, Armour and Company completed

work on its icehouse in Round

Lake. Said to be the largest icehouse

working at the time, the plant made

100,000 tons of ice each winter and provided

employment for many people in the

area. One-hundred-and-eighty tons of ice

were hauled out of the lake each day –

enough to fill five or six boxcars. The building

covered five acres.

Frank Federson, famous locally for his

fur coat, came from Chicago to run the

plant. The Federsons also operated a large

guesthouse adjoining the plant that

housed Armour employees.

Ice from Armour Ice House was used to

cool the plant for meat processing. The ice

traveled in wooded chutes. The chutes

brought the ice in from the north on two

runways and deposited it onto a 60-foot

conveyor. The big conveyor took the ice to

the top of the icehouse inside the building.

A steam engine located on the north side of

the building generated the conveyor belt.

A weed-cutter barge would cut a strip of

ice 24 to 30 feet wide and 40 feet long from

the frozen lake water. Steam powered with

a paddlewheel on the back, the barge had a

cycle bar on the front that was lowered to

cut the weeds. Horses pulled the ice back to

the icehouse. Occasionally, a horse would

fall through the ice, and the men would try

to catch the choke rope to save the horse.

A double set of railroad tracks set 30 feet

Women from Armour’s Chicago plant vacationing

in Round Lake

The Armour Ice House burnt down on August 19, 1917.

The Armour Ice House was the largest manufacturer of ice at its time. The building covered five acres.

apart, with a bumper at the end, transported

the ice. One day, a speeding train shoved

two cars into the lake. Thankfully, workers

were able to pull them out with a wrecker.

On the night of August 19, 1917, a fire

destroyed the icehouse. The fire was

thought to have been started by some of

the International Workers of the World.

Bystanders who first noticed the fire said

they saw something shoot across the roof

that looked like a star. The structure’s roof

began burning in six places. The bright

glow of the fire – so bright that newspapers

could have been read through out the village

– raged for hours and smoldered for

two weeks.

ROUND LAKE CENTENNIAL 1908-2008

After the wrecking crew had removed

eighteen ice cars, the wheels and other

wreckage, new rails were laid so cars could

be brought in to be filled with ice that had

not melted. When all of the ice was

removed, the boards of the walls were torn

down and sold as firewood at $1.50 per

load. The building was never rebuilt

because manufacturers were then able to

make ice by electric refrigeration.

The guesthouse continued to operate as

a vacation spot for the girls employed by

Armour in their large meat-packaging

establishment. It remained a private resort

called the Oval Lodge. Later, Armour sold it

to the owners of the Alpine Country Club.

The Armour’s Boarding House after the fire destroyed the plant. This building, where some workers

lodged, was connected to a boarding house for women workers from the Chicago plant. It is now

Alpine Country Club.

5


ROUND LAKE HISTORY

Grocery store. Originally Esmond & Kirkpatrick. Changed

to Rosing Bros.

An early shuttle-bus-type business. This wagon picked up

people from the railroad station and take them to George

Renehan’s Round Lake Hotel.

One-cell jail and the Schumacher Hotel. The hotel still

exists across the street from where the blacksmith was.

This nine-hole golf course used to be on the east side of

Fairfield in the 1930s.

6

The Village of Round Lake

owes its being and, to a

large extent, its growth, to

the far-sighted efforts of

Amarias M. White and a small group

of men who foresaw the importance

of rail transportation.

It was White who convinced railroad

officials to locate a depot in

Round Lake and who gave the land

for that purpose. The Lake, Cook and

McHenry Counties Railway Company

was formed in 1899 to build a branch

of the Chicago Milwaukee and St.

Paul Railroad, from Libertyville to

Janesville, Wisc. Initially, a station was

planned for Hainesville.

Hainesville was already a thriving

village and the oldest in Lake County.

As the track neared the town, A.C.

Goodnow, head of the company and

later a vice president of the

Milwaukee Road, began bargaining

with George B. Battershall,

Hainesville merchant and owner of

much of the land in that area.

Battershall set a high price on his

land.

A boxcar was set up beside the

tracks in Hainesville to provide a temporary

headquarters for the telegrapher,

but Battershall was a stubborn

man and refused to lower his price.

At this time, White offered the railroad

a free site for the station if they

would locate it in what is now Round

Lake. Goodnow accepted the offer on

the condition that White would have

several streets laid leading to the station.

White agreed to do this, and

soon tents dotted the right-of-way as

men brought the tracks through to

Round Lake.

The line was finished and deeded

to the Chicago, Milwaukee and St.

Paul on July 1, 1901. The following

month, White filed the original plat of

the village at the Lake County Court

House. This plat showed Railroad

Avenue at the north, along the tracks

Cedar Lake as the east boundary and

the Nippersink Avenue the south. In

honor of the railroad official, White

ROUND LAKE CENTENNIAL 1908-2008

named the west boundary after

Goodnow and presented him with a

choice lot at the corner of Nippersink

and Cedar Lake. Avilon Avenue

bisected the village, and two alleys

provided further access. A Mr.

