A Dictionary of Sussex Dialect (438)

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A Dictionary of Sussex Dialect (438)

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ifc Preface.

form it now assumes.

Professor Bosworth also, although busily engaged (in his

8yth year) in bringing out a new Professor Bosworth aise, although busily engaged (in his

87th yeu) in bringing out a newquarto quarto Anglo-Saxon Anglo-Su:on dictionary,

dictionary,

found time to encourage encourage me in my work, and set me in the right right

track br correctingthe

by correcting the first pages pages of my proof. proof. To him himand and many

others my

my

best thanks are due. Such a work could never have

been done single-banded, single-handed, and volunteers have come forward on

ail sides to help me.

all sides to help me.

Pn/au.

To the Rev. W. W. Skeat, as the representative of that

Society, I owe more than I am able to express for the To the Rev. W. W. Skeat, as the representative of that

Society,l owe more than 1 am able to express for the guidance guidance

that he that he has given me,

given me, and the pains that pains that he has taken to render

this work this work as as free as possible

possible from imperfections. imperfections. Without his

assistance assistance 1I could never have presented it presented to ta the reader in the

fOmI it now assumes.

The Rev. W. de St. Croix,late Croix, late editor of the Sussex Susser ArchaeoArcbreologicallogical Society's Society's Collections, bas has formany for many years years given given me valuable

assistance. Miss Bessie C. Curtels, Curteis, of Leasam, Leasam,near near Rye, Rye, has bas contributed

at lcast least 100 200 words, with conversational illustrations and •

legends from the East East Susser Sussex district. The Rev. J.C. J. C. Egerton, Egerton,of of

Burwasb, bas also placed at my disposai his collection of upwards

Burwash, has also placed at my disposal his collection of upwards

of 100 words in in use in bis his section section of of the the c.ounty; county; and when I1 add

that the Rev. C. Swainson has helped me in my folk-lore, and

Mr. James Britten, of the British Museum, has corrected my

botanical definitions, the reader will understand how much kindly

effort has been made to render my work tbat the Rev. C. Swainson bas belped me in my folk-lore, and

Mr. James Britten, of the British Museum, has corrected my

botanical definitions, the readerwill understand bow much kindly

effort has been made to render my work successful, and how little !iule

its sucœss (if it sball be attained) is due to myself.

its success (if it shall be attained) is due to myself.

W. D. D. PARISH.


LIST OF AUTHORITIES.

W. DURRANT COOPER'S SUSSEX GLOSSARY.

HALLIWELL'S DICTIONARY OF ARCHAIC AND PROVI PROVINCIAL CIAL WORDS. WORDS.

W. HOLLOWAY'S GENERAL GENERAL DICTIONARY OF PROVINCIALISMS.

BOSWORTH'S ANGLO-SAXON DICTIO DICTIONARY. ARY.

SUSSEX ARCHlEOLOGICAL ARCHAEOLOGICAL COLLECTIONS.

AYSCOUGH'S SHAKESPEARE.

BRAND'S POPULAR ANTIQUITIES.

R. CHAMBERS' BOOK OF DAYS.

NOTES OTES AND AND QUERIES.

1 ••

M. A. LOWER, CONTRIBUTIO CONTRIBUTIONSS TO LITERATURE, &c., &C., &C. &c.

PROFESSOR LÈo's LEO'S TREATISE ON ON THE LOCAL NOMENCLATURE OF OF THE THE

ANGLO-SAXONS.

STRATMANN'S OLD OLD ENGLISH DICTIO DICTIONARY. ARY.

WEDGWOOD'S WEDGWOOD'S DICTIONARY DICTIONARY OF ENGLISH ETYMOLOGY.

RAy's RAY'S COLLEt:;TION COLLECTION OF LOCAL WORDS.

BOSHAM MMANOR OR CUSTOMS, AND AND THE OLD OLD BOOKS OF THE MANOR OF

ARUNDEL ARUNDEL (KINDLY LE LENTT BY R. G. RAPER, ESQ.)

VARIOUS lINVENTORIES VE TORIES OF OF FFARM ARM AND AND HOUSEHOLD GOODS GOODS OF OF THE LAST LAST

THREE THREE CENTURIES.

CENTURIES.


THE SUSSEX DIALECT.

, ,

almost every establishment in the country there is to be

found some old groom, or gardener, bailiff, or factotum,

whose odd expressions and quaint sayings and apparently

outlandish words afford a never-failing source I

N almost every establishment in the CQuntry tbcre is to he

round sorne old groom, or gardener, bailiff, or factotum,

whose odd expressions and quaint sayings and appa·

rendy outlandish wards a1Jord a never.Camug source

of amusement to the older as well weil as to the younger younger members of

the household, who are not aware that many of the words and

expressions which raise the laugh are purer specimens of the

English language than the words which are used to tell the the household, who are not aware that many of the wards and

expressions whicb Taise the laugb arc purer specimens of the

English language tban the word! whicb are nsed to tell the story story

in which they are introduccd.

in which they are introduced.

Every schoolboy home for the holidays at Christmas knows

that the London cabman who drives him to the Theatre

accentuates the word much more classically than the young

gentleman who sits inside, who, if he had the audacity to

Every schoolboy home for the holidays at Christmas knows

that the London cabman who drives him to the Theatre

accentuales the ward much more classicaJ1y than the young

gentleman who sits inside, who, if he had the audacity to

pronounce Theatron witb with a short short a in in his bis next next construe constme at al

school, would send a shudder through the Form amid which he

would soon find himself in a lower place. So it is with our

Sussex words; they sound strange to ears that are not accustomed

to them and ; by some persons they may be supposed to be mere

slang expressions, not worthy of attention; but when they are

examined, many of them will be found to be derived from the

purest sources of our school, would send a shudder through the Form amid which he

would saon find himself in a lower place. 50 it is with our

Susse:l woros; they sound strange 10 ears that are not accustomed

to them; and hy some peTSOns they may he suppoged to he mere

slang e:lpressions, not worthy of attention; but when they are

examined, many of them will he found to be derived from the

purest sources of our language, and to contain in in themselves tbemselves a

clear reflection reflection of the the history of of the the county in in which which they are are

nsed. used.

Every page of this dictionary will show how distinctly the

British, Roman, Saxon and Norman elements are to be traced in

the words in every day use among our Everr page of this dictionary will show how.distinctly the

British, Roman, Saxon and Norman elements are to be traced in

the words in every day use among our labouring people, who

rctain among them many of the oldest forms of old words which

retain among them many

,.


7%


4 •

The Sussex Dialect.

and the confusion becomes every day worse confounded.

Still, I am aware that after all that can be said, word collectors

will never be satisfied with merely collecting without deriving,

and many of them will be at first inclined to resent any restriction

Still, 1am awarethal after ail tbat can he said, wordcollectoTS

will neveT he satisfied with merel}' colleeting withaut deriving,

and many of thcm will he at tirst inclined la resent any restriction

oCtheirlibertie8, of their liberties; therefore 1hopethat I hopethat the English English Dialect Society Society

will talte take an early opportunity early opportunity of buoying buoying the dangerous dangerous channels

ofetymology,and of etymology, and give a give a (ew few dear clear and distinct directions whereby whcreby

we may he be able to ta steer a sare safe course within certain defined

limits.

limits.

traced chiefly to Anglo-Saxon, Old Dutch, Old Welsh (or

British), with a dash of British), with a dash of '+th 14-th ccntury century French, and and a little Scan­

dinavian, the latter due to the sea-coast, which has for many

generations invited hosts of friendly invaders to our generations invited hosts of friendly invaders to our shores, and

the history and language of the whole country.

When the Roman Roman legions landed on our our coast they left an

pandalus, which is in constant use in this part of the county.

The arrival of the Normans, and the foundation of their

history of our vocabulary.

Tilt SUUl.1: Ilia/«I.

Besides this, every amateur etymologist, who fancies he has

made a fresh discovery, is led to make a series of wild shots

at derivations, forgetting that it is the history of a word, and not

the similarity of it to another in form or Besides this, every amateur elymologist, who rancies he bas

made a fresh discovery, ia led to male a series of wild shots

at derivations, forgetting that il is the /litlt1ry of a ward, and not

llu ûmi/an'lyof il to another in fOIm or sound, sound, which determines

the the source from whicb which il it is derived; derived so sa one mistake mistakeleads leads ;

to others, others,

and the confusion becomes every day worse confounded.

The dialect of the Sussex people has been affected by the

geographical position and the history of the county. It may be

The dialect of the Sussex people has been affecloo by the

geographical position and the history of the county. Il may be

traced chiefly to Anglo-Saxon, Old Dutch, Qld Welsh (or

dinavian, thc latter due to the sea-coast, which has for many

has has twicc twice witnessed witnessed the landing of armies annies destinoo destined to influence

the history and language of the whole country.

evidence of thcir their appreciation of the the Pevensey shrimps, which

remains to this day in the word word pandle, jO/rdk, derivoo derived from the the Latin

panda/us, which is in constant use in this part of the county.

The arrivai of the Norman!, and the foundation of thcir

large monastic establishments marks marks a very distinct distinct phase in the

history of our vocabulary.

But But it will be observed that most most of ofourwords our words now in common

use, denoting denoting agricultural and domestic implcments. implements, are are either to

he be traced traced to an Anglo-Saxon derivation, or or actually retain their

original Anglo-Saxon names in ail purity of spelling and pronunciation.

From this source also nearly ail the Susscx sumames

original Anglo-Saxon names in all

purity of spelling and pronunciation.

From this source also nearly all the Sussex surnames


clearly asserts his German origin.

Tlu The SUlUX Sussex Dialed. Dia/(cl.

6

and names of villages and farms (noticed in the Appendix) are

derived. Nor must I forget to remark that when the Sussex

peasant speaks of the sun as and names of villages and fanns (lIOticed in the Appendix) are

derived. Nor must 1 forget to remark that when the Sussex

pcasant spealts of the SUn as dt. he she, he uses an expression

expression which

c1early asserts bis German origin.

As might be expected, many words are due to our proximity

to the coast. The Sussex fishermen, in their constant intercourse

with their Dutch and French brethren, although finding much

difficulty in parleying to their satisfaction, have nevertheless

for many generations adapted and introduced so As might be exptcted. many words are due to our proximity

to the coast. TheSussex 6shermen, in their constant intercourse

with their Dutch and French brethren, ahhough finding much

difficulty in parleying to their satisfaction. have nevertheless

for many generations adapted and introduced so many foreign foreign

words into common use among themseJves, themselves, that their vocabulary vocabuJary

is almost worthy of being called a fourth branch of the dialect.

is almost worthy of being called a fourth branch of the dialect.

Other circumstances, too, have tended to the increase of the

French influence. Between 1562 and 1572 no less than 1,400

refugees from France settled themselves in Sussex, and many of

their names may be still traced among our labouring people in

Other circumstanccs, too, have tended to the incrcase of the

French influence. Between 1561 and 1572 no Jess than ',+00

refugees from France settled themselves in Sussex, and manyof

their names may be still traced among our labouring people in

the castem eastern division of the county. Besides this, the establishments

of French prisoners prisoners in later times, and the the custom which

still prevails, though prevails, though not 50 so much as it did, of shopkeepers and

townsfolk Cl:changing exchanging chiidren children with French French families famiIies in order

that cach each might leam learn enough of of the other's language to be he

useful in after Iife, life, has has kept the the French French e1ement element alive alÎ\'e amongst

us, and accounts accounts for the the Cl:istence existence of of many words which which are arc not

S? so much derived from as as positive corruptions of of modern modern French. French.

But besides those words in the Sussex dialect which are

really valuable as having been derived from authentic sources,

there are a great many which are very puzzling to the

etymologist, from the fact of their having been either But besides those words in the Sussex dialect which are

really valuable as having been derived from authentic sources,

there are a great many which are very puuling to the

etymologist, from the faet of their having been either actually

invcnted invented without any reference to to the laws laws of of language, or or

adapted aTld corrupted from other words. A Sussex man has

adapted and corrupted from other words. A Sussex man has

a great faciIity facility for for invendng inventing words. If he has any difficulty

in expressing himself, he has no hesitation about forming a

in Cl:pressing himself, he has no hesitation about forming a

word for the occasion. This he does on the phonetic principle

word for the occasion. This he does on the phonetic principle

(if it can be said to be done on any principle at (if it can he said to be donc on any principle at all), aU), and as he

prefeTS a long word, the result of his im'cntion is generally very

prefers a long word, the result of his invention is generally very

,


6

curious indeed ;

The Sussex Dialect.

curions indeed; and and whether or not the word ward serves the purpose purpose

rated among the words available for general use in the village.

There are also many words which are used to convey

meanings totally different to their original intention. These meanings totally different to their original intention. These may

he be called called words of substitution. They are introduced in this

rhythm.

The SIlSltX Dia/td.

for which it was intended, it is sure to be caught up by some

one else, and, especially if it is a long one, is very soon (or which it I\'as intended, it is sure to he caught up br sorne

one cise, and, especially if it is a long one, is verysoon incorpoincorpof3ted among the wards amiable (or general use in the village.

There are a[so many words which are used to couvey

way, a person hears a word which he does not quite understand ;

he does not take the trouble to ascertain either the meaning or

pronunciation of it, but he uses a word something like it. This is

specially the case with the names of complaints, such as will be

found incidentally mentioned in some of the illustrations which

I have given of the use of Sussex words, as, for instance, browncrisis

for bronchitis, and rebellious for bilious, &c. The names

of any but the most common trees and shrubs are also strangely

perverted. A friend of mine had a gardener who persisted in

calling an acacia the way,-3 persan hearsa ward which he does not quite understand;

he does not take the trouble to ascertain either the meaning or

pronunciation of h, but he uses a word $owullting like il. This is

special!y the case with the names of complaints, such as will he

round incidentally mentioncd in sorne of the illustrations which

1 have given of the use of Sussex words, as, for instance, browncrisis

for bronchitis, and rebellious for bilious, &c. The names

of any but the mast common trees and shrubs are also strangely

perverted. A friend of mine had a gardener who persistcd in

calling an acacia the Circassian, and and arter after much pains pains had been

taken to point out out the mistake, never never got nearer than calling calling it

the cash-tree. cash-tree. 1I have have heard chlj-santhemums chrysanthemums called Christy

anthcrns, anthems, and China China asters Chane)" Chancy o}"sters; oysters but that ;

was by by the

same same man man who also also once enquired how 1I made out with "them "thcm

Scotch-Chaney Scotch-Chancy fowls" of of mine.

