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WELCOME TO SPENCERIAN COLLEGE - Sullivan University | Library

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Welcome to spencerian college<br />

Over a Century of Excellence in Education<br />

For over a century, Spencerian College has helped<br />

fulfill the dreams of many ambitious, alert students<br />

who consider a rewarding career as a worthwhile goal.<br />

With a variety of academic and extracurricular<br />

opportunities, Spencerian College can offer you both<br />

an enjoyable and rewarding college experience.<br />

Thousands of Spencerian graduates before you can Jan M. Gordon<br />

Executive Director<br />

attest to the special attention they received while<br />

studying at Spencerian, a college that through the years<br />

has set the standards for excellence in career education. It is these same<br />

standards that have helped shape the success of our graduates, not only in<br />

their careers, but in their personal lives as well.<br />

Of course, there are numerous reasons for the success of the college and its<br />

graduates. This catalog, complete with details of each program and course<br />

we offer, will give you insight into some of those reasons. At the same time,<br />

the information enclosed will assist you in starting toward your own career<br />

success.<br />

Because words and pictures cannot fully depict the atmosphere we strive to<br />

maintain at Spencerian College, this is your personal invitation to visit and<br />

experience our campus for yourself.<br />

We look forward to meeting you.<br />

Sincerely,<br />

Jan M. Gordon<br />

Executive Director<br />

1


pHilosopHY/mission<br />

The mission of Spencerian College is to provide men and women with quality training for<br />

careers in the business, technical, and health care professions.<br />

This mission is met through providing:<br />

• A favorable environment for learning that includes a faculty that is academically and professionally<br />

prepared to assist students toward relevant employment;<br />

• An experienced administration interested in, and receptive to, new ideas and concepts for<br />

continued improvement of the college and its programs of study;<br />

• Industry-standard equipment and facilities so that graduates will be able to utilize their<br />

training on this equipment in their initial employment;<br />

• Continuous evaluation and appraisal of every facet within the college’s program, ensuring<br />

relevance to the needs and demands of business and of the community, and ensuring effectiveness<br />

in preparing the graduate for career success;<br />

• An employment service for graduates that provides meaningful assistance in matching the<br />

graduate to available job openings.<br />

2


tHe spencerian success storY<br />

Spencerian College has earned an excellent reputation through the success of its tens of thousands<br />

of graduates since its founding in Louisville in 1892. With a high percentage of its graduates<br />

finding employment every year, Spencerian College continues to provide an unmatched<br />

history of offering its students a unique opportunity to prepare for a successful career in<br />

today’s professional world. This is the direct result of Spencerian College’s commitment to a<br />

quality career education — an education for success in a setting that is vibrant with success!<br />

History of the College<br />

Spencerian College was founded in 1892 by Enos Spencer, a nationally recognized business<br />

educator of his time. In the history book entitled Beginning of the Business School, author<br />

Charles G. Reigner states: “The name Spencerian has imbedded itself in the consciousness<br />

of the American people. The name has been associated with business schools for almost a<br />

hundred years. It is an honored name.”<br />

Spencerian College still proudly stands for quality career education, expanding into Allied<br />

Health and Technology as a growing dynamic institution. Thousands of Spencerian graduates<br />

hold positions in business, medical professions, and industry all across the country, and<br />

employers continue to seek Spencerian graduates to meet their employment needs.<br />

Spencerian College is proud of its distinctive reputation earned in over a century of service in<br />

education. The college is positioned to prepare its graduates to meet the employment needs of<br />

the present and the future.<br />

In 1997 Spencerian opened its Lexington campus, located in the heart of “bluegrass country.”<br />

(Please refer to a separate academic catalog for that campus.)<br />

Spencerian specializes in business and medical areas at the main campus and medical and<br />

technical programs at the branch campus in Lexington. The college continues to adapt to<br />

employer needs in a continuous process of program and course evaluation.<br />

3


accreditation & approvals<br />

Spencerian College and its individual programs have met the educational standards and<br />

criteria for accreditation, approval or licensure from the following organizations:<br />

Spencerian College is accredited by the Accrediting Council for<br />

Independent Colleges and Schools to award certificates, diplomas, and<br />

associate degrees.<br />

Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools<br />

750 First Street, NE, Suite 980<br />

Washington, DC 20002-4241<br />

Telephone: (202) 336-6780<br />

The Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools is listed<br />

as a nationally recognized accrediting agency by the United States<br />

Department of Education and is recognized by the Council for Higher<br />

Education Accreditation.<br />

Spencerian College is licensed by the Kentucky State Board for<br />

Proprietary Education. The Kentucky State Board for Proprietary<br />

Education license is granted under legislative authority of KRS 165.<br />

Kentucky State Board for Proprietary Education<br />

P.O. Box 1360<br />

Frankfort, KY 40602<br />

Telephone (502) 564-3296<br />

Spencerian College is regulated by the Indiana Commission on<br />

Proprietary Education.<br />

Indiana Commission on Proprietary Education<br />

302 West Washington Street, Room E 201<br />

Indianapolis, Indiana 46204<br />

Telephone: 1-800-227-5695 or (317) 232-1320<br />

Spencerian College’s Medical Assisting Diploma program is accredited by<br />

the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs<br />

(www.caahep.org) upon the recommendation of the Medical Assisting<br />

Education Review Board (MAERB).<br />

The Surgical Technology program is accredited by the Commission<br />

on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP), on<br />

recommendation of the Accreditation Review Council on Education<br />

in Surgical Technology and Surgical Assisting (ARC-ST/SA).<br />

The Invasive Cardiovascular Technology program is accredited by the<br />

Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs<br />

(CAAHEP), on recommendation of the Joint Review Committee on<br />

Education in Cardiovascular Technology (JRC-CVT).<br />

Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education<br />

Programs<br />

1361 Park Street<br />

Clearwater, FL 33756<br />

Telephone: (727) 210-2350<br />

4


accreditation & approvals<br />

IAPS<br />

®<br />

Spencerian College’s Radiologic Technologist AAS program is accredited<br />

by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology.<br />

Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology<br />

20 N. Wacker Drive, Suite 2850<br />

Chicago, IL 60606-3182<br />

Telephone: (312) 704-5300<br />

Spencerian College’s Medical Laboratory Technican AAS Program is<br />

accredited by the Accrediting Bureau of Health Education Schools (ABHES).<br />

Accrediting Bureau of Health Education Schools<br />

7777 Leesburg Pike, Suite 314 N.<br />

Falls Church, VA 22043<br />

Telephone (703) 917-9503<br />

Spencerian College’s Practical Nursing Diploma program and Associate<br />

of Applied Science (AAS) Degree* in Nursing program are approved by<br />

the Kentucky Board of Nursing.<br />

*See nursing addendum for more information<br />

Spencerian College’s Limited Medical Radiography Diploma program<br />

and Radiologic Technologist Associate of Applied Science (AAS) Degree<br />

program are approved by the Cabinet for Health and Family Services<br />

of the Commonwealth of Kentucky, Radiation Health & Toxic Agents<br />

Branch.<br />

Spencerian College’s Phlebotomy Certificate program is approved by the<br />

International Academy of Phlebotomy Sciences, Inc. (IAPS)<br />

Spencerian College’s Massage Therapy program is approved by the<br />

Kentucky Board of Licensure for Massage Therapy<br />

The Respiratory Therapy program at Spencerian College-Louisville holds<br />

a Letter of Review from the Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory<br />

Care (www.coarc.com).<br />

Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care<br />

1248 Harwood Road<br />

Bedford, Texas 76021-4244<br />

(817)283-2835<br />

5


louisville - a diverse place to live & studY<br />

Situated on the banks of the Ohio River, Louisville has been the home of Spencerian College<br />

since its founding in 1892<br />

Louisville is a major city contrasting the modern with the traditional. The city enjoys a colorful<br />

history as an old river city with deep bluegrass traditions dating back to the pre-Civil War era.<br />

This metro area, the sixteenth largest city in the country, enjoys having a progressive business<br />

climate, a stable job market, and a highly diversified economy.<br />

In recent years, Louisville has become one of the world’s leading medical centers. The city also<br />

is proud of its long-standing interest in the arts.<br />

As Kentucky’s largest financial and industrial center, Louisville is a major transportation hub<br />

and attracts visitors from all over the world. It has a dynamic cultural flavor from the many<br />

exhibits, entertainment events, and attractions offered throughout the year.<br />

Louisville, with its people and many diverse opportunities, is the perfect community for<br />

Spencerian College students to study, work, and grow.<br />

Spencerian Academic Calendar<br />

Winter Quarter: 2011 2012 2013<br />

Registration Dec. 28-29, 2010 Dec. 27-28, 2011 TBD<br />

Orientation Dec. 30, 2010-Jan. 3 Dec. 29-30, 2011 TBD<br />

First Day of Class Jan. 3 Jan. 3 Jan. 2<br />

Holiday: MLK Jr. Jan. 17 Jan. 16 Jan. 21<br />

Last Day toReceive a W Feb. 18 Feb. 17 Feb. 15<br />

Final Exams March 14-20 March 12-18 Mar. 11-17<br />

End of Term March 20 March 18 Mar. 17<br />

Winter/Spring Break March 21-27 March 19-25 Mar. 18-24<br />

Spring Quarter: 2011 2012 2013<br />

Registration March 22-23 March 20-21 Mar. 19-20<br />

Orientation March 24-25 March 22-23 Mar. 21-22<br />

First Day of Class March 28 March 26 Mar. 25<br />

Last Day to Receive a W May 13 May 11 May 10<br />

Holiday: Memorial Day May 30 May 28 May 27<br />

Final Exams June 6-12 June 4-10 June 4-9<br />

End of Term June 12 June 10 June 9<br />

Spring/Summer Break June 13-26 June 11-24 June 10-23<br />

Summer Quarter: 2011 2012 2013<br />

Registration June 21-22 June 19-20 June 18-19<br />

Orientation June 23-24 June 21-22 June 20-21<br />

First Day of Class June 27 June 25 June 24<br />

Holiday: 4th of July July 4 July 4 July 4<br />

Last Day to Receive a W Aug. 12 Aug. 10 Aug. 9<br />

Holiday: Labor Day Sept. 5 Sept. 3 Sept. 2<br />

Final Exams Sept. 5-11 Sept. 4-9 Sept. 3-8<br />

End of Term Sept. 11 Sept. 9 Sept. 8<br />

Summer/Fall Break Sept. 12-25 Sept. 10-23 Sept. 9-22<br />

Fall Quarter: 2011 2012 2013<br />

Registration Sept. 20-21 Sept. 18-19 Sept. 17-18<br />

Orientation Sept. 22-23 Sept. 20-21 Sept. 19-20<br />

First Day of Class Sept. 26 Sept. 24 Sept. 23<br />

Last Day to Receive a W Nov. 11 Nov. 9 Nov. 8<br />

Fall Break Nov. 21-27 Nov. 19-25 Nov. 28-Dec. 1<br />

Final Exams Dec. 12-18 Dec. 10-16 Dec. 9-15<br />

End of Term Dec. 18 Dec. 16 Dec. 15<br />

Fall/Winter Break Dec. 19–Jan. 2, 2012 Dec. 17–Jan. 1, 2013 Dec. 16-Jan. 1, 2014<br />

6


WHat makes spencerian Work<br />

Job Search Assistance<br />

From the time you enroll at Spencerian<br />

College, the primary aim is to prepare you for<br />

a successful career. The success of our graduates<br />

is the only standard that really matters.<br />

Graduate success is the primary reason any<br />

student selects a particular college. Although<br />

Spencerian College cannot guarantee employment<br />

to a graduate, every effort is made to<br />

assist with the job search process.<br />

At Spencerian, you enjoy many advantages—<br />

smaller classes, modern equipment, and<br />

a quality faculty that teaches in curricula<br />

designed to meet today’s career needs. Yet we<br />

consider that only part of our mission. Much<br />

of our effort is directed toward helping you<br />

as a graduate get—and keep—that important<br />

“first” job…and the next job…and the next!<br />

Career Services<br />

The Career Services staff plays a major role in<br />

your successful employment. Highly qualified<br />

staff work to help you match your abilities,<br />

interests, and personality to the job that<br />

will most likely bring you success and career<br />

fulfillment.<br />

In both private and group counseling sessions,<br />

the Career Services staff carefully prepares<br />

you for your first job interview. Much<br />

of the anxiety of that first encounter can be<br />

diminished with counseling that includes<br />

helpful hints and techniques for interviewing.<br />

In personal one-on-one sessions, you have<br />

the opportunity to communicate special preferences,<br />

abilities, or needs. Once these are<br />

established, the process of matching you to<br />

suitable job openings begins.<br />

The Career Services staff is available to assist<br />

qualified graduates with career placement.<br />

The Career Services Department assists<br />

all graduates who have met their financial<br />

obligation to the school, formally applied<br />

for Career Services assistance, supplied the<br />

Career Services Department with the required<br />

support information, and are available to<br />

interview with employers. Graduates of<br />

all programs are eligible for unlimited job<br />

search assistance. The assistance is provided<br />

to all eligible graduates at any time at no<br />

additional cost to the graduate. Although<br />

7<br />

Spencerian College cannot guarantee employment,<br />

contacts, guidance and direction are<br />

provided to a graduate by the Career Services<br />

Department. Students who have not successfully<br />

completed all of the above requirements<br />

are not eligible for Career Services assistance.<br />

Lifetime, Nationwide<br />

Employment Assistance<br />

Once it is apparent that a graduate is ready to<br />

make a career advancement, or should a current<br />

job situation become limited, we work to<br />

ensure your continued advancement. We do<br />

this through our lifetime, nationwide employment<br />

assistance.<br />

This means that for whatever reason you<br />

need employment assistance, our Career<br />

Services staff is ready to help. This includes<br />

assisting the graduate to find job opportunities<br />

locally, nationally or internationally<br />

- once, twice, or as many times as necessary.<br />

This assistance even applies when a graduate<br />

decides to leave and then later re-enter the<br />

job market. This is your lifetime benefit as<br />

a Spencerian graduate, and it is yours at no<br />

additional cost…ever!<br />

Placement and completion rate information<br />

can be found at http://nces.ed.gov/ipeds<br />

Lifetime Review Privileges<br />

Another valuable reward for you as a graduate<br />

is the right to return to Spencerian at<br />

any time – as many times as desired – to<br />

review, audit, or repeat any course previously<br />

completed without additional tuition cost.<br />

For those who have left the job market for<br />

any reason and wish to review any classes,<br />

or for those graduates who simply want to<br />

refresh their knowledge, this Lifetime Review<br />

Privilege is a helpful way of stimulating a<br />

career.<br />

The Lifetime Review Privilege and the<br />

Lifetime, Nationwide Employment Assistance<br />

are an important part of Spencerian College’s<br />

reputation as a leader in career education.<br />

Our Career Services staff is familiar with<br />

local, national, and international job markets.<br />

It is this kind of lifetime assistance that adds<br />

an invaluable dimension to your Spencerian<br />

College education.


tHe campus<br />

Academic Facilities<br />

Spencerian College’s main campus is located on a beautiful ten-acre campus at 4627 Dixie Highway,<br />

just one-half mile south of the Watterson Expressway in Louisville, Kentucky. Spencerian’s branch<br />

campus is situated in Lexington, Kentucky, in the “heart of bluegrass country.”<br />

Spencerian’s main campus is comprised of six buildings totaling over 51,000 square feet: an<br />

administration/classroom building, 4 adjacent classroom buildings, and an allied health annex<br />

facility .24 miles from the administration building. The main campus is equipped with computer<br />

labs, a learning resource center, medical, radiology, and surgical technology, science and<br />

massage therapy laboratories, numerous classrooms and support facilities.<br />

Administrative Offices<br />

The Offices of the Campus Director, Department Directors, Career Services, Admissions and<br />

Financial Planning are all located in the Spencerian College campus administration building.<br />

Each office maintains an “open door” policy. A student may request a meeting with any school<br />

official by stopping at the receptionist’s desk. Appointments can be scheduled in advance by<br />

contacting the appropriate office or the school receptionist.<br />

Accommodations For Students With Disabilities<br />

Spencerian College recognizes and supports the standards set forth in Section 504 of the<br />

Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Amendment Act of 2009,<br />

which are designed to prevent discrimination against qualified individuals with disabilities.<br />

Disabilities are defined as mental and/or physical impairments which substantially limit one<br />

or more of a person’s major life activities, and which necessitate modifications to the facilities,<br />

programs, or services of the College. Spencerian College is committed to making reasonable<br />

accommodations for qualifying students in accordance with law and to creating full accessibility<br />

to campus facilities. Spencerian College cannot, however, make accommodations that<br />

are unduly burdensome or that fundamentally alter the nature of the College’s programs.<br />

Qualifying students need to file a Request for Accommodation form with the Compliance<br />

Office located in Student Services at the beginning of their program to ensure that the student<br />

benefits from the maximum assistance possible. Official documentation of the disability and<br />

the requested accommodations must be presented in writing at that time. In addition, such<br />

persons should meet with the appropriate Department Director in order to verify ability to<br />

complete technical program requirements.<br />

It is the responsibility of the student to inform the institution of any disabilities, physical and/<br />

or mental, which might in any way affect the student’s academic progress. The College will<br />

make reasonable accommodation to meet the needs of any student with a disability.<br />

Physical accommodations currently provided include special parking facilities, ramped<br />

entrances, and accessible water fountains and restroom facilities. A valid, state issued, handicapped<br />

parking identification, in addition to the required school parking permit, must be displayed<br />

by any vehicle parked in the handicapped parking areas.<br />

ADA Grievance Procedures<br />

Faculty, staff and students who believe the College has not met its obligation under ADA<br />

should consult with the Compliance Office, Dean or Executive Director.<br />

Student Lounge<br />

The student lounge provides snack areas and vending machines for the students’ convenience.<br />

The lounge is open from 7:30 a.m. to 9:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday, and Fridays from 8<br />

a.m. to 4:30 p.m.<br />

Since Spencerian College is a smoke-free facility, there is a patio courtyard just outside the<br />

student lounge for a pleasant work area or a relaxing break.<br />

8


student services and activities<br />

Learning Resource Center<br />

The College provides a Learning Resource Center that includes books, tapes, and reference<br />

materials for research purposes and additional enrichment, as well as computers to access the<br />

Internet and databases. The resource center is well equipped and carries current issues of magzines<br />

and newspapers, fiction and general selections, as well as business and professional materials.<br />

Learning Resource Center Hours<br />

Monday through Thursday 7:45 a.m. – 8:30 p.m<br />

Friday 8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.<br />

Saturday 8:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.<br />

Student Services Hours<br />

Monday 7:45 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. Thursday 7:45 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.<br />

Tuesday 7:45 a.m. – 7:00 p.m. Friday 8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.<br />

Wednesday 7:45 a.m. – 7:00 p.m.<br />

Academic Advisement and Counseling<br />

Professional, interested faculty and staff are available to assist you with career planning from<br />

preadmission advisement to the day of graduation. By appointment, an admissions officer<br />

is available to provide personal career advice without obligation, even before you officially<br />

decide to enroll.<br />

After entry, you will find friendly and caring staff available to assist with academic or personal<br />

situations. The Dean, Associate Dean of Student Services, and Associate Dean of the Evening<br />

Division are available to assist you. In addition there is a faculty member on staff who holds<br />

weekly support groups or is available by appointment for an individual session.<br />

An exciting concept for communication and sharing is the Spencerian Advisor program. All<br />

first- quarter students are assigned an advisor/coach and students can ask questions, share<br />

concerns, or request assistance.<br />

PLA<strong>TO</strong> Learning<br />

The College has purchased licenses to PLA<strong>TO</strong> Learning, an interactive tutoring program<br />

available through Spencerian College, as a service to our students who would like help in<br />

reading, writing, and math skills. The computerized program includes real-life examples and<br />

lets users work at their own pace. Students can get more information and sign up to use the<br />

program by consulting with LRC staff. Nursing students also have the option of signing up for<br />

PLA<strong>TO</strong> through the Nursing Administrative Assistant. Instructors may refer a student to the<br />

Learning Resource Center to use PLA<strong>TO</strong> based on individual classroom performance.<br />

Student Life<br />

A quality education involves the total person. Spencerian College offers a well-rounded campus<br />

life that enhances your academic welfare as you participate. From club participation to<br />

special events, Spencerian opens many doors for the student who is eager to make the most of<br />

available opportunities. Friendships made under these conditions can, and often do, endure for<br />

a lifetime.<br />

You are encouraged to participate in extracurricular activities. These activities give you an<br />

opportunity to learn through taking a leadership role outside the classroom.<br />