Hooper was the station agent.

At that time, the only building in

the village was the one on the corner

of Railroad and Cedar Lake avenues.

It was a general store and post office

run by Wilton J. Esmond and George

B. Kirkpatrick. (Kirkpatrick was

named the first postmaster on

November 16, 1901.) Naomi Vasey

(McCanless) was clerk at the general

store when news of President

McKinley’s assassination came over

the wires on September 6, 1901. Later,

Henry Gieske, then a Mr. Weber, sold

general merchandise, groceries and

meats from the same building. Frank

Drummond purchased the business,

and he was in the process of moving

into the store, from his previous shop

a block away, when the Armistice was

declared November 11, 1918. Jubilant

people stopped what they were

doing, and all moving came to a halt.

Stock was covered and left on the

sidewalk to be moved another day.

In 1908, people were talking about

Admiral Peary’s expedition to the

North Pole. That summer, Round

Lake residents began thinking about

politics and considering that desirability

of incorporating the village in

order to channel its rapid growth.

Everyone seemed to approve of the

idea except the farmers, who didn’t

want to have to pay taxes to a village

government. However, to comply

with the area population regulations

set by the county, it was necessary to

have not only the farmers’ vote but

also to have the area of their farms

included in the village limits.

That summer, Amarias White, the

Amann brothers, Will Rosing, A. J.

(Del) Smith, John Hart (whose father,

Henry, owned one of the largest

farms) and others went around the

countryside trying to convince their


neighbors that incorporation was a good

and necessary thing for the community.

The farmers were not easily convinced.

Eventually, however, the coalition

and the farmers reached an agreement.

The farmers signed the petition to

support an election on the condition that

they could withdraw immediately after

the village was incorporated.

White and his cohorts presented the

petition to the Honorable D.L. Jones,

judge of the court at Waukegan, on

November 19, 1908. Judge Jones found

everything in order and called for an

election to be held at Paddock’s

Hardware Store on December 9, 1908,

Jones appointed John Hart, Will Rosing

and Walter White, a local auctioneer, as

judges of the election.

Notices of the election were posted in

prominent places in the village: at the

depot, at Gilbert school, in front of the

creamery, at Rosing Brothers Store (the

Rosings had bought out Kirkpatrick and

Esmond) and at the entrance to the Fort

Hill cemetery. Between 7 a.m. and 5 p.m.,

66 people voted: 51 ‘for’ and 15 ‘against’

incorporating the village. Claus Junge, Sr.

was appointed village president.

ROUND LAKE BEACH

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ROUND LAKE

An election for village officials was set

for January 7, 1909. At the January election,

only 29 people voted. Amarias

White was unanimously chosen village

president. For police magistrate, there is

some discrepancy as to whether Phillip

Flary or W. A. McClintock was elected.

George E. Richardson was named village

clerk; W. A. Rosing was named treasurer.

The trustees were Walter White, S.C.

Litwiler, Edward Hendee, Martin Thelen,

Edward Luby and Frank Amann.

They held the first board meeting on

February 6, 1909, and the first item on

the agenda was the 14 residents petitioning

for the disconnection of their property

from the village. True to their word, the

board allowed this, and the petition was

filed with the county. Those who sought

disconnection were Sherman C. and

Simon A. Davis, Daniel Wightman,

Harrison Gilbert, W. E. Renehan, C. B.

Coombs, C. M. Cleveland, Mary Dutzler,

Hener Hart, Josephine A. Hendee, Mary

A. Litwiler, Charles Tucker, M. E. Huson

and William Wilson. The actual disconnection

was delayed because the territory

had to be described again due to an

error of the attorney or his stenographer.

847.791.6049

36735 N. Rte 83, C Lake Villa (Next to Round Lake Beach Chiropractic)

CORNER OF FAIRFIELD RD. & 134

CONGRATULATIONS TO

THE VILLAGE OF ROUND LAKE

®

SM

ROUND LAKE CENTENNIAL 1908-2008

Ben Peterkort’s drug Store and Ice Cream Parlor

Fox Lake - Round Lake Area Rotary Club

Dedicated To Humanitarian Service

And Fellowship

In Our Communities And The World

SERVICE Above Self

For further information call: 847-587-2315

ANCEL GLINK MEANS LOCAL GOVERNMENT LAW

ANCEL, GLINK, DIAMOND,

BUSH, DICIANNI & KRAFTHEFER, P.C.