It is also surprising how little trouble people will take to

ascertain correctly even the names of their neighbours, and I

know an instance of a man who lost sight of his own name

altogether, from having been accustomed for many years to hear

it mispronounced. But this in a great measure is to be attributed

to the fact that a musical ear is very rarely found among Sussex

people, a defect which is It is also surprising how Httle trouble people 'I\'iIJ take to

a.sccrtain correctly even the names of their neighbonrs, and 1

knaw an instance of a man who lost sight of his own name

altogether, from having been accustomed for many ycan ta hear

it mispronounced. But this in a great measure is to he attributed

ta the fact that a musical car is very rarely found among Sussex

people, a defect which is remarkably shawn shown not only in the

monotonous tunes tunes to to which which their o!d old songs are sung, but also

in the the songs themselvcs, themselves, which are almost almost entirely devoid of

rhythm.

The Sussex pronunciation is, generally speaking, broad and

The Sussex pronunciation is, generally speaking, broad and

rather drawling. It is difficult to say why certain long words are

rather drawling. It is difficult to say why certain long words are


The Sussex Dialect. 1

abbreviated, or why certain short words are expanded. In some

names or of places every syllable, and

places every syllable, and e...en even every letter,

every letter, is is made

three syllables to two by the most ruthless excision.

people to anything like a system it is this,

Tilt SI/m.:>: J)ia/ttl. 7

abbreviated, or wby eertain short words are expanded. In sorne

the most of as East Hdadlye for East the most or-as East HôMI}'e ror East Hoathly-while

Hoathly while others, others,

like the naDle name or of my

my

own village, are village, are abruptly curtailed abruptly curtailed from rrom

three syllables to two by the most ruthless excision.

As rar far as 1I can reduee reduce the pronunciation or pronunciation of the Sussex Sussex:

people to anything Iike a system it is this,-

a berore before double d beeomes becomes Dr; ar; whereby whereby ladder and

adder are pronounced pronounced larder and arder.

a bcrore before double / is pronouneed pronounced like (J; o; fallow rallow and

tallow beeome become roller foller and toller. toiler.

a berore 1 is expanded into ta; rate, mate. plate, gate,

a before / is expanded into ea; rate, mate, plate, gate,

are pronouneed pronounced reat, re'at, meat, pleat, géàt.

pleat, ge'at.

a berore before el ct becomes e; as satisreetion satisfection for ror satisfaction. satisraction.

e berore CI becomes a; and affection, effect and neglect

e before ct becomes a; and affection, effect and neglect

are pronouneed pronounced affaction, effact effact and neglact.

Double e is pronounced as i in such words as sheep, week,

Double e is pronounced as i in such words as sheep, week,

called ship and wick; and and the sound or of double e

follows the same rule in fild for field.

rollows the saDle mie in fild rOt field.

Having pronounced et as i, the Susscx people in the mast

Having pronounced ee as t, the Sussex people in the most

impartial manner pronounce i as impartial manner pronounce i as ee, te, and thus mice, miee,

hive, dive, become meeee, heeve and dee,·e.

hive, dive, become meece, heeve and deeve.

i becomes becomes e in pet ror for pit, 'pet spet for rOt spit, spit. and and similar similar

words.

wio and (Ji oi change placesrespectively; places respectively; and and violet and and violent

become voilet and and voilent, while while boiled and spoiled

are are bioled bioled and and spioled.

(J o berore before n is expanded into into ()tJ oa in such 5uch words words as as pony,

dont, bane; bone; whic:h which are pronounced poany, pciany, ddant, dôânt,

and bo'an.

and bOan.

() belote, is pronou,nced as a; as carn and maming, rOt

o before r is pronounced as a ; as earn and marning, for

corn and mommg. morning.

() o also also tJtcomes iTecomes a in such words words as rad, crass, and crap, crap.

ror rod, cross, and crop.

for rod, cross, and crop.

ou is elongated into aou in words like hound, pound and

(JU is elongated into Q(JU in words like hound, pound and

mound ; pronounced haound, paound and maound.

mound; pronounced haound, paound and maound.

The final aw, as in many other counties, is The final (JUJ, as in many other counties, is pronounced pronounced", er,

as foller for fallow.

as roller ror rallow.


\0

10

Til, Susux J)ia/al.

The Sussex Dialect.

I hope that they may at least serve the purpose of inducing

some persons to look through the pages of my book, who would

otherwise have taken no interest in a mere collection of words;

and perhaps when they see how many interesting points may be

1 hope that they may at least serve the purpose of induclng

sorne persans to look through the pages of my book, who would

otherwise have taken no interest in a Mere collection of words;

and perhaps when they see how many" interesting points may be

elicited from

elicited from c10ser closer intercourse with their thelr poorer poorer neighbours, neighbours,

they may be they may he persuaded to

persuaded

to become in their turn tum collectors oollectors of

old words and stories of the pasto

old words and stories of the past.

1 am convinced that there are many more wards yel to he

I am convinced that there are many more words yet to be

recorded, and recorded, and 1I hope that

hope that sorne some of my readers will send me

materials for a larger dictionary of the Sussex dialect, which I

hope some day to be able to complete. I have little doubt of

finding many persons ready to help me in this respect, for I

have already received much assistance from persons who were

strangers to me till they saw my name in connection with this

publication ; and even up to the last moment, while my work

has been in the hands of the printers, several words have been

sent me too late to find a place in the alphabetical list. I

have, therefore, requested the materials for a larger dictionary of the Sussex dialect, whicb 1

hope sorne day to he able to complete. 1 have little doubt of

6nding many persans ready to help me În this respect, fOr 1

have already received much assistance from persans who "'cre

strangers to me til! they saw my name in connection with this

publication; and even IIp 10 the last moment, while my work

has been in the hands of the printers, severa! words have been

sent me too lale 10 find a place in the aIphabetical Iist. 1

have, therefore, requested the publishers publishers to 10 add at the end of

each volume a few blank pages, pages, so perforated as to be easily easily

detached without injury injury 10 to the book, in the hope that such sucb

persons as are willing 10 help me, may write down and forward

persons as are willing to help me, may write down and forward

to me any words not hitherto published which may come under

their notice; adding always the name of the locality in which

they are used, their pronunciation if it seems necessary, and

any proverb or anecdote which to me "any words not hitherto published which may come under

their notice; adding always the name of the locality in which

they are used, their prommciation if it scems necessary, and

any proverb or anecdote which may add add to ta their interest.

In making this announcement I acknowledge the imperfection

of my own work. Such a work must of necessity be

In maling Ihis announcement 1 acknowledge the imper.

fection of my own won:. Such a worl: must of necessity be

tentative and and imperfect, but but sucb such as it it is 1I offer otrer it to ta the

kind kind perusai perusal of aIl all who are are interested in the the old-world old·world ideas ideas

and language of our kind·hearted kind-hearted old-fashioned old·fashioned Sussex Sussex folk,

IIWly of whom 1 number among my dearest friends.

many of whom I number among my dearest friends.


20

A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect.

BOOK. The Bible is almost always spoken of by old people as

the Book. Not many years ago the family Bible was the

only book to be found in the cottages of the poor; now

the frequent visits of the book-hawker have introduced a

taste for reading into the remotest districts of the the Book. Not many )'ears ago the Camily Bible was the

only book to he round in the cottages of the POOT; DOW

the frequent visits of the book-hawkcr have introduced a

taste for reading iota the {effiolest districts of the countr, county,

but but still the still the Bible retains ils its title of the Book; and I1 was

glad to hear a rough-looking carter boy say the other day,

"I always read a bit of my Book before I "1 alwa)'!l read a bit of my Book before 1 goos to bed."

BOOT-LEGS, m. Short gaiters, not reaching to the knee.

BOSTAL, or BORSTAL. A pathway up a hill, generally a very

steep one, and on the northern escarpment of the Downs;

as the White Bostal near Alciston, the Ditchling Bostal, &c.

With respect to the derivation of this stcep one, and OD the IlOrthem escarpment of the Downs;

as the White Dostal near Alciston, the Ditchling BostaI, &c.

\Vith respect to the derivation of Ihis much-disputed

mucb-disputed

woro, word, Professor Bosworth bas has kindly kindly gîvcn given me the

sedes super collem vel clivum, Cot. 209. The name of places

built on a hill, hill, as Burstall in Suffolk, Borstall in Kent and

Oxfordshire, &c. &c.

Mr. Kemble (Sussex Archaeological Collection, vol. ii.,

p. 292) takes " the first word of the compound to be

the Saxon word beorh, a hill or mountain, the passing of

which into bor, is neither unusual nor p. Z9Z) takes "the tirst word of the compound to be

the Saxon word ho,h, a hill Of mountain, the passing of

which into bOf, is neither unusual nor surprising. surprising. The

second wOfd word is is not so so easHy easily determined. detennined. Were the tbe

word ever written borstill, Mr. K. should suggest the Saxon

stigel, a stile or rising path; and rtigtl, a stile Of rising path; and beorh-stigel beorb-stigel would be

the the bill-patb hill-path or mountain-path. He does not know knowwhetber, whether,

in tbat that branch of of the the West West Saxon Saxon which wbich prevailed in Sussex,

'steal' did signify a road or way; but it is not without probability

that some of the Anglo-Saxon dialects might have

bability that sorne of tbe Anglo-Saxon dialccts migbt ba,·e

leaping.'"

BOTTOM, w. A reel of cotton.

A Diiti/l1Mf)' if"il Sussex Dialul.

BooL The Bible is almost a1W3yS spoken of br old people as

glad to hear a rough.looking carter boy say the other dar,

BOOT-LEGS,"'. Short pileTS, not reaching to the mec.

Boss. To tbrow. throw.

BOSTAL, or BoltSTAL. A pathway up a hill, generaJly a very

following:-Durg-stal,-stol, es; following: Burg-stal,-stol, es; m [burg, [burg, beorg, beorg, beorh,ahill, beofh,a hill,

stal a place, scat, place, seat, dwelling.) dwelling.] A hill-seat, dwelling dwelling on a hill bill; ;

sedes supefcollem vel c1ivum, Cot. Z09. The name of places

]',[f. Kemble (Sussex Arehaeological Collection, '·01. ii.,

'lord ever wrilten oorstill, ]',[r. K. should suggest the Suon

'steal' did signify a road or way; but it is not without pro­

justified that use of the justilied tbat use of the term; tenn; for 'stealian' or Of 'stellan'

does sometimes scern seem to be be applied in in the the sense of 'going or Of

leaping.'''

BoTIO", BOTTOM, m. A valley in tbe the Downs. Downs.

BOTT03I, w. A reel of cotton.

BoUGE, BOUGE, 111. m. [BOIl!fr, \_Bouge, Ffench.) French.] A water cask.

The round swelling part of a cask.

BOOGH-BOUSE, m. A private bouse allowed to be open at fairs

BOUGH-HOUSE, m. A private house allowed to be open at fairs

for the sale of liquor.

An old person describing the glories of Selmeston fair, fair

wbich which bas has now been discontinlled discontinued many years, ycars, said "There "Ther;

was all manner of booths and bough-houses."


22

A Dictionary tif I!lt SuUtX Dia/tel.

A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect.

BRITT, m. [Brytan, Aug. Sax., to break.] To shatter like hops

from being over-ripe.

BROACH, w. [Brvche, French.] A spit.

"Broached with the steely point of Clifford's lance."

in Henry VL, Act ii. sc. 3.

BRONK, m. A disdainful toss of the head.

"She didn't choose to see me, so she just gave a bronk

and passed on."

BROOK, m. A water meadow.

BROOM-DASHER, m, BROOMSQUIRE, w. A dealer in faggots,

brooms, &c.

The word dasher is also combined in haberdasher.

BROOM-CLISHER, m. [Clish, a bond.]

BROWN-BIRD, m. Thrush.

A broom maker.

BRUFF, e. Rough; short in manners and speech.

BRUSS, m. [Compare French Brusque, blunt.] Proud; upstart.

BRUSTLES. [Variation of BRITT, m. (Brylm., A;Jg. Sax., to break.] To shatter like hops

from bemg over-rlpe.

BROACH, w. (BflI(!It, French.] A spit.

"Broached lriC.h the Iteely point of Clifford'I lance."

_III Umry YI., Act ü. IC. J.

BRONK, m. A disdainful toss of the head.

"She didn't choose to sec me, so she just gave a bronk

and passed on."

BROOK:, m.- A water meadow.

BaOO),l-DASllB1l., m, B1l.oo)lSQUI1l.E, w. A dealer in faggots,

broorns, &c.

The word dasher is aIso combined in haberdasher.

BROO»-CUSHER, m. (Clish, a bond.]

BROWN-llIRD, m. Thrush.

A broom maker.

BRUFl', t. Rough; short in manners and speech.

BRUSS, m. (Compare French Brusqou, blunt.] Proud; upstart.

BRUSTLES. [Variation of Bristles.]

Bristles.]

BRtTITI:, t. (Brouler, French,tonibble.] To browse orfeed upon.

BRUTTE, e. \_Brouter, French, to nibble.] To browse or feed upon.

BRUITLE. Always in Sussex t1sed for brittle.

BRUTTLE. Always in Sussex used for brittle.

BUCKING, m. \Buc, Ang. Sax., a tub.] A washing of clothes.

BUD, w. A calf of the first year, so called because the horns then

begin to BUCXING, m. (BI4", Ang. Sax., a tub.] A washing of clothes.

Buo, w. A calfof the first year, 50 called because the horns then

begin to appear or bud.

BUDDY, w. Stupid, in in the the same same sense as the word calf is often

used for for a stupid fellow.

BUDGE, w. (Boul', French.] Acask placed on wheels for carrying

BUDGE, w. \_Bouge, French.] A cask placed on wheels for carrying

water. (Sec (See Bouge.)

BUDGB, m. [Boudtr, French, to pout.] Grave; 5Olemn.

BUDGE, m. [Bonder, French, to pout.] Grave ; solemn.

"He looked looked very budge when when I1 asked him him who stole the

apples."

BUG. BUG. Any hard-winged insect. insect.

BULLOCK, m. A fat beast beast of either either sex. sel.

1 was very much astonished when 1 first heard a fanner say,

I was very much astonished when I first heard a farmer

" say,

"Yes, Yes, she's aa purty cow, cow, a very \'ery purty cow cow indeed, and one

of these days she'll make a nice bullock."

of these days shc'II make a nite bullock."

BttlIBLBSOlolE, m. Hunched up; misfitting.

BUMBLESOME, m. Hunched up; misfitting.

BttlIBOO, m. A mysterious compound of spirituous liquors under

the inlluence of which, Mr. Turner, draper, of Easthoathly,

BUMBOO, m. A mysterious compound of spirituous liquors, under

the influence of which, Mr. Turner, draper, of Easthoathly,


A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect. 23

I went down to Jones', where we drank one bowl of punch

and two muggs of and two muggs of bumboo, bumboo, and 1I came home again

again in

Iiquor. Oh

liquor. Oh t with ! with what hOITors horrors docs does it fill fil! my heart to think

1I should be guilty of

guilty of doing so, and

doing so, and on a Sunday

Sunday too 1 ! Let

me once more endeavour, endeavour, never, never, no never, Dever, to be he guilty

guilty of

the same again." again."