Student Organizations and Activities<br />

The college offers a variety of organizations. Membership in these clubs enables you to<br />

exchange ideas with fellow students who are interested in similar career pursuits, while giving<br />

you the opportunity to enjoy all of the advantages of typical college life. Organizations include:<br />

9


student services and activities<br />

SIGMA BETA CHI<br />

This honorary organization is made up of students who earn at least a 3.75 grade point average<br />

(GPA) or better, carrying at least 9 credit hours per quarter.<br />

Nightengale Club<br />

The practical nursing classes work together with activities and fund-raising projects to assist<br />

local charities.<br />

Spencerian Activities Board (SAB)<br />

This organization’s primary purpose is to propose, plan, and present a variety of activities<br />

designed to serve the cultural, educational, and social interests of all students enrolled at<br />

Spencerian College. Members of the SAB become involved in choosing programs and activities<br />

sponsored on our campus and work to produce the events. Multiple opportunities exist for<br />

members to express creative thinking and exercise leadership skills!<br />

Social Activities<br />

From informal breaks between classes to planned school-wide activities and special college<br />

events, Spencerian offers its students a positive social experience both on and off campus. A<br />

favorite event among students is the annual cruise on the Ohio River aboard the paddlewheel<br />

steamboat Belle of Louisville. This excursion, in the grand riverboat tradition, is the perfect<br />

way to meet new classmates. Picnic-style food, music, and dancing are all part of this fun<br />

cruise.<br />

Special group trips give students a unique opportunity to meet one another while enjoying all<br />

the benefits a college experience has to offer. A variety of campus-wide activities also are held<br />

throughout the year, providing students with an opportunity to interact in a less formal setting<br />

outside the classroom.<br />

Guaranteed Answer Suggestion Box<br />

Administrators and faculty encourage students to make use of the Guaranteed Answer<br />

Suggestion Box. This instrument provides an excellent communication opportunity for you to<br />

let your school administrators know and respond to your ideas. A signed suggestion is guaranteed<br />

a personal reply from the appropriate school administrator.<br />

Newsletters<br />

A weekly newsletter, the Communicator for day division and The Sundown for evening division,<br />

is available for students, faculty, and staff. This newsletter provides information on activities,<br />

policies, organizations, clubs and student success stories. It is available every Monday<br />

that classes are in session. The Spencerian newspaper is a semi-annual illustrated publication<br />

featuring major articles on graduate employment success stories, school and student activities,<br />

opportunities, and other topics of interest.<br />

Orientation<br />

The transition to college is an important time in your life. Spencerian’s new-student orientation<br />

helps set the stage for success at Spencerian College. Orientation takes place over the course of<br />

one or two days each quarter, and offers incoming students helpful ways of adjusting to college<br />

life as well as important programmatic information.<br />

Bookstore<br />

The bookstore is conveniently located on campus and carries a complete selection of textbooks,<br />

workbooks and supplies. The bookstore is normally closed on Friday afternoons and weekends.<br />

Current hours are posted near the bookstore for reference.<br />

Students may get information on book costs on our web site at www.spencerian.edu. Click on<br />

the BOOKS<strong>TO</strong>RE LINK. Current students may request that information be printed on their<br />

class schedule. The book prices and listing on the web site will be reflective of the books that<br />

10


student services and activities<br />

are being used in the current quarter and are subject to change. For this reason, book information<br />

can become quickly outdated. Therefore, the best source of information is the web site or<br />

to request the information from the bookstore.<br />

Parking and Transportation<br />

Parking for a large number of student vehicles is available right on campus or on college<br />

leased facilities near the campus. Shuttle service is provided from college leased off-campus<br />

parking. A parking permit is required.<br />

The campus is served by public bus service. Carpooling is encouraged and is practiced by<br />

many Spencerian students. Students involved in externships or clinicals are responsible for<br />

their own transportation.<br />

Student Housing<br />

Housing in Gardiner Point Residence Hall is for students under 21 only. Arrangements for<br />

housing should be made well in advance in order to ensure availability. Contact an admissions<br />

officer for assistance and more information.<br />

Dress Code<br />

Medical students are expected to wear their department’s medical uniform whether on campus<br />

or at a clinical or externship site. Business students need to adhere to the dress code stated in<br />

the Student Handbook (Supplement B to this catalog).<br />

Computer Usage Policy<br />

Internet access is provided to all active Spencerian College students for research relevant to<br />

students’ classes, coursework, and career paths. Students are expected to use the Internet for<br />

educational and research purposes.<br />

Computers in the Learning Resource Center are available on a walk-in basis.<br />

Student Portal<br />

The student portal is a valuable tool offered to all Spencerian College active students. On the<br />

Student Portal the student can view his/her schedules, grades, attendance, email faculty and<br />

other students, search the online library, and search employment links. Active students can log<br />

onto the student portal at http://studentportal.spencerian.edu and then enter their student<br />

username and password. Any problems accessing the student portal can be addressed by contacting<br />

Student Services.<br />

11


admission to tHe college<br />

Spencerian College continually strives to maintain a student body that is committed to higher<br />

learning and career development. The College actively searches for those students who have<br />

a desire to earn a college diploma, certificate, or associate degree within their chosen field.<br />

Spencerian College awards certificates for programs of less than 45 credit hours, diplomas for<br />

programs of 45–96 credit hours and degrees for programs of more than 96 credit hours. Each<br />

program description page in the catalog designates certificate, diploma, or associate degree.<br />

Application Procedure<br />

You must submit a completed application with the required fee and meet all entrance requirements<br />

to be considered for acceptance. There is no deadline for submitting the application for<br />

admission. Some programs have limited space and/or have a selective admission process.<br />

Therefore, it is best to complete your application as early as possible to be considered before<br />

the date you anticipate starting your enrollment.<br />

The College individually interviews each person seeking admission. Students from out of state<br />

may be contacted by phone and in some cases special visits may be arranged. If you would<br />

like to arrange an interview, or call the Admissions Office at (502) 447-1000 or (800) 264-1799.<br />

An admission representative will schedule a time to visit with you and answer questions.<br />

Home Schooled Applicants<br />

Applicants who have been home schooled will be asked to provide verification that they<br />

have completed the minimum course of study and met content standards required for high<br />

school graduation as established by their state Board of Education administrative regulations.<br />

Applicants should provide a copy of their coursework and grades and, in addition, may be<br />

asked to provide portfolio work, ACT or SAT scores, and/or copies of letters notifying the<br />

school district superintendent for each year the student was home schooled. All applicants<br />

will be required to meet Spencerian College’s general admission as well as programmatic<br />

admission requirements. Applicants who are unable to verify that they have completed high<br />

school requirements may be required to obtain their General Education Diploma before being<br />

accepted.<br />

Jump Start Program<br />

The Jump Start Program provides high school seniors the opportunity to attend classes at<br />

Spencerian College without tuition costs. (Fees, books, and supplies are the responsibility of<br />

the student.) This program is designed to provide high school seniors the opportunity to have<br />

a postsecondary educational experience regardless of their eventual college or career choice.<br />

• The Jump Start Program is available to high school seniors during the College’s winter<br />

and/or spring quarters.<br />

• Students are limited to no more than two regular classes per quarter.<br />

• The student must be in satisfactory academic standing at their high school as verified by<br />

their high school counselor.<br />

• The student must pass the College’s entrance examination and all other entrance requirements<br />

at the same level required of other applicants in order to be accepted into the same<br />

program.<br />

Admission Requirements<br />

To be accepted for admission to the College, you must be a high school graduate or have official<br />

General Educational Development (GED) scores. Evidence of this can be either a transcript,<br />

a copy of the diploma, official GED scores, or a signed attestation by the student. Candidates<br />

are required to demonstrate the appropriate aptitude for their anticipated area of study. This is<br />

accomplished through one of the following means:<br />

12


admission to tHe college<br />

1. Successful completion of the Spencerian College Distance Education Assessment (SCDEA) or<br />

the Career Programs Assessment Test (CPAt). The latter is produced by the American College<br />

Testing program (ACT). CPAt/SCDEA minimum score requirements are as follows:<br />

CPAt/SCDEA TEST B 38-Language 15-Reading 13-Math<br />

TEST C 39-Language 17-Reading 13-Math<br />

If a student falls below any of the above scores on the CPAt, they will be accepted with a composite<br />

score of 70 on Test B or 73 on Test C as long as the individual components do not fall<br />

below:<br />

CPAt/SCDEA TEST B 35-Language 13-Reading 10-Math<br />

TEST C 36-Language 15-Reading 10-Math<br />

Retesting may be allowed under certain circumstances. If a retest occurs before a full 30 days<br />

have passed since the previous testing, an alternate form must be used for the test. If a minimum<br />

of 30 days or more have passed since the administration of a particular form, the examinee<br />

may be retested using the same form. No form may be administered to a given individual<br />

more than twice in a 90-day period.<br />

2. Submission of the student’s ACT with a test score of at least 16 or SAT score of 800 (1200 on<br />

revised test) in place of the entrance test<br />

3. A score of 40 on the HOBET (Health Occupations Basic Entrance Test) or 42 on the TEAS<br />

(Test of Essential Academic Skills) is acceptable for admissions to all programs excluding<br />

Nursing, Radiologic Technologist, Medical Laboratory Technician, Surgical Technology and<br />

Invasive Cardiovascular Technology.<br />

4. Documented completion (official transcript required) of an associate degree program or<br />

higher may be accepted for general admission to the College in place of the CPAt, SAT, ACT or<br />

HOBET. Admission into specialized programs, however, will require the requisite admission<br />

test scores. The Executive Director reserves the authority to admit a candidate who doesn’t<br />

obtain the listed scores if he or she feels there are extenuating circumstances that adversely<br />

affected the test results.<br />

Admission to the College for Specialized Programs<br />

The following are additional specialized program requirements:<br />

In addition to CPAt (diploma) or the HOBET scores (associate degree), all Surgical Technology<br />

program applicants must also pass two manual dexterity tests, as well as watch the Surgical<br />

Technology video. The program director reserves the right to interview prospective candidates.<br />

The final decision regarding acceptance into the program lies with the program director.<br />

The HOBET* is required for all Radiologic Technologist applicants. Applicants will be evaluated<br />

on an objective point system. Admission into the program will be based on a comparative<br />

evaluation of several application requirements. A minimum composite score of 60 is required<br />

on the HOBET* to be considered for admission. If a student scores below the required HOBET<br />

score for admission, the test may be retaken once in a twelve month period. Candidates who<br />

are a Limited Medical Radiology graduate must also provide verification that they have taken<br />

x-rays throughout the last six months prior to the start date of the Radiologic Technologist<br />

program. Candidates must be able to meet technical standards required by Spencerian College.<br />

International students are required to have a minimum Test of English as a Foreign Language<br />

(<strong>TO</strong>EFL) score of 500 (paper), 173 (computer-based), or 61 (internet based). The final decision<br />

regarding acceptance into the program lies with the program director.<br />

13


admission to tHe college<br />

Applicants for the Limited Medical Radiography diploma program will be evaluated on an<br />

objective point system. Admission into the program will be based on an evaluation of several<br />

application requirements including high school grade point average or GED scores, ACT or<br />

SAT, and HOBET or CPAt scores (SCDEA scores for online test). (See admissions packets for<br />

minimum required score.) The final decision regarding acceptance into the program lies with<br />

the program director.<br />

The Health Occupations Basic Entrance Test (HOBET*) is required for Invasive Cardiovascular<br />

Technology candidates. A minimum composite score of 55 on the HOBET is required with separate<br />

Math and English subsection scores of 55 or better. Applicants must also pass a manual<br />

dexterity test with a score of 60 seconds or less. Candidates must also be able to meet technical<br />

standards required by Spencerian College. The program director reserves the right to interview<br />

prospective candidates. The final decision regarding acceptance into the program lies with the<br />

program director.<br />

The Health Occupations Basic Entrance Test (HOBET*) is required for Medical Laboratory<br />

Technician candidates. A minimum composite score of 50 on the HOBET is required with separate<br />

Math and English subsection scores of 50 or better. The program director reserves the right<br />

to interview prospective candidates. The final decision regarding acceptance into the program<br />

lies with the program director.<br />

The Health Occupations Basic Entrance Test (HOBET) is required for Respiratory Therapy candidates.<br />

A minimum composite score of 55 is required with a Math score of 50 or higher and an<br />

English/Reading score of 55 or higher.<br />

*The HOBET test can only be taken twice in one year, and the score is good for only one year.<br />

All medical candidates, once accepted into their programs, are subject to a criminal background<br />

check and a drug screen.<br />

Nursing<br />

The Practical Nursing program is a selective admission program. In order to be considered for<br />

admission to the practical nursing program, an applicant must submit:<br />

• Official High School transcript with a minimum GPA of 2.0 or 12 hours of college work<br />

with a GPA of 2.0 or higher substituted for the high school GPA; official GED scores; and<br />

any transcripts from colleges previously attended; completed practical nursing applicant<br />

profile; read and sign the Director of Nursing expectations sheet.<br />

• Copy of nursing admission test score with the designated minimum requirement. (See<br />

admissions packets for minimum required score.) The nursing admission test must be<br />

taken within the last 12 months and is good for only 12 months.<br />

• If English is not the native language, <strong>TO</strong>EFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language)<br />

scores of 173 (computer based) or 500 (paper-based) or 61 (internet based) will be considered<br />

for admission to the nursing program<br />

• Completed Spencerian College Nursing Applicant Profile<br />

• One letter of recommendation from an employer, school counselor, teacher, or similar professional<br />

• Criminal background check. A form will be filled out during admissions interview.<br />

• Kentucky Nurse Aide Abuse Registry check. A form will be filled out during admissions<br />

interview.<br />

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admission to tHe college<br />

The selection of students that are accepted into the Practical Nursing program is the decision<br />

of the Director of Nursing. Each application for a nursing program is reviewed and evaluated<br />

with the purpose of selecting applicants who are academically qualified and demonstrate the<br />

potential to succeed in a nursing program. The Director of Nursing may choose to schedule<br />

interviews with potential students.<br />

The following items must be submitted to the nursing department by the first day of class:<br />

• Current CPR card from the American Heart Association for the Healthcare Provider with<br />

AED or equivalent; must be kept current throughout educational program including clinical<br />

rotations and internships/practicum.<br />

• Copy of current PPD (TB skin test) received within past year or chest x-ray received<br />

within past five years.<br />

• Proof of two MMR immunizations* (measles, mumps and rubella) or a copy of a titer<br />

indicating immunity.<br />

• Signed Declaration showing varicella immunization.* (chicken pox). Form provided by<br />

Spencerian.<br />

• Signed Declaration showing pertussis immunization.* Form provided by Spencerian.<br />

• Copy of tetanus shot within last 10 years.<br />

• Signed Declaration showing polio immunization.* Form provided by Spencerian.<br />

• Copy of hepatitis B vaccination or signed informed consent declination form provided by<br />

Spencerian.<br />

• Copy of physical examination completed within one year prior to start date.<br />

*not applicable if born in or prior to 1956<br />

The Associate Degree Nursing program is a selective admission program. In order to be considered<br />

for admission to the nursing program, an applicant must submit:<br />

• Completed an PN/VN program with a minimum of 2.5 grade point average.<br />

• Copy of PN/VN license if applicable.<br />

• Official High School transcript, or official GED scores, and any transcripts from colleges<br />

previously attended.<br />

• Copy of nursing admission test score with the designated minimum requirement. (See<br />

admissions packets for minimum required score.) The nursing admission test must be<br />

taken within the last 12 months and is good for only 12 months.<br />

• If English is not the native language, <strong>TO</strong>EFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language)<br />

scores of 173 (computer based) or 500 (paper-based) or 61 (internet based) will be considered<br />

for admission to the nursing program.<br />

• Completed Spencerian College Nursing Applicant Profile.<br />

• One letter of recommendation from current employer<br />

The selection of students that are accepted into the Associate Degree Nursing program is the<br />

decision of the Director of Nursing. Each application for a nursing program is reviewed and<br />

evaluated with the purpose of selecting applicants who are academically qualified and demonstrate<br />

the potential to succeed in a nursing program. The Director of Nursing may choose to<br />

schedule interviews with potential students.<br />

If a student does not meet the A.D.N. GPA requirement, the Director of Nursing may accept<br />

them conditionally and may permit the student to take general education courses the first<br />

quarter to prove academic proficiency. Under no circumstances will a student be admitted into<br />

the nursing program (i.e. NS500) until all admission requirements are met and turned in to the<br />

15


admission to tHe college<br />

nursing department. Only completed applications will be considered for review and MUST<br />

include:<br />

• Application and enrollment fee<br />

• Copy of nursing admission test score<br />

• Completed profile sheet<br />

• High school (or GED scores) and college transcripts<br />

• Current CPR card (American Heart Association for the Healthcare Provider with AED or<br />

equivalent) must be kept current throughout the educational program including clinical<br />

rotations and internship/practicum<br />

• Copy of current PPD (TB skin test) received within past year or chest x-ray received within<br />

past five years<br />

• Proof of two MMR immunizations* (measles, mumps and rubella) or a copy of a titer<br />

indicating immunity<br />

• Signed declaration showing varicella immunization.* (chicken pox). Form provided by<br />

Spencerian<br />

• Signed declaration showing pertussis immunization.* Form provided by Spencerian<br />

• Copy of tetanus shot within last 10 years<br />

• Signed declaration showing polio immunization.* Form provided by Spencerian<br />

• Copy of hepatitis B vaccination or signed inform consent declination form provided by<br />

Spencerian<br />

• Copy of physical examination completed within one year prior to start date<br />

• Criminal background check. A form will be filled out during admissions interview.<br />

• Kentucky Nurse Aide Abuse Registry check. A form will be filled out during admissions<br />

interview.<br />

*not applicable if born in or prior to 1956<br />

Surgical Technology students must also provide a copy of the following before clinical rotation:<br />

• Applicants must read and sign the Surgical Technology Standards form<br />

• A history and physical within six months<br />

• MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella) immunizations x2 (if born after 1956) or a Rubella<br />

Titer (only if no MMR)<br />

• PPD (TB skin test) must also have the result recorded within 48-72 hours of date<br />

given; within 1 year and must be kept current during clinical rotations, or current chest<br />

x-ray (within one year) only if cannot take PPD skin test due to positive past test<br />

• Varicella immunization (chickenpox) (if born after 1956) or a signed verification provided<br />

by Spencerian<br />

• Hepatitis B immunizations or a singed informed consent declination form provided by<br />

Spencerian.<br />

• Current CPR card (American Heart Association for the Healthcare Provider with AED or<br />

equivalent) must be kept current throughout educational program including clinical rotations<br />

and externship<br />

• Proof of student HIPAA training at Spencerian<br />

• Read and sign verification of non-felon form<br />

• Criminal background checks will be done on all students<br />

• Students with a disability should declare any physical or learning disability and provide<br />

verification to the Director of Surgical Technology so that possible reasonable accommodations<br />

can be made<br />

• The Director of the Surgical Technology Program reserves the right to interview any candidate.<br />

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admission to tHe college<br />

Radiologic Technologist students must provide a copy of the following before clinical<br />

rotation :<br />

• MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) immunization X 2 or titer verifying immune status (if<br />

born after 1956)<br />

• PPD (TB skin test) within one year and must be kept current during clinical rotations or<br />

current chest x-ray (within six months) only if cannot take PPD skin test due to positive<br />

past test<br />

• Copy of recent history and physical exam<br />

• Copy of varicella immunization or signed verification form<br />

• Hepatitis B vaccination series of 3 or a signed informed consent declination form<br />

• Current CPR card (American Heart Association for the Healthcare Provider with AED or<br />

equivalent) must be kept current throughout educational program including clinical rotations<br />

and externship<br />

• Proof of student HIPAA training at Spencerian<br />

• Copy of tetanus shot within last 10 years<br />

• *Read and sign verification of Non-Felon Form. Criminal background checks will be done<br />

on all students<br />

• *Read and sign Radiology Technical Standards Form (students with a disability should<br />

declare the disability and provide verification to the Director of Radiology so that reasonable<br />

accommodations can be made).<br />

* These are required before acceptance into the program<br />

Limited Medical Radiography students must provide a copy of the following before clinical<br />

rotation:<br />

• MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) immunization X 2 or titer verifying immune status (if<br />

born after 1956)<br />

• PPD (TB skin test) within one year and must be kept current during clinical rotations or<br />

current chest x-ray (within six months) only if cannot take PPD skin test due to positive<br />

past test<br />

• Copy of recent history and physical exam<br />

• Copy of varicella immunization or signed verification form<br />

• Hepatitis B vaccination series of 3 or a signed informed consent declination form<br />