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ATTORNEYS

REPRESENTING PUBLIC ENTITIES AND PUBLIC OFFICIALS

THROUGHOUT ILLINOIS SINCE 1931

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CRYSTAL LAKE WAUKEGAN

PHONE 312-782-7606

VISIT WWW.ANCELGLINK.COM TO REQUEST OUR QUARTERLY NEWSLETTER VIA EMAIL

7


THE TRAIN ENGINE AT THE

BOTTOM OF ROUND LAKE

Armour Ice House used to sit on the site of today’s Alpine

Country Club. Before the invention of the refrigerator,

icehouses were buildings used to store ice throughout

the year. The most common designs involved underground

chambers, usually man-made, which were built close to

natural sources of winter ice such as freshwater lakes (i.e. Round

Lake). During the winter, ice and snow would be taken into the icehouse

and packed with insulation, often straw or sawdust. It

remained frozen for many months, often until the following winter,

and it could be used as a source of ice during summer months.

This could be used simply to cool drinks or allow ice cream and

sorbet desserts to be prepared. In winter months, ice was chopped

from a lake surface and often dragged by sledge to the ice house,

and in summer months, was delivered from local icehouses to residences

in ice wagons or ice trucks, where it would be stored in an

ice box, which was used much like a modern refrigerator. In Round

Lake, it was not dragged by sledge. Rather, it was moved via temporary

rail lines laid down on the iced over lake. An engine would

move the ice back and forth. In addition, the engine would take

loads up the rail spur to the main line about half a mile away. As

8

CALVARY

PRESBYTERIAN

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510 N. Cedar Lake Road, Round Lake

847-546-4444

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Healing Service.

2nd Sunday of every month

8:00 AM

The Rev. Lisle J. Kauffman, Pastor

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home and business refrigeration became more common, icehouses

disappeared. Local lore has it that a train engine car that was

parked on the ice had fallen through. This was near the end of the

ice cutting season, and the ice melted sooner than expected.

Instead of recovering the engine, company officials thought it best

to leave the engine right where it was at the bottom of Round Lake.

Years later, an ultra-sound was done on the lake to see if the engine

could be spotted and perhaps salvaged. The end result? No engine

was found. However, you can still see evidence of the rail spur that

was used when the icehouse was in full operation.

Round Lake locomotive, August 1903

CHIROPRACTIC CARE

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ROUND LAKE CENTENNIAL 1908-2008

Sports Center

Over 60 parks, trails and open spaces

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FOREST GLEN CREAMERY

The Claus Junge family began construction on the Forest Glen Creamery

in 1907, and it went into operation the following year. During this time,

farmers brought their milk to the depot early each morning and loaded

the eight-gallon cans onto Chicago-bound milk trains. Occasionally,

Ed Bauman and the other farmers would stop at the taverns before going home.

They left their teams out in the front while they played Euchre (cards) inside.

Claus Junge helped start the growth and development of Round Lake. He was

in the dairy business, and he saw possibilities out in the country after a new law

required milk to be pasteurized before it was shipped.

During the early 1900s, nearly all of the business in the Round Lake area was

dairy farming. With the exception of a few shopkeepers, all were farmers from as

far away as Lake Villa and Fox Lake who had no place to pasteurize their milk The Forest Glen Creamery, renamed the Round Lake

Creamery, was open by Claus Junge in 1907.

before shipping it to Chicago. Junge and two partners built the Forest Glen

Creamery.

The Forest Glen Creamery was the first industry for Round Lake. It began operating

with about 70 patrons. Farmers came from Grayslake, Round Lake, Lake

Villa, Fox Lake and most of Fremont Township to have their milk pasteurized.

The creamery was really a big business; it employed 25-30 full-time people. All

work was done by hand. The employees washed and sterilized the milk cans by

hand, and the milk bottles were washed and filled by hand. The creamery made

its own ice to help store the milk before it was loaded on the train for Chicago.

Farmers would wait in line on a big hill in front of the creamery to unload their

milk every morning. Inside the creamery

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VALLEY LAKES

VETERINARY CLINIC

Dr. Peter Hartman, DVM

847-270-0880

Call for Appointments

415 N. Wilson Rd. Round Lake

(Between Rt. 134 & Nippersink Rd.)

www.valleylakesvet.com

ROUND LAKE CENTENNIAL 1908-2008

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137 Sayton Road

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9


10

BANK ROBBERY THWARTED

BY LOCAL HEROES

The 400 residents of Round Lake in

Lake County last evening were celebrating

the feat of an elderly bank

cashier and several citizens who

yesterday balked a holdup of the First State

Bank in the Village and shot and captured

one of the robbers. The celebration took the

form of a search for a companion of the captured

bandit who fled on foot while two others

got away in an automobile. Even woman

and children joined in the hunt.

It seemed a perfect setup for a small town

bank robbery when two shabbily clothed

men entered the bank with their hands in

their pockets at 9:35 a.m. Edwin C. Webber,

the 60 year old cashier, was in the cage, and

Miss Vilah Hart, bookkeeper, daughter of the

bank president, John Hart., was in a rear

office. They were alone, and there was some

$10,000 in cash on hand.