BUNCH, m. A swelling.

"Itcame "

It came out in bunches all over me."

BUNGER, m. To do anything awkwardly.

BUNNY, w. A wooden or brick drain laid under a road or gateway

to carry off carry off the \Valer; water; aise also called a cocker.

BUNT, e. To rock a cradle with the foot ; to push or butt.

A bunt is described to me as a push push with a knock in it, it,

or a knock with a push push in it.

"1'11 "

I'll give give you you a middlin' middlhr bunt prensley prensley if you you d6hnt ddant keep keep

still."

BUNTER, m. An old-fashioned machine for cleaning corn.

BURGH, m. [Burg, Ang. Sax.] A rising ground a hillock. The

;

term is frequently applied to the barrows or tumuli on the

Downs.

BURNISH,*?. To grow fat. The expression, "You burnish nicely,"

meaning, "You look well," is frequently used in East stil!."

BUNTER, m. An old-fashioned machine for cleaning corn.

BURGH, m. rBurg,Ang. Sax.] A rising ground; a hillock. The

term is frequently applied to the barrows or tnmnli on the

Downs.

BUIl.NISH, t. To grow fat. The expression, "You burnish nicely,"

meaning, "You look weil," is frequently used in East Sussex,

and is meant as a compliment.

and is meant as a compliment.

" No I wunt butter ; my wig if I will !

BY-THE-BYE, e. By chance.

A Dklionary of"U SUSSlX Dial«t.

made the following entry

following entry in his diary:_HI7S6, April

diary: "1756, April 28th. :8th.

·1 went down to Jones', where we drank one bowl of punch

BUNCH, m. A s'l'elling.

BUNGEIl., m. To do anything awkwardly.

BUNNY, w. A '1'ooden orbrick drain laid under a road or gateway

BUNT, t. To rock a cradle \Vith the foot; to push or butt.

BunEIt-:UV'WlG, BUTTER-MY-WIG, m. A shong strong asseveration.

"

"No 1 lVunt; butter my wig if 1 will t"

BV-THE-nvE, t. By chance.

"He come come along one one day by-the-bye, or else cise he hasn't

been a-nigh me for the the last ten ten years." yean."

BYTHEN. By the time that.

"Bythen you've come back 'twill be coager-time."

"Bythen you've come back 'twill be coager-time."

BvsTB, m. A couch made up of two chairs for a child to sleep

BYSTE, m. A couch made up of two chairs for a child to sleep

upon in the upon in the day-time.

BYSTE, m. To lie down in the day-time.

BYSTE, m. To lie down in the day-time.

"I was quite took to (ashamed) to think you should have

come in the other day and found me bysted, but I was quite

entirely eat up with the "1 was quite took to (ashamed) to thint. you should have

come in the other day and found me bysted, but 1 was qnite

rheumatics, and couldn't get about

entirely eat up with the rheumatics, and conldn't get about

no hows."

"


"

26 A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect.

CHARGER, e. A large platter

or meat dish.

medicine, but it is carefully distinguished from doctor's stuff,

by whicb which a tonie tonic is meant.

by

The use of charms, especially in cases of ague or wounds,

is still prevalent in the country; and the following charm is

not unfrequently used for the cure of a burn. It must be

repeated three The use of charms, especially in cases of ague or wounds,

is still prevalent in the country; and the foJ1owing chann is

not unfrequently used for the cure of a bum. It must be

repeated tbroc limes,-

times,

"Two " Two Angel.

Angels from (rom the North,

One brought brought Jiu, one fire, one brought brought frost (rosi: :

Out fite, in fire, in Crosl, frost,

ln In the name or of the Father, Father, the Son, and the Holy HoIyGhosl." Ghost."

CHASTISE, m. To accuse.

"

They've been chastising my boy of setting the faggotstack

a-fire."

CHAVISH, e. A chattering or prattling noise of CHASTlSR, m. To accuse•

.. Ther've been chastising my boy of setting the faggotstack

a-lire."

CHAVISH, e. A chattering or prattling noise of many persons

speaking speaking together.

together.

A noise made by a ftock flock of of birds.

CHECK, m. To reproacb reproach or or taunl. taunt.

.. " He cbecked checked him of his cousin Tom (who had bad been sent

to prison)."

prison)."

CHEE, t. A hen-roost. Going to chee is going to roost.

CHEE, e. A hen-roost. Going to chee is going

CHKQUER, CHEQUER, w. The sen'ice service tree. P)'fW Pyrus tormi1/alit. torminalis. The The fruit

is called chequers.

CHICK. CHICK. In In East East Sussex used used as the plural of of chicken.

"1 reckon you have got a good sighl of chick chîck here."

" I reckon you have got a good sight

CHICKllN. CHICKEN. In Mid-Sussex Mid-Sussex used as the plural of chick.

CHILL. To take off the extreme coldness from from any beverage beveIage by

placing il it hefore before the the fire. lire.

"1 "I often gets my mistus to chili chill a drop of of beer for me,

when 1I cornes comes home winter winter evenings."

CHIZZLE, w. Bran.

A Dirllimary 0/ litt Sussex DiiJl«I.

CHARGER, t. A large platter or meat dish.

CHARM-STUFF, e. Ague medicine.

CHARll-STUPF, t. Ague medicine.

In In Sussex, medicine Sussex, medicine is generallr spokcn generally spoken of as physical pnYlicaJ

mediânt, but il is carerully distingwshcd from doctor's stuff,

is called chequers.

CHESS, e. A CHESS, t. A plaid.

" "1I brought a chess chess shawl for mother." mother."

CHIZZLE. w. Bran.

CHIZZLY, e.

\_Ceosel, Ang. Sax., sand.] Gritty; harsh and CmZZLY, t. [Ce.ne/, Ang. Sax., sand.] Grilty; harsh and dry

under the leeth. teeth.

CHOGS, m. The refuse refuse cuttings of the hop plants when when dressed dressed

in in the spring before being heing polled.


A IJi(ltimary ifIhe Sumx IJia/trl.

A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect. 29

COARSE, e. Rough ; stormy ; applied to weather.

COARSE, e. Childish.

"She is twelve years old, but she is so coarse for her years

that you would not take her to be but ten."

COAST.* \_Coste, Old French, a rib.] The ribs of cooked meat,

particularly lamb.

COARSE, e. Rongh; stormy; appHed ta weather.

COARSE, e. Childish.

"She is twelve }'eal'll old, but she is 50 coarse for her years

that you would not take her to be but !en,"

COAST: [CMle, Qld French, a rib.] The ribs of cooked meat,

particularly lamb.

COanLE-STosES. COBBLE-STONES. Pebbles OD on the sea shore.

COCKER, w. A culvert; a drain under a road or gate.

COCKER, w. A culvert ; a drain under a road or gate.

COCUR-UP. COCKER-UP. To spoi1; to spoil to gloss over ; gloss over with an air of truth. tl11th.

"You see this here chap of hers he's cockered-up sorne

"You see this here chap of hers he's cockered-up some

story about having to story about having to goo away somewheres up into the

sheeres; sheeres; and 1I tell her she's no DO call to be so cluck over it; it;

and for my part part 1I dunno but what 1I be1 he'very very glad glad an't, an't, for he

was a chap as was always always a cokeing about the cupboards, cupboards,

and cogging cogging her ont out of a Sunday." Sunday."

CODDLE, e. To parboil.

Apples so cooked are called CODOLE, e. To parboil.

Apples so cooked are called coddled-apples.

CODGER. Amisel; astingyold fellow.

CODGER. A miser ; a stingy old fellow.

COG, m. [CDggtr, Old Eng1ish, a trickster.] To entice.

COG, m. \_Cogger, Old English, a trickster.] To entice.

"1 "I canDot cannot flatter, and and spw speak fair,

5milc Smile in mCtl's men's f.u:a, faces, m>ooth, smooth, dcœive, deceive, and aud cog."

_Ri&NJNIII., Richard III., Act Ad i. L sc. lJC. 3. 3.

COAGER, m. m. Luncheon. Luncheon. Called Called in sorne some parts of of the the county an

elevener, from from the the time at which which it is is generallytaken generally taken by the

labourel'll.

labourers.

COAGEK-CAKE. A plain cake is often baked as the coager cake,

COAGER-CAKE. A plain cake is often baked as the coager cake,

for the week's consumptiOD.

consumption.

COILBRS. COILERS. (See Quilers.)

COKE, m. [Kylm, \Jtijken, Duteh, Dutch, ta to peep about.] To Ta pry about.

COLE: COLE.* Seakale.

COllE. When snch a time arrives.

COME. When such a time arrives.

" "1I shall be be eighty-two come Ladytide." Ladytide,"

COMlolENCE, COMMENCE, fil. m. An alrair; affair; a job.

"

"Here's Here's a pretty commencel"

commence!"

COMP,PI. [CDmp, Ang. Sax.] A valley.

COMP, m. \Comp, Ang. Sax.] A valley.

Sorne Some cottages in in the parish of Beddingham Beddingbam are called by

this name, from ""hich which also the name Dame of the the village of

Compton is derived. derived,

C2

"

"


A Dicliona/]' o/Ihe Sumx Dialut.

A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect. 31

CORD. A cord of wood is a pile of wood cut up for buming,

CORD. A cord of wood is a pile of wood cut up for burning,

8ft. by 4ft. and

by 4ft. and 4ft.

4ft. thick.

CORDBATS, or CORDWOOD, m. Large pieces of wood, roots, &c.,

set up in stacks.

CORE, w. [Cceur, French, heart.] The middle of a stack of CORDBATS, or CORDWOOD, m. Large pieces ofwood, roots, &c.,

sel up in stads.

CORB, w. (Caur, French, heart.] The middle of a stack of

hay

hay

which has been eut away ail round.

which has been cut away all round.

COTTERIL, w. A pothoo1r.; or a hook to hang spits on.

COTTERIL, w. A pothook ; or a hook to hang spits on.

COUSINS, e. To call cousins, is to be on intimate terms but it ; is

generally used in the negative, as, "She and I doant call

cousins at all."

COUNTABLE. A contraction of unaccountable.

"Mymistus is countable ornaryagin to-day."

CRACKLINGS, w. Crisp cakes.

COUSINS, e. To cali cousins, is ta beon intimate tenns; but it is

gcnerally used in the negath'e, as, "She and 1 domt cali

cousins at ail:'

COUNTABLE. A contraction of unaccountable.

"!lI)' mistus is eountable omary agin Io-day:'

CRACKUNGS, w. Crisp cakes.

CIl.ANK, CRA..'


A DirtiMaty ift!le Sumx Dia/ut.

A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect. 39

frequently pronounced ash.

E.

E.

EARSIf, EARSH, W. w. A stubble field; field as ; as a wheat earsh, a earsh, a barley

barley earshfrequently

pronounced ash.

EARTH. To tum up the ground as a mole does.

EARTH. To turn up the ground as a mole does.

EDDEL. [Ang. Su., M/, oorrupted.] Rouen.

EDDEL. [Ang. Sax., ddl, corrupted.] Rotten.

EELSHEAR, e. An iron instrument with three or four points,

EELSHEAR, e. An iron instrument with three or four points,

fastened to the end of a Jong long pole, pole, by by means of which it is

thrust into muddy ponds and ditches for the purpose of

catching eels.

thrust in10 muddy ponds and ditches for the purpose of

catching eels.

E'BN-,,'yOST. [Corruption of even almost.] Nearly.

E'EN-A'MOST. [Corruption of even almost.] Nearly.

"'Tis e'en-a'most time you you gave gave over eelshearing eelshearing for this

year." year."

EFFET,m. [Efite,Ang.Sax.] A newt or eft. Dryeftsarethose

EFFET, m. \_Efete, Ang. Sax.] A newt or eft. Dry efts are those

found in the earth under hedge banks, and are said by by the

country people to be poisonous.

country people to be poisonous.

EGG. [EgglOn, Ang. Sax., to excite.] To urge on; 10 incite.

EGG. \_Eggian, Ang. Sax., to excite.] To urge on ; to incite.

ELDERN. Made of elder. (See Ether.)

ELEVENER, w. A luncheon. In Durham the haymakers and

reapers call their afternoon meal in the field their "four

o'clock."

ELLAR and ELLET, e. ELDERN. Made of eider. (Sec Ether.)

ELEVENBR, w. A luncheon. In Durham the haymakers and

reapers cali their aftemoon meal in the lield their "four

o'clock."

ELLAR and ELLET, e. [Elanr, \_Elam, Ang. Sax.] The eider elder tree.

EWR. ELLER. The aider alder tree. tree.

ELLEY and ELVEN, m. [El/m, Sax.] The elm.

ELLEM and ELVEN, m. \_Ellm, Sax.]

ELLYSGE, m. [EI/enie, Ang. Sax., foreign.] Solitary; far from

ELLYNGE, m. \_Ellende, Ang. Sax., foreign.] Solitary; far from

neighbours; uncanny.

"'Tis a terrible ellynge lonesome old house, and they do

say as how there's a man walks under them gurt elven trees

o'nights, but I've never seen him neighbours; uncanny.

"'Tis a terrible ellynge lonesome old house, and they do

say as how there's a man walks under tbem gurt elven trees

o'nights, but l've never secn him myself."

END-ON, e. In a END-OY, e. In a great hurry.

"He went at at it end on, as though he he meant to to finish linish afore afore

he begun."

EI:BW. ENEW. Enoagh. Enough.

ERSPUL. ERNFUL. Sad; Sad; lamentable.

lamentable.


39


40

A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect.

ETHER, or EDDER. [Ang. Sax., ether, edor.~\ A hedge. Apiece

of pliant underwood, of pliant underwood, wound between the stakes of a newmade

hedge.

hedge.

" An eldem eldern .tole stake and blackthorn bbckthorn ether

WlJ! Will malle make a bedge hedge to last for fOl'e_." ever."

EVED-A...D.LIMBED, /JI.

EYED-AND-LIMBED, m. "He eyed eyed and limbed Iimbed me" means, he

auathematized anathematized my my e}'es and eyes and limbs.

FAD. A whim.

FADDY. Fancifu!.

Fanciful.

A IJictûmary of tIlt SUSl(X IJ'alt,I.

ETHER, or EDDER. [Ang. Sax., 'I,"r, {dl)r.] A hedge. A piece

FAD. A whim.

F.

F.

FAG,

FAG, w. To eut cut corn or stubble close to the ground. ground.