• Current CPR card (American Heart Association Healthcare Provider with AED or equivalent)<br />

must be kept current throughout educational program including clinical rotation<br />

and externship<br />

• Proof of student HIPAA training at Spencerian<br />

• Copy of tetanus shot within last 10 years<br />

• *Read and sign verification of Non-Felon Form. Criminal background checks will be done<br />

on all students<br />

• *Read and sign Radiology Technical Standards Form (students with a disability should<br />

declare the disability and provide verification to the Director of Radiology so that reasonable<br />

accommodations can be made)<br />

* These are required before acceptance into the program<br />

Invasive Cardiovascular Technology students must also provide a copy of the following at<br />

or before clinical rotation:<br />

• MMR immunization verification (if born after 1956)<br />

• PPD (TB skin test) within one year and must be kept current during clinical rotations or<br />

current chest x-ray (within one year) only if cannot take PPD skin test due to positive past<br />

test<br />

• Copy of recent history and physical exam (with one year)<br />

17


admission to tHe college<br />

• Copy of varicella immunization or signed verification form<br />

• Hepatitis B immunization or a signed informed consent declination form<br />

• Current CPR card (American Heart Association Healthcare Provider with AED or equivalent)<br />

must be kept current throughout educational program including clinical rotation<br />

and externship<br />

• Proof of student HIPAA training at Spencerian<br />

• *Read and sign verification of Non-Felon Form. Criminal background checks will be done<br />

on all students<br />

• *Read and sign Radiology Technical Standards Form (students with a disability should<br />

declare the disability and provide verification to the Director of Radiology so that reasonable<br />

accommodations can be made)<br />

* These are required before acceptance into the program<br />

Medical Laboratory Technician students must provide the following before clinical rotation:<br />

• Medical Laboratory Technician Statement of General Health<br />

• A history and physical within six months<br />

• Documentation of MMR (if born after 1956) and varicella immunizations or proof of<br />

immunity<br />

• PPD (TB skin test) must also have the result recorded within 48-72 hours of date given;<br />

within six months and must be kept current during clinical rotations, or current chest<br />

x-ray (within six months) only if cannot take PPD skin test due to positive past test<br />

• Hepatitis B immunizations or a signed informed consent declination form<br />

• Current CPR certification within one year (American Heart Association Healthcare<br />

Provider with AED or equivalent) must be kept current throughout educational program<br />

including clinical rotation and externship<br />

• Proof of student HIPAA training at Spencerian<br />

• Current Td (Tetanus) Shot – within the last nine years.<br />

Phlebotomy students must provide the following before doing externship:<br />

• A history and physical within six months<br />

• Documentation of MMR (if born after 1956) and varicella immunizations or proof of<br />

immunity<br />

• PPD (TB skin test) must also have the result recorded within 48-72 hours of date given;<br />

within six months and must be kept current during externship, or current chest x-ray<br />

(within one year) only if cannot take PPD skin test due to positive past test<br />

• Hepatitis B immunizations or a signed informed consent declination form<br />

• Current CPR card (American Heart Association Healthcare Provider with AED or equivalent)<br />

must be kept current throughout educational program including clinical rotation<br />

and externship<br />

• Proof of student HIPAA training at Spencerian<br />

• Current Td (Tetanus) Shot – within the last nine years<br />

Clinical Assistant students must provide the following:<br />

• A history and physical within six months<br />

• Documentation of MMR (if born after 1956) and varicella immunizations or proof of<br />

immunity<br />

• PPD (TB skin test) must also have the result recorded within 48-72 hours of date given;<br />

within six months and must be kept current during externship or current chest x-ray<br />

(within six months) only if cannot take PPD skin test due to positive past test<br />

18


admission to tHe college<br />

• Hepatitis B immunizations or a signed informed consent declination form<br />

• Current CPR card (American Heart Association Healthcare Provider with AED or equivalent)<br />

must be kept current throughout educational program including clinical rotation<br />

and externship<br />

• Proof of student HIPAA training at Spencerian<br />

• Current Td (Tetanus) Shot – within the last nine years.<br />

Medical Administrative Assistant students must provide the following:<br />

• A history and physical within six months<br />

• Documentation of MMR (if born after 1956) and varicella immunizations or proof of<br />

immunity<br />

• PPD (TB skin test) must also have the result recorded within 48-72 hours of date given;<br />

within six months and must be kept current during externship, or current chest x-ray<br />

(within one year) only if cannot take PPD skin test due to positive past test<br />

• Hepatitis B immunizations or a signed informed consent declination form<br />

• Current CPR card (American Heart Association Healthcare Provider with AED or equivalent)<br />

must be kept current throughout educational program including clinical rotation<br />

and externship<br />

• Proof of student HIPAA training at Spencerian<br />

• Current Td (Tetanus) Shot – within the last nine years<br />

Medical Assistant students must provide the following:<br />

• A history and physical within six months<br />

• Documentation of MMR (if born after 1956) and varicella immunizations or proof of<br />

immunity<br />

• PPD (TB skin test) must also have the result recorded within 48-72 hours of date given;<br />

within six months and must be kept current during externship, or current chest x-ray<br />

(within six months) only if cannot take PPD skin test due to positive past test<br />

• Hepatitis B immunizations or a signed informed consent declination form<br />

• Current CPR card (American Heart Association Healthcare Provider with AED or equivalent)<br />

must be kept current throughout educational program including clinical rotation<br />

and externship<br />

• Proof of student HIPAA training at Spencerian<br />

• Current Td (Tetanus) Shot – within the last nine years<br />

Medical Clinical Specialties students must provide the following before doing externship.<br />

• A history and physical within six months<br />

• Documentation of MMR (if born after 1956) and varicella immunizations or proof of<br />

immunity<br />

• PPD (TB skin test) must also have the result recorded within 48-72 hours of date given;<br />

within six months and must be kept current during externship, or current chest x-ray<br />

(within one year) only if cannot take PPD skin test due to positive past test<br />

• Hepatitis B immunizations or a signed informed consent declination form<br />

• Current CPR card (American Heart Association Healthcare Provider with AED or equivalent)<br />

must be kept current throughout educational program including clinical rotation<br />

and externship<br />

• Proof of student HIPAA training at Spencerian<br />

• Current Td (Tetanus) Shot – within the last nine years<br />

*See Medical Department Handbook, Supplement C<br />

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admission to tHe college<br />

Medical Coding Specialist students must provide the following:<br />

• A history and physical within six months<br />

• Documentation of MMR (if born after 1956) and varicella immunizations or proof of<br />

immunity<br />

• PPD (TB skin test) must also have the result recorded within 48-72 hours of date given;<br />

within six months and must be kept current during externship, or current chest x-ray<br />

(within six months) only if cannot take PPD skin test due to positive past test<br />

• Hepatitis B immunizations or a signed informed consent declination form<br />

• Proof of student HIPAA training at Spencerian<br />

• Current Td (Tetanus) Shot – within the last nine years<br />

Healthcare Reimbursement Specialist students must provide the following:<br />

• A history and physical within six months<br />

• Documentation of MMR (if born after 1956) and varicella immunizations or proof of<br />

immunity<br />

• PPD (TB skin test) must also have the result recorded within 48-72 hours of date given;<br />

within six months and must be kept current during externship, or current chest x-ray<br />

(within six months) only if cannot take PPD skin test due to positive past test<br />

• Hepatitis B immunizations or a signed informed consent declination form<br />

• Proof of student HIPAA training at Spencerian<br />

• Current Td (Tetanus) Shot – within the last nine years<br />

Medical Administrative Management students must provide the following:<br />

• A history and physical within six months<br />

• Documentation of MMR (if born after 1956) and varicella immunizations or proof of<br />

immunity<br />

• PPD (TB skin test) must also have the result recorded within 48-72 hours of date given;<br />

within six months and must be kept current during externship, or current chest x-ray<br />

(within one year) only if cannot take PPD skin test due to positive past test<br />

• Hepatitis B immunizations or a signed informed consent declination form<br />

• CPR certification – within one year and must be kept current during externship<br />

• Proof of student HIPAA training at Spencerian<br />

• Current Td (Tetanus) Shot – within the last nine years<br />

*See Medical Department Handbook, Supplement C<br />

Massage Therapy<br />

After acceptance into the Massage Therapy program, the following requirements must be met<br />

by orientation in addition to the general requirements of admission to Spencerian College:<br />

• PPD (TB skin test) less than 1 year old, which must be kept current during clinical rotations,<br />

or a current chest X-ray (within one year) only if the applicant cannot take PPD skin<br />

test due to positive past test<br />

• Hepatitis B immunizations or a signed informed consent declination form.<br />

• Current CPR card (American Heart Association Healthcare Provider with AED or equivalent)<br />

must be kept current throughout educational program including externship<br />

Applicants will be applying for various internship positions. Some internship sites will require<br />

proof of current tetanus and other vaccinations, as well as testing for TB and hepatitis. Students<br />

will be advised of the requirements of the particular sites at the end of the first term and<br />

expected to meet the requirements by eighth week of the second term.<br />

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admission to tHe college<br />

Applicants should be aware that any person with a criminal record at the felony level may be<br />

denied a license to practice in Kentucky and other states or localities that regulate massage<br />

therapy. They may also be prohibited from employment in healthcare settings and this may<br />

affect placement for the clinical component of the massage therapy program. `Such convictions<br />

or pending legal matters must be discussed with the program director in the admissions<br />

interview or as soon as an arrest occurs. Failure to reveal felony conviction or arrest will lead to<br />

dismissal from the program.<br />

Respiratory Therapy<br />

Criminal background and Child Abuse Registry checks will be done on all students.<br />

Respiratory therapy students must provide a copy of the following prior to clinical rotation:<br />

• MMR (measles, mumps, rubella) immunization X 2 or titer verifying immune status (if<br />

born after 1956)<br />

• PPD (TB skin test) within one year and must be kept current during clinical rotations or<br />

current chest x-ray (within six months) only if cannot take PPD skin test due to positive<br />

past test<br />

• Copy of recent history and physical exam<br />

• Copy of varicella immunization or signed verification form<br />

• Hepatitis B vaccination series of 3 or a signed informed consent declination form<br />

• Current CPR card (American Heart Association for the Healthcare Provider with AED or<br />

equivalent) must be kept current throughout educational program including clinical rotations<br />

and externship<br />

• Proof of student HIPAA training at Spencerian<br />

• Copy of tetanus shot within last 10 years<br />

• Read and sign verification of Non-Felon Form.<br />

Personal Trainer admissions requirements are as follows:<br />

• Admission test score with the designated minimum requirement. See admissions packet<br />

for minimum required score.<br />

• The Director of the Personal Trainer Program reserves the right to interview any candidates.<br />

The final decision regarding program acceptance lies with the program director.<br />

• A history and physical within six months<br />

• Verification of tetanus shot within last 9 years and kept current through internship<br />

• Read and sign verification of Non-Felon Form. Criminal background checks will be done<br />

on all students<br />

• Read and sign Personal Trainer Standards Form (Students with a disability should declare<br />

the disability and provide verification to the Department Director so that reasonable<br />

accommodations can be made).<br />

Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)<br />

In accordance with Federal laws implemented in April of 2003, Spencerian College maintains<br />

compliance with all guidelines set forth under the Health Insurance Portability and<br />

Accountability Act (HIPAA). All students are required to complete HIPAA training prior to<br />

placement for clinicals and/or externship in programs that have this requirement, or prior<br />

to graduation in programs that do not have the clinical or externship requirement. The Chief<br />

Privacy Officer appointed by the college oversees HIPAA compliance and is available as a<br />

resource person for HIPAA related questions and for reporting possible HIPAA violations<br />

involving the college.<br />

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admission to tHe college<br />

Distance Education Admissions<br />

Many Spencerian College classes are offered online via the Internet or in a blended format<br />

where students complete a portion of the course online and a portion on campus or at<br />

approved sites/facilities. Entrance and graduation requirements for distance education classes<br />

and on-campus classes are the same.<br />

If a student enrolled in an online program moves to a different state or to a location too far<br />

from their original location to get to campus or their original sponsoring facility for required<br />

labs and practicum experiences, this could jeopardize their ability to complete the program.<br />

All students must complete Spencerian College’s online non-credit introductory course, “Student<br />

Quick Start,” a tutorial explaining the features of the Learning Management System before<br />

beginning their first distance education class. Students must also complete a self-assessment that<br />

evaluates whether their technical ability and personal traits will contribute to or hinder their success<br />

in an online course, and students are encouraged to review a demonstration course.<br />

Distance education students must have access to a PC (minimum 56k Modem) with an Internet<br />

connection. Spencerian College utilizes ANGEL Learning, Inc. software, a fully integrated<br />

e-learning platform that allows the College to rapidly create, deliver, and measure interactive<br />

learning over the Internet.<br />

Students must purchase any software that may be required for a specific course. All student<br />

assignments must be submitted by using Microsoft Word 2007 or newer, Excel and Access.<br />

There is an additional per credit hour charge for distance education classes (see Supplement<br />

A). Students are provided statements to assess their technical ability and personal traits for<br />

success in a distance education course. A student’s acceptance into a class is contingent upon<br />

the student’s eligibility to take the class. The Registrar will verify that the student has met the<br />

prerequisites and course requirements. Students enrolled in online programs receive first priority<br />

for online classes. Other students are accepted on a space available basis.<br />

Students who are accepted into a class will receive a confirmation of registration that includes<br />

the following:<br />

• Course number(s)<br />

• Instructions for accessing the course web page<br />

• Student logon and password for the course<br />

• Information on how to immediately access the introductory course, “Student Quick<br />

Start,” a tutorial explaining the features of the Learning Management System<br />

• Date the course(s) will be available to access (Monday of Week 1)<br />

Associate Degree Nursing Distance Education Admission<br />

Students who want to become enrolled in the Spencerian College Associate Degree Nursing<br />

distance education program must meet all admission requirements for the College and for<br />

the program. In addition, distance education candidates must be in one of the two following<br />

groups:<br />

1) Live in or near the Louisville, Kentucky campus in order to attend the lab and clinical<br />

experiences in Louisville, Kentucky each week of courses, or,<br />

2) Be part of a group that is “sponsored” by a local facility in your area. A “sponsoring”<br />

facility is one that contracts with Spencerian College to:<br />

a. Provide space for the clinical experience for medical-surgical, pediatric, obstetrical,<br />

and psychiatric for each student.<br />

b. Provide space or have an agreement with a local high school or other facility for<br />

laboratory use for anatomy and physiology and microbiology<br />

22


admission to tHe college<br />

c. Provide qualified faculty to Spencerian College that meet the Kentucky Board of<br />

Nursing regulations for faculty.<br />

To find out if you are in an area of a sponsoring facility, you may ask at your local facility or<br />

call 502-447-1000 or 1-800-264-1799 and ask for the distance learning coordinator.<br />

Phlebotomy<br />

Distance education candidates must be Kentucky or Indiana residents and must be part of a<br />

group that is “sponsored” by a local facility in their area. A “sponsoring” facility is one that<br />

contracts with Spencerian College to provide space for the lab and clinical experience for each<br />

student and agrees to provide qualified preceptors for clinical and assist in locating qualified<br />

instructors in the area that Spencerian might hire for laboratory supervision.<br />

To find out if you are in an area of a “sponsoring” facility, you may ask at your local facility or<br />

call 502-447-1000 or 1-800-264-1799 and ask for the distance learning coordinator.<br />

Affirmative Action Policy<br />

The College provides equal admissions opportunity to all applicants on the basis of their<br />

demonstrated ability, aptitude, prior educational preparation, experience, training and their<br />

desire for postsecondary education. The most qualified persons are selected without prejudice<br />

or discrimination by reason of race, age, sex, color, religious belief or national origin. Both the<br />

Spencerian College–Louisville and Lexington campuses support the tenets and spirit of the<br />

Americans with Disabilities Act. Otherwise qualified individuals with physical or mental disabilities<br />

are eligible for admission on an equal basis with non-disabled applicants, considering<br />

reasonable accommodations to their limitations.<br />

Transfer Credit From Spencerian College<br />

Although Spencerian College is nationally accredited, transfer of credits from any college to<br />

another institution cannot be guaranteed, as the receiving college has the final decision in<br />

credit transfer matters. Decisions concerning the acceptance of credits by any institution are<br />

made at the sole discretion of the receiving institution. No representation is made whatsoever<br />

concerning the transferability of credits to any institution.<br />

Students considering continuing their education at, or transferring to, other institutions must<br />

not assume that credits earned at this school will be accepted by the receiving institution. An<br />

institution’s accreditation does not guarantee that credits earned at that institution will be<br />

accepted for transfer by any other institution. Students must contact the registrar of the receiving<br />

institution to determine what credits, if any, that institution will accept.<br />

Transfer Credits To Spencerian College<br />

The College accepts credit from other postsecondary institutions accredited by an agency<br />

recognized by the U.S. Department of Education or the Council for Higher Education<br />

Accreditation (CHEA) to satisfy specific requirements for completion of a program. Credit will<br />

be approved only for those courses that are equivalent to courses offered at Spencerian College.<br />

Only courses in which a student has earned a grade of C or better will be considered for transfer.<br />

Students requesting transfer of credit consideration must provide Spencerian College with<br />

an official transcript.<br />

The department director or the registrar is responsible for determining course work that transfers<br />

into a program of study at the college. Students must take at least the last 25% of their program<br />

at Spencerian College. Because of the ongoing developments in the medical field, some<br />

departments at Spencerian College require that program-specific credits transferred in must be<br />

credits received within a limited time frame. See the programmatic Supplement C for further<br />

detailed information.<br />

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admission to tHe college<br />

All students enrolled on a full program charge basis will have any transfer of credit reduction<br />

posted during the last quarter of the student’s normal program length. If a student withdraws<br />

for any reason before completing the program, no reduction will be made. All students<br />

enrolled on a credit hour basis will not have any transfer of credit reduction.<br />

CLEP Policy<br />

Spencerian College – Louisville Campus recognizes prior learning by accepting College Level<br />

Examination Program (CLEP) tests that measure a student’s mastery of college-level, introductory<br />

course content in a wide range of disciplines. Students meeting the credit-granting score<br />

standard will earn the credits and course exemptions listed below. Transfer students can earn<br />

credit through prior CLEP exams if their scores meet these credit-granting standards.<br />

students must submit clep scores prior to the quarter in which a course is to be taken.<br />

CLEP Examination Credit Granting<br />

Score<br />

Credits Granted Equivalent Course<br />

English Composition (with essay) 50 4 English 121 or 101<br />

Algebra 50 4 Math 151 or 101<br />

College Math 50 4 Math 151 or 101<br />

Psychology, Intro 50 4 Psychology 293 or 214<br />

Business Law, Intro 50 4 Business Law 241<br />

Management, Principles of 50 4 Management Principles 299<br />

Sociology, Intro 50 4 Sociology 214<br />

Financial Accounting 50 4 Accounting 100 or 101<br />

Please contact the Admissions or Registrar’s Office for information on local CLEP testing centers.<br />

Experiential Learning<br />

Spencerian College gives students an opportunity to demonstrate knowledge gained through<br />

experiential learning. Bypass exams for general subjects are administered two times each quarter.<br />

Bypass exams for other specialized “core” programmatic courses require advance arrangement<br />

through the designated Department Director. All bypass exams must be completed prior<br />

to the first day of class (with the exception of keyboarding). A student must obtain a score of 87<br />

or above for successful completion of a bypass exam. If the passing score of 87 is achieved the<br />

student does not take the course and is not charged tuition for that course. There is, however,<br />

an additional fee charged per bypass exam (see supplement A). Distance Education students<br />

may be required to travel to campus to take a bypass exam.<br />

All students enrolled on a full program charge basis will have any reduction due to courses<br />

bypassed posted during the last quarter of the student’s normal program length. If a student<br />

withdraws for any reason before completing the program, no reduction will be made. All students<br />

enrolled on a credit hour basis will not have any credit reduction due to any bypasses<br />

successfully completed.<br />

Admission of International Students/English as a Second Language Policy<br />

Spencerian College encourages international understanding through intercultural exchange<br />

derived from the admission of qualified international students from countries throughout the<br />

world. The college’s academic requirements for admission as described in other sections must<br />

be met. All necessary documents including academic records, financial certificate and proof of<br />