Bank

CHICAGO DAILY NEWS: APRIL 25, 1934

FAIRVIEW HEIGHTS OFFICE

D. Michael Bowen

Senior Vice President

No. Six Executive Drive, Suite 6

Fairview Heights, IL 62208

Email: mbowen@bernardisecurities.com

Phone: 618-206-4180

Fax: 618-206-0016

One of the strangers asked Webber where

they could get jobs. He told them he didn’t

know and the man suddenly said: “This is a

stick-up.” Webber mentally thanked the foresight

of the bank officials in providing bulletproof

glass on the cages, tear-gas guns, a

revolver and an alarm system. Then, he

answered, tartly, “The hell it is,” and reached

for the revolver.

Both bandits fired, but the glass and steel

framework of the cages stopped their bullets.

Webber stepped on a button, causing the

alarm to sound in the street and in the shops

of merchants who form the town’s volunteer

guards. He pushed his revolver through a

porthole and fired two shots as the bewildered

robbers fled from the bank. The driver

of the bandit car and a fourth man sped

away to save themselves. The two running

from the bank fled in different directions.

www.bernardisecurities.com

ROUND LAKE CENTENNIAL 1908-2008

One of them, gun in hand, almost bumped

into Michael Luby, a Village employee who

was raking a garden plot across the street. “I

had been reading about John Dillinger,”

Luby related afterward. “I thought it must be

one of that gang, so I lifted my rake and

whacked him over the head with it as he

passed.”

The fugitive was slowed down by the blow.

A moment later he fell, struck in the right

thigh by a bullet from a rifle held by either

Jack Stadtfield, the town Marshall, Wilbur

Madsen, the barber or Benjamin Peterkort,

the druggist. All of whom armed with rifles,

rushed into the street when the alarm

sounded.

The captured man was Elisworth

Ferguson, 45 years old. A parolee from Joliet

Penitentiary out just 3 years ago after serving

part of a 1–10 year term for larceny.

Congratulations

Congratulations

Village Village Of Of

Round Round Lake Lake

Happy Happy Centennial Centennial

CAPITAL PLANNING & DEBT FINANCING

REFERENDUM SERVICE

ROLF C. CAMPBELL & ASSOCIATES, INC.

Community Planning Economic Development

Landscape Architecture Development Coordination

101 Waukegan Rd. #1000 847-735-1000

Lake Bluff, IL 60044 Fax 847-735-1010

CHICAGO OFFICE

Robert P. Vail

Vice President

105 West Adams, Suite 1900

Chicago, IL 60603

rvail@bernardisecurities.com

Phone: 312-281-2014

Fax: 312-726-1431

CONGRATULATIONS Village of Round Lake on Celebrating 100 Years!


ROUND LAKE POLICE DEPT.

Cliffton R. Metaxa, Round Lake’s chief of police

W.A. McClintock was the first

elected police magistrate of

Round Lake after the village was

incorporated in 1908.

Phillip Flary followed in 1909. Flary also

served the village as constable in 1913.

Mark Letts was judge in 1911 until James

M. Carney took over in 1912 and

served until 1916. Records do not

show who was in charge of the local

courts until the name of Julius N.

Barrus appears in 1924-1925

records.

The court docket shows Fred B. Piche

tried cases in 1928 presumably until James

B. Triggs was elected police magistrate in

1930. George Richardson, first village clerk of

Round Lake, took over as police Magistrate in

1933 and served through 1941 when Walter

Rosing assumed the job. Raymond Falk succeeded

Rosing in 1945. Matt Hoellen was elected in 1949.

Matt Hoellen reorganized the Round Lake Police

Department in 1953 after his appointment as chief of

police. Al Mueller succeeded Hoellen in 1958. Ben

Dimuro was appointed as chief of police in 1964 and

served until his retirement in 1983; Joseph Trkovsky then took on the role.

Trkovsky served as chief of police until 2000 when Charles Foy was appointed. In

2005, Cliffton R. Metaxa was appointed chief of police; he continues to serve in

that role as the leader of the Round Lake Police Department.

The Round Lake Police Department is a full-service police department with a

total of 34 employees; 24 are sworn law enforcement officers. The police department

handles approximately 15,000 calls for service a year and generates

approximately 5,000 police reports. On an average, the Round Lake Police

Department writes approximately 2,000 traffic citations each year. The crime

index offense rate for the Village of Round Lake in 2006 was 1,532.70 per 100,000

inhabitants, which is a 21.65 percent decrease from 2005. This is the lowest crime

rate recorded by the Illinois State Police for the Village of Round Lake since they

started recording statistics in 1996 (3,734.30 per 100,000 inhabitants). The Village

of Round Lake has the lowest crime index offense rate in the Round Lake area.

SENIOR NON-MEDICAL HOME CARE SERVICES

where your family is our family...

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ROUND LAKE CENTENNIAL 1908-2008

Laundry

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Pet care

Transportation

Medication reminders

Escort to doctors and

dentist appointments

11


ROUND LAKE VOLUNTEER FIRE DEPT.