FAG-HOOK. A hook or bill falltenoo on a long stick for trimming

FAG-HOOK. A hook or bill fastened on a long stick for trimming

hedges, or for fagging corn.

hedges, or for fagging corn.

FAGOT, 11/. m. A good-for.nolhing good-for-nothing girl. girl.

FAGOT-ABOVE-A-WAD, t. Rather too moch of a good thing.

FAGOT-ABOVE-A-LOAD, e. Rather too much of a good thing.

"Well, I do call it a fagot-above-a-load, to have to "Weil, 1 do cali it a fagot-above·a.load, to have to go go

down to Mr. Barham's twice a day."

FAIL. To fall ill ; generally used of catching complaints.

"He looks to me very much as though he was going to

down tu 1\Ir. Barham's t\Vice a day."

FAIL. To fall il!; generally llsed of catching complaillts.

"He looks to me very much as though he was going to

fail with the measles."

F AIRY-RINGS. Circles of grass which are higher, and of a

FAIRY-RINGS. Circles of grass which are higher, and of a

deeper green than the grass which grows round deeper green thall the grass which grQws round them; thern;

attributed to the dancing of the fairies.

" Ye Ye e1ves_yOll elves you demy·puppet..IlIat demy-puppets, that by moonshine do the green sour IOW"

ringlets mole, make, whereof whereoItbe the ewc ewe not not bites." bitel."

_TmojJut, Act V.5Ç. 1.

FAIRY-SPARKS, e. Phosphoric light

in the the night-time.

Tempest, Act v. sc. I.

FAIRY'SPARKS, t. Phosphoric light seen on variou! substances

seen on various substances

FAU" FALL, fil. m. The The autumn. autumn.

"1 "I have the ague every spring and and fall." fal!."

FALL. [FtallI1R, Ang. Sax.] To eut dowll timber.

FALL. \_Feallan, Ang. Sax.] To cut down timber.

"These trees trees are getting too too thick, I1 shall fall fall aa few few of

thern them next year."

FAN, t. e. To banter; to to tcase. tease.

"Be not not angry,

Most mighty princess, prineeu, that that 1I have bave adventured

To 1'1 try youc your taking of a false rahe report.

• •* The love lem: I1 bear bear him bim

Made me to to fan yon you thus; th",,; but but the the Gods GOOs made you, '1:""

Unlike aU all others, chaffless. ehallless. Pray you yt>II pardon." pardon. '

-CJ"'fbdiou, Cymbeline, Act i. 1. sc. 51'. 7.


46

A Di,h'()lIary ofIlll SIlIU.r Dia/«I.

A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect,

FRAYEL, m. A

FRAYEL, m. A flezible basket flexible basket made of bulrushes, bulrushes, commonly

used used for for paclting game.

packing game.

FRENCHY, e. A foreigner of any country who cannot FRL'ICHY, 1. A foreigner of any country who cannnt speak spcak

English, the nationality being added or not, as the case

English, the nationality being added or not, as the case

seems to require; thus an old fisherman, giving an account

of a Swedish vessel which was wrecked on the coast a year

or two ago, finished by saying that he thought the French

Frenchys, take 'em all in all, were better than the Swedish

Frenchys, for he could make out what they were seems 10 require; thus an old lishcrman, giviog an account

of a Swedish vessel which was wrecked on the coast a year

or two ago, finishcd by saying Thal he thought the French

Frenchys, take 'cm ail in ail, wcre better than the Swedish

Frenchys, for he conld malee out wbat They wcre driving at,

but he was ail all at sea with the othcrs. others.

FRiLSH, m. Home-brewed small beer, which must be drunk

FRESH, m. Home-brewed small beer, which must be drunk

while new or fresh.

FRESH, e. To decorate to renew.

;

"I freshed up my bonnet with those ribbons you gave me."

while new or (rcsb.

FRESli.I. Ta dceorate; to renew.

"1 freshed up my bonnet wltb those ribbons yon gave me."

FRBSB, t. Fresh air.

FRESH, e. Fresh air.

"It feels very close to you coming in out of the fresh, but

Jane she's had her fevers all day, and I dursn't set the

the window open to let in any fresh, for I was afraid 'twould

give her cold."

FRESH. Not quite drunk, but rather noisy.

FRIT, e. Frightened.

"I was quite frit to see him so near the water."

FRITH, e. Young underwood brushwood ; growing by the side

of hedges.

FRORE, w. Frozen. Spenser uses frorne in the same sense.

FROSTBECK, w. A strong handbill for cutting up turnips when

they are frozen.

FROUDEN, m; or FROUGHT, w. Frightened.

I met an elderly man one evening going through the

churchyard ; it was too dark to see who he was, and I passed

without speaking. To my surprise he stopped and began

shouting as loud as he could; and recognising his voice, I

went back to ask him what was the matter. "Oh dear me,

sir!" he said, "is that you? I didn't know it was you, sir,

I'm sure I beg your pardon." It was in vain that I enquired

why he was making such a dreadful noise "Il fcels very close 10 you coming in out of the frcsh, but

Jane she's had ber revers aU day, and 1 dursn't set the

the window open 00 let in any fresh, for 1 was afraid 'twould

give her eold."

Fusa. Not quite dronk, but ralher noisy.

FRIT, t. Frightened.

"1 was quite frit to see him so near the water."

FRITH, t. Young underwood; broshwood growing by the side

of hedges.

FRORE, ID. Frozen. Spenser nses fTOrne in the same sense:

FROSTBECX, ID. A strong handbill for cutting up tnmips when

they are frozen.

FROUDEN, f'l; or FROUGHT, w. Frightened.

1 met an elderly man one evening going through the

chnrchyard; it was 000 dan: to sec who he was, and 1 passed

without speaking. To my surprise he stopped and began

shonting as lond as he could; and recognising bis voice, 1

went back to ask him what was the matter. "Oh dear me,

sirI" he said, "js that you? 1 didn't know it was you, sir,

l'm sure 1 heg your pardon." Ir wall in vain that 1 enquired

why he was making such a dreadful noise; no answer could

; no answer could

1I get, beyond that he didn't know who it it was. So I1 wished

him him good night and went on, under the the impression that he

was drunk; drunk but the ; but the matter was explained e:r;plained by his turning tuming back

to to say, "1 "I beg your pardon, sir, but I1 hope you doant think

1I was was froudenl frouden! Bless Bless me, no! nol I1 was noways frouden, not

at all ! at alll I'm l'm a man as aint easily frouden fTOudcn at meeting anyone an)'one

in the the churchyard arter after dark."

dark,"


"

50

A Di(/wnaryifllu SUSSIX Diai«I.

A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect.

GOODY.

GOODY.

The title title of an elderly widow.

elderly widow.

EJ:pcnces for the )'eau 1743:

Expences for the yeare 1743 :

Payd Goody Gorge for washing and mending her suns

cloath and Goody Pumphery 6 Fard Goody Gorge for washing and mending ber SUDS

cloathand Goody Pumphery 6 penœ. . . . . .

pence

01 .. •. oo 00 .. •• 06

GOSSIP, e. [GobstU, Ang. Sax., a sponsor.] This word is still

used, though very rarely, by old GosSIP, I. [GOOsiU, Ang. Sax., a sponsor.] This ward is still

used, though very rarely, br nid people. people.

.. They've brought a child to he cbristened, but they

"They've brought a child to be christened, but they

haven't got no gossips."

GO-UNDER. Undergo.

" The doctor says he must go to the hospital and go under

haven't got no gossips."

Go-UYDER. Undergo.

"The doctor says bernast go ta the hospital and go under

an operation."

operation."

GRABBY, e. GRAl:lIlY, l. Grimy; Grimy; 6lthy; dirty.

filthy; dirty.

GRAFF, or GRAFPllW-TOOL, m. [Gra/all, Ang. Sax., to dig.]

GRAFF, or GRAFFING-TOOL, m. \_Grafan, Ang. Sax., to dig.]

A curved spade, generally made of wood shod with A curved spade, generally made of wood shod with iron,

userl used br by drainers.

GRANDFATHER, m. A daddy-long-legs.

GRATTEN, m. A stubble field.

GRATTEN. \_Gratter, French, to scratch.] To scratch for the

grain that may be left on the GRM1DPATHER, m. A daddy-Iong-legs.

GRATTEN, m. A slubble field.

GRATTIlN. [Gralltr, French, 10 scratch.] Ta scratch for the

grain that may he left on the grattens.

grattens.

"Br "

By the lime time the the pigs have have been becn grattening for aa week

IheiIJ look eversmuch bettcr."

they'll look eversmuch better."

GREW, e. A GREW, t. A greyhound.

GREYBEARDS, m. Earthen jugs formerly used in public-houses

for beer, and so called from having on them the face of a

man with a large beard.

GREYBIRD, m. The thrush.

GRIB, e. Variation of grip. A sharp bite.

GRIDGEN, m. Grudging; stingy.

"If he has anything given him, he's that gridgen that

he'll never give away naun an't."

GRIG, e. GREYBEAR05, 111. Earthen jugs formerly used in public-houses

for beer, and so called from having on them the face of a

man with a large beard.

GREYBIRD, 1JI. The thrush.

GRIn., t. Variation of grip. A sharp bite.

GRIOOlL.'i,1JI. Grudging; stingy.

"If he has anything given him, he's that gridgen that

,he'lI never give away Paun an't."

GRIG, 1. Merry; happy.

"Master Harry he's he's always 50 so grig."

GRIP. [G1Wp, \_Groep, Ang. Sax.] A small ditch or drain.

GRlzzU, GRIZZLE, 1JI. m. To fret; to grieve.

"1 "I know know the child aint aint well, weil, because because she's been been grizzling

about so all all day, and she's never one to to grizzle when she's

weil." well."

GROM, e. (Grommele,., Dutch, to wallow.] Dirty; to soil or

GROM, e. {Grommeler, Dutch, to wallow.] Dirty; to soil or

male make dlrty.

dirty.


A DÛlionfJ1;Y'f l''e Sussex Dia/tcl.

A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect. 51

GROOM, m. An instrument used by thatchers for carrying bundles

of straw.

GROUT-HEADED. Stupidly noisy.

GRUBBY, e. To make in a mess.

"You've grubbied your pinney," means "you have dirtied

your pinafore."

GRUMMUT. An awkward boy.

Mr. M. A. Lower states that this word is a corruption of

the old French, gromet, a diminutive of groom ; the cabinboy

of the Cinque Ports navy was so called. The condition

of the distinguished immunities of those ancient

corporations was, that they should provide for the King's

use a certain number of ships, and in each ship twenty-one

men, with one boy, called a gromet "et in qualibit nave

xxi. homines, cum uno garcione qui dicitur gromet"

Suss. Arch. Coll. vol. xiii. p. 217.

GRYST. [Grist, Ang. Sax., a grinding.] A week's allowance of

flour for a family.

GUBBER, e. Black mud.

GUDGE, m. To probe.

"The doctor came and vaccinated our baby yesterday;

nasty man ! he just did gudge his poor little arm about."

GUESS-SHEEP, m. Young ewes that have been with the ram and

had no lambs ; so called because it is doubtful or a matter

of guess whether they will ever have lambs.

GULL, w. To sweep away by force of running water; a breach

made by a torrent.

GULL. A gosling.

GULL, m. The blossom of the willow; called in Cambridgeshire

goslins.

GUMMUT. A lout a ; stupid fellow. (See Grummut.)

GUMPTIOUS, e. GROOlol, m. An instrument used by thatchers for canying bundles

of straw.

GROUT-HllAOE,... Stupidly noisy.

GRUBDY, t. To make in a mess.

"You've grubbied your pinney," means "you have dirtied

your pinafore."

GRUl,fllUT. An awkward boy.

Mr. M. A. Lower states that this word is a corruption of

the old French, gromtl, a diminutive of groom; the cabinboy

of the Cinque Ports navy was 50 called. The condition

of the distinguished immunities of those ancient

corporations wa.


A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect. 57

HOB,

HOE, w. Fuss; Fuss anxiety.

; anxiety.

"1 "I dôânt ddant see as )'ou've any cali

you've any call to putt lourself in

putt yourself in no ho such sucb

terrible gurt hoe

gurt hoe over it:' it."

HOGARVES, m. Hog-gazels;

hawthorn berries.

HOG-FORM, w. A bench on which pigs are laid to be killed and

dressed.

On the I:.nuckle knuckle of a pig's fore·lcg there

pig's fore-leg there are always always six sis:

marks, marks, about the siu: size of a pea, pea, which are believed to have

been caused br the

by the devil's fingers when fingers when he entered the herd

of swine.

HOGGET, w. A young sheep, just more than a year old.

HOG-JET, w. A small bucket, fastened into a long handle, by

which the food is tal:.en taken out of the hog-tub.

HOGO.* \JHaut gout, French.] A strong foul smell.

Sundays.

"Ah*! many's the time as we've stood over the hog-pound

together, and looked 'em over, and rackoned 'em up, whiles

people was in church; little did he think as he'd be putt in

before that hog was killed! and he always allowed she'd

weigh sixty stun."

"AJ}I many's the tîme as we've staod over the hog.pound

togcther, and looked 'cm over, and rackoned 'em up, whiles

people was in church; little did he think as he'd be putt in

before that hog was killedl and he all.ays allowed she'd

weigh sixtYstun."

HOLL, e. To hurl ; to throw.

A Diclwlfa1]1 of llu Susses Diakil.

HooARVES, m. Hog-gazels; hawthom bernes.

Hoo-FOR,"" w. A bench on which pigs are laid to he killed and

HOGGET, w. A young sheep, just more than a yea.r old.

HOO-JET, w. A small bucket, fastened into a long bandle, by

Hooo: [Haui !fIJul, French.] A strong foulsmell.

HOOPOUNO, HOGPOUND, m. The pigstye; pigstye a favQurite favourite ; rendezvous on

Sundays.

HOLL, t. To hurl; to throw.

HOLLARDS: HOLLARDS.* Dead branches of of trees.

HOLP, m. [Hta/P, Ang. Sax.] The perfect of help.

HOLP, m. \_Healp, Ang. Sax.] The perfect of help.

.. "She She had me me round to the pound, to see see a little hogget

what she'd hobbed-up; and then she had me indoors and

"what she'd hobbed-up; and then she had me indoors and

holp me to a cup of tea and sorne honey-bread:'

holp me to a cup of tea and some honey-bread."

HOLT, m. [Ho/l, Ang. Su., a grave.] A small plantation.

HOLT, m. \Holt, Ang. Sax., a grove.] A small plantation.

HOLT. A hold.

"'Tis just like a lawyer, if once it takCll a holt 'an ye, le

"'Tis just like a lawyer, if once it takes a holt 'an ye, ye

dôânt doant very easy get free agin."

HOLT, m. [Corruption of HaIt.] A cali always used to stop a

HOLT, m. [Corruption of Halt.] A call always used to stop a

person.