English language proficiency must be received before permission to enroll and the I-20 Form<br />

can be issued.<br />

24


admission to tHe college<br />

Applicants are required to provide official or certified copies of academic records. Records in<br />

any language other than English must be accompanied by a certified English translation (paid<br />

for by the student).<br />

Financial ability must be demonstrated by completion of a financial certificate, including<br />

signatures of the sponsor and a bank official. Persons receiving a scholarship may demonstrate<br />

financial ability by sending an original or certified copy of the award letter, including<br />

the amount of the scholarship or the expenses it covers. The college may require an advance<br />

deposit of funds to cover one year’s tuition and living expenses of all non-immigrant international<br />

students from a particular country before issuance of the I-20 Form.<br />

All applicants whose native language is not English must submit <strong>TO</strong>EFL (Test of English as<br />

a Foreign Language) scores to demonstrate basic English proficiency. Applicants native to<br />

Australia, Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom will be presumed to be<br />

proficient. It is the applicant’s responsibility to obtain necessary information and application<br />

forms, and to schedule and take the test by a date that will assure delivery of results to the<br />

college by required deadlines. International students are required to have a minimum <strong>TO</strong>EFL<br />

score of 173 (computer based), 500 (paper based), or 61 (internet based).<br />

There are instances where <strong>TO</strong>EFL scores may not be required, such as for:<br />

• Nonnative speakers who hold degrees or diplomas from postsecondary institutions in<br />

English-speaking countries<br />

• Nonnative speakers who have successfully completed at least a two-year course of<br />

study in which English was the language of instruction<br />

• Nonnative speakers who have successfully pursued academic work at schools where<br />

English was the language of instruction in an English-speaking country for a specified<br />

period, generally two years.<br />

Applications received from international students will be reviewed on a competitive basis.<br />

Fulfillment of the minimum requirements does not guarantee admission to the college. An<br />

effort will be made to admit students from a variety of countries.<br />

The Executive Director reserves the right to require the applicant to take and submit <strong>TO</strong>EFL<br />

scores.<br />

Re-entering Requirements<br />

A student wishing to re-enter Spencerian College must contact the Re-entry Coordinator.<br />

During the re-entry registration process, student records will be reviewed and a determination<br />

made on the student’s qualification for re-entry. Approval of the department director is<br />

re quired for some programs.<br />

A re-entering student will be required to pay the current tuition rate for the student’s<br />

remaining classes.<br />

Program Changes<br />

Once a student begins school, every program change will have an administrative fee. This fee<br />

must be paid at the time of the program change.<br />

25


Financial inFormation<br />

Tuition and Fees<br />

Current charges for tuition and fees are listed in Supplement A, included with this catalog. If<br />

this supplement is missing, please use the form in the back of this catalog to request a copy by<br />

mail or call the school to receive a copy. (See Supplement A)<br />

General Fees<br />

The general fee is charged to all students. The general fee includes, but is not limited to, all student<br />

activities and events, all expenses involving graduation, and the new technology acquisitions<br />

to support the academic programs. (See Supplement A)<br />

Comprehensive Fees<br />

Most medical programs have a comprehensive fee that covers the use of medical supplies, film<br />

badge monitoring, clinical fees, uniforms in some programs, and other miscellaneous programmatic<br />

items. (See Supplement A)<br />

Kentucky Refund Policy<br />

The College will refund state programs administered by KHEAA after Return to Title IV regulations<br />

have been satisfied and a credit balance remains on the student’s account. KHEAA<br />

state programs will be refunded in the following order: CAP Grant, KTG, Teacher Scholarship,<br />

KEES, National Guard Tuition Assistance Program and Early Childhood Development<br />

Scholarship. Amounts will be calculated using the same formula in determining the Return to<br />

Title IV funds.<br />

Refund Policy for Title IV Funds<br />

Federal financial aid funds are awarded with the expectation that students “earn” a percentage<br />

of the funds they are disbursed with each day of class attendance each term. When a student<br />

who has received federal financial aid funds (Title IV Funds) leaves school before the end of<br />

the term, federal law requires Spencerian College to calculate the percentage and amount of<br />

“unearned” financial aid funds that must be returned to the federal government. Once a student<br />

has completed more than 60 percent of a term, he/she is considered to have earned all<br />

funding received. This calculation may have the effect of requiring the student to repay funds<br />

that have already been disbursed to the student. Students are encouraged to meet with their<br />

financial aid administrator prior to making the decision to withdraw from school.<br />

The order of repaying the funds is as follows: (1) Direct Unsubsidized; (2) Direct Subsidized;<br />

(3) Perkins Loan; (4) Direct Plus; (5) Pell Grant; (6) Federal Supplemental Educational<br />

Opportunity Grant; (7) other Title IV programs. Please see the Financial Planning Department<br />

for complete regulations mandating the policy on returning Title IV funds.<br />

Cancellation Policy<br />

If a student cancels with written notice within three (3) working days of application, or if the<br />

application is rejected by the school, all prepaid tuition and fees will be refunded. Indiana residents<br />

are entitled to a full refund if they cancel the enrollment agreement within six (6) business<br />

days after signing.<br />

Institutional Withdrawal Policy for Distance Education Students<br />

Distance Education students withdrawing or being terminated by the school will fall under the<br />

refund guidelines of the Department of Education.<br />

26


Financial inFormation<br />

Institutional Withdrawal Policy for First Quarter Students<br />

In the event a student discontinues during his/her first quarter of study, the school will reduce<br />

tuition on a pro rata basis (less an administrative fee of $100) as follows:<br />

Week 1: A reduction of 90% of the current Week 5: A reduction of 50% of the current<br />

quarter’s tuition, less $100 quarter’s tuition, less $100<br />

Week 2: A reduction of 80% of the current Week 6: A reduction of 40% of the current<br />

quarter’s tuition, less $100 quarter’s tuition, less $100<br />

Week 3: A reduction of 70% of the current<br />

quarter’s tuition, less $100<br />

Week 4: A reduction of 60% of the current<br />

quarter’s tuition, less $100<br />

Week 7-11: No reduction due<br />

All tuition charges prepaid by the student for periods in excess of the above will be refunded.<br />

Charges for all fees (General Fee/Technology Fee, Comprehensive Lab Fee, Online Fee,<br />

Medical Insurance Fee, or Parking Fee) will not be reduced or refunded once the student has<br />

attended class.<br />

Institutional Withdrawal Policy for Continuing Students<br />

In the event of withdrawal by the student or termination by the school during the second or<br />

subsequent quarters of attendance, the student will be subject to the institution’s withdrawal<br />

policy that follows. If the student is receiving federal funds, a return to Title IV funds calculation<br />

is required.<br />

Weeks 1-3: A reduction of 25% of the current quarter’s tuition less $100<br />

Weeks 4-11: No reduction due<br />

Institutional Withdrawal Policy for Indiana Residents<br />

Sec. 6.5. (A) The postsecondary proprietary educational institution shall pay a refund to the<br />

student in the amount calculated under the refund policy specified in this section or as otherwise<br />

approved by the commission. The institution must make the proper refund no later than<br />

thirty-one (31) days of the student’s request for cancellation or withdrawal.<br />

(B) The following refund policy applies to each resident postsecondary proprietary educational<br />

institution, except as noted in section 4.5 of this rule:<br />

(1) A student is entitled to a full refund if one (1) or more of the following criteria are met:<br />

(a) The student cancels the enrollment agreement or enrollment application within six (6)<br />

business days after signing.<br />

(b) The student does not meet the postsecondary proprietary educational institution’s<br />

minimum admission requirements.<br />

(c) The student’s enrollment was procured as a result of a misrepresentation in the<br />

written materials utilized by the postsecondary proprietary educational institution.<br />

(d) If the student has not visited the postsecondary educational institution prior to<br />

enrollment, and, upon touring the institution or attending the regularly scheduled<br />

orientation/classes, the student withdrew from the program within three (3) days.<br />

(2) A student withdrawing from an instructional program, after starting the instructional<br />

program, at a postsecondary proprietary institution and attending one (1) week or less, is entitled<br />

to a refund of ninety percent (90%) of the cost of the financial obligation, less an application/enrollment<br />

fee of ten percent (10%) of the total tuition, not to exceed one hundred dollars<br />

($100).<br />

27


Financial planning<br />

(3) A student withdrawing from an instructional program, after attending more than one<br />

(1) week but equal to or less than twenty-five percent (25%) of the duration of the instructional<br />

program, is entitled to a refund of seventy-five percent (75%) of the cost of the financial obligation,<br />

less an application/enrollment fee of ten percent (10%) of the total tuition, not to exceed<br />

one hundred dollars ($100).<br />

(4) A student withdrawing from an instructional program, after attending more than twenty-five<br />

percent (25%) but equal to or less than fifty percent (50%) of the duration of the instruction<br />

program, is entitled to a refund of fifty percent (50%) of the cost of the financial obligation,<br />

less an application/enrollment fee of ten percent (10%) of the total tuition, not to exceed one<br />

hundred dollars ($100).<br />

(5) A student withdrawing from an instructional program, after attending more than fifty<br />

percent (50%) but equal to or less than sixty percent (60%) of the duration of the instructional<br />

program, is entitled to a refund of forty percent (40%) of the cost of the financial obligation,<br />

less an application/enrollment fee of ten percent (10%) of the total tuition, not to exceed one<br />

hundred dollars ($100).<br />

(6) A student withdrawing from an instructional program, after attending more than sixty<br />

percent (60%) of the duration of the instructional program, is not entitled to a refund.<br />

(Indiana Commission on Proprietary Education; 570 IAC 1-8-6.5)<br />

Financial Planning<br />

Spencerian College is interested in assisting those students who are sincere in their pursuit of<br />

an education. It is for this reason that the Financial Planning staff is available to arrange an outline<br />

of payments that will best meet your financial obligations without excessive burden upon<br />

you or your family. Contact the Admissions Office for an appointment.<br />

Payment Plans<br />

Although many students pay their tuition in full at entry, the College offers quarterly and other<br />

tuition self-payment plans. Spencerian College is interested in assisting those students who are<br />

sincere in their pursuit of an education. It is for this reason that the Financial Planning staff is<br />

available to arrange an outline of payments that will best meet your financial obligations without<br />

excessive burden upon you or your family. Contact the Admissions Office for an appointment.<br />

A plan tailored to meet your needs can be arranged.<br />

College Interruption<br />

There will be no refund of tuition, fees, charges or any other payments made to the College in<br />

the event the operation of the College is suspended at any time as a result of any “Act of God,”<br />

strike, riot, disruption, or for any other reasons beyond the control of the College.<br />

Books and Supplies<br />

Students are responsible for purchasing their own books and supplies unless arrangements<br />

have been made for purchase through the use of financial aid resources. All books and supplies<br />

needed are available in the College bookstore, but students may purchase books from any<br />

source they choose.<br />

Affording Spencerian College<br />

While some people may believe they are not financially able to attend college, most who<br />

aspire to higher education can afford Spencerian College. From this understanding, we<br />

approach financing for college with the expectation that there is a way if you really desire an<br />

education. For this reason, Spencerian College has a Financial Planning Office with a staff that<br />

is thoroughly knowledgeable with today’s student financial aid programs, including grants,<br />

28


Financial planning<br />

loans, scholarships, and work opportunities. In addition, our staff is current with educational<br />

programs for veterans, as well as national, state, and local workforce development programs.<br />

The Financial Planning staff will offer advice and find ways to help achieve the financial help<br />

necessary to complete your college education. If you want to consider financial assistance, you<br />

are urged to contact the Financial Planning Office by calling (502) 447-1000.<br />

Financial Aid Programs<br />

Eligible students attending Spencerian College have access to all available federal and student<br />

financial aid programs. As directed by the U.S. Department of Education, federal funds are<br />

allotted to those who qualify.<br />

Federal Pell Grants<br />

This is a grant for those who qualify. No repayment required. For undergraduates only, Pell<br />

Grants are awards to help undergraduates pay for their education after high school. For<br />

many students, these grants provide a “foundation” of financial aid, to which aid from other<br />

federal and non-federal sources may be added. Pell Grant awards for the academic year will<br />

depend on program funding. The amount of the award will depend on your Expected Family<br />

Contribution (EFC) number, the cost of education at Spencerian, whether you are a full-time or<br />

part-time student, and how long you will be enrolled in the academic year.<br />

College Access Program (CAP)<br />

College Access Program Grants are for qualified Kentucky residents with proven need.<br />

Amounts are determined by the Kentucky Higher Education Assistance Authority (KHEAA)<br />

Grant Program. CAP eligibility is in line with Pell Grant eligibility. Repayment is not required.<br />

Only associate degree students qualify.<br />

Federal Direct Stafford Loans<br />

For qualified student borrowers, Stafford Loans are either subsidized or unsubsidized. If you<br />

are a regular, degree-seeking student, enrolled in an eligible program of study at least half<br />

time, you may receive a Stafford Loan, as long as you meet other general eligibility requirements.<br />

A subsidized loan is awarded on the basis of financial need. If you qualify for a subsidized<br />

loan, the federal government pays interest on the loan until you begin repayment and during<br />

authorized periods of deferment thereafter. An unsubsidized loan is not awarded on the basis<br />

of need. If you qualify for an unsubsidized loan, you will be charged interest from the time the<br />

loan is disbursed until it is paid in full. You can choose to pay the interest or allow it to accumulate.<br />

If you allow it to accumulate, it will be capitalized — that is, the interest will be added<br />

to the principal amount of your loan and will increase the amount you have to repay. If you<br />

pay the interest as it accumulates, you will repay less in the long run.<br />

Federal Perkins Loans<br />

The Perkins Loan is a low-interest loan to help qualified students pay for their education. It<br />

must be repaid. The amount of the loan is based on need and availability of funds. If you are a<br />

new borrower, and you are attending at least half-time, you have a “grace period” of nine (9)<br />

months after you graduate, leave school, or drop below half-time before you begin to repay<br />

your loan. If you are less than a half-time student, your grace period may be different. Check<br />

with your financial planning administrator.<br />

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (FSEOG)<br />

A Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) is an award for undergraduates<br />

who qualify to help pay for a college education. No repayment is required. It is for undergraduate<br />

students with exceptional financial need (with priority given to Pell Grant recipients).<br />

The amount of award is based on need and availability of funds.<br />

29


Financial planning<br />

Part-Time Jobs<br />

Students who are seeking part-time, after-school positions will find employment opportunities<br />

posted through information received by the Career Service Office.<br />

Workforce Development Programs<br />

These programs are for those students who have a substantial handicap to employment. The<br />

amount available depends on the individual circumstances of each applicant. Information can<br />

be obtained from the workforce development counselor in the student’s hometown district.<br />

Federal Direct PLUS Loans<br />

The PLUS Loan Program enables parents with good credit histories to borrow money to pay<br />

the educational expenses of each child who is a dependent undergraduate student enrolled at<br />

least half time. To be eligible to receive a PLUS Loan, parents generally will be required to pass<br />

a credit check. Parents may also qualify for a loan if someone who is able to pass a credit check<br />

agrees to co-sign the loan. Students and their parents must also meet other general eligibility<br />

requirements for receiving federal student financial aid. The yearly limit on the PLUS Loan is<br />

equal to your cost of attendance minus any other financial aid for which the student is eligible.<br />

Spencerian Scholarships<br />

Scholarships are available to selected high school seniors based on their seventh semester high<br />

school class ranking, grade point averages (GPA), aptitude/achievement test scores and career<br />

essays. Up to 20 awards are for $500 per quarter and are renewable for up to 9 consecutive<br />

quarters, depending on program length, as long as the student maintains at least a 3.0 GPA<br />

while a Spencerian student. In addition to the above scholarship, there is a full-tuition scholarship<br />

for high school valedictorians who enter Spencerian within six months of graduating from<br />

high school. Applications and the above documents must be submitted by the end of April<br />

each year. These scholarships are applicable for either June or September admission immediately<br />

following their high school graduation.<br />

Each year Spencerian College hosts a Scholarship Day for prospective students. Applicants<br />

compete for scholarships by taking a standardized exam, and scholarships are awarded in<br />

amounts of $250 to $3,000 based on exam scores.<br />

Scholarships are available through Spencerian’s Tech Prep High School program. High schools<br />

that have developed a Tech Prep articulation agreement with Spencerian are awarded $500<br />

scholarships to give to seniors who may be considering Spencerian College. The high school<br />

may use their own criteria in awarding these scholarships. The number of Tech Prep scholarships<br />

each high school receives is based on the number of programs the school has articulated.<br />

As evidence of its commitment to the adult learner in the Commonwealth of Kentucky, each<br />

year Spencerian College will offer two scholarships valued at up to $3,000 ($500 per term for up<br />

to six terms) as a reduction of tuition. The recipient must also receive an overall total score of<br />

540 or higher on the GED. The recipient must also meet all other Spencerian College entrance<br />

requirements, maintain continuous full-time status, and a minimum quarterly GPA of 3.0.<br />

Jan McKenzie Gordon Scholarship – This is a full tuition scholarship award presented annually<br />

to the most outstanding freshman student at the end of their freshman year, who is pursuing<br />

their Associate of Applied Science Degree at Spencerian College.<br />

In addition, Norton Healthcare, Jewish Hospital, Clark Memorial Hospital and UofL Health<br />

Care <strong>University</strong> Hospital offer scholarship opportunities for qualified medical students. See the<br />

Career Services office for details.<br />

The aggregate volume of scholarships awarded is up to $60,000. Additional information can be<br />

obtained from the Admissions Office.<br />

30


Financial planning<br />

Veterans Approval<br />

Specific programs at Spencerian College are approved for persons eligible to receive VA educational<br />

benefits. Contact the school VA Certifying Official for a list of approved programs.<br />

Career Education Funds (CEF)<br />

Career Education Funds (CEF) are available for students not qualifying for adequate amounts<br />

of other financial assistance. Loans will be applied to tuition only. Students must not be in<br />

default on any type of student loan at any institution. The loan amount varies according to<br />

need. Students may borrow a minimum of $500 per academic year (to be repaid in 12 months)<br />

up to a maximum of $4,000 per academic year (to be repaid in 60 months). The interest rate is<br />

8% simple interest. Students must agree to make a minimum of $1,000 cash payments towards<br />

their tuition in installments while attending school during the shorter of 12 months or the loan<br />

term. Monthly payments of principal and interest will begin two (2) months after studies cease<br />

for any reason and will continue until the loan is paid in full.<br />

Institutional Grants<br />

Institutional grants may be awarded to students who after applying for all appropriate federal<br />

financial assistance still have a balance remaining. The student must demonstrate the inability<br />

to make payments or obtain a cash based loan. Institutional grants may be awarded to cover<br />

up to $3000 of the total remaining balance owed to the school.<br />

Kentucky Educational Excellence Scholarship (KEES)<br />

Kentucky high school students who try to get the most from high school by studying diligently<br />

and making good grades (C+ and above) can earn scholarships for college through the KEES<br />

program. Students should contact their high school counselors for additional information.<br />

General Information for Financial Planning<br />

The regulations governing all financial assistance programs are subject to change. The<br />

College’s Financial Planning Office will have the latest information.<br />

Financial Aid Probation or Suspension<br />

Financial aid probation or suspension occurs when a student passes fewer than the required<br />

minimum number of credit hours or falls below the grade point average minimum as defined<br />

in the section regarding satisfactory academic progress (SAP). Students may be eligible to<br />

receive financial aid while placed on academic probation. At the end of the probationary<br />

quarter, the student’s satisfactory academic progress will be reviewed. If SAP is not met, the<br />

student is subject to being academically suspended for a minimum of one quarter. Students<br />

returning to school from a suspension are not eligible for financial aid until they have again<br />

established satisfactory academic progress. Once a student has achieved satisfactory academic<br />

progress, their financial aid eligibility may be reinstated.<br />

Financial Aid Reinstatement<br />

Once placed on academic/financial aid suspension, a student will be considered for additional<br />

financial aid at the College only when one of the following conditions has been met:<br />

1. Sufficient credits have been completed and/or the minimum grade point average requirements<br />

have been satisfied.<br />

2. It is established through the appeals process that the student encountered extenuating circumstances<br />

that hindered academic performance (for example, a documented serious medical<br />

problem) during the quarter(s) in question. Students wishing to appeal the suspension must<br />

do so in writing with any appropriate documentation to the Dean of the College.<br />