In the early days of the founding of the

Village of Round Lake, the town

fathers and others of forward vision

and civic responsibility, found themselves

faced by the ever-present and frightening

responsibility of a fire or other disaster

within the village.

Therefore on February 14, 1912, a meeting

was called and it was resolved: “That

we, in mass meeting assembled, organize a

volunteer fire department, that we may

render such assistance on short notice as

may be necessary to protect life and property.”

Also at this meeting, where William

Rosing was acting chair and Claus Junge, Jr.

served as secretary pro-tem, a constitution

and bylaws committee was appointed with

Clint Hendee, George Cleveland and Nath

Kimball serving.

Engine Company Number One: Edward

A. Brown, chief; A.J. ‘Del’ Smith, assistant

chief; Joseph Amann, Foreman; Nath

Kimball, Chief Engineer; Sam Litwiler,

assistant engineer; Leo Hendee, 2nd assistant

engineer; Harry Litwiler, 3rd assistant

engineer; Milton Litwiler, 4th assistant

engineer; Lyle Litwiler, 5th assistant engineer;

Mike Luby, 6th assistant engineer;

Frank Amann, 7th Assistant Engineer.

Eleven other residents 11 also signed the

original charter.

Firemen’s Dance flyer

12

Round Lake Volunteer Fire Department

After the Armour & Co. Ice House fire in

1917, the company donated 500 feet of

hose to the department. To facilitate the

storage, handling and transportation of the

hose, the department purchased a handdrawn

hose cart. During the years of World

War I, all of the able bodied men in Round

Lake enlisted and therefore the fire department

was disbanded. However, the women

of the community continued to respond

with the hose cart and hand pumper and

fight fires.

The first department did an outstanding

job in the years following, but times were

changing. The L. B. Harris Company was

starting to subdivide and develop the area

that is now Round Lake Beach. So once

again, the men of civic pride and leadership

were faced with a challenge.

On the evening of June 3, 1929, these

men called a meeting to reactivate and

rebuild the Round Lake Volunteer Fire

Department. Although many new names

signed the charter to become members of

the department, several of the old ‘Fire

Eaters’ signed on again to help get the

‘Rookies’ going.

On the evening of June 10, 1929, Rev. A.

W. Schmitz was elected president of the

Round Lake Volunteer Fire Department. He

held the position until his death on

October 27, 1953. Frank Drummond was

elected vice president, in which position he

remained until he resigned on January 6,

1930. U.C. Hendee was elected secretary,

Joseph L. Molidor became treasurer and

ROUND LAKE CENTENNIAL 1908-2008

Harry Merritt was named fire chief.

From 1932 until 1934, William

Hironimos served as Fire Chief. William ‘Pa’

Harrison, Sr. followed him in 1934, and he

served in this capacity until 1963 with a

short interruption while he was stationed

with the See Bees in World War II. During

his time in the service, William Redman

and Francis Luby shared responsibilities as

fire chief. While ‘Pa’ Harrison was Chief, the

fire department saw many changes. An

International Pumper was purchased in

1947; it was the first white truck in the state.

In 1946, the department voted to cash in

the war bonds, sell the building bonds and

accept donations to the building fund. The

big, warmhearted response to this is still a

great pleasure to the department. The

money poured in from many people who

had faith in what the department had been

doing for their fellow people and the surrounding

territory for so many years.

Volunteers built the station.

1930 saw the first of many Firemen’s

Dances. For many years, the Round Lake

Fire Department Association held these

dances, as well as Firemen’s Days, for

fundraising.

Norm Hoppe, the fire chief elected after

Harrison, served in that capacity for seven

years until 1971. It was while he was chief

that Station II on North Cedar Lake Road in

Round Lake Beach was built. It cost

$36,000. Again, volunteers did a lot of the

work. Ed Glowczewski succeeded Norm

Hoppe as fire chief. Fifteen years later, Paul


Fire station. (right) Fire trucks throughout the years.

Maplethorpe took on the role that he

continues to fill to this day.

In 1967, the Greater Round Lake Fire

protection District was voted in by referendum.

Avon Township Board appointed

three Trustees to the district: William

Harrison, Sr. (president), Edward

Kohlmeyer (secretary) and James

Vandenboom (treasurer). Bill Harrison

resigned in 1976, and Ray Lambert was

appointed as secretary while Ed

Kohlmeyer moved to president.

As of June 1, 2008 the statistics for the

Greater Round Lake Fire Department are

as follows:

Apparatus: four pumpers, one pumper

squad, one ladder tower, one water tender,

six ambulances, two water rescue

boats, one brush truck, one utility squad

Personnel: 54 full-time staff members

and 23 part-time members

GRLFPD protects approximately 16

square miles of territory in Avon,

Fremont and Lake Villa townships.

Services provided include advanced life

support emergency medical services, fire

prevention and protection, public education,

water rescue and recovery, hazardous

materials response, technical rescue

responses and car seat technicians.