HOLy-SUNOAY, t. Easter-day.

HOLY-SUNDAY, e. Easter-day.

There is a tradition that the sun always dances on the

morning of Holy-Sunday, but There is a tradition that the sun always dances on the

morning of Holy-Sunday, but nobody nohady has has even even seen secn it

because because the devil is 10 so cunning that that he always puts a hill in

the way to hide it.

the way to hide it.

"


"

58

A Di(/iqnQ1;J' if IIIt

Dictionary of the SUIUX Sussex Dialect. Dial«I.

HOME-DWELLERS, m. People accustomed to live in houses, as

opposed to tramps.

" A good many of these people who've come HOllR-OWltLLERS, m. People accustomed to live in houses, as

opposed to tramps.

.. A good many of these people who've come harvesting

harvesting

this year, look this year, look like home-dwellers."

BONEY-SREAD. HONEY-BREAD. Bread and honey. hODey.

Hoou, HOOKE, or or HooK. HOOK. [Uk, Ang.

{Hoc, Ang. Sax., Su., a hook.] book.] AAname name given given to

several places in

places in Sussex.

HOP,ooG, HOP-DOG,

m. A caterpillar peculiar

caterpillar peculiar to the hop gardens. gardens.

HOP-DOG,

HOP-DOG, m. An instrument used to drawthe draw the hop-poles hop-poles out of

the ground, for

ground, for the purpose of purpose of carrying carrying them to the bin to

he be picked. picked.

HOP-KORSI!, t. A short ladder nscd br the hop-pickers.

HOP-HORSE, e. A short ladder used by the hop-pickers.

HOP-MAND, w. [Mond, Ang. Sax., a basket.]

brew-houses.

A vessel used in

HORN-FAIR, m. Rough music with frying pans, horns, &c.,

generally reserved for persons whose matrimonial difficulties

have attracted the attention of their neighbours. The fair

annually held in Charlton, Kent (now abolished), was always

known as Horn fair.

HORNICLE, w. A hornet.

HORSEBEACH, or HusBEECH, w. The hornbeam.

HORSE-DAISY, w.

themum.

The ox-eye daisy. Chrysanthemum leucan-

HOSTE, e. Described by Durrant Cooper as "A vendor of

articles out of shops or houses," so used at Hastings. From

the old French word Hoste, which meant both a host and a

guest.

This word is used in the second sense, a guest, a person

allowed to come, a stranger.

"Every person not lotting or shotting to the common

charge of the Corporation, who should be a common hoste in

the fish market." Hastings Corporation Records, 1604.

HOT, m. To warm up.

"I was that cold when I got indoors that gaffer hotted up

some beer for me."

HOTAGOE.* To move nimbly ; spoken of the HOP'MAND, w. (Mond, Ang. Su., a basket.]

brew·houses.

A vessel nsed in

HORN'PAIR, m. Rough music with fl}ing pans, horns, &c.,

gencrally reserved for persons whose matrimonial difficulties

ha\'e attracted the attention of tbeir ncighbours. The fair

annually held in Charlton, Kent (now abolished), was always

known as Horn fair.

HORNICLE, w. A homet.

HoaSEBEACH, or HUSBEECH, w. The hombeam.

HORSE-DAISY, w.

/Mmum.

The ox-e)"e dais)". ChT)'l411ilumum /(U(411-

HosTE, l. Described by Dunant Cooper as "A vendor of

articles out of shops or houses," SO used at Hastings. From

the old French word Hoste, which meant both a host and a

guest.

This word is used in the second sense.-a guest, a person

allowed to come, a stranger.

"Eve!)' person not lottîng or shotting ta the common

charge of the Corporation, who should be a cornmon !un/tin

the fishmarket," _HIJ.Jtings Ccrp


A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect. 63

J.

JACK-HEARN, m. A heron; always spoken of as "a gurt old

jack.hëam."

jack-hearn."

the most interesting heronries in the south of England."

Knox's Ornithological Rambles in Sussex.

JACK-IN-THE-HEDGE, e. Lychnis diurna.

JACK-IN-PRISON, e. Nigella damascena.

JACK-UP, m. To give up anything in a bad temper.

A man came to my house _Knn's Ornü!uH


64

A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect.

A is spider considered a useful insect for the cure of the

ague. If

ague. If taken internally, it it should

internally, should be rolled

up

up in a cobweb

and and swallowed swallowed like like a pill. If

pill. If applied eztemally, it it

applied externally, should be he

placed in a nutshell and hung round the neck in a bag of

black silk. The ague generally hangs about Sussex people

a long time.

JOINT-STEDDLE, or JOINT-STOOL, w. A stool framed by joinery

work, so called in distinction from stools rudely formed of

a single block.

"Away with the joint-stools, remove the court-cupboard."

Romeo and Juliet, Act i. sc.

5.

JORAM, m. A capacious bowl or goblet; called in Norfolk a

Jeroboam.

JOSSING-BLOCK, e. A block by which a rider mounts his placed in a nutshell and hung round the neck in a bag of

black silk. The ague generally hang8 about SusseJ[ people

a long lime..

jOIlO"STJl.DDLE, or J0!l','T.STOOL, w. A stool framed br joinery

work, 50 called in distinction from stools rudely formed of

a single- bld.

"1.:"", 1ri.th the joint-stoob, relllon the rourt..:upboard."

_R_andY,,/id, Actf. sel 5:

jOltAY, m. A capacious bowl or goblet; called in Norfolk a

Jeroboam.

jossn;o"BLOCK. t. A block by which a rider mouuls bis horse, borse,

onen often seen al at the gale gate of a country country churchyard churchyard in Sussex.

JOSS-UP,

"Ah "Ah! 1- she josses josses op up like- like: a (eather, feather, she doant dOànt want no

jossing-block nOI nor chair chair either."

JOSTLE, m. To cheat.

JOUND, m. JOID


68

A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect.

LARDER, m. [Corruption of Ladder.]

"Master's got a lodge down on the land yonder, and as I was

going across totherday-morning to fetch a larder we "Master'sgota lodge down on the landyondcr,and asIwas

going across IOlhcrday.moming to fctch a Jarder wc kecps

keeps

there, a law)"er catched holt 'an me and scratched my face."

there, a lawyer catched holt 'an me and scratched my face."

LASH, m. To get into a passion.

"He makes me lash and swear otherwhile when he be so

lapsy; soonasever I'm backturned he's off after the birdsnestes,

or up to some LASH, m. Ta gel ioto a passion.

"He makcs me lasb and swcar otbcrwhile when he be sa

lapsy; soonasever l'm backturned he's oB" arter the birds·

nestes, or up to sorne game or aDother."

another."

!.AsT, t. A lasi of hcrrings is ten thousand.

LAST, e. A last of herrings is ten thousand.

LAST, e. A court of 1.A.sT, t. A court of tI'Venty-four jurats

twenty-four jurats who levy

levy rates for fOI

keeping keeping up up lhe the marshes.

LASUS. A water meadow.

LATS. [Lalla, Ang. \_Latta, Ang. Saz.) Sax.] Laths.

but in that year people spelt as they pleased.

LAURENCE. A mysterious individual whose influence is supposed

to produce indolence. "Old Laurence has got hold

posed to produce indolence. "Qld Laurence bas gol bold

of me" means "1 "I have gol got a fit of idleness." idlcncss."

LAVANT, w. [Lafian, Ang. Sax., to sprinkle with water; or,

LaW,., Laver, French, ta to wash.J wash.] A violent flow Oow of water.

"How it did rain! It ran down the street in a lavant."

"How it did rain! It ran down the street in a lavant."

LAWYER, e. A long bramble full of thorns, so called because,

"When once theygets they gets a holt holt an ye, ye ddant d6ant easy get shut shul

of'em." of 'em."

.

Lw, LAY, m; or LEY. LEY. [LeaC, \_Leag, Ang. Sax.] Land laid down for

pasture: pasture ; not pennanently, permanently, but to 10 be be broken up every evel)' three or

fOllr four years.

LAYLOCK, m. The lilac tree.

A Dirliim4t;J1ifIht SUlltX Djalal.

I...uwn, m. [Corruption of Ladder.)

LATTIN, w. Plate-tin. Spelt lattyn in an inventory dated 1 LATTL'I,!D. Plate-tin. Spelt lattyn in an inventory dated 15+9. 549,

but in that year people spelt as tbey plcase


.. JI.

84

A DidiOllary ifIht

Dictionary of the Sussex Sumx Dialect. Dia/at.

PALLA.NT. [Palml, Ang. SU., a palace.] The PaUant is a dis­

PALLANT. [Palent, Ang. Sax., a palace.] The Pallant is a district

of trict of Chichester opening from

opening from the West-street.

Murray says "It

Murray says "It forms a miniature Chichester with its

own own fout four streets, and streets, and is the palalinalt,

palatinate, or Archbishop's

Archbishop's

peculiar."

PALM. The bloom of the willow, which is worn on Palm

Sunday.

In Kent yew-trees are always called palms.

PANNAGE, m. The mast of the oak and beech on which swine

feed in the woods.

A copyhold right to these existed in one of the manors

of Brighton.

PANDLE, m. A shrimp. Also used in Kent.

PARGET. [Old English pariet, a wall; derived from the Latin

paries.,] To plaster with cement; especially to plaster the

inside of a chimney with cement made of cow-dung and

lime.

PARLY. [Parler, French, to talk.] To talk French, or to talk

unintelligibly.

A fisherman said, " peculiar."

PAUl. The bloom of the willow, which is WOrD on Palm

Sunday.

In Kent yew-trees are always called palms.

PANNAGll, m. The mast of the oak and beech on which swine

(ccd in the woods.

A copyhold right to these CIÎSted in one of the rnanOrs

of Brighton.

PANOLE, m. A shrimp. Also used in Kent.

PARGET. IOld Englisbparid, a wall; derived from the Latin

pariu. To plaster with cement; especially to plaster the

inside of a chimney with cement made of cow.dung and

lime.

PAJU.Y. (Parler. French, to talk.' To tallr: French, or to tallt

nnintelligibly.

A fisherman said, "1I can can make malte shift to to parly a bit myself,

but deuee-a·bit deuce-a-bit can can 1I mal:.e make out out when the Frenchies begins

to parly parly me," me."

A maid servant servant being asked asked who was with her master,

answered that that she she didn't rightly know, but she knew he

was a Parly.Gmnalll

Parly- German!

PARSON-ROOK. PARSON-ROOK. A Royston-crow.

Royston.crow.

This This species has has obtained the the specifie specific name name given by the

Romans Romans to sorne some bird bird of of the the crow kind, deemed of unlucky

omen-lillulra omen sinistra consi:r:. cornix.

PUTIAL. To he partial to anything, means, to like it; generally

PARTIAL. To be partial to anything, means, to like it; generally

in in the the sense sense of of relishing.

"I be very partial to a few pandles."

PARTICULAR, m. To look particular, is to look unwell.

"He's been looking very particular for some time past."

PASSEL, m. [Corruption of "1 he very partial to a few pandles."

PUTICULAR, m. To look particular, is to look unwell.

"He's been lookiDg very particular for sorne time past."

PASSltL, m. [Corruption of Parcel.l Parcel.]

PASTIME, m. [Pass and time.] This word is used according to

its origin original acceptation, not so 50 much much to to express amusement,

as occupation for the mind.

"I likes evening school, 'tis such a pastime; but there's

PASTIllE, m. JPaSS and time.] This word is used according to

"Ilikes evening school, 'tis snch a pastime; but there'!

a passel of chaps chaps that cornes comes and do'ant dOânt want to learn leam naun

themse1ves, themselves, and and wunt let any one else." e1se,"


A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect. 91

Q.

QUAINT. [For acquainted.]

QUALITY, w. This word occurs in old parochial account books

for a kind of tape.

QUARTERING, w. The wooden framing of a house, the upper

story of which is made of wood-work covered with tiles.

QUEER, m. To puzzle.

"

It has queered me for a long time to find out who that

man is and ; my mistus she's been quite in a QUAI!-ï. [For acquainted.]

Ql1ALlTY, w. This word occurs in old parochial account books

for a kind of tape.

Ql1ARTERING, w. The wooden framing of a house, the upper

story of which is made of waod-work covered with tiles.

Ql1EER, m. To punIe.

"It has queeroo me for a long time ta find out who that

man is; and my mistus she's been quite in a quirk quirk over it.

He dôànt doant seem to he be quaint quaint with nobody, and he doant d6a.nt

seem to have no business, business, and for a11 all that he's always alwa}'S to and

thro', to and thro', for everlastin'."

thro', to and thro', for everlastin'."

QUERN, w. \Cwtorn, Ang. Sax., a mill.] A hand-mill to grind

malt.

" "Are An yon you Dot not he

That rrights frights the maidenll maidens orthe of the villag'ry, vilbg'ry,

Skim millt, miik, and 'IOlDetime. sometimes Iabollr labour in in the quernl" quern?"

QUEST, e. To give tongue like a hound.

QUlCK, QUICK, w. Pregnant.

"Faith, UD\e"IS unless yon you play the honest Trojan, the the poor pour wench is i. cast eut

away; away: she'.quick." she's quick."

, __, '_L.. L-' A·

_ ......... S


"

A Dictionary 0/ tne Sussex Dialtel.

98 A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect.

SAG. [Connected with SAG. (Connected with Salgan, Ang. Su.,

Saegan, Ang. Sax., to cause to descend.)

descend.]

Ta To fit badly; to fit badly; to bang clown

hang down on onc one sicle; side; to subside by

by its ils

own weight or an overload.

own weight or an overload.

"The mind I sway by, and the heart I bear,

Shall never sag with "The milld 1 s..ay by. and the hnrt 1 bear,

Shdl never aag wlth doubt, doubt, nor Ilot shùe shake with fear." feu."

_Ma(:/;dll, Act v, sc. 3.

Macbeth, Act v. sc. 3.

$ALmoTE, m. The court of the lord of the old manor of Bright­

SALIMOTE, m. The court of the lord of the old manor of Brighthelmston

in 1656 1656 was described as the Salimote Court.

SALUT. A salad. (As ballet for ballad.)

SALLET. A salad. (As ballet for ballad.)

"Sunday, May 13, 1764. Myself, Mr. Dodson and servant

at church in the morn. We dined on a calf's heart pudding,

a piece of beef, greens and green sallet. Mr. "Sunday, May '3, '76+ Myself, MT. Dodsonand servant

at church in the mom. Wc dined on a calf's heart pudding,

a piece of beef, greens and green sallet. Mr. Hartley Hartleycame came

to bring me bring me a new wigg. wigg. Paid him in full for a new wigg wigg

\. 153., and new-mounting an old one, 43."