31


academic programs<br />

The School of Business Administration<br />

Office Professional Diploma<br />

9 months day<br />

15 months evening<br />

Accounting Diploma<br />

18 months evening<br />

Executive Assistant Diploma<br />

12 months day<br />

18 months evening<br />

Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) Degree<br />

in Accounting and Management<br />

27 months evening<br />

Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.) Degree<br />

in Business Office Management<br />

18 months day<br />

27 months evening<br />

32


oFFice proFessional diploma<br />

The purpose of this program is to prepare the graduate for work in a business office. A graduate<br />

of Spencerian’s Office Professional program is skilled in keyboarding, the use of word<br />

processing, and spreadsheet software applications. This work frequently serves as a steppingstone<br />

to jobs with increased responsibilities. The graduate has the skill to be of value to businesses<br />

of all sizes.<br />

Curriculum 50 Credit Hours<br />

660 Clock Hours<br />

Length: 9 months - Day Division<br />

15 months - Evening Division<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

110A College Success Strategies 2<br />

111 Customer Service 4<br />

121 English I 4<br />

130 Keyboarding 5<br />

150 General Mathematics 4<br />

164 Filing/Records Management 3<br />

115 Computer Spreadsheet Applications I 3<br />

122 English II 4<br />

245A Career Development 2<br />

280 Word Processing I 3<br />

100 Accounting for the Business Office 3<br />

223 Business Correspondence 4<br />

272 Business Transcription 2<br />

281 Word Processing II 3<br />

293 Personal Psychology 4<br />

Total 50<br />

All courses require “C” or better.<br />

Office Professional students must demonstrate a keyboarding proficiency of 45 wpm or better and<br />

provide proof of HIPAA training at Spencerian to be eligible for graduation.<br />

33


accounting diploma<br />

The purpose of this program is to prepare the graduate to administer accounting systems for<br />

small to medium size businesses. Also, a graduate is able to combine accounting principles<br />

with the modern technology of computer systems, making the graduate a valuable asset to<br />

prospective employers.<br />

Curriculum 65 Credit Hours<br />

880 Clock Hours<br />

Length: 18 months – Evening Division<br />

All accounting classes must be taken in the evening division.<br />

Courses other than accounting may be taken during the day, and this<br />

could affect the length of the program.<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

101 Accounting I 6<br />

110A College Success Strategies 2<br />

121 English I 4<br />

130 Keyboarding 5<br />

150 General Mathematics 4<br />

102 Accounting II 3<br />

111 Customer Service 4<br />

115 Computer Spreadsheet Applications I 3<br />

280 Word Processing I 3<br />

103 Accounting III 6<br />

202 Payroll Accounting 3<br />

215 Computer Database Applications I 3<br />

299 Management Principles 4<br />

203 Cost Accounting 3<br />

205 Income Tax Accounting 6<br />

241 Business Law 4<br />

245A Career Development 2<br />

Total 65<br />

All courses require “C” or better.<br />

Accounting students must demonstrate a 10-key proficiency of 9000 kph or better.<br />

34


eXecutive assistant diploma<br />

The purpose of the Executive Assistant program is to prepare the graduate to be a top assistant<br />

to the manager in businesses of all sizes. This profession combines general office and computer<br />

skills with the basics of good management.<br />

Curriculum 63 Credit Hours<br />

836 Clock Hours<br />

Length: 12 months - Day Division<br />

18 months - Evening Division<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

110A College Success Strategies 2<br />

121 English I 4<br />

130 Keyboarding 5<br />

150 General Mathematics 4<br />

164 Filing/Records Management 3<br />

115 Computer Spreadsheet Applications I 3<br />

122 English II 4<br />

245A Career Development 2<br />

280 Word Processing I 3<br />

100 Accounting for the Business Office 3<br />

163 Business Office Procedures 3<br />

223 Business Correspondence 4<br />

272 Business Transcription 2<br />

281 Word Processing II 3<br />

293 Personal Psychology 4<br />

215 Computer Database Applications I 3<br />

241 Business Law 4<br />

299 Management Principles 4<br />

C106 Desktop Publishing 3<br />

Total 63<br />

All courses require “C” or better.<br />

Executive Assistant students must demonstrate a keyboarding proficiency of 55 wpm or better.<br />

35


associate oF applied science (a.a.s.)<br />

accounting and management<br />

The purpose of the Associate of Applied Science Degree in Accounting and Management program<br />

is to equip the graduate with advanced accounting skills and the capabilities required<br />

to serve as a manager in various office settings. Greater complexity of tax laws, technological<br />

advances, and the multiplicity of new businesses have brought about an increased demand for<br />

persons with accounting and management skills.<br />

Curriculum 93 Credit Hours<br />

1232 Clock Hours<br />

Length: 27 months – Evening Division<br />

All accounting classes must be taken in the evening division.<br />

Courses other than accounting may be taken during the day,<br />

and this could affect the length of the program.<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

101 Accounting I 6<br />

110A College Success Strategies 2<br />

121+ English I 4<br />

130 Keyboarding 5<br />

151+ College Mathematics 4<br />

102 Accounting II 3<br />

111 Customer Service 4<br />

115 Computer Spreadsheet Applications I 3<br />

122+ English II 4<br />

280 Word Processing I 3<br />

103 Accounting III 6<br />

202 Payroll Accounting 3<br />

215 Computer Database Applications I 3<br />

299 Management Principles 4<br />

203 Cost Accounting 3<br />

205 Income Tax Accounting 6<br />

241 Business Law 4<br />

245A Career Development 2<br />

293+ Personal Psychology 4<br />

315 Computer Accounting Applications 6<br />

498 Small Business Management 4<br />

201 Intermediate Accounting 3<br />

305 Advanced Income Tax 3<br />

499 Human Resource Management 4<br />

Total 93<br />

All courses require “C” or better.<br />

+ General education courses<br />

Accounting and Management students must demonstrate a 10-key proficiency of 9000 kph or better.<br />

36


associate oF applied science (a.a.s.)<br />

Business oFFice management<br />

The purpose of the Associate of Applied Science Degree in Business Office Management<br />

program is to prepare the graduate with techniques needed to direct an office staff. Training<br />

in basic office procedures is combined with human resource and data management skills to<br />

enhance the graduate’s administrative ability.<br />

This associate degree program combines education specific to the business field with practical<br />

training. Qualities that are useful in business management careers are developed and enhanced<br />

by this curriculum. They include computer technology, problem-solving skills, critical thinking,<br />

balanced judgment, understanding human behavior, and leadership abilities.<br />

Curriculum 93 Credit Hours<br />

1232 Clock Hours<br />

Length: 18 months – Day Division<br />

(courses 101, 202 and 315 are available in the evening only)<br />

27 months – Evening Division<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

121+ English I 4<br />

151+ College Mathematics 4<br />

164 Filing/Records Management 3<br />

101# Accounting I 6<br />

110A College Success Strategies 2<br />

111 Customer Service 4<br />

122+ English II 4<br />

241 Business Law 4<br />

280 Word Processing I 3<br />

293+ Personal Psychology 4<br />

130 Keyboarding 5<br />

115 Computer Spreadsheet Applications I 3<br />

223 Business Correspondence 4<br />

272 Business Transcription 2<br />

281 Word Processing II 3<br />

299 Management Principles 4<br />

163 Business Office Procedures 3<br />

215 Computer Database Applications 3<br />

245A Career Development 2<br />

315# Computer Accounting Applications I 6<br />

450 Introduction to Sales and Marketing 4<br />

498 Small Business Management 4<br />

C106 Desktop Publishing 3<br />

499 Human Resource Management 4<br />

202# Payroll Accounting 3<br />

C109 Integrated Computer Applications Project 2<br />

Total 93<br />

# courses offered in the evening only<br />

+ General education courses<br />

All courses require “C” or better.<br />

Business Office Management students must demonstrate a keyboarding proficiency of 50 wpm or better.<br />

37


tHe scHool oF allied HealtH sciences<br />

Health Unit Coordinator Certificate<br />

6 months day, 9 months evening or distance<br />

education divisions<br />

Ophthalmic Assistant Certificate<br />

6 months day, 9 months evening<br />

Patient Care Assistant Certificate<br />

6 months day, 9 months evening<br />

Phlebotomy Certificate<br />

6 months day, 9 months evening or distance<br />

education divisions<br />

Clinical Assistant Diploma<br />

9 months day, 15 months evening or distance<br />

education divisions<br />

Massage Therapy Diploma<br />

9 months day, 15 months evening<br />

Medical Administrative Assistant Diploma<br />

9 months day, 15 months evening or distance<br />

education divisions<br />

Clinical Assistant with<br />

Limited Medical Radiography Diploma<br />

18 months day, 24 months evening<br />

Clinical Assistant with<br />

Phlebotomy Diploma<br />

12 months day, 18 months evening<br />

Clinical Laboratory Assistant Diploma<br />

12 months day<br />

Limited Medical Radiography Diploma<br />

12 months day, 18 months evening<br />

Limited Medical Radiography with<br />

Phlebotomy Diploma<br />

15 months day, 21 months evening<br />

Personal Trainer Diploma<br />

12 months day, 18 months evening<br />

Medical Assistant Diploma<br />

12 months day, 18 months evening or<br />

distance education divisions<br />

Medical Coding Specialist Diploma<br />

12 months day, 18 months evening or<br />

distance education divisions<br />

Medical Transcriptionist Diploma<br />

12 months day, 18 months evening or<br />

distance education divisions<br />

38<br />

Practical Nursing Diploma<br />

12 months day, 24 months evening<br />

Medical Assistant with<br />

Phlebotomy Diploma<br />

15 months day, 21 months evening<br />

Associate of Applied Science (A. A. S.)<br />

Degree in Medical Massage Therapy<br />

15 months day, 24 months evening<br />

Associate of Applied Science (A. A. S.)<br />

Degree in Surgical Technology<br />

18 months day<br />

Associate of Applied Science (A. A. S.)<br />

Degree Healthcare Reimbursement<br />

Specialist<br />

18 months day, 27 months evening or<br />

distance education divisions<br />

Associate of Applied Science (A. A. S.)<br />

Degree in Medical Administrative<br />

Management<br />

18 months day, 27 months evening or<br />

distance education divisions<br />

Associate of Applied Science (A. A. S.)<br />

Degree Invasive Cardiovascular Technology<br />

21 months day<br />

Associate of Applied Science (A. A. S.)<br />

Degree in Medical Clinical Specialties<br />

24 months day, 33 months evening<br />

Associate of Applied Science (A.A.S.)<br />

Degree in Medical Administrative<br />

Management with Phlebotomy<br />

21 months day, 30 months evening<br />

Associate of Applied Science (A. A. S.)<br />

Degree Medical Laboratory Technician<br />

24 months day<br />

Associate of Applied Science (A. A. S.)<br />

Degree in Nursing<br />

12 months day, 24 months distance education<br />

divisions<br />

Associate of Applied Science (A. A. S.)<br />

Degree Respiratory Therapy<br />

24 months evening<br />

Associate of Applied Science (A. A. S.)<br />

Degree Radiologic Technologist<br />

27 months day<br />

NOTICE <strong>TO</strong> MEDICAL CAREERS STUDENTS<br />

Spencerian College teaches to the license and certification standards of the Commonwealth of Kentucky.<br />

If you plan to work in any state other than Kentucky it is your responsibility to verify that state’s permit,<br />

license or certification requirements. A state’s requirements may include, among other things, specialized<br />

training that is not required in Kentucky and as a result may not be sufficiently covered in Spencerian’s curriculum.<br />

Spencerian disclaims responsibility for failure of any student to meet the educational requirements<br />

for a permit, license or certification in any jurisdiction other than Kentucky.


HealtH unit coordinator certiFicate<br />

The purpose of the Health Unit Coordinator is to prepare the student to perform the clerical,<br />

reception/communication, and coordination tasks for the nursing unit. The unit coordinator is<br />

prepared to work with the medical and nursing teams to care for the sick and promote wellness.<br />

After completion of the short six-month program, the graduate possesses the skills to perform<br />

in a hospital setting as a unit secretary or unit coordinator.<br />

Curriculum 42 Credit Hours<br />

528 Clock Hours<br />

Length: 6 months – Day Division<br />

9 months – Evening or Distance Education Divisions<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

110A College Success Strategies 2<br />

121 English I 4<br />

130 Keyboarding 5<br />

171 Medical Law & Ethics 4<br />

172 Anatomy & Physiology I 4<br />

173 Anatomy & Physiology II 4<br />

176 Medical Terminology 4<br />

177 Pharmacology/Laboratory Terminology 4<br />

211 Health & Safety Techniques 3<br />

245A Career Development 2<br />

297* Health Unit Coordinator Procedures 6<br />

Total 42<br />

All courses require “C” or better.<br />

*Course 297 is offered in online format only.<br />

Some classes may require on site clinical and/or residential skills training. Students may not receive payment/reimbursement of<br />

any type for clinical and/or externship hours required in their academic program. Students may also not perform these clinical<br />

and/or externship hours with their employer in the capacity of their regular position.<br />

The Health Unit Coordinator Certificate program is also available through distance education. Spencerian classes are offered<br />

online or in a blended format where students complete a portion of the course online and a portion on campus or at approved<br />

sites/facilities. Entrance and graduation requirements for distance education classes and on-campus classes are the same.<br />

All students must complete Spencerian College’s non-credit introductory course, “Student Quick Start,” a tutorial explaining the<br />

features of the Learning Management System before beginning their first distance education class. Distance education students<br />

must have access to a PC (minimum 56k Modem) with an Internet connection. Spencerian College utilizes ANGEL Learning, Inc.<br />

software, a fully integrated e-learning platform that allows the College to rapidly create, deliver, and measure interactive learning<br />

over the Internet. Students must purchase any software that may be needed for a specific course. All student assignments must<br />

be submitted by using Microsoft Word 2007 or newer, Excel and Access. There is an additional per credit hour charge for distance<br />

education classes. See Supplement A.<br />

39


opHtHalmic assistant certiFicate<br />

The purpose of the Ophthalmic Assistant Certificate program is to prepare students to perform<br />

the specialized skills needed for employment in ophthalmology and/or optometric physician<br />

offices. Students will be trained in the various administrative and clinical duties performed by<br />

an entry level Ophthalmic Assistant in an eye care medical setting.<br />

Curriculum 33 credit hours<br />

472 clock hours<br />

Length: 6 months – Day Division<br />

9 month – Evening Division<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

110A College Success Strategies 2<br />

245A Career Development 2<br />

171 Medical Law & Ethics 4<br />

172 Anatomy & Physiology I 4<br />

173 Anatomy & Physiology II 4<br />

176 Medical Terminology 4<br />

211 Health & Safety Techniques 3<br />

OPH100* Ophthalmic Assisting Techniques 6<br />

OPH200** Ophthalmic Assistant Externship 4<br />

Total 33<br />

All courses require a “C” or better<br />

*The Ophthalmic Assisting Techniques (OPH100) course is offered in the day division only. It consists of the clinical portion of<br />

the Ophthalmic Assistant Certificate program. The didactic portion of the OPH100 course will be conducted on campus durring<br />

the day, but the clinical training portion of the OPH100 course will require the student to attend the off-site clinical location in<br />

Louisville each Friday from 8:00am until 12:00pm throughout the 11-week quarter. There is no alternate offering for the OPH100<br />

clinical training, so each student enrolled (day or night) must be able to do the clinical training durring the day Monday through<br />

Thursday, and on Friday morning.<br />

**The Ophthalmic Assistant Externship (OPH200) consists of 120 hours of on-the-job training that is taken after all other course<br />

work is completed. Students may not receive payment/reimbursement of any type for clinical and/or externship hours required in<br />

their academic program. Students may also not perform these clinical and/or externship hours with their employer in the capacity<br />

of their regular position. Students must be available to complete the externship hours during regular (day) business hours, Monday<br />

through Friday, as there is no availability for evening or weekend clinical sites.<br />

40


patient care assistant certiFicate<br />

The purpose of the Patient Care Assistant Certificate program is to give a foundation in healthcare<br />

that would advance a student’s career and give a foundation for a nursing program. The<br />

graduate has training in much needed areas of mental health, home health, and restorative<br />

health. Successful completion of the program leads to eligibility to sit for the Kentucky State<br />

Registered Nurses Aide certification (SRNA).<br />

Curriculum 40 Credit Hours<br />

517 Clock Hours:<br />

Length: 6 months – Day Division<br />

9 months – Evening Division<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

171 Medical Law & Ethics 4<br />

172 Anatomy & Physiology I 4<br />

173 Anatomy & Physiology II 4<br />

176 Medical Terminology 4<br />

177 Pharmacology/Laboratory Terminology 4<br />

211 Health & Safety Techniques 3<br />

245 Career Development 2<br />

PN101* Personal & Vocation Relationships 2<br />

PCA100** Nurse Assistant Skills 5<br />

PCA102* Mental Health, Restorative Aide, & Home Health 8<br />

<strong>TO</strong>TAL 40<br />

All courses require a “C” or better<br />

* PCA100 and PCA102 class time will extend beyond the normal class schedule. Students need to be aware that these classes<br />

will require them to be in school for extended time in order to meet the contact hour requirement.<br />

** PCA100 is offered only in conjunction with this program; it is not offered as a stand-alone course.<br />

41


pHleBotomY certiFicate<br />

The purpose of the Phlebotomy Certificate program is to prepare students with the skills necessary<br />

to obtain quality laboratory specimens in a variety of medical settings. Students will gain<br />

the technical knowledge and skills required to take a national certification exam. Spencerian<br />

faculty and staff will assist students with certification examination registration in order for the<br />

student to become an important member of the healthcare team.<br />

Curriculum 33 Credit Hours<br />

472 Clock Hours<br />

Length: 6 months - Day Division<br />

9 months - Evening or Distance Education Divisions<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

110A College Success Strategies 2<br />

171<br />

172<br />

176<br />

211<br />

Medical Law & Ethics<br />

Anatomy & Physiology I<br />

Medical Terminology<br />

Health & Safety Techniques<br />

4<br />

4<br />

4<br />

3<br />

Clinical Assistant Diploma with<br />

Phlebotomy<br />

75 Credit Hours<br />

1096 Clock Hours<br />

173 Anatomy & Physiology II 4 Length: 12 months - Day Division<br />

214 Phlebotomy Techniques 6<br />

18 months - Evening Division<br />

245A<br />

279*<br />

Total<br />

Career Development<br />

Phlebotomy Externship<br />

2<br />

4<br />

33<br />

Limited Medical Radiography Diploma<br />

with Phlebotomy<br />

76 Credit Hours<br />

All courses require “C” or better<br />

1227 Clock Hours<br />

* The Phlebotomy externship consists of 120 hours of on-thejob<br />

training which is taken after all other course work is com-<br />

Length: 15 months - Day Division<br />

21 months - Evening Division<br />

pleted. Students must complete 100 successful venipunctures Medical Assistant Diploma<br />

and 25 successful capillary sticks.<br />

**Students in the Medical Assisting and Medical Administrative<br />

Management portion are required to take the Certified Medical<br />

Assistant (CMA) exam of the American Association of Medical<br />

Assistants (AAMA) as a programmatic/graduation requirement.<br />

Distance education enrollment for the Medical Assistant portion<br />

with Phlebotomy**<br />

95 Credit Hours<br />

1424 Clock Hours<br />

Length: 15 months - Day Division<br />

21 months - Evening Division<br />

is limited to residents of Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio and Tennessee. Medical Administrative Management A.A.S.<br />

Some classes may require on-site clinical and/or residential<br />

skills training. Students may not receive payment/reimbursement<br />

of any type for clinical and/or externship hours required<br />

in their academic program. Students may also not perform<br />

these clinical and/or externship hours with their employer in the<br />

with Phlebotomy**<br />

119 Credit Hours<br />

1732 Clock Hours<br />

Length: 21 months - Day Division<br />

30 months - Evening Division<br />

capacity of their regular position.<br />

These programs include the same core<br />

The Phlebotomy Certificate program is also available through courses as the Clinical Assistant and Medical<br />

distance education for Kentucky and Indiana residents. Assistant Diploma programs, and the Medical<br />

Spencerian classes are offered in a blended format where stu- Administrative Management Associate<br />

dents complete a portion of the course online and a portion on<br />

campus or at approved sites/facilities. Entrance and graduation<br />

requirements for distance education classes and on campus<br />

classes are the same. All students must complete Spencerian<br />

Degree program. The difference is the addition<br />

of two specialized phlebotomy courses.<br />

College’s non-credit introductory course, “Student Quick Start,” a tutorial explaining the features of the Learning Management<br />

System before beginning their first distance education class. Distance education students must have access to a PC (minimum<br />

56k Modem) with an Internet connection. Spencerian College utilizes ANGEL Learning, Inc. software, a fully integrated e-learning<br />

platform that allows the College to rapidly create, deliver, and measure interactive learning over the Internet. Students must purchase<br />

any software that may be needed for a specific course. All student assignments must be submitted by using Microsoft Word<br />