Emergency calls answered per year?

Approximately 4300!

to the Village of Round Lake! St. Joseph School

118 N. Lincoln Ave.

The Edward H. Luby,

Joseph Molidor, and

Robert Kristan Families

Round Lake, IL

847-546-1720

www.stjosephrl.org

Co Congratulations

ngratulations

Village of Round Lake

from your neighbors in Round Lake Beach

Mayor Richard Hill and Village Board of Trustees

ROUND LAKE CENTENNIAL 1908-2008

ENROLL NOW FOR PRESCHOOL—GRADE 8

Strong Academic Curriculum

Quality Music, Art, Computer, P.E. &

Library Programs

3, 4 & 5 yr. old Flexible,

Half or Full Day Preschool Classes

Full Day Kindergarten

Before & After School Day Care,

6 a.m. - 6 p.m.

Archdiocesan Certifi ed &

State of IL Recognized

CATHOLIC VALUES ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE NURTURING COMMUNITY

SERVING ROUND LAKE SINCE 1952

100

100

YEARS

YEARS

13


A CENTURY OF HISTORY

1900s

1901

Jan. 5 Amarias White donates land for train station

July 1 Railroad arrives

Dec. 28 Armour Ice House strike

1902

1903

Aug. 20 First train accident

1904

June 15 Rural mail route established

1908 Joseph Amann first in Round Lake to buy a car

Dec. 9 Round Lake incorporates

1909

Jan. 7 First election in village

Jan. 13 Village charter issued

Feb. 6 First village board meeting

1910s

1910 School District 44 in Round Lake was the First

ConsolidatedSchool in Lake County

July 12 First electricity used in Round Lake

1911

June 1 First diploma issued

Sept. 10 Cornerstone for St. Joseph’s Catholic Church laid

1912

Feb. 14 Fire department initiated

Mar. 24 St. Joseph’s Catholic Church’s first service

1914

June 9 Jack Benny visits Amann Hall

1917

Aug. 18 Armour Ice House destroyed by fire

1918

Jan. 14 First privately owned bank established

1911

June 3 Squaw Creek drainage formed

1920s

1922

Nov. 16 Elementary school founded

1928

Feb. 9 Amarias White dies

14

Amann Hall

ROUND LAKE CENTENNIAL 1908-2008

Amann’s car was an

International Harvester,

and he had to go to

Madison, Wisc. to get it.

Amarias White’s farm and home

School District 44

Cedar Lake Road

St. Joseph’s Catholic Church


1930s

1930

1931

Dec. 13 Round Lake Community Church organized

1932

June 2 Community Church first service

Oct. 2 Community Church dedicated

1933

Feb. 1 PTA chartered

1934

April 24 Round Lake Bank robbery foiled (see page 19)

1936

Jan. 22 Blizzard traps kids in school

July 3 Fire protection district formed (non taxing)

1938

June 30 4-foot floodwaters on Cedar Lake Road

1939

Nov. 14 Round Lake Lyons Club formed

Dec. 14 First privately owned bank closes

1940s

1940

July 7 First service St. Paul’s Lutheran Church

1945

Dec. 23 VFW established

1946

Mar. 3 Round Lake Area sanitary district formed

Dec. 6 Lakes Region Bible formed

1947

Feb. 17 Round Lake Area Chamber of Commerce formed

1948

June 10 Auxilary of American Legion formed

1949

May 9 First State Bank of Round Lake opened

1950s

1952

Nov. 16 St. Joseph’s Catholic Church and School dedicated

1953

Mar. 15 Calvary Presbyterian first service

June 4 Round Lake High School district formed

July 11 First Round Lake High School board meeting

Oct. 2 Baptist Bible Church opens

1954

April 1 Home-mail delivery starts

ROUND LAKE CENTENNIAL 1908-2008

Blizzard of 1936

1908

President: Theodore Roosevelt

Vice President: Charles W. Fairbanks

Cost of a first-class stamp: $0.02

1958

President: Dwight D. Eisenhower

Vice President: Richard M. Nixon

Cost of a first-class stamp: $0.03

($0.04 as of 8/1/58)

2008

President: George W. Bush

Vice President: Richard B. Cheney

Cost of a first-class stamp: $0.41

($0.42 as of 5/12/08)

Looking north toward Railroad (now

Main) Street, end of World War I

Before Cedar Lake Road dam was installed

St. Paul’s Lutheran Church

15


April 11 Round Lake High School groundbreaking

Oct. 2

1955

Round Lake High School opens as a two-year school

Sept. 6

1956

Round Lake High School opens as a four-year school

Jan. 14 Cornerstone laid new St. Paul’s Lutheran Church

June 24 Groundbreaking new St. Paul’s Lutheran Church

July 12

1957

Round Lake Area Civil Defense Tower built

Jan. 4 Consolidation movement

Feb. 10 Round Lake High School dedicated

May 19 St. Paul’s Lutheran Church dedicated

Aug. 14 Certificate of Application: Campbell Airport

Aug. 20 Calvary Presbyterian Church groundbreaking

1959 The Holiday Movie Theater hit by tornado

1960s

1960

May 26 Petitions started for unit school district

May 26 Round Lake Sanitary District votes to enlarge plant

July 28 R-Lettes win US Championship

Aug. 25 Unit School District voted down

Oct. 13 Ed Sullivan Show considers taping R-Lettes

1961

July 13 R. Ellis retires RLA School Supt. (33 yrs)