Diary of Mr, Turner, of East El. 158., and ncw-mounting an old one, 45."

-Diry, 1549.

Sc.w, m. A small black plum whicb grows wild in the bedges.

SCAD, m. A small black plum which grows wild in the hedges.


..

A Didionary of l''t

Dictionary of the Sussex Sumx Dialect. Dial«l. 99

SCADDLE, m. [Stœlh(g, Ang. Sax., hurtfld.] Wild; mischievous;

SCADDLE, m. \_Scathig, Ang. Sax., hurtful.] Wild; mischievous;

thievish. The Anglo-Saxon word sceatha has the same

double meaning (i) a robber; thief; (2) an thievish. The Anglo-Saxon word rualha has Ihe same

double meaning (1) a robber; thief; (11) an adversary.

adversary.

Applied to a truant boy, or a cow which breaks Applied to a troant bo}', or a cow which breaks through through

hedges, or

hedges, or a cat which steals.

SCADE. Harm; mischief.

ScALY, SCALY,

W. w. Inclined to stea!. steal.

SCMlBLE, SCAMBLE, w. '

To male make a confusion of anything.

anything.

"The scambling scambling and llllquiet unquiet time

Did pub it out of frier question."

Did it push out of further question."

-Ki"CHIJI?, King Henry v., V., Act i. sc. I. J.

ScAR, t. [Possibly connecte


102

102

A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect.

SEW, w. A cow is said to be gone to sew when her milk is

dried off.

SHACKY. Shabby; ragged.

SHACKLE, w. To idle about; to waste time; to be very busy

about nothing.

SHADE. [Shard.~\ A piece of broken tile or pottery.

SHAG, w. A cormorant.

"As wet as a shag," is a common expression, taken from

the idea of a cormorant diving frequently under the water.

SHARD, e. A gap in a hedge. This SHACKY. Shabby; ragged.

SHAc.'kLE, w. Tu idle about; to waste time; to he very busy

about nothing.

SHAnE, (Shard'.] Apiece of broken tile or pottery.

SHAG, w. A connorant.

"As wet as a shag," is a common expression, takcn from

the idea of a cormarant diving frequently under the water.

SHAkD, t. A gap in a hedge. This word, "Y0rd. like iike sbade, shade, is derived

from the Anglo-Saxon

Anglo-Saxon

sœard, sceard, which WhlCh means (i) (1) a sherd; sberdj (2) (2)

a division.

SHARP: SHARP.* The shaft of a cart.

SSARPS. The finesl refuse siftings of lI.our. (See Pollard.)

SHARPS. The finest refuse siftings of flour. (See Pollard.)

SHATTER, m. A number or quantity.

"There's a tidy shatter of hops this year."

SHAUL, or SHAWLE. A wooden shovel without a handle, used for

putting corn into a winnowing machine. This word is a

variation of shool or shovel.

"

I, said the owl,

With my spade and showl."

SHAW, e. A small hanging wood.

SYATTER. m. A nomber or quantity.

"There's a tidy shatter of hops tbis year."

SHAUL, or SltAWLJt. A wooden shovel without a bandle, used for

putting corn into a winnowing machine. This word is a

variation of shoot or shoveJ.

"J, uid the owt,

With my spade and show!."

SHAW, t. A small hanging wood.

Ray defines it as "a wood that encompasses aa close." close."

Ray defines it as "a wood that encompasses

likeness, and seems to correspond to the Sussex bly.

A man who who was was trying to describe describe to ta me a fearful fearrul apparitionrition

which which he he had had seen in Firle Firle park, said, after after much much

cross-e.xamination. cross-examination, that it passed quite dose close to him in the

form of an enormous white horse, and there was a bluish

shay. I should myself have supposed that a horse and shay

was a sulliciently sufficiently cornmon common object of the the country not not to have

excited excited undue influence, influence, but on this occasion occasion the appearance appcarance

SHEAR, e. A spear,

A nirliMaryifllu Sussex Dialt".

SEW, e. \_S_ychu, Welsh, to dry up ; cognate with Latin siccare.~]

To drain land.

SEW, e. An underground drain.

SEW, t. (Sychu, Webb, to dry op; cognate with Latin .riuQrt.]

Tu drain land.

SEW, t. An underground drain.

SEW, w. A cow is said to he gone to sew when ber milk is

SHAY. A faint rayof ray of light. In In Kent Kent the the word word means roeans a general

likeness, and seems ta correspond to the Sussex bly.

form of an enormous white horse, and tbere was a bluish

shay. 1 should myself have supposed that a horse and shay

was so overwhelming that the man was was il! ill for for several several days.

SHEAR, t. A spear, as an ecl-shear.

eel-shear.

SHEAT, t. A young hog of the first ycar. (See Shoot.)

SHEAT,


A Didima']'if lAt SUSStX Dialtd. 103

A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect. 103

SUUR. (SC/T, Ang. SM" c1ear, white.] Smooth and shiny, as

SHEER. \_Scir, Ang. Sax., clear, white.] Smooth and shiny, as

f1esh flesh which is is swollen.

SHEERES. The true Sussex man divides the \\'orld into Iwo parts.

SHEERES. The true Sussex man divides the world into two parts.

Kent and Sussex fonns forms one division, division, and ail all the rest is "The

Sbeeres," Sheeres." 1I have heard China and Australia both described

as in the sheeres; sheeres; but 1I confess that 1I was 50mewhat somewhat startled

at being told that 1 was m)'self "a man as was weil acquaint

at being told that I was

"

myself a man as was well acquaint

with the sheeres, and had got friends in all parts of this

world and the world to come." This statement was meant as a

compliment, but when I came to consider it with the sheeres, and bad got friends in al! parts of this

world and the world to come." This statement was meant as a

compliment. but when 1 came to consider it afterwards, aftcrwards. I1 was

not sure tbat that it VI'as was altogether altogether complimentaly complimentary to some sorne of my

frie!lds. friends.

SHEERE-MAN. A man who comes from the shires (and not

necessarily sure of a favourable reception in Sussex).

SHEERE-MOUSE. A field mouse. A shrew-mouse.

The country people have an idea that the harvest-mouse

is unable to cross a path which has been trod by man.

Whenever it attempts to do so it is said to be immediately

struck dead. This accounts (they say) for the numbers

which on a summer's evening may be found lying dead on

the edge of the field footpaths without any wound or apparent

cause of death.

SHEERE-MOUSE. An epithet of derision applicable to a sheereman.

The phrase "the sheeres" is found in many other

parts of England, and is generally expressive of a certain

degree of SUEERE-MA.'1. A man who cornes from the shires (and not

necessarily sure of a favourable reception in Sussex).

SUEERE-MOUSE. A field mouse. A shrew-mouse.

The country people have an idea that the harvest-mouse

is unable to cross a path which hall been trod by man.

Whene\'er it atternpts co do so it is liaid to be immediately

struck dead. This accounts (they say) for the numbers

which on a summer's evening may be found Iying dead on

the edge of the field footpaths without any wound orapparent

cause of death.

SUEil:R.E-MOUSE. An epithet of derision applicable to a sheereman.

The phrase "the sheeres" is found in many other

parts of England, and is generally expressive of a certain

degree of depreciation. In Shropshire the the manufacturing

manufacluring

districts are spoken of as as "down "down in in the the shires."

SIIEERE-WAY, t. A bridle-way.

SHEERE-WAY, e. A bridle-way.

SHEL..-FIRE. Phosphorescent Hght from decaying matter; caIIed

SHELL-FIRE. Phosphorescent light from decaying matter; called

also also fail)' fairy sparks.

SHELVE, e. To throw manure out of a cart by raising the forepart

so that the bottom may shelve or SUELVE, t. To throw manure out of a cart by raising the forepart

so that the bottom may shelve or slope.

SUlM. (&Alin, Dutch, a shade or ghost.] A glimpse of any­

SHIM. \_Schim, Dutch, a shade or ghost.] A glimpse of anything.

"I thought I saw a shim of the carpenter going by the

"1 thought 1 sali' a shim of the carpcnter going by the

gatc gate just now, but l'm I'm not sure."

SIIIM, t. A narrow strip or glimpse of white white on aa horse's horse's face.

SHIM, e. A narrow strip or glimpse

Sumo A horse hoc for cleaning the ground betwcen rows of

SHIM. A horse hoe for cleaning the ground between rows of

beans beans or hops.

SHUIPER. SHIMPER. (Sdmliln, \_Scimian, Ang. Sax,. Sax., to shine or or shimmer.] To shine

brightly.


10.

104

A Dkh'qnQO' ifJiu SIISSex Dia/ut.

A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect.

SHINOLBS. Small wooden tilcs made of split oak, used for roofs,

SHINGLES. Small wooden tiles made of split oak, used for roofs,

steeples, &c.

steeples, &c.

There There are are several several church spires in

spires in Sussex covered with

tbese these shingles.

shingles.

SHlP, m. Sheep.

SHIP, m. Sheep.

Sddom Seldom used in the singular.

singular.

SHIRTY. Easily offended. A man who bas quickly lost his

SHIRTY. Easily offended. A man who has quickly lost his

temper is said to have temper Is said to bave got his got his shirt out.

SHOD. [Perfect of Shed.] Spilt. This word is correct, the

Anglo-Saxon past tense being sceod.

"I sent him up to fetch a little beer, but he shod half of

it bringing of it home."

SHOES AND STOCKINGS, m. A wild flower of the cypripedium

genus (Holloway) called in East Sussex " pattens and clogs,"

or " butter and eggs."

SHOG. The core of an apple.

SHOKE, m. The original form of shook.

" He shoke his fistes in my face, he did!"

SHOCKED, e. Shook.

"

I shocked in my shoes to hear what words he used."

SHOOLER, e. An SHOD. \Perfect of Shed.] Spilt. This word i8 conect, the

Ang a-Saxon past tcose heing sce6d.

"1 sent him up to fetch a ]jule beer, but he shod half of

il hringing of it home."

SHOES AND STOCKlNGS, m. A wild fiower of the t:ypn"pdium

gtllUI (Holloway) caUed in East Sussex" pattens and clogs,"

or " butter and eggs."

SROG. The core of an apple.

SKOIa, m. The original fonn of shoolt.

"He shoke his listes in my.face, he did 1"

SHOOUD, t. Shook.

.. 1 shooked in my shoes to hear wbat wards he used,"

SHOOLER, (. An idle, Jazy lazy fellow; described described as "a man who

goes goes about with \Vith his boots undone."

SHOOT, w. A young growing pig. (See Sheat.)

SHOOT. A gutter round round a roof roof for shooting of!" off the water.

SUORE, SHORE, m. To shelve shelve of!": off; to to eut cut off of!" evenly.

"If "If the road road was better shored at at the the sides sides the water water

wouldn't lay so much much as as what what it it does."

SHORE. \_Schoren, Dutch, to prop up.] A prop, a support.

SHORN-BTJG, m. [Scearn,A.ng. Sax., dung; scearn-wibba, a shorn -

SHORE. [&Mffll, Dutch, to prop up.) A prop, a support.

SHORN-BUG, m. [Sctam, Ang. Su., dung; Ictam-wiUa, a shombug.J

A beetle. To eat shom-bugs for dinner is a pro­

bug.] A beetle. To eat shorn-bugs for dinner is a proverbIalverbial

expression for for the extremity of of poverty.

SHORT, m. Out of temper; unable to give a civil answer.

SHORT, m. Tender.

A rat-catcher once told me that he knew many people

who were in the habit of eating barn-fed rats, and he added,

"When they're in a pudding you could not tell them from a

chick, they eat so short and purty."

SHOVE, e. To put the loose corn into cops or heaps, that it SHORT, m. Out of temper; unable to give a civil answer.

SHORT, m. Tender.

A rat-catcher once told me that lie knew many people

who were in the habit of eating bam-fed rats, and he added,

"When they're in a puddingyotl could not tell them from a

chick, they eat sc short and purty."

SHOVE," Tc put the loose corn iuto cops or heaps, that it may

be be more more conveniently taken up.


A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect. 105

SHRAPE, e. To scold.

SHRAVEY.* A loose sub-soil, something between clay and sand.

SHRIEVY, e. Unravelled ; having threads withdrawn.

SHROGS, e. The refuse trimmings of SHRAPE,I. To scold.

SURAVEV.' A loose sub-soil, something between clay and sand.

SHRIEVY, e. Unravelled; having threads withdrawn.

SHROGS, e. The refuse trimmings of hop-plants; also

hop-plants; also called

chogs.

chogs.

SIlRUCI:. SHRUCK, e. e. Shocke


106

A IJictiomu)' if llu Sumx nialtel.

106 A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect.

StZZING. Yea.st or barm. It is probable that this word may

SIZZING. Yeast or barm. It is probable that this word may

have its origin in the sound made by beer or ale in have its origin in the sound made by beer or ale in waTking.

working.

SUELlNG: SKEELING." The bay of

bay of a haro; barn the side of a gaTTet ; garret or Of upper

upper

room, wbere the slope of the roof Înterferes with the

room, where the slope of the roof interferes with the

upright."

upright."

SK1!:P. rsup, Ang. Sax., a basket.] A beehive, or the straw

SKEP. \_Scep, Ang. Sax., a basket.] A beehive, or the straw

hackle placed ove!

placed over it for protection.

protection.

SKJtP, t. A hat; a broad fiat basket.

SKEP,


110 HO

A Didionary 01 '"1 Sumx Dial«l.

A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect.

childles$ wcre placed with the old bachelors at the third

childless, were placed with the old bachelors at the third

table. Various toasts were given, and the company always

broke up at the temperate hour of eight, " generally very

cheerful and good tempered."

S-ussex Archaological Collections, vol. xiii. p. 228.

table. Variolls toasts were given, and the company always

broke up at the temperate hout of eight, "generally very

cheerful and good tempered."

_Sussu: ArcA(Z(>ÙJgWJ Cdi«tWns, vol. zili. p. 228.

SOSS-ABOUT, e. To mix different BOSS-ABOUT, 1. Ta mil.: dilferent things together; things together; generally generally

applied to liquids.

applied to liquids.

"To soss" in the North means to go about in the dirt.

SOSSEL. To make a slop.

Sow. A word used among the old Sussex iron-workers for a

weight of 2,ooo-lbs.

SOW-CAT, m. A female cat.

SOW-WAPS. The queen wasp.

In some parts of the county a reward of sixpence is

offered for each sow-waps killed in the spring.

SPACE. A measurement of three feet. Spaces and rods are

almost the only terms of measurement I have ever heard

used by country people.

SPACE. To measure ground.

SPALT, e. [Connected with the Dutch spalten, to SassEL. Ta maie a slop.

Sow. A ward nscd among the old Sussex iron·'vorkers for a

weight of :t,GDO-lbs.