2007 or newer, Excel and Access. There is an additional per credit hour charge for distance education classes. See Supplement A.<br />

42<br />

Programs offered with<br />

Phlebotomy:


clinical assistant diploma<br />

The purpose of the Clinical Assistant program is to prepare the student to provide quality health<br />

service by performance of clinical skills in a medical office or clinic. Graduates of this program will<br />

be able to demonstrate safe practice in the performance of clinical procedures required by physicians,<br />

including CPR and First Aid. Also, these graduates will be taught to accurately perform limited<br />

waived medical laboratory tests and diagnostic procedures, including electrocardiograms.<br />

Due to the administrative content of the Clinical Assistant Program, graduates will be eligible to<br />

sit for certification through the American Medical Technologist (AMT) as a Registered Medical<br />

Assistant (RMA).<br />

Curriculum 65 Credit Hours<br />

888 Clock Hours<br />

Length: 9 months - Day Division<br />

15 months - Evening or Distance Education Divisions<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

110A College Success Strategies 2<br />

121 English I 4<br />

130 Keyboarding 5<br />

150 General Mathematics 4<br />

171 Medical Law & Ethics 4<br />

172 Anatomy & Physiology I 4<br />

176 Medical Terminology 4<br />

165 Electronic Records Management 3<br />

173 Anatomy & Physiology II 4<br />

177 Pharmacology/Laboratory Terminology 4<br />

211 Health & Safety Techniques 3<br />

293 Personal Psychology 4<br />

212 Medical Lab Procedures 6<br />

213 Advanced Clinical Skills 3<br />

245A Career Development 2<br />

274 Medical Assisting Techniques 3<br />

277 Introduction to Medical Coding 3<br />

278* Clinical Practicum 3<br />

Total 65<br />

All courses require C or better.<br />

* The Clinical Practicum consists of 96 hours of on-the-job training which is taken after all other course work is completed.<br />

Students may not receive payment/reimbursement of any type for clinical and/or practicum hours required in their academic<br />

program. Students may also not perform these clinical and/or practicum hours with their employer in the capacity of their regular<br />

position.<br />

The Clinical Assistant Diploma program is also available through distance education. Spencerian classes are offered online or in a<br />

blended format where students complete a portion of the course online and a portion on campus or at approved sites/facilities.<br />

Some classes may require on site clinical and/or residential skills training. Entrance and graduation requirements for distance<br />

education classes and on-campus classes are the same. All students must complete Spencerian College’s non-credit introductory<br />

course, “Student Quick Start,” a tutorial explaining the features of the Learning Management System before beginning their first<br />

distance education class. Distance education students must have access to a PC (minimum 56k Modem) with an Internet connection.<br />

Spencerian College utilizes ANGEL Learning, Inc. software, a fully integrated e-learning platform that allows the College<br />

to rapidly create, deliver, and measure interactive learning over the Internet. Students must purchase any software that may be<br />

needed for a specific course. All student assignments must be submitted by using Microsoft Word 2007 or newer, Excel and<br />

Access. There is an additional per credit hour charge for distance education classes. See Supplement A.<br />

43


clinical assistant WitH limited medical<br />

radiograpHY diploma<br />

The purpose of the Clinical Assistant with<br />

Limited Medical Radiography diploma is to<br />

prepare students to provide quality health<br />

service by performance of clinical skills in<br />

a medical office or clinic. The program also<br />

provides a progressive academic and clinical<br />

educational environment by training students<br />

to become highly competent and qualified<br />

to administer ionizing radiation for medical<br />

diagnostic imaging purposes while preparing<br />

them for future licensing examination.<br />

Upon successful completion of this program,<br />

students will be able to: demonstrate<br />

safe practices in the performance of clinical<br />

procedures required by physicals, including<br />

CPR and first aid; accurately perform limited<br />

waived medical laboratory tests and diagnostic<br />

procedures, including electrocardiograms;<br />

and administer ionizing radiation (x-rays) for<br />

medical diagnostic imaging purposes.<br />

Due to the administrative content of the<br />

Clinical Assistant with LMR program, graduates<br />

will be eligible to sit for certification<br />

through the American Medical Technologist<br />

(AMT) as a Registered Medical Assistant<br />

(RMA).<br />

The Clinical Assistant Diploma portion of the program is also<br />

available through distance education. Spencerian classes<br />

are offered online or in a blended format where students<br />

complete a portion of the course online and a portion on<br />

campus or at approved sites/facilities. Some classes may<br />

require on site clinical and/or residential skills training.<br />

Entrance and graduation requirements for distance education<br />

classes and on-campus classes are the same. All students<br />

must complete Spencerian College’s non-credit introductory<br />

course, “Student Quick Start,” a tutorial explaining the features<br />

of the Learning Management System before beginning their<br />

first distance education class. Distance education students<br />

must have access to a PC (minimum 56k Modem) with<br />

an Internet connection. Spencerian College utilizes ANGEL<br />

Learning, Inc. software, a fully integrated e-learning platform<br />

that allows the College to rapidly create, deliver, and measure<br />

interactive learning over the Internet. Students must purchase<br />

any software that may be needed for a specific course. All<br />

student assignments must be submitted by using Microsoft<br />

Word 2007 or newer, Excel and Access. There is an additional<br />

per credit hour charge for distance education classes. See<br />

Supplement A.<br />

44<br />

Curriculum 104 Credit Hours<br />

1599 Clock Hours<br />

Length:<br />

18 months - Day Division<br />

24 months - Evening Division<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

110A College Success Strategies 2<br />

121 English I 4<br />

130 Keyboarding 5<br />

151 College Mathematics 4<br />

171 Medical Law & Ethics 4<br />

172 Anatomy & Physiology I 4<br />

176 Medical Terminology 4<br />

165 Electronic Records Management 3<br />

173 Anatomy & Physiology II 4<br />

177 Pharmacology/Laboratory<br />

Terminology 4<br />

211 Health & Safety Techniques 3<br />

293 Personal Psychology 4<br />

212 Medical Lab Procedures 6<br />

213 Advanced Clinical Skills 3<br />

245A Career Development 2<br />

274 Medical Assisting Techniques 3<br />

277 Introduction to Medical Coding 3<br />

278* Clinical Practicum 3<br />

RAD100 Introduction to Radiography 4<br />

RAD102 Introduction to Radiographic<br />

Clinical Topics I 3<br />

RAD200 Radiographic Positioning I 9<br />

RAD300 Radiographic Positioning II 4<br />

LMR201 Radiographic Imaging 4<br />

LMR300** Limited Medical Radiography<br />

Clinical I<br />

LMR301** Limited Medical Radiography<br />

3<br />

Clinical II 9<br />

LMR400 Limited Medical Radiography<br />

Certification Review 3<br />

Total 104<br />

All courses require C or better. See catalog addenda “C” for<br />

specialized program grading scale.<br />

*The Clinical practicum consists of 96 hours of on-the-job<br />

training which is taken after all other course work is completed.<br />

Students may not receive payment/reimbursement of any type<br />

for clinical and/or practicum hours required in their academic<br />

program. Students may also not perform these clinical and/<br />

or practicum hours with their employer in the capacity of their<br />

regular position.<br />

**The LMR clinical requirement consists of 370 hours. due<br />

to availability of clinical space, these hours must be completed<br />

during the day.


clinical laBoratorY assistant diploma<br />

The Clinical Laboratory Assistant program will prepare students to fill a vital role in the clinical<br />

laboratory setting. Students will be able to perform duties in the laboratory or donor services<br />

field that are above the complexity level of a phlebotomist but not yet to the level of a medical<br />

laboratory technician. This program will provide an opportunity for students who excel in<br />

phlebotomy to further their education.<br />

Curriculum 81 Credit Hours<br />

1132 Clock Hours<br />

Length: 12 months – Day Division<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

110A College Success Strategies 2<br />

121 English I 4<br />

122 English II 4<br />

151 College Mathematics 4<br />

245A Career Development 2<br />

293 Personal Psychology 4<br />

171 Medical Law & Ethics 4<br />

172 Anatomy & Physiology I 4<br />

173 Anatomy & Physiology II 4<br />

176 Medical Terminology 4<br />

211 Health & Safety Techniques 3<br />

BIO101 Biology 6<br />

165 Electronic Records Management 3<br />

214 Phlebotomy Techniques 6<br />

130 Keyboarding 5<br />

MLT101 Introduction to the Medical Laboratory 6<br />

212 Medical Laboratory Procedures 6<br />

CLA101 Special Collections & Processing 6<br />

279* Phlebotomy Externship 4<br />

Total 81<br />

All courses require a “C” or better.<br />

*The Phlebotomy externship consists of 120 hours of on-the-job training that is taken after all other course work is completed.<br />

Students must complete 100 successful venipunctures and 25 successful capillary sticks. Students may not receive payment/<br />

reimbursement of any type for clinical and/or externship hours required in their academic programs. Students may also not perform<br />

these clinical and/or externship hours with their employer in the capacity of their regular position.<br />

45


massage tHerapY diploma<br />

The purpose of the Massage Therapy program is to prepare the student with the knowledge,<br />

skills and experience to be employed or self-employed as a massage therapist.<br />

Graduates of this program will be able to implement a variety of massage techniques, perform<br />

client assessments and develop individualized therapeutic massage treatment plans, communicate<br />

effectively with clients, the general public and other healthcare professionals, make<br />

referrals, understand the psychological and professional boundary issues in a touch therapy<br />

practice, act based upon ethical standards of practice, and understand and practice wellness<br />

including proper biomechanics. They will be prepared to obtain national certification, state<br />

licensure and local permits in massage therapy.<br />

Curriculum 62 Credit Hours<br />

866 Clock Hours<br />

Length: 9 months – Day Division<br />

15 months – Evening Divisions<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

110A College Success Strategies 2<br />

172 Anatomy & Physiology I 4<br />

176 Medical Terminology 4<br />

MST100 Introduction to Massage Therapy* 2<br />

MST101 CORE Massage I* 5<br />

173 Anatomy & Physiology II 4<br />

211 Health & Safety Techniques 3<br />

245A Career Development 2<br />

MST102 CORE Massage II* 6<br />

MST103 Massage Practive Lab* 1<br />

MST113 Myology* 4<br />

MST114 Kinesiology* 3<br />

MST116 Massage Pathology* 4<br />

MST121 Business of Somatic Practices* 4<br />

MST110 Holistic Therapies* 2<br />

MST118 National Certification Review* 2<br />

MST104 CORE Massage III* 6<br />

MST130 Massage Therapy Externship* 4<br />

Total 62<br />

All courses require “C” or better.<br />

*Course may not be taken on-line. National Certification Board requires “in-class” hours to sit for exam.<br />

Some courses may require on site clinical skills training. Students may not receive payment/reimbursement of any type for clinical<br />

and/or externship hours required in their academic program. Students may also not perform these clinical and/or externship<br />

hours with their employer in the capacity of their regular position. Some clinical settings may require TB or other specific tests or<br />

proof of current inoculations.<br />

Current CPR certification (American Heart Association Healthcare Provider) is required by fourth week of 2nd term to apply for<br />

externship positions.<br />

Kentucky and Indiana state law require the applicant to be 18 years of age to be a message therapist.<br />

Spencerian College’s Massage Therapy diploma program is a member of the American Massage Therapy<br />

Association Council of Schools.<br />

46


medical administrative assistant diploma<br />

The Medical Administrative Assistant is an asset to physicians in private practice, staff physicians<br />

of hospitals and clinics, and other health professionals. The administrative procedures<br />

include telephone handling, appointment making, billing and collections, insurance, medical<br />

records maintenance, and communication with all patients and visitors.<br />

The purpose of this program is to prepare the student to perform administrative duties in a<br />

variety of medical settings.<br />

Curriculum 59 Credit Hours<br />

812 Clock Hours<br />

Length: 9 months - Day Division<br />

15 months - Evening or Distance Education Divisions<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

110A College Success Strategies 2<br />

121 English I 4<br />

130 Keyboarding 5<br />

165 Electronic Records Management 3<br />

172 Anatomy & Physiology I 4<br />

176 Medical Terminology 4<br />

122 English II 4<br />

173 Anatomy & Physiology II 4<br />

178 Medical Insurance 3<br />

245A Career Development 2<br />

280 Word Processing I 3<br />

171 Medical Law & Ethics 4<br />

211 Health & Safety Techniques 3<br />

223 Business Correspondence 4<br />

277 Introduction to Medical Coding 3<br />

270 Medical Administrative Techniques 3<br />

271 Medical Transcription I 2<br />

296* Medical Administrative Practicum 2<br />

Total 59<br />

All courses require “C” or better. Completed timed keyboard writings of 40 wpm with fewer than 5 errors (backspace key disabled)<br />

* The Medical Administrative practicum consists of 64 hours of on-the-job training which is taken after all other course work is<br />

completed. Students may not receive payment/reimbursement of any type for clinical and/or practicum hours required in their<br />

academic program. Students may also not perform these clinical and/or practicum hours with their employer in the capacity of<br />

their regular position.<br />

The Medical Administrative Assistant Diploma is also available through distance education. Spencerian classes are offered in a<br />

blended format where students complete a portion of the course online and a portion on campus or at approved sites/facilities.<br />

Some classes may require on site clinical and/or residential skills training. Entrance and graduation requirements for distance<br />

education classes and on-campus classes are the same. All students must complete Spencerian College’s non-credit introductory<br />

course, “Student Quick Start,” a tutorial explaining the features of the Learning Management System before beginning their first<br />

distance education class. Distance education students must have access to a PC (minimum 56k Modem) with an Internet connection.<br />

Spencerian College utilizes ANGEL Learning, Inc. software, a fully integrated e-learning platform that allows the College<br />

to rapidly create, deliver, and measure interactive learning over the Internet. Students must purchase any software that may be<br />

needed for a specific course. All student assignments must be submitted by using Microsoft Word 2007 or newer, Excel and<br />

Access. There is an additional per credit hour charge for distance education classes. See Supplement A.<br />

47


limited medical radiograpHY diploma<br />

The purpose of the Limited Medical Radiography (LMR) program is to provide a progressive<br />

academic and clinical educational environment by training students to become highly competent<br />

and qualified to administer ionizing radiation for medical diagnostic imaging purposes<br />

while preparing them for future licensing examination.<br />

Through the LMR program, graduates are prepared to perform x-ray (radiographic) examinations<br />

in clinics, physicians’ offices, public health institutions, and urgent care centers.<br />

They prepare patients for radiographic examinations by explaining the procedure, ensuring<br />

proper positioning of both the patient and the radiographic equipment. Because they provide<br />

the necessary x-rays needed to help with the diagnosis of the patient, the Limited Medical<br />

Radiographers are valued members of the health care team.<br />

Curriculum 66 Credit Hours<br />

1019 Clock Hours<br />

Length: 12 months – Day division<br />

18 months – Evening<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

110A College Success Strategies 2<br />

151 College Math 4<br />

171 Medical Law & Ethics 4<br />

245A Career Development 2<br />

176 Medical Terminology 4<br />

172 Anatomy & Physiology I 4<br />

173 Anatomy & Physiology II 4<br />

211 Health & Safety Techniques 3<br />

RAD100 Introduction to Radiography 4<br />

RAD102 Introduction to Radiographic Clinical Topics I 3<br />

RAD200 Radiographic Positioning I 9<br />

RAD300 Radiographic Positioning II 4<br />

LMR201 Radiographic Imaging 3<br />

LMR300* Limited Medical Radiography Clinical I 3<br />

LMR301* Limited Medical Radiography Clinical II 9<br />

LMR400 Limited Medical Radiographic Certification Review 4<br />

Total 66<br />

All courses require “C” or better. See catalog addendum “C” for specialized program grading scale.<br />

* The LMR clinical requirement consists of 370 hours. due to availability of clinical space, these hours must be completed<br />

during the day. Students may not receive payment/reimbursement of any type for clinical and/or externship hours required in<br />

their academic program. Students may also not perform these clinical and/or externship hours with their employer in the capacity<br />

of their regular position.<br />

Radiology Department has an additional policy and procedure manual.<br />

Courses with RAD and LMR prefixes are not currently available through distance education.<br />

48


medical assistant diploma<br />

The goal of the Medical Assistant Diploma program is to provide education and training to the<br />

student in the cognitive, psychomotor, and affective domains required for competency in entry<br />

level employment. The program emphasizes the importance of academic knowledge base, clinical<br />

and administrative competency, professionalism, and critical thinking skills which students<br />

will incorporate into their on-the-job duties as Medical Assistants working in various ambulatory<br />

healthcare settings. The program works diligently with our communities of interest to<br />

deliver competently trained Medical Assistants who are vital members of the healthcare team.<br />

Students are required to take the Certified Medical Assistant (CMA) exam of the American<br />

Association of Medical Assistants (AAMA) as a programmatic/graduation requirement.<br />

Curriculum 85 Credit Hours<br />

1216 Clock Hours<br />

Length: 12 months - Day Division<br />

18 months - Evening or Distance Education Divisions<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

110A College Success Strategies 2<br />

121 English I 4<br />

130 Keyboarding 5<br />

151 College Mathematics 4<br />

171 Medical Law & Ethics 4<br />

172 Anatomy & Physiology I 4<br />

176 Medical Terminology 4<br />

100 Accounting for the Business Office 3<br />

122 English II 4<br />

165 Electronic Records Management 3<br />

177 Pharmacology/LabTerminology 4<br />

173 Anatomy & Physiology II 4<br />

211 Health & Safety Techniques 3<br />

49<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

270 Medical Administrative Techniques 3<br />

271 Medical Transcription I 2<br />

293 Personal Psychology 4<br />

178 Medical Insurance 3<br />

212 Medical Lab Procedures 6<br />

213 Advanced Clinical Skills 3<br />

245A Career Development 2<br />

274 Medical Assisting Techniques 3<br />

277 Introduction to Medical Coding 3<br />

280 Word Processing I 3<br />

278** Clinical Practicum 3<br />

296* Medical Administrative Practicum 2<br />

Total 85<br />

All courses require “C” or better. Completed timed keyboard writings of 40 wpm with fewer than 5 errors (backspace key disabled)<br />

* The Medical Administrative practicum consists of 64 hours of on-the-job training which is taken after all other course work is<br />

completed. Students may not receive payment/reimbursement of any type for clinical and/or practicum hours required in their<br />

academic program. Students may also not perform these clinical and/or practicum hours with their employer in the capacity of<br />

their regular position.<br />

** The Clinical practicum consists of 96 hours of on-the-job training which is taken after all course work is completed. due to<br />

facility availability, these hours must be completed during the day.<br />

The Medical Assistant Diploma is also available through distance education. Spencerian classes are offered in a blended format<br />

where students complete a portion of the course online and a portion on campus or at approved sites/facilities. Some classes<br />

may require on site clinical and/or residential skills training. Distance education enrollment in the Medical Assistant portion of<br />

the program is limited to residents of Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio and Tennessee. Entrance and graduation requirements for distance<br />

education classes and on-campus classes are the same. All students must complete Spencerian College’s non-credit introductory<br />

course, “Student Quick Start,” a tutorial explaining the features of the Learning Management System before beginning their<br />

first distance education class. Online students must have access to a PC (minimum 56k Modem) with an Internet connection.<br />

Spencerian College utilizes ANGEL Learning, Inc. software, a fully integrated e-learning platform that allows the College to rapidly<br />

create, deliver, and measure interactive learning over the Internet. Students must purchase any software that may be needed for a<br />

specific course. All student assignments must be submitted by using Microsoft Word 2007 or newer, Excel and Access. There is an<br />

additional per credit hour charge for distance education. See Supplement A.


medical coding specialist diploma<br />

The purpose of the Medical Coding Specialist Diploma program is to prepare the student to<br />

analyze medical records and abstract data for the purpose of billing and insurance reimbursement.<br />

Medical Coding Specialists learn to transform narrative descriptions of procedures and<br />

diagnoses into numerical billing format. Graduates possess the skills necessary for employment<br />

in doctors’ offices, clinics, hospitals, insurance companies, and medical billing agencies.<br />

This program prepares the student for future certification with various professional organizations.<br />

Curriculum 74 Credit Hours<br />

1040 Clock Hours<br />

Length: 12 months – Day Division<br />

18 months – Evening or Distance Education Divisions<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