Aug. 10 Round Lake Consolidation talks move on

Dec. 28 Consolidation issue dies

1962

April 12 Post office on Nippersink construction start

May 17 Civil defense tower torn down

Nov. 20 Post office on Nippersink opens

with Joe Molidor as postmaster

1963

April 24 Petition for #116 Unit School District presented

May 2 Greater Round Lake Fire Department formed

as a taxing body

May 18 Round Lake High School competed

on TV “It’s Academic” (ch 5)

1964

July 10 Certificate of approval Campbell Airport

1968

July 28 Round Lake Unit School

District #116 established

1970s

1971

Feb. 1 Lake Lure files for annexation

Mar. 3 Lake Lure annexed

May 17 $1 million bond for schools

16

1908 Sports

World Series: Chicago Cubs d. Detroit (4-1)

Stanley Cup: Montreal Wanderers

Wimbledon:

Women: Charlotte Sterry d. A. Morton (6-4 6-4)

Men: Arthur Gore d. R. Barrett (6-3 6-2 4-6 3-6 6-4)

Kentucky Derby Champion: Stone Street

NCAA Football Champions:

Penn (CFRA, HF) (11-0-1) & LSU (NCF) (10-0-0)

1908 Summer Olympics – London (4th Modern Olympic)

1958 Sports

World Series: NY Yankees d. Milwaukee Braves (4-3)

NBA Championship: St. Louis Hawks d. Boston (4-2)

Stanley Cup: Montreal d. Boston (4-2)

Wimbledon:

Women: Althea Gibson d. A. Mortimer (8-6 6-2)

Men: Ashley Cooper d. N. Fraser (3-6 6-3 6-4 13-11)

Kentucky Derby Champion: Tim Tam

NCAA Basketball Championship: Kentucky d. Seattle (84-72)

NCAA Football Champions:

LSU (AP, UPI) (11-0-0) & Iowa (FW) (8-1-1)

2008 Sports

World Series: TBA! Go White Sox! Go Cubs!

NBA Championship: Boston Celtics d. Los Angeles Lakers (4-2)

Stanley Cup: Detroit Red Wings d. Pittsburgh Penguins (4-2)

Wimbledon:

Women: Venus Williams d. Serena Williams (7-5 6-4)

Men: Rafael Nadal d. Roger Federer (6-4, 6-4, 6-7(5), 6-7(8), 9-7)

Kentucky Derby Champion: Big Brown

NCAA Basketball Championship: Kansas d. Memphis (75-68)

2008 Summer Olympics – Beijing (29th Modern Olympic)

ROUND LAKE CENTENNIAL 1908-2008

Round Lake High School

Holiday Movie Theater


1972

Dec. 2 Round Lake Area Library District opens

1974

April 3 Round Lake Area Park District incorporated

June 14 First Round Lake Area Park District meeting

1976

April 8 Consolidation Talks

1979

May 20 Groundbreaking for new St. Joseph’s Catholic Church

Oct. 14 Cornerstone laid for new St. Joseph’s Catholic Church

1980s

1980

Aug. 12 Round Lake Sanitary District dissolved

Aug. 14 First mass in new St. Joseph’s Catholic Church

Sept. 28 St. Joseph’s Catholic Church dedication

1981

April 20 Round Lake Area Historical Society formed

July 14 Round Lake Area Historical Society issued charter

1984

Dec. 3 Consolidation talks

1986

Feb. 24 Brass Wheel burns to ground

Sept. 25 Storm flooded Round Lake. Worst storm in 100 years

In the ’80s:

Round Lake Area Park District acquired Renwood Golf Course

Round Lake Area Park District joint purchase of little league fields in Hainesville

Round Lake Area Park District donated 2 acres for library building

Round Lake Area Park District opened Community Center on Hart Road

1990s

1999

June 5 Veterans’ Memorial dedicated

In the ’90s:

Round Lake Area Park District Aquatic Center opens

Round Lake Area Park District Duck Swim Team & Booster Club started

Pritzker Property annexed allowing for future development

that nearly doubled the size of Round Lake

2000s

2001

June New Village Hall dedication

2003 Special Census population @ 10,100

2004 Round Lake Park District Teen Center opens

2005 Round Lake Area Park District Sports Center opens

Construction finished new police department

and public works building

2006 Special Census population @ 16,482

ROUND LAKE CENTENNIAL 1908-2008

Round Lake Area Public Library

St. Joseph’s Catholic Church

Renwood Golf Course

Aquatic Center

Sports Center

17


18

HISTORIC HEADLINES

ROUND LAKE CENTENNIAL 1908-2008


DOWNTOWN ROUND LAKE

One of the first photos of Round Lake. (left to right) Amann Hall, Esmond & Kirkpatrick General Store and the train depot