SOW-CAT, m. A fernale cal.

SoW-WAPS. The queen wasp.

In sorne parts of the CQunty a reward of sixpence is

offered for each sow-waps killed in the spring.

5PACE. A measurement of tbree Ceet. Spaces and rods are

almost the ouly tenns of measurement 1 have ever beard

used by country people.

SPACE. Ta measuJe gfOund.

SPALT, t. [Connected wilh the Dlltch fjJtl/lln, to split.] split.] Split; Split;

brittle, decayed. Applied to timber.

brittle; decayed. Applied

SPALTER, w. To split or chip off.

SPANNEL, m. To make dirty foot marks about a floor, as a

spaniel dog does.

"I goos into the kitchen and I says to my mistus, I says

('twas of a Saddaday), the old sow's hem ornary, I says.

Well, says she, there aint no call for you to come spanneling

about my clean kitchen any more for that, she says so I

;

goos out and didn't say naun, for you can't never make no

sense of women-folks of a Saddaday."

Shakespeare uses the word in the sense of dogging the

steps,

"The hearts that spaniel'd me at heels."

Anthony and SPAl,TER, w. To split or chip off.

SpANmL, ln. To male dirty foot marks about a fioor, as a

spanlel dog does.

"1 gOO$ into the kitchen and 1 says to my mistus, 1 says

('twas of a Saddaday), the old 5Ow's hem omary, 1 says.

Weil, saysshe, there aint no cali for )"ou to come spanneling

about my clean kitchen any more for that, she says; 50 1

goos out and didn't say naun, for you can't never make no

sense of women-folks of a Saddaday."

Shakespeare uses the word in the sense of dogging the

steps,-

"The hearts that spaniel'd me at heels."

-À.>


A Dictwnary of l''t SUSSlX Dia/«I.

"'

A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect. 115

STODGE, m. A fuss.

"He's always in such a stodge; if he's got to goo anywhere's

he always wants to be off two hours too soon."

STOKE. To stir the fire; hence the word stoker.

STOLT, e. Stout; strong; generally said of fowls.

"The chickens are quite stolt."

STOMACHY, m. Proud; obstinate.

STONE. A weight of eight pounds.

STOOD, m. Stuckfast.

An old man told me, "I've seen a wagon stood in the

snow on the road from Selmeston to Alciston, and they

never moved it for six weeks."

STOOL-BALL. An old Sussex game similar in many respects to

cricket, played by females. It has lately been revived in

East Sussex by the establishment of stool-ball clubs in many

villages, which not only provide good exercise for young

ladies who might otherwise become lazy, but also promote

kind, social intercourse among all classes. The " elevens"

go long distances to play their matches; they practice

regularly, and frequently display such perfection of fielding

and wicket-keeping as would put most amateur cricketers to

shame. The rules are printed, and are as keenly discussed

and implicitly obeyed as those of the Marylebone Club.

The game is thus alluded to in Poor Robin's Almanack

for 1740,

"Now milkmaid's pails are deckt with flowers,

And men begin to drink in bowers ;

Sweet sillabubs, and lip -loved tansey,

For William is prepared by Nancy.

Whilst hob-nail Dick and simp'ring Frances

Trip it away in country dances ;

At stool-ball and at barley-break,

Wherewith they harmless pastime make."

STOP, e. A rabbit-stab; probably so-called because the doe

stops up the entrance when she leaves her STODGE, m. A fU55.

.. He's always in such a stodge; if be's gat to goo anywhere's

he always wanls to be olf two hours too soon.'·

STOKE. To stir the 6re; hence the word stoker.

STOLT, t. Stout; strong; generally said of fowls.

"The chickens are quite stolt."

STO»ACHY, m. Proud j obstinate.

STOSE. A weight of eight pounds.

STOOD, m. Stuckfast.

An old man told me, ''l've seen a wagon stoOO in the

snow on the rood from Selmeston to Alciston, and they

never moved it for six weeks.'·

STOOL-IlALL. An old Sussex game similar in many respects ta

cricket, pla)"cd by females. It has lately been revived in

East Sussex by the establishment of stool-ball clubs in many

villages, which oot only provide good exerdse for young

ladies who might otherwise become lazy, but also promote

kind, social intercourse among ail classes. The" elcvens"

go long distances to play their matches; they practice

regularly, and frequently display such perfection of 6elding

and wicket-keeping as would put most amateur cricketers to

shame. The mies are printed, and are as lteenly discussed

and implicitly obeyed as those of the Marylebone Club.

The game is thus alluded to in Poor Robin's A1manack

for '140,-

"t\ow milkmaid', pails are deckt with Howen,

And meD begin to drink in bmven;

Sweet $ilbbuœ, and Up·loved tansey,

For William il p"'F.-red br Nancy.

Whil5t hob·rWI Dick and $imp'ring Frante5

Trip it awa)' ln rountry danœ5;

At $too1.balI and at harley_brulr,

Whermth they b.annles, pastime maire."

STOP, t. A rabbit-stab; probably so-called because the doc

stops up the entrance when she leaves her young.

STOIUl:-COCJC, STORM-COCK, or or SREECHER. The The missel thmsh. thrush.

STOT, w. w. A young hullock. bullock.

STRAND, m. A withered staIl. stalk of grass; grass ; one of the twists twists of of aa

line.

STUAU: STREALE.* (Slrœ/, [Strcel, Ang. Sax.] An arrow.

STREET. In Sussex a road is called a street without any

STREET. In Sussex a road is called a street without any

reference reference to there being houses beside it; but 1I am quite quitc


hs

118

A IJitJi01Ulry 0/ t!lt Sumx IJiaÜtt.

A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect.

SWADE. The leather strap of a spinning-wheel.

SWADING-IRON, w. An instrument used in a blacksmith's forge.

SWALLOCKY, e. A term applied to the appearance of clouds in

hot weather, before a thunderstorm.

SWANK, w. A bog; a dell or damp hollow.

SWANKY, m. Small beer.

SWAP, m. To reap corn and beans.

SWAP-HOOK, m. The implement used for swapping.

SWARLY. Ill-tempered ; usually applied to animals.

SWARVE, e. To fill up ; to choke with sediment.

"Our ditch is quite swarved up."

SWATH. [Pronounced swarth.] A row of cut grass or corn as

it is laid on the ground by mowers or swappers.

"And there the strawy Greeks, ripe for his edge,

Fall down before him, like the mower's swath."

Troilus and Cressida, Act v. sc.

5.

SWEAL. \_Swelan, Ang. Sax., to kindle.] To burn the hair ; to

singe a SWADE. The leather strap o( a spinning-wheel.

SWADISG-TRON, w. An instrument used in a blackamith's(orge.

SWALLOCK.Y, t. A tenn applied 10 the appCjlIance of clouds in

hot weather, before a tbunderstonn.

SWANK, U!. A bog; a dell or damp bollow.

SWANK.Y, m. Small beer.

SWAP, m. To reap corn and bea.ns.

SWAP-HOOK, m. The implement used (or swapping.

SWARLY. IIl.tempered; usually applied to animais.

SWARVE, t. To lill up; to choke witb sediment.

"Our ditch is quite swarved up:'

SWATH. [Pronounced swarth.] A row of cut grass or corn as

it is laid on the ground by mowers or swappers.

"And there tbe stnwy Green, ripe fot h1s edge,

FaU down bd'ore h1m, Iike tbe mower's swatb."

-Tnn·[..., ami C..urida, Act v. sc. 5.

SWEAL. [Suri/an, Ang. Sax., to kindle.] To bum the haïr; to

singe a pig. pig.

SV,'1I:LT. SWELT. [Sweilan, [Sweltan, Ang. Sax., to die.] die.] Hot; faint.

"Like "Like a swelt cal, cat, better better than tban it it looks."

SWINGS. SWINGE. [Swingan, \_Swingan, Ang. &u:.] Sax.] To flog. 1I.0g.

"1 "I will swinge him Mm well weil when when 1I catches him."

SWINGEL. SWINGEL.

,0


TAG,


A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect. 123

It was useless to reason with the woman, or to attempt to

comfort her by reading her

by reading her the reply from

reply from the War \Var Office

tbat that ber her son was weil. well. Il It was not till till he returned retumed home and

in bis his own persan refuted person refuted the evidence of the tbe token that her

confidence in it it wa.s was at ail all sbaken. shaken.

TOM. Any cock bird, as a torn-turkey or a torn-parrot.

.. " 1I bought two bought two bens hens and a tom torn off old Mis Cluckleford, Cluckleford,

but 1I d6ant doant knowas know as 1I shall make out much with witb 'em, 'em, for

bacca, because the boys cut the small wood in pieces to

smoke like c1gars. cigars.

TOOK-TO, e. Ashamed; vexed.

.. " 1I was quite took-to quite took-to when you you come in, in, for (or 1I hadn't had

time to tight-op tight-up ail all da,.." day."

to be up-a-top-of-the-house.

"If you says anything to him he's up-a-top-of-the-house

drackly minut."

TORE-GRASS, m. [Also spelt toar-grass.] Tare-grass. The

long old grass which remains in "If you says anything to bim be's IIp-a-top-o(-the-house

drackly minut."

TORE-GRASS, m. [Aiso spelt toar-grass.] Tare-grass. The

long old grass whicb remains in pasture during the winter.

TOT, m. A bush; a tuft of grass.

"There warn't any grass at all when we fust come "There wam't any grass at ail when we fust come here;

nann naun but a passel 0' o' gurt old tots aod and tussicks. tllSSicks. You Voo see

there was one of these here new-fashioned men had had the

1I

A Dkltimaryif11u Sussex Djalal. 123

It was useless to reason with the woman, or to attempt to

TOll. Any coelt bird, as a tom-turkey or a tom-parrot•

they doant seem none of 'em inclined to they doont seem none of 'cm indined to lay." lay."

TOY-DACCA. TOM-BACCA. Traveller's joy. C/tmalis

joy. Clematis vitalba; viJal6a; also alsocalled called boys'-

boys'

bacca, bccause the boys eut the small wood in picces to

TOMMY, m. Bread.

TONGUES, e. Small soles ; probably so called from their T01UfY, m. Bread.

TONGUI!S, t.

TOOK-TO, t.

SmaU soles; prohably so called from their shape. shape.

Ashamed; vexed.

TOP-OF-THE-HouSE. Top-OF-THE-HousE. A person who has lost his temper is said

to be up-a-top-o(-the-house.

TO-RIGHTS, m. Completely; perfectly.

"I had my little boy into Lewes to get his likeness taken

a Saddaday, and the man took him to-rights, and you'll say

so when you sees it."

Toss, e. The TO-RIGHTS, m. Completel,.; perfectly.

"1 had my little boy into Lewes to get his likeness taken

a Saddaday, and the man took him to-rights, and you'lI say

so when yoo sees it."

Toss, t. The mow, or or ha)' bay of a barn barn into into which which the corn corn is put

to be tbrashed.

thrashed.

TOT,' m. A bush; a tuft of grass.

farm, and he'd properly starved the land and the labourers,

and the cattle and everything, without it was hisself."

TOT, e. A brood of chicken; a covey of partridges.

T'oxHER-DAY. If pronounced t'otherdy, means the day before

yesterday.

This expression is correct, because in Early English other

invariably means there was one of these here new-fashioned men bad had the

fann, and he'd properly starved the land and the labourera,

and the cattle and everything, without it was hissclf."

TOT, t. A brood of chicken; a covey o( partridges.

T'oTHRa-OAY. If pronounced t'otherdy, means the day before

yestenlay.

This expression is correct, because in Early English other

invariably means second, second, and the day before bc(ore yesterday is

the SI.'Cond second day recltoning reckoning backwards. It is is remarkable that tbat


132 A Dictionary Dictionary of of the Sussex Dialect. Dz'a/ecl.

YEILD-IT, e. Give YEILD-IT, e. Give up. up.

A farmer fanner took his team to harrow a piece piece of wheat, but

finding it too wet he said to his carter"Come along home,

finding it too wet he said to his carter "Come along home,

we'll yeild it."

yeild it."

YETNER. [Gzï nd, Ang. Sax., not as yet.J Not nearly. The

YETNER. \_Git nd, Ang. Sax., not as yet.] Not nearly. The

reduplication of the negative is reduplication of the negative is very very common in Sussex.

"1 "I bëant be'ant farty farty year year old yetner." yetner."

YOE, m. [Corruption of Ewe.J From the Ang. Sax., eowu.

YOE, m. [Corruption of Ewe.] From the Ang. Sax., eowu.

YOYSTER, m. To play play about roughly roughly and noisily.

noisily.


13.

134

A Dic1ionao' 0/ /lit Stlsso,: Dia/ul.

A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect.

BULLOCK-LEAZE. The right of turning one bullock out on a

common to graze. (Used at Berwick and other places.)

BURY. A rabbit hole; a hole made by any animal.

CAFFINCHER, w. The chaffinch.

CARDIOUS. A mixed cloth made of wool and linen thread. A

word which frequently occurred in old account books when

spinning-wheels were in use.

CARRIERS. Part of a spinning-wheel fitted with wire hooks

through which the thread passed to the reel.

CAST. The second swarm from a hive of bees.

CAULKER-BRIDGE, w. A rough bridge made of logs and fagots.

CHIP, w. The wooden part of a plough to which the share is

fastened.

CHIPPER, w. Lively; cheerful.

BmLOCK-LEAZE. The right of tuming one bullock out on a

common to graze. (Used al Berwick and otheT places.)

DURY. A rabbit hole; a hole made br any animal.

CAFnNCIIER, w. The cbaffincb.

CARDIOUS. A mixed cloth made of waal and linen thrcad. A

ward whicb frequentlyoccurred in old account books wben

spinning-wheels were in use.

CARRIERS. Part of a spinning-whecl fitted with wire hooks

through which the thread passed to the reel.

CAST. The second swann from a hive of becs.

CAULKER-BRIDGIl, w. A rough bridge made of logs and fagots.

CUIP, w. The wooden part of a plough to which the share is

fastened.

CUIPPI!R, w. Livety; cheerful.

CHUR.CH-STEEPLE, CHURCH-STEEPLE, w. The common agrimony. Agrimonia

rupaiorM.

rupatoria.

Con. COVE. A lean·ta, lean-to, or 1011' low building building with aa shelving roof. Pigeoncotes

are frequently called called pigeon-coves in East East Sussex.

CURMUDGEON, w. To mend up old clothes. A curmudgeon

originally meant a hard-bargainer, a miserly fellow, and

probably this meaning of the word is connected with mending

up rags in a miserly manner.

CURlIUDGEON, w. To mend up old clothes. A cunnudgeon

originally meant a hard-bargainer, a miserly fellow, and

probably this meaning of the word is connected with mending

up rags in a miserly manner.