110A College Success Strategies 2<br />

176 Medical Terminology 4<br />

172 Anatomy & Physiology I 4<br />

121 English I 4<br />

130 Keyboarding 5<br />

171 Medical Law & Ethics 4<br />

277 Introduction to Medical Coding 3<br />

173 Anatomy & Physiology II 4<br />

122 English II 4<br />

177 Pharmacology/Laboratory Terminology 4<br />

289 Medical Coding II 3<br />

270 Medical Administrative Techniques 3<br />

209 Advanced Medical Terminology for Medical Coding 4<br />

293 Personal Psychology 4<br />

165 Electronic Records Management 3<br />

290 Medical Coding III 3<br />

178 Medical Insurance 3<br />

245A Career Development 2<br />

280 Word Processing I 3<br />

291 Advanced CPT Coding 3<br />

298* Medical Coding Externship 5<br />

Total 74<br />

All courses require “C” or better. Completed timed keyboard writings of 40 wpm with fewer than 5 errors (backspace key disabled)<br />

* The externship consists of 160 hours of on-the-job training, which is taken after all other course work is completed. due to facility<br />

availability, these hours must be completed during the day. Students may not receive payment/reimbursement of any type<br />

for clinical and/or externship hours required in their academic program. Students may also not perform these clinical and/or<br />

externship hours with their employer in the capacity of their regular position.<br />

The Medical Coding Diploma program is also available through distance education. Spencerian classes are offered in a blended<br />

format where students complete a portion of the course online and a portion on campus or at approved sites/facilities. Entrance<br />

and graduation requirements for distance education classes and on-campus classes are the same. All students must complete<br />

Spencerian College’s non-credit introductory course, “Student Quick Start,” a tutorial explaining the features of the Learning<br />

Management System before beginning their first distance education class. Distance education students must have access to a PC<br />

(minimum 56k Modem) with an Internet connection. Spencerian College utilizes ANGEL Learning, Inc. software, a fully integrated<br />

e-learning platform that allows the College to rapidly create, deliver, and measure interactive learning over the Internet. Students<br />

must purchase any software that may be needed for a specific course. All student assignments must be submitted by using<br />

Microsoft Word 2007 or newer, Excel and Access. There is an additional per credit hour charge for distance education classes.<br />

See Supplement A.<br />

50


medical transcriptionist diploma<br />

With today’s increasing demand for specialized health care office skills, the need for<br />

Spencerian’s Medical Transcriptionist graduates is also increasing. Through this program, students<br />

become an integral part of the medical team. The purpose of the Medical Transcriptionist<br />

program is to prepare the graduate to transcribe necessary medical records in a variety of<br />

medical settings.<br />

Students learn how to accurately transcribe a physician’s surgical and diagnostic reports and<br />

physical exams. Because transcribing depends on a knowledge of medical terminology and<br />

body structure, Spencerian’s Medical Transcriptionist program includes courses in anatomy<br />

and physiology.<br />

Curriculum 62 Credit Hours<br />

836 Clock Hours<br />

Length: 12 months - Day Division<br />

18 months - Evening or Distance Education Divisions<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

110A College Success Strategies 2<br />

121 English I 4<br />

130 Keyboarding 5<br />

172 Anatomy & Physiology I 4<br />

176 Medical Terminology 4<br />

122 English II 4<br />

165 Electronic Records Management 3<br />

171 Medical Law & Ethics 4<br />

173 Anatomy & Physiology II 4<br />

177 Pharmacology/Laboratory Terminology 4<br />

223 Business Correspondence 4<br />

271 Medical Transcription I 2<br />

280 Word Processing I 3<br />

245A Career Development 2<br />

276 Medical Transcription II 6<br />

281 Word Processing II 3<br />

293 Personal Psychology 4<br />

Total 62<br />

All courses require “C” or better.<br />

Medical Transcriptionist students must demonstrate a keyboarding proficiency of 60 wpm or better to be eligible for graduation.<br />

Some classes may require on site clinical and/or residential skills training.<br />

The Medical Transcriptionist Diploma program is also available through distance education. Spencerian classes are offered in a<br />

blended format where students complete a portion of the course online and a portion on campus or at approved sites/facilities.<br />

Entrance and graduation requirements for distance education classes and on-campus classes are the same. All students<br />

must complete Spencerian College’s non-credit introductory course, “Student Quick Start,” a tutorial explaining the features of<br />

the Learning Management System before beginning their first distance education class. Distance education students must have<br />

access to a PC (minimum 56k Modem) with an Internet connection. Spencerian College utilizes ANGEL Learning, Inc. software,<br />

a fully integrated e-learning platform that allows the College to rapidly create, deliver, and measure interactive learning over<br />

the Internet. Students must purchase any software that may be needed for a specific course. All student assignments must be<br />

submitted by using Microsoft Word 2007 or newer, Excel and Access. There is an additional per credit hour charge for distance<br />

education classes. See Supplement A.<br />

51


personal trainer diploma<br />

The Personal Trainer Diploma program will prepare the student to work with individuals or<br />

groups to improve health and fitness. Proficiency in nutrition, fitness training, lifestyle and<br />

health, business development and practice management will be emphasized. This program<br />

prepares the student to take the exam given by the American College of Sports Medicine<br />

(ACSM) for certification as a Certified Personal Trainer.<br />

Curriculum 72 Credit Hours<br />

958 Clock Hours<br />

Length: 12 months—Day Division<br />

18 months—Evening Division<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

110A College Success Strategies 2<br />

172 Anatomy & Physiology I 4<br />

173 Anatomy & Physiology II 4<br />

176 Medical Terminology 4<br />

211 Health & Safety Techniques 3<br />

245A Career Development 2<br />

MST113 Myology 4<br />

MST110 Holistic Therapies 2<br />

PT100 Introduction to Personal Training 2<br />

PT101 Software Management for Personal Trainer 3<br />

PT102 Personal Training I 6<br />

MST114 Kinesiology 3<br />

PT103 Personal Training II 6<br />

PT104 Training Program Design 2<br />

PT105 Nutrition for Weight Management & Physical Activity 4<br />

PT106 Exercise Physiology 4<br />

PT107 Exercise Psychology 2<br />

PT108 Special Populations 4<br />

PT109 Personal Trainer Exam Review 4<br />

PT110 Personal Training Internship 3<br />

MST121 Business for Somatic Practices 4<br />

Total 72<br />

All courses require “C” or better.<br />

Students may not receive payment/reimbursement of any type for clinical and/or externship hours required in their academic<br />

program. Students may also not perform these clinical and/or externship hours with their employer in the capacity of their regular<br />

position. Some clinical settings may require TB or other specific tests or proof of current inoculations.<br />

A list of available courses offered through distance learning can be obtained from the Distance Education Coordinator or through<br />

Student Services. Course availability varies per quarter. There is an additional per credit hour charge for distance education. See<br />

Supplement A.<br />

52


practical nursing diploma<br />

The Practical Nursing program prepares graduates to be employed within the discipline of<br />

nursing, in a variety of structured health care settings under the supervision of the registered<br />

nurse or physician. After successful program completion, graduates are eligible to apply to<br />

a state board of nursing for licensure by examination. Upon licensure, the graduate may be<br />

employed as a Licensed Practical Nurse (LPN) and practice to the scope allowed by law. A student<br />

will gain on-the-job experience in the clinical phases of nursing. This is accomplished in a<br />

variety of health care facilities under the supervision of qualified nursing faculty. This program<br />

is offered in both the day and evening divisions.<br />

Curriculum 87 Credit Hours<br />

1386 Clock Hours (Includes 737 clinical and skills lab hours)<br />

Length: 12 months – Day division<br />

24 months – Evening division<br />

Class<br />

LEVEL I<br />

Title Credits<br />

PN100 Anatomy & Physiology 7<br />

PN101 Personal & Vocational Relationships 2<br />

PN102 Mathematic Concepts for Pharmacology 2<br />

PN103 Introduction to Nursing & Healthcare 6<br />

PN104*<br />

LEVEL II<br />

Development of the Care Giver Role 10<br />

PN200* Introduction to Health Deviations 7<br />

PN201 Pharmacology 3<br />

PN202* Mental Health Concepts 7<br />

PN302*<br />

LEVEL III<br />

Management of the Geriatric Client 4<br />

PN203* Nursing & Child Bearing Family 7<br />

PN300* Health Deviations I 14<br />

PN301<br />

LEVEL IV<br />

Nursing Trends & Issues 2<br />

PN400* Health Deviations II 16<br />

Total 87<br />

All courses require a grade of “C” or better. See catalog addendum “C” for specialized program grading scale.<br />

*The clinical requirements consist of a total of 585 hours. Students may not receive payment/reimbursement of any type for<br />

clinical and/or externship hours required in their academic program. Students may also not perform these clinical and/or externship<br />

hours with their employer in the capacity of their regular position.<br />

Criminal Convictions: The Kentucky Board of Nursing requires that all criminal convictions (misdemeanors<br />

and felonies) be reported at the time of application for licensure. The Board may deny a license to<br />

practice nursing to an individual with a criminal conviction.<br />

53


associate oF applied science (a.a.s.)<br />

medical massage tHerapY<br />

The purpose of the Medical Massage Therapy Associates Degree program is to prepare graduates<br />

to work in a medical or specialized clinical setting. The associate degree program gives the<br />

student a deeper knowledge of neurology, analysis and application skills, and communication<br />

tools.<br />

Curriculum 99 credit hours<br />

1306 Clock hours<br />

Length: 15 months – Day Division<br />

24 Months – Evening Division<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

110A College Success Strategies 2<br />

121+ English I 4<br />

122+ English II 4<br />

151+ College Mathematics 4<br />

171 Medical Law & Ethics 4<br />

172 Anatomy & Physiology I 4<br />

173 Anatomy & Physiology II 4<br />

176 Medical Terminology 4<br />

211 Health & Safety Techniques 3<br />

245A Career Development 2<br />

293+ Personal Psychology 4<br />

299 Management Principles 4<br />

MST100 Introduction to Massage Therapy* 2<br />

MST101 CORE Massage I* 5<br />

MST102 CORE Massage II* 6<br />

MST103 Massage Practice Lab* 1<br />

MST104 CORE Massage III* 6<br />

MST110 Holistic Therapies* 2<br />

MST113 Myology* 4<br />

MST114 Kinesiology* 3<br />

MST116 Pathology 4<br />

MST118 National Certification Review* 2<br />

MST121 Business for Somatic Practices* 4<br />

MST130 Massage Externship* 4<br />

MST214 Neurology 4<br />

MST216 Neuromuscular Skeletal Assessment 3<br />

MST230 Medical Massage 6<br />

Total 99<br />

All courses require a C or better.<br />

*May not be taken online<br />

+Indicates general education courses<br />

Some courses may require on site clinical skills training. Students may not receive payment/reimbursement of any type for clinical<br />

and/or externship hours required in their academic program. Students may also not perform these clinical and/or externship<br />

hours with their employer in the capacity of their regular position. Some clinical settings may require TB or other specific tests or<br />

proof of current inoculations.<br />

Kentucky and Indiana state law require the applicant to be 18 years of age to be a message therapist.<br />

Spencerian College’s Massage Therapy program is a member of the American Massage Therapy Association Council of Schools.<br />

54


associate oF applied science (a.a.s.)<br />

respiratorY tHerapY<br />

The goal of the Respiratory Therapy A.A.S. program is to prepare graduates with demonstrated<br />

competence in the cognitive (knowledge), psychomotor (skills), and affective (behavior) learning<br />

domains of respiratory care practice as performed by registered respiratory therapists<br />

(RRTs).<br />

Curriculum 111 credit hours<br />

1914 clock hours<br />

Length: 24 months – Evening Division<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

110 College Success Strategies 2<br />

121+ English I 4<br />

122+ English II 4<br />

151+ College Mathematics 4<br />

171 Medical Law & Ethics 4<br />

172 Anatomy & Physiology I 4<br />

173 Anatomy & Physiology II 4<br />

176 Medical Terminology 4<br />

211 Health & Safety Techniques 3<br />

245A Career Development 2<br />

293+ Personal Psychology 4<br />

BIO100 Fundamentals of Science 4<br />

BIO201 Medical Microbiology 6<br />

RES100 Introduction to Clinical Assessment 4<br />

RES200 Respiratory Fundamentals I 3<br />

RES300 Respiratory Fundamentals II 3<br />

RES305 Respiratory Clinical I 4<br />

RES400 Respiratory Fundamentals III 3<br />

RES402 Cardiopulmonary Pathophysiology 4<br />

RES405 Respiratory Clinical II 4<br />

RES500 Respiratory Pharmacology 4<br />

RES505 Respiratory Clinical III 4<br />

RES600 Neonatal & Pediatric Respiratory Therapy 3<br />

RES605 Respiratory Clinical IV 4<br />

RES701 Respiratory Therapy Seminar 2<br />

RES705 Respiratory Clinical V 4<br />

RES801 Respiratory Therapy Registry Review 4<br />

RES805 Respiratory Clinical VI 8<br />

SOC214+ Introduction to Sociology 4<br />

<strong>TO</strong>TAL 111<br />

All courses require a C or better.<br />

+Indicates general education courses<br />

*Respiratory Therapy Department has an additional policy and procedure manual.<br />

The clinical requirement consists of 924 hours. Students may be placed in day, evening, or night shift clinical rotations depending<br />

on availability and course sequence.<br />

Some courses may require onsite clinical skills training. Students may not receive payment/reimbursement of any type for clinical<br />

hours required in their academic program. Students may also not perform these clinical hours with their employer in the capacity<br />

of their regular position. Some clinical settings may require TB, other specific tests or proof of current inoculations, and screening<br />

through the child abuse registry.<br />

55


associate oF applied science (a.a.s.)<br />

surgical tecHnologY<br />

The objective of the AAS Surgical Technology program is to utilize learning experiences in the<br />

cognitive, psychomotor, and affective domains to prepare students for entry-level employment<br />

positions and then future advancement in today’s surgical technology profession. The<br />

associate degree program offers both didactic and clinical training in advanced and future<br />

trends in surgical technology. In addition, biomedical sciences, laser surgery, and the impact of<br />

technological advances will be addressed. The program stresses the importance of academic<br />

knowledge, professional accountability, independent decision-making, and the critical nature<br />

of self-assessment.<br />

Curriculum 107 Credit Hours<br />

1558 Clock Hours<br />

Length: 18 months – Day division<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

110A College Success Strategies 2<br />

121 English I 4<br />

122+ English II 4<br />

151+ College Mathematics 4<br />

245A Career Development 2<br />

293+ Personal Psychology 4<br />

171 Medical Law & Ethics 4<br />

172 Anatomy & Physiology I 4<br />

173 Anatomy & Physiology II 4<br />

176 Medical Terminology 4<br />

177 Pharmacology/Laboratory Terminology 4<br />

211 Health & Safety Techniques 3<br />

SOC214+ Introduction to Sociology 4<br />

PSY274+ Developmental Psychology 4<br />

SUR100 Introduction to Surgical Technology 6<br />

SUR199 Microbiology for Surgical Technologists 6<br />

SUR174 Surgical Anatomy & Physiology 4<br />

SUR178 Surgical Pharmacology 4<br />

SUR200 Surgical Techniques 6<br />

SUR201* Surgical Procedures I 14<br />

SUR202* Surgical Procedures II 14<br />

SUR301 Professional Issues 2<br />

Total 107<br />

All courses require “C” or better in the classroom and a passing grade or satisfactory in lab and/or clinicals.<br />

See catalog addendum “C” for specialized program grading scale.<br />

For departmental guidelines, policies and/or procedures refer to the Surgical Technology Department’s Addendum to the student<br />

handbook.<br />

+General education course<br />

* The clinical requirement consists of a total of 480 hours.<br />

56


associate oF applied science (a.a.s.)<br />

HealtHcare reimBursement specialist<br />

The purpose of the Associate of Applied Science Degree in Healthcare Reimbursement Specialist<br />

program is to prepare students to become medical coders, and then go beyond that to become<br />

skilled in reviewing rejected medical claims and prepare them for resubmission. Students are also<br />

introduced to chart auditing, compliance issues, and management of coding services. This program<br />

prepares the graduate for future certification with various professional organizations.<br />

Healthcare Reimbursement Specialist graduates typically work at physician practices, clinics,<br />

insurance companies, consulting firms, medical billing companies, and hospitals.<br />

Curriculum 103 Credit Hours<br />

1392 Clock Hours<br />

Length: 18 months – Day Division<br />

27 months – Evening or Distance Education Divisions<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

110A College Success Strategies 2<br />

176 Medical Terminology 4<br />

172 Anatomy & Physiology I 4<br />

121+ English I 4<br />

130 Keyboarding 5<br />

171 Medical Law & Ethics 4<br />

277 Introduction to Medical Coding 3<br />

173 Anatomy & Physiology II 4<br />

122+ English II 4<br />

177 Pharmacology/Lab Terminology 4<br />

289 Medical Coding II 3<br />

270 Medical Administrative Techniques 3<br />

209 Advanced Medical Terminology<br />

for Medical Coding 4<br />

293+ Personal Psychology 4<br />

165 Electronic Records Management 3<br />

57<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

290 Medical Coding III 3<br />

300** Effective Management of<br />

Coding Service 4<br />

178 Medical Insurance 3<br />

245A Career Development 2<br />

280 Word Processing I 3<br />

151+ College Mathematics 4<br />

281 Word Processing II 3<br />

291 Advanced CPT Coding 3<br />

179** Compliance Issues 4<br />

284** Medical Correspondence 3<br />

292** Medical Billing &<br />

Health Claims Review 4<br />

115 Computer Spreadsheet Applications 3<br />

299 Management Principles 4<br />

298* Medical Coding Externship 5<br />

Total 103<br />

All courses require “C” or better. Completed timed keyboard writings of 40 wpm with fewer than 5 errors (backspace key disabled)<br />

* The externship consists of 160 hours of on-the-job training, which is taken after all other coursework is completed. due to<br />

facility availability, these hours must be completed during the day. Students may not receive payment/reimbursement of any<br />

type for clinical and/or externship hours required in their academic program. Students may also not perform these clinical and/or<br />

externship hours with their employer in the capacity of their regular position.<br />

** Courses offered in the day and distance education divisions only.<br />

+ General education courses.<br />

The Healthcare Reimbursement Specialist Associate Degree is also available through distance education. Spencerian classes are<br />

offered in a blended format where students complete a portion of the course online and a portion on campus. Some classes may<br />

require on site clinical and/or residential skills training. Entrance and graduation requirements for distance education classes and<br />

on-campus classes are the same. All students must complete Spencerian College’s non-credit introductory course, “Student Quick<br />

Start,” a tutorial explaining the features of the Learning Management System before beginning their first distance education class.<br />

Distance education students must have access to a PC (minimum 56k Modem) with an Internet connection. Spencerian College<br />

utilizes ANGEL Learning, Inc. software, a fully integrated e-learning platform that allows the College to rapidly create, deliver, and<br />

measure interactive learning over the Internet. Students must purchase any software that may be needed for a specific course.<br />

All student assignments must be submitted by using Microsoft Word 2007 or newer, Excel and Access. There is an additional per<br />

credit hour charge for distance education classes. See Supplement A.


associate oF applied science (a.a.s.)<br />

medical administrative management<br />

The purpose of the Associate of Applied<br />

Science Degree in Medical Administrative<br />

Management program is to train students<br />

first and foremost as Medical Assistants, then<br />

further expand this knowledge base with<br />

emphasis on management skills. Students are<br />

trained in the cognitive, psychomotor, and<br />

affective domains required for competency in<br />

entry level employment. The program emphasizes<br />

the importance of academic knowledge<br />

base, clinical and administrative competency,<br />

professionalism, and critical thinking skills<br />

which students will incorporate into their onthe-job<br />

duties as Medical Assistants working<br />

in various ambulatory healthcare settings. The<br />

additional course work in medical office management<br />

will aid in professional growth and<br />

the ability of graduates to seek future leadership<br />

roles in ambulatory healthcare facilities.<br />

Students are required to take the Certified<br />

Medical Assistant (CMA) exam of the<br />

American Association of Medical Assistants<br />

(AAMA) as a programmatic/graduation<br />

requirement of the Medical Assistant portion<br />

of the Associate of Applied Science Degree<br />

in Medical Administrative Management program.<br />

The Medical Administrative Management Associate Degree is also available<br />

through distance education. Spencerian classes are offered in a<br />

blended format where students complete a portion of the course online<br />

and a portion on campus or at approved sites/facilities. Some classes<br />

may require on site clinical and/or residential skills training. Distance<br />

education enrollment in the Medical Assistant portion of the program is<br />

limited to residents of Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio and Tennessee. Entrance<br />

and graduation requirements for distance education classes and oncampus<br />

classes are the same. All students must complete Spencerian<br />

College’s non-credit introductory course, “Student Quick Start,” a tutorial<br />

explaining the features of the Learning Management System before<br />

beginning their first distance education class. Distance education<br />

students must have access to a PC (minimum 56k Modem) with an<br />

Internet connection. Spencerian College utilizes ANGEL Learning, Inc.<br />

software, a fully integrated e-learning platform that allows the College<br />

to rapidly create, deliver, and measure interactive learning over the<br />

Internet. Students must purchase any software that may be needed<br />

for a specific course. All student assignments must be submitted by<br />

using Microsoft Word 2007 or newer, Excel and Access. There is an<br />

additional per credit hour charge for distance education classes. See<br />

Supplement A.<br />

58<br />

Curriculum<br />

109 Credit Hours<br />

1524 Clock Hours<br />

Length: 18 months - Day Division<br />

27 months - Evening or Distance<br />

Education Divisions<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

110A College Success Strategies 2<br />

121+ English I 4<br />

130 Keyboarding 5<br />

151+ College Mathematics 4<br />

171 Medical Law & Ethics 4<br />

172 Anatomy & Physiology I 4<br />

176 Medical Terminology 4<br />

177 Pharmacology/Lab Terminology 4<br />

100 Accounting for the Business Office 3<br />

122+ English II 4<br />

165 Electronic Records Management 3<br />

173 Anatomy & Physiology II 4<br />

211 Health & Safety Techniques 3<br />

270 Medical Administrative Techniques 3<br />

271 Medical Transcription I 2<br />

293+ Personal Psychology 4<br />

178 Medical Insurance 3<br />

212 Medical Laboratory Procedures 6<br />

213 Advanced Clinical Skills 3<br />

245A Career Development 2<br />

274 Medical Assisting Techniques 3<br />

277 Introduction to Medical Coding 3<br />

280 Word Processing I 3<br />

278* Clinical Practicum† 3<br />

296** Medical Administrative Practicum† 2<br />

The preceding courses complete the Medical Assistant<br />

portion of the program:<br />

223 Business Correspondence 4<br />

215 Computer Database Applications I 3<br />

115 Computer Spreadsheet Applications 3<br />

299 Management Principles 4<br />

312*** Advanced Clinical Lab Procedures 6<br />

313 Medical Office Manager Techniques 2<br />

499 Human Resource Management 4<br />

Total 109<br />

All courses require a “C” or better. Completed timed keyboard writings of 40 wpm with fewer than 5 errors (backspace key disabled)<br />

+ General education courses<br />

* The clinical practicum consists of 96 hours of on-the-job training which is taken after all course work is completed.<br />

** The Medical Administrative practicum consists of 64 hours of on-the-job training, which is taken after all other course work is completed.<br />

***The 312 course is offered in online format only.<br />

† Practicum hours must be completed durring the day. Students may not receive payment/reimbursement of any type for clinical and/or practicum<br />

hours required in their academic program. Students may also not perform these clinical and/or practicum hours with their employer in the capacity<br />

of their regular position.


associate oF applied science (a.a.s.)<br />

medical clinical specialties<br />

The purpose of the Associate of Applied<br />

Science Degree in Medical Clinical Specialties<br />

program is to prepare the student to perform<br />

in multiple capacities in various healthcare<br />

facilities. The graduate possesses the skills<br />

of a Medical Assistant, Phlebotomist, and<br />

Limited Medical Radiographer. Students are<br />

trained in the cognitive, psychomotor, and<br />

affective domains required for competency<br />

in entry level employment. The program<br />

emphasizes the importance of academic<br />

knowledge base, clinical and administrative<br />

competency, professionalism, and critical<br />

thinking skills which students will incorporate<br />

into their on-the-job duties. Graduates<br />

will possess the skills necessary to perform<br />

administrative and clinical duties, assist in<br />

patient care, obtain laboratory specimens, and<br />

perform radiologic exams (x-rays).<br />

Students are required to take the Certified<br />

Medical Assistant (CMA) exam of the<br />

American Association of Medical Assistants<br />

(AAMA) as a programmatic/graduation<br />

requirement of the Medical Assisting portion<br />

of the Associate of Applied Science Degree in<br />

Medical Clinical Specialties program.<br />

All courses require a “C” or better. Completed timed keyboard<br />

writings of 40 wpm with fewer than 5 errors (backspace key<br />

disabled)<br />

+General education courses<br />

*The Clinical Assistant practicum consists of 96 hours of onthe-job<br />

training which is taken after all other course work is<br />

completed.<br />

**The Medical Administrative practicum consists of 64 hours<br />

of on-the-job training which is taken after all other course work<br />

is completed.<br />

***The Phlebotomy externship consists of 120 hours of<br />

on-the-job training. Students must complete 100 successful<br />

venipunctures and 25 successful capillary sticks.<br />

****The LMR clinical requirement consists of 370 hours.<br />

Students may not receive payment/reimbursement of any type<br />

for clinical, practicum and/or externship hours required in their<br />

academic program. Students may also not perform these clinical,<br />

practicum and/or externship hours with their employer in<br />

the capacity of their regular position. due to facility availability,<br />

these hours must be completed during the day.<br />

Courses with RAD and LMR prefixes are not currently available<br />

through distance education. Distance education enrollment<br />

in the Phlebotomy portion of the program is limited to<br />

Kentucky or Indiana residents, and students must be<br />

part of a group that is “sponsored” by a local facility in<br />

their area. Distance education enrollment in the Medical<br />

Assistant portion of the program is limited to residents<br />

of Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio, and Tennessee.<br />

59<br />

Curriculum<br />

134 Credit Hours<br />

2135 Clock Hours<br />

Length: 24 months – Day Division<br />

33 months – Evening Division<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

110A College Success Strategies 2<br />

121+ English I 4<br />

130 Keyboarding 5<br />

151+ College Mathematics 4<br />

171 Medical Law & Ethics 4<br />

172 Anatomy & Physiology I 4<br />

176 Medical Terminology 4<br />

177 Pharmacology/Laboratory<br />

Terminology<br />

4<br />

100 Accounting for the Business Office 3<br />

122+ English II 4<br />

165 Electronic Records Management 3<br />

173 Anatomy & Physiology II 4<br />

211 Health & Safety Techniques 3<br />

270 Medical Administration<br />

Techniques<br />

3<br />

271 Medical Transcription I 2<br />

293+ Personal Psychology 4<br />

178 Medical Insurance 3<br />

212 Medical Laboratory Procedures 6<br />

213 Advanced Clinical Skills 3<br />

245A Career Development 2<br />

274 Medical Assisting Technology 3<br />

277 Introduction to Medical Coding 3<br />

278 Clinical Practicum* 3<br />

280 Word Processing I 3<br />

296 Medical Administrative<br />

Practicum**<br />

2<br />

The preceding courses complete the Medical Assistant<br />

portion of the program:<br />

214 Phlebotomy Techniques 6<br />

279 Phlebotomy Externship*** 4<br />

RAD100 Introduction to Radiography 4<br />

RAD102 Introduction to Radiographic<br />

Clinical Topics I<br />

3<br />

RAD200 Radiographic Positioning I 9<br />

RAD300 Radiographic Positioning II 4<br />

LMR201 Radiographic Imaging**** 4<br />

LMR300 Limited Medical Radiography<br />

Clinical I****<br />

3<br />

LMR301 Limited Medical Radiography<br />

Clinical II****<br />

9<br />

LMR400 LMR Certification Review 3<br />

Total 134


associate oF applied science (a.a.s.)<br />

invasive cardiovascular tecHnologY<br />

The Invasive Cardiovascular Technologist is a highly specialized and knowledgeable health<br />

care professional who is educated and trained to perform diagnostic procedures at the request<br />

of the physician to evaluate, diagnose, and treat patients with cardiac disease.<br />

The mission of the Invasive Cardiovascular Technology program is to provide educational<br />

opportunities for students to develop knowledge, skills, and attitudes conducive to the challenges<br />

within the field of Invasive Cardiology. Experiences prepare students to practice effectively<br />

with clients who have diverse cardiovascular health needs.<br />

Working in the cardiac catheterization laboratory, the technologist assists the physician in utilizing<br />

x-ray and monitoring equipment in performing invasive diagnostic tests to determine<br />

the condition of the patient’s heart. Additionally, interventional techniques such as balloon<br />

angioplasty and pacemaker implantation may be performed to treat existing cardiac conditions.<br />

Curriculum 124 Credit Hours<br />

2073 Clock Hours<br />

Length: 21 months - Day division<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

121+ English I 4<br />

110A College Success Strategies 2<br />

176 Medical Terminology 4<br />

151+ College Mathematics 4<br />

211 Health & Safety Techniques 3<br />

171 Medical Law & Ethics 4<br />

122+ English II 4<br />

172 Anatomy & Physiology I 4<br />

245A Career Development 2<br />

293+ Personal Psychology 4<br />

173 Anatomy & Physiology II 4<br />

CVT100 Introduction to Invasive Cardiology 4<br />

CVT200 Cardiovascular Anatomy & Physiology 4<br />

CVT201 Cardiac Pharmacology & Disease 4<br />

CVT202 Radiation Physics, Biology & Protection 4<br />

CVT203 Advanced Patient Care & Assessment 4<br />

CVT204 Chemistry & Special Topics in Invasive Cardiovascular Science 4<br />

CVT300 ECG Interpretation & Pacemakers 4<br />

CVT301 Cardiovascular Diagnostic Techniques I 3<br />

CVT302 Imaging Systems & Angiography 3<br />

CVT303 Hemodynamic Data & Monitoring 4<br />

CVT304* Cardiovascular Clinical I 3<br />

CVT400 Cardiovascular Diagnostic Techniques II 4<br />

CVT403 Hemodynamics & Cardiovascular Topics 4<br />

CVT405* Cardiovascular Clinical II 8<br />

CVT500 Cardiovascular Special Topics & Review 4<br />

CVT505* Cardiovascular Clinical III 12<br />

CVT605* Advanced Cardiovascular Clinical 12<br />

Total 124<br />

All courses require “C” or better. See catalog addendum “C” for specialized program grading scale.<br />

* The clinical requirement consists of 1,050 hours. Students may not receive payment/reimbursement of any type for clinical<br />

and/or externship hours required in their academic program. Students may also not perform these clinical and/or externship<br />

hours with their employer in the capacity of their regular position.<br />

+ General education courses.<br />

60


associate oF applied science (a.a.s.)<br />

medical laBoratorY tecHnician<br />

The purpose of the Medical Laboratory Technician Associate of Applied Science program is<br />

to prepare students to become clinical laboratory technicians. The program provides students<br />

with a foundation of knowledge and skill necessary to function in a modern, highly technical<br />

medical laboratory setting. Upon completion, students will be prepared to apply for a national<br />

certification examination.<br />

Employment opportunities include private physicians, group medical practices, hospitals,<br />

community blood facilities, and reference laboratories.<br />

Curriculum 135 Credit Hours<br />

2200 Clock Hours<br />

Length: 24 months - Day division<br />

Program Delivery: On-campus; * selective courses - distance learning<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

121+ English I 4<br />

110A College Success Strategies 2<br />

176 Medical Terminology 4<br />

151+ College Mathematics 4<br />

211 Health & Safety Techniques 3<br />

171 Medical Law & Ethics 4<br />

122+ English II 4<br />

172 Anatomy & Physiology I 4<br />

245A Career Development 2<br />

293+ Personal Psychology 4<br />

CHE101 Chemistry I (Inorganic) 6<br />

214 Phlebotomy Techniques 6<br />

MLT101 Introduction to Medical Lab 6<br />

BIO101 Biology 6<br />

CHE201 Chemistry II (organic) 6<br />

173 Anatomy & Physiology II 4<br />

MLT200 Clinical Chemistry 6<br />

MLT201 Hematology 6<br />

BIO201 Medical Microbiology 6<br />

MLT202 Coagulation 6<br />

MLT203 Immunology/Immunohematology 6<br />

MLT204 Body Fluids 6<br />

MLT300 Medical Laboratory Clinical I 11<br />

MLT301 Medical laboratory Clinical II 11<br />

PSY274+ Developmental Psychology 4<br />

SOC214+ Introduction to Sociology 4<br />

Total 135<br />

All courses require “C” or better.<br />

+ General education courses.<br />

Students may not receive payment/reimbursement of any type for clinical and/or externship hours required in their academic<br />

program. Students may also not perform these clinical and/or externship hours with their employer in the capacity of their regular<br />

position.<br />

The list of available courses offered through distance learning can be obtained from the distance education coordinator or<br />

through student services. Course availability varies per quarter. On-campus students require special permission from the Executive<br />

Director to take online courses. Courses with an MLT, BIO, or CHE prefix are not available through distance learning format.<br />

61<br />

Clock hours<br />

44<br />

22<br />

44<br />

44<br />

44<br />

44<br />

44<br />

44<br />

22<br />

44<br />

88<br />

88<br />

88<br />

88<br />

88<br />

44<br />

88<br />

88<br />

88<br />

88<br />

88<br />

88<br />

352<br />

352<br />

44<br />

44<br />

2200


associate oF applied science (a.a.s.)<br />

radiologic tecHnologist<br />

The mission of the Radiologic Technology program is to provide a progressive academic and<br />

clinical educational environment by training students to become highly competent and qualified<br />

to administer ionizing radiation for medical diagnostic imaging purposes while preparing<br />

them for future licensing examination.<br />

Through knowledge gained from the Radiologic Technology program’s didactic and clinical<br />

curriculum and from the liberal arts and sciences, the students develop the knowledge to<br />

consistently apply principles of radiologic technology and produce radiographs of diagnostic<br />

quality. The students will practice professional judgement, critical thinking, problem-solving<br />

skills, and leadership through the program curriculum.<br />

Graduates of the Limited Medical Radiography program may apply to the Associate of<br />

Applied Science in Radiologic Technologist program and if accepted will be able to complete<br />

this program in a minimum of six additional quarters. (See admission requirements for the<br />

Associate of Applied Science in Radiologic Technologist program.) Didactic classes are held<br />

during the day, and clinicals are held during the day, evening, and on weekends<br />

Curriculum<br />

161 Credit Hours<br />

2901 Clock Hours<br />

Length: 27 months – Day division only<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

RAD100 Introduction to Radiography 4<br />

RAD102 Introduction to Radiographic 3<br />

Clinical Topics I<br />

110A College Success Strategies 2<br />

121+ English I 4<br />

122+ English II 4<br />

151+ College Mathematics 4<br />

171 Medical Law & Ethics 4<br />

172 Anatomy & Physiology I 4<br />

173 Anatomy & Physiology II 4<br />

176 Medical Terminology 4<br />

177 Pharmacology/Lab Terminology 4<br />

RAD200 Radiographic Positioning I 9<br />

RT201 Advanced Radiographic 3<br />

Positioning I<br />

RT202*# Radiographic Clinical II 3<br />

211 Health & Safety 3<br />

245A Career Development 2<br />

293+ Personal Psychology 4<br />

RAD300 Radiographic Positioning II 4<br />

RT301 Radiographic Imaging I 4<br />

62<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

RT302*# Radiographic Clinical III 3<br />

RT402* Radiographic Clinical IV 3<br />

RT404 Patient Care & Education 4<br />

RT501 Radiographic Imaging II 4<br />

RT502* Radiographic Clinical V 9<br />

RT503 Radiation Physics 4<br />

RT504 Radiation Protection & Biology 4<br />

RT601 Radiographic Special 3<br />

Procedures & Pathophysiology<br />

RT602* Advanced Radiographic Clinical I 10<br />

RT603 Advanced Radiographic 4<br />

Topics/Quality Assurance<br />

RT700 Radiographic Pathology 4<br />

& Film Critique<br />

RT702* Advanced Radiographic Clinical II 10<br />

RT801 Special Topics in 4<br />

Radiography & Computers<br />

RT802* Advanced Radiographic Clinical III 10<br />

RT900 Radiographic Registry Review 4<br />

RT902* Advanced Radiographic Clinical IV 8<br />

Total 161<br />

All courses require “C” or better. See catalog addendum “C” for specialized program grading scale. Radiology Department has an<br />

additional policy and procedure manual.<br />

+ General education courses<br />

* The clinical requirement consists of 1,680 hours total for the RTA program. Students may not receive payment/reimbursement<br />

of any type for clinical and/or externship hours required in their academic program. Students may also not perform these clinical<br />

and/or externship hours with their employer in the capacity of their regular position.<br />

# Not required if LMR300 and LMR301 have been taken


associate oF applied science (a.a.s.)<br />

nursing<br />

The Associate of Applied Science Degree in Nursing (A.A.S.) program enables Licensed<br />

Practical Nurses the opportunity to pursue the role of the professional registered<br />

nurse. Graduates of the program are eligible to apply to the National Council Licensure<br />

Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN) to sit for the exam and to become a registered<br />

nurse. Core components of the program of study include professional behaviors, communication,<br />

assessment, clinical decision making, evidence-based practice, caring interventions,<br />

teaching and learning, collaboration with members of the healthcare team, and the<br />

management of patient care.<br />

The program is offered on campus and in a web blended format with both programs incorporating<br />

nursing and general education classes necessary for the degree. Clinical experiences<br />

are conducted in various hospital and healthcare facilities in the Louisville metropolitan area<br />

for both program formats. Nursing courses must be taken and successfully completed in the<br />

sequence delineated in the program of study.<br />

Curriculum 92 Credit Hours<br />

1408 Clock Hours<br />

Length: 18 months - Day Division<br />

24 months - Distance Education Division<br />

Class Title Credits<br />

BIO103#+ Human Anatomy & Physiology 6<br />

NS500 LPN to RN Bridge 7<br />

PSY214#+ Introduction to Psychology 4<br />

NS501 Health Promotion & Disease Prevention 10<br />

ENG101#+ Composition I 4<br />

MTH101#+ College Mathematics 4<br />

PSY274#+ Developmental Psychology 4<br />

NS600 Health Deviations I 10<br />

BIO201#+ Medical Microbiology 6<br />

ENG102#+ Composition II 4<br />

SOC214#+ Introduction to Sociology 4<br />

NS700 Health Deviations II 10<br />

NS801 Seminar in Management & Professional Development 3<br />

NS800 Health Deviations III 16<br />

Total 92<br />

All courses require a C or better. See catalog Addendum C for specialized program grading scale.<br />

+ Indicates general education courses<br />

# Indicates course offered in affiliation with <strong>Sullivan</strong> <strong>University</strong><br />

Students may not receive payment/reimbursement of any type for clinical and/or externship hours required in their academic<br />

program. Students may also not perform these clinical and/or externship hours with their employer in the capacity of their regular<br />

position.<br />

The Associate Degree in Nursing is also available through distance education. Spencerian classes are offered in a blended format<br />

where students complete a portion of the course online and a portion on campus. Some classes will require on site clinical and/<br />

or residential skills training. Entrance and graduation requirements for distance education classes and on-campus classes are<br />

the same. See information regarding distance education admission to the AAS nursing program. All students must complete<br />

Spencerian College’s non-credit introductory course, “Student Quick Start,” a tutorial explaining the features of the Learning<br />

Management System before beginning their first distance education class. Distance education students must have access to a PC<br />

(minimum 56K modem) with an internet connection. Spencerian College utilizes ANGEL Learning, Inc., software, a fully integrated<br />

e-learning platform that allows the College to rapidly create, deliver, and measure interactive learning over the internet. Students<br />

must purchase any software that may be needed for a specific course. All student assignments must be submitted by using<br />

Microsoft Word 2007 or newer, Excel and Access. There is an additional per credit hour charge for distance education classes.<br />

See Supplement A.<br />

63


academic inFormation<br />

All course descriptions, programs of study, and requirements for graduation are listed in this<br />

catalog. Spencerian College reserves the right to alter any of these items, wholly or partially, as<br />

deemed necessary by the College. It is the responsibility of all students to fully understand the<br />

regulations and policies listed in this section in order to prevent any misunderstandings that<br />

could lead to academic probation or suspension from the College.<br />

Class Schedule and the Friday Plus Day<br />

Most classes are regularly held Monday through Thursday 8:15 a.m. to 2:45 p.m. during the<br />

day and 6:00 p.m. to 9:40 p.m. in the evening. Nursing classes meet Monday through Friday<br />

8:00 a.m. to 3:45 p.m. Evening nursing classes meet from 5:30 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Monday<br />

through Thursday.<br />

Friday is called the “Plus Day” and provides students with the opportunity to meet with<br />

instructors for individual assistance or to use facilities and equipment for individual study and<br />

practice. Many students use the Friday “Plus Day” for personal and