Historic downtown Round Lake

Downtown Round Lake today

Round Lake Downtown Development has been

one of continuous motion since 1908. How

could it not with its foundation linked so closely

to the train? With each decade, the changes

have come, some obvious, some more subtle. This

decade is no different. The Plan has been six years in the

making and continues to this day. A Transportation

Oriented Development (TOD) with input from residents

and local businesses has been created. The goal is to form

a downtown that allows easy access to transportation,

housing and retail for the Round Lake resident. One that

allows accessibility to work, rest or play within the confines

of the downtown area. Here is a quick peak at the

planned downtown development coming to Round Lake.

ROUND LAKE CENTENNIAL 1908-2008

19


PATRIOTISM

A VITAL PART OF ROUND LAKE HISTORY

In the 100 years since the

incorporation of the village,

back in December of

1908, the residents of

Round Lake were called upon

to support their country in a

series of wars, conflicts, police

activities and fact-finding missions.

Many were called; many

answered. Many returned.

Many remained forever more

on the battlefields across the

ocean.

As the boundaries of the

hamlet of Round Lake were

stretched to include loved ones

in far away places, the boundary

of patriotism was also

stretched. With each altercation,

came a new group of

devotees in defense of democracy,

freedom and humanity.

Much like the rest of the

United States, the residents of

Round Lake witnessed the

changing times with the passing

of each altercation with

another country. Many social

movements helped to grow and

feed the American Dream. It

was that dream many soldiers

vowed to defend whether it was

during World War I or World

War II, the Korean Conflict, the

civil unrest of Vietnam, in the

fields of Cambodia, grounds of

Afghanistan or the lands of Iraq

and Iran.

Even as early as during the

days of World War I, rumors circulated

of local legend. Stories

at home depicting the same

courage and strength our soldiers

were displaying many

miles away, such as the woman

of Round Lake managing the

fire fighting while the men of

the Volunteer Fire Department

were away on duty. Round Lake

20

Residents did whatever they

could to help.

1963 was no different then

the years during World War I. It

came on the heels of the Cuban

Missile Crisis of October 1962.

Yet, it was full of hope. Hope

that the world could change for

the better, in a lifetime, with a

little effort from everyone. The

people of Round Lake set about

to build something tangible to

display the hope they felt. The

hope they felt was as a direct

result of the sacrifices of those

gone before, in the previous

wars and conflicts. To prove

that their sacrifices did not go

unnoticed, an idea was born.

That idea was in the form of a

memorial, unveiled in time for

the Memorial Day ceremonies

in 1963, to honor all the veterans

of the village of Round

Lake. The memorial was situated

on the corner of Rte. 134 and

Cedar Lake Road.

In 1999, a new memorial was

erected, honoring those veterans

of service to the United

States in all the battles up

through that year. The Annual

Round Lake Area Memorial Day

parade stops at this site for a

short ceremony before proceeding

to the end of the

parade route. The parade starts

in Round Lake Park across the

street from the VFW Post

(Clifton) and proceeds West on

Rte. 134 to Cedar Lake Road,

then North to the Round Lake

Beach Memorial (corners of

Cedar Lake Road and

Clarendon).

Clearly the residents of the

Village of Round Lake want it to

be known to all: Patriotism is

alive and well in Round Lake!

Veterans Memorial

ROUND LAKE CENTENNIAL 1908-2008


1908 2008

PHOTOS FROM NONA MARXEN

Oldest living person

born in Round Lake

Extended Family

Wedding Day Extended Family

Childhood Home Eighth Grade Class Father and Horses

Nona (Junge) Marxen

Not wanting ever to divulge a lady’s age, an exception will be made for Nona

Marxen. Nona has the distinction of being the oldest living person, born in

Round Lake. Nona is the second oldest child to Claus and Lena Junge (of

Round Lake Creamery fame). Born at the family home located at 303

Nippersink on December 5, 1911, Nona has certainly witnessed a lot of history.

One could say she had a front row seat for the Village of Round Lake!

ROUND LAKE CENTENNIAL 1908-2008

21


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Three Generations Of Ownership And Caring Service For Over 110 Years


The Village of Round Lake

Proud of our Past – Building for the Future

Bill Gentes, Mayor

Jeanne Kristan, Village Clerk

Village Board

Michael Blum Brian Brubaker Robert Del Prato

Dale Multerer Don Newby Sherry Perkowitz

WWW.EROUNDLAKE.COM

442 N. Cedar Lake Road, Round Lake, Illinois 60073 (847) 546-5400

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