CUTS, w. The cross-beams on the the Iloor floor of aa wagon.

DOGGER, w. w. A support for for the sbafts shafts of of a cart. cart.

EARS. The irons to to which which the bail of of a bucket bucket is fastened.

GRAKDlIOTHER'S-NIGIlTCAP. GRANDMOTHER'S-NIGHTCAP. Tbe The white campion. L. dioica. dioira.

HATCHET-PIECES. Paul-pieces of land of irregular shape. (See

Tenantry-acre.)

HEMPSHARE, or HEMSHARE. Certain lands in the centre of

Brighton, so named from having been used by persons

engaged in the fishing trade for growing hemp for HATCHET-PIECES. Paul-pieces of land of irregular shape. (See

Tenantry-acre.)

HEMPSHARE, or HEMSUARE. Certain lands in the centre of

Brighton, so named frorn having been used by persons

engaged in the fishing trade for growing hemp for ropemaking.

The word is found in the court rolls, .660.

making. The word is found in the court rolls, 1660.

HERRING-HANG, e. A HERRJNG-UANG,t. A place where herrings are hung up to dry;

also caUed called a dee. dee.

LEAKWAY. A road dividing one furlong from another in the

LEAKWAY. A road dividing one furlong frorn another in the

tenantl}·-acre. (See Tenantr)'-acre.)

tenantry-acre. (See Tenantry-acre.)

LILY, m. The field convolvulus. Conmuiltl Convolvulus arvensis. anmtm.


APPENDIX.

THE MUMMERS'

PLAY.

FFATHER ATHER CHRISTMAS.

ST. GEORGE. GEORGE.

Dramatis Persona. Personœ.

A TuRKISH TURKISH KNIGHT.

A DOCTOR.

Father Christmas.-Here come l, Old Father Christmas.

Father Christmas. Here come I, Old Father Christmas.

Christmas or not,

I hope Old Father Christmas

, Will never be forgot.

Make room, make room here, gallant boys,

And give us room to ; rhyn^e

We're come to show activity,

Upon a Christmas time.

Acting youth or Christmas or not,

I hope Old Father Christmas

Will never be forgot.

Make room, make room here, gallant boys,

And give us room to rhYIl\,e;

We're come to showactivity,

Upon,a Christmas time.

Acting youth or acting age, age,

The like was never acted on on this this stage; stage ;

If you you don't believe what I now say, say,

l!nter, St. George, and clear the way!

Enter, St. George, and clear the way !

St. Géorge.-Here come l, St. George the valiant man,

St. George. Here come I, St. George the valiant man,

With naked sword and spear in hand ;

Who fought the dragon and brought him to the slaughter,

And for this won the King of With naked s\vord and spear in hand;

Who fought the dragon and broughthim to the slaughter,

And for this won the King of Egypt's daughter.

What What man or or mortal mortal dare to stand

Before Before me me with with my sword sword in in hand? hand ?

l'Il I'll slay him him and and cut eut him him as as smali small as the flies, flies,

And send him to to Jamaica to.make to make mince-pies.

mince-pies.

Turkish Knzght.-Here come l, a Turkish Knight,

Turkish Knight. Here come I, a Turkish Knight,

In Turkish land I learned learned to fight;

l'Il fight St. George with cuurage bold,

And if his blood's hot will make it cold.

I'll fight St. George with courage bold,

And if his blood's hot will make it cold.


138 AA Dictionary DzcHonary of of the Sussex Dialed. Dialeel.

At Salisbury Salisbury the Mummers used to be called John John Jacks, and

Jacks, and

there was a fifth performer called John Jack, who was represented

there was a fifth performer called John Jack, who was represented

with a large hump-back, large hump-back, and concluded the play play by by coming coming

forward and saying,

Here come I,

Little John Jack,

With my wife and family at my back,

Roast beef, plum-pudding, and forward and saying,-

Here come l,

Little John Jack,

With my wife and family at my back,

Roast beef, plum-pudding, and mince-pie,

mince-pie,

No one loves them better than l !

No one loves them better than I !

God save the Queen !

God save the Queen !


ANGLO-SAXON NAMES

IN SUSSEX.

The follo"lng Anglo-Saxon ward, "ill he traced in the names

The following Anglo-Saxon words will be traced in the names

of almolt almost ail all the towns and and villagea villages in in Sussex:-

Sussex :

BEce. A brook. Bd. Bexhill.

BECC. A brook. Beck. Bexhill.

BOlt. BUR. A cottage; a dwelling. Edburton.

Edburton.

BORR. A bill; a citadel. Burghersb; Bury; Pulborough.

BURH. A hill; a citadel. Burghersh; Bury; Pulborough.

BORN•. BURNE. A stream; a river. Bmlnu. Bourne. Eastbourne. Eutbourne.

CEAST1lR. CEASTER. A camp. (From Lat. ltUfnt••) castrum.} Chester. C/i4t". Chichester. Chichester.

Con. COMB. A vallcr. valley. (From Webh Welsh cwm.} tw•.) C-N. Combe. Balcombe. Balcombe.

Con. COTE. A oot. cot. Woodm&DCotei Woodmancote; Coates.

CRon. CROFT. A Imall small enclosed field. field. Wivelscroft. Wive\scroft.

DAI.. DAL. A valley_ valley. Dell; Dr//,- del. dû. Arundel.

DENU. A valley. Den; Dn.; tka. dean. Harden; Manie"; Westdean. Weatdean.

DUN. DCrN. A bill; hill; aa down. down. Don. DrJ.. Slindon. Slindan.

EA.. EA. \Vater; Water; marshy manhy place. Ea. L. Selsea; Winchelsea. WiDchelsea.

FELD. An open field; pasture; plain. Field. Fidd. Heathfield.

FOLD.. FOLDE. Afield. A field. Fold. FMi. Slinfold.

GAT. A gate; or rather, away; street. Gate. GAT. A pte: orrather, a wayj street. Galt. Rogate; Easter- Easter·

gate.

K•


140

A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect.

GRJEF. A grave ; or a grove. Grove. Boxgrove.

HAM. A village ; an enclosed place. Ham. Beddingham.

Hou. A hill. Hoe. Piddinghoe

HOLT. A grove. grove. Wigginholt.

Wigginholt.

HURST. A wood. Nuthurst.

IG. An island. Ey. Thorney.

ING. A meadow. Angmering.

; Houghton.

descendants of Wilm ; whence Wilmington ; Rustington, &c.

LEAG. A pasture. Ley. Earnley.

MERE. A pool or lake. Mare; mere. Haremare ; Tangmere.

MERSC. A marsh. Marsh. Peasmarsh.

Horsted.

A Dt'ctionary of the Sussex Dialect,

GRiEF. A grave; or a grove. Grove. Boxgrove.

HAM. A village; an enclosed place. Ham. Beddingham.

Hou. A hill. Hoe. Piddinghoe; Houghton.

IG. An island. Ey. Thomey.

ING. A meadow. Angmering.

lING. G. Used as a patronrmic; patronymic; thus Wilming would signify the

signify the

descendants of Wilm; whence Wilmington; Rustington, &c.

LEAG. A pasture. Lf:JI. Earnley.

MERE. A pool or lake. Mare; men. Haremare; Tangmere.

MERsc. A marsh. Marsh. Peasmarsh.

STEDE. A place a station. ; Stead; sted. Eastgrinstead ;

STEDE. A place; a station. Stead; sted. Eastgrinstead;

Horsted.

STOC. A place. Stock; stoke. West Stoke.

STOC. A place. Stock; stoke. West Stoke.

TÛN. A close; a field; a dwelling. Ton. Alciston.

TUN. A close; afield; a dwelling. Ton. Alciston.

WEORTHIG. WEORTHIG. A farm; farm ; an estate estate; a ; public public way. way. Worth. Fittleworth.worth.

Wic. WIC. A dwelling place; a village. village. Wt'ck. Wick. Wick; Terwick.

WINCEL. A corner. Winchelsea.

(See Wt'ncel in Bosworth,

WINCEL. A corner. Winchelsea. (See Wincel in Bosworth,

who who gives this example.) example.)


SUSSEX SURNAMES.

The following names of families, now residing in the

county, are derived from or connected with Sussex words which

will be found in this dictionary:

AKEHURST. [Ang. Sax., de, dc, an oak, and hursl, hurst, a wood.]

ASHBUR ASHBURNHAM. HAM. [Ang. Sax., (BSC, cese, an ash ash; bume, ; burne, a stream, and

ham, hdm, a dwelling.

ASHDOWN. jfiEsc, an ash, and dun, a hill.

ASHENDEN. JEsc, an ash, and denu, a valley.

BALKHAM. Balca, a ridge, and ham, a dwelling.

sure.]

BECK. Beck, a brook. [Ang. Sax., becc.~\

pasture.

BICKLEY. Beck, a brook, and ley, a pasture.

BINSTEAD. Bin and steddle, a stand.

BOURNE. A stream. [Ang. Sax., burne.~\

BOSTEL. A hill path. (See Borstal.)

BRACKFIELD. Brake, a fern, and field.

BROAD. BROAD. A common. common.

K2

.. ,

The following names of families, now residing in the

county, are derived from or connected with Sussex words which

will be found in this dictionary:-

ASHDOWN. Atse, an ash, and dun, a hill.

A HE DEN. Atse, an ash, and denu, a valley.

BALKHAM. Balca, a ridge, and hdm, a dwelling.

BARTO. BARTON. Barton, Bar/on, a farm-yard. [Ang. Sax., bere-tun, berc-Iun, an enclosure.]

BECK. Beek, a brook. [Ang. Sax., beee.l

BENTLEY. BE TLEY. Bent, Beni, a tuft tuft of of grass, and and ley (Ang. Sax., leag), leag), a

pasture.

BICKLEY. Beek, a brook, and ley, a pasture.

BI STEAD. Bt'n and sleddle, a stand.

BOUR E. A stream. [Ang. Sax., bume.]

BOSTEL. A hill path. (See Borstal.)

BRACKFIELD. Brake, a fem, and field.


144 A Dù:tùmary Dictionary of of the Sussex Dùûeet. Dialect.

REEVE. An officer of the manor.

SHAW. A wood.

STEAD. An enclosed place. place.

SOUTHERDEN. The south valley. valley.

WE WENHAM. HAM. JlVén, Wen, or waz'n, wain, a wagon, wagon, and ham, an enclosure. wagon-house.

wagon-house.

The

WENMAN. The wagon-man.

WHEATCROFT. The wheat field.

WHEATCROFT. The wheat field.

WOODWARD. An officer of the manor; a wood-warden.

WOODWARD. An officer of the manor; a wood-warden.

WYNDHAM. Wynd, a path up a hill, and ham.

WYNDHAM. UYnd, a path up a hill, and ham.


SUSSEX SURNAMES.

SUR AMES.

BOURNE. [Burne, Ang. Sax.] A stream.

BOURNE. [Burne, Ang. Sax.] A stream.

Boorne Boome

Bourner Boumer

Bourne Boume

Michelbourne.

Miehelboume.

BROO,K. A stream; a water-meadow.

BROOK. A stream ; a water-meadow.

COMP. A valley.

COMP. A valley.

Brook

Brookshaw

Brooks

Colbrook

Brookfield

Westbrook.

Comper

Compton.

COOMBE, or COMBE. A hollow in the downs.

COOMBE, or COMBE. A hollow in the downs.

Combe Fameomb Farncomb

Comber Fameombe

Farncombe

Anseombe Anscombe Lipseombe

Lipscombe

Balcombe Titeombe Titcombe

Dunseombe Dunscombe Whiteombe

Whitcombe

Elleome Ellcome

Witeomb. Witcomb.

CROFT. [Ang. Sax.] A small enclosed field near a house.

CROFT. [Ang. Sax.] A small enclosed field near a house.

Croft

Crofts

Horseeroft

Longeroft

Croft Pycroft

Horsecroft Tredcroft

Longcroft

Pycroft

Ravenseroft

Ravenscroft

Trederoft

Wheateroft.

Wheatcroft.


146

146

A Dietionary of the Sussex Dialeel.

A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect.

DE , or DE E. A valley.

Barnden Holden

Blagden Norden

Blunden Ockenden

Brigden Pagden

Cobden Pattenden

Cruttenden Ramsden

Farenden Rigden

Fogden Standen

Gosden Southerden

Hebden Wickenden

Hepden Wisden

Hobden Witherden.

HAM. (1) A hamlet; (2) an enclosed place.

Balkham Markham

Barham Mepham

Bellingham Milham

Benham eedham

Bromham Oldham

Clapham Oxenham

Cobham Packham

Coldham Pelham

Cosham Sandham

Gilham Stoneham

Grabham Stonham

Gresham Stopham

Grinham Southam

Hardham Tatham

Higham Wenham

Hockham Whapham

Hookham Wickham

Kingham Witham

Langham Woodham

Lingham Woodhams

Lulham Wyndham.


Sussex Surnames. urn.a11les.

HURST. [Ang. [Ang. Sax.] Sax.] A wood.

Hurst

Luckhurst

Brinkhurst

Medhurst

Broadhurst

Pankhurst

Crowhurst

Folkhurst

Haslehurst

Staplehurst

Staplehurst

Songhurst

Songhurst

Ticehurst

Longhurst

Longhurst

Wilmshurst.

LEY. [Ang. Sax., leag.] A pasture land.

LEY. [Ang. Sax., leag.~\ A pasture land.

Ley Bayley Bentley Bentley

Hoadley

Hockley

Huntley

Bletchley Bletchley Langley

Burley Lee

Cawley Copley Cowley

Leigh

Longley

Lutley Lutley

Crutchley MMedley dley

Ernley Morley

Graveley Notley

Handley Hawley

Nutley utley

Oakley oakley

Hayley Pelley

Helmsley Rapley

Hemsley Ripley

Henley Stapley

Hickley

Worsley Wor ley

Wheatley.

SHAW. SHAw. A small wood on a hill side. side.

Shaw Buttonshaw

Bagshaw Bag haw Crawshaw

Brookshaw Brook haw Henshaw

Burstenshaw Bur ten haw Langshaw Langsha\

Burtenshaw Burt nshaw Oldershaw.

147


148

A Dù:tionary of the Sussex Dz"a/ect.

A Dictionary of the Sussex Dialect.

STEAD. [Ang. Sax.] [Ang. Sax.] A place. place.

Stead

Felstead

Hempsted Hempsted

Isted

Grinstead

Maxted

Halstead

Polsted Foisted

Halsted

Steadman.

WICK. [Ang. [Ang. Sax.] Sax.] A town.

Wicks

Markwick

Butterwick

Padwick

Chadwick

Rudwick

Feldwick

Strudwick

Gratwick

Wickerson

Hardwick

Wickham

Madgwick

Wickenden.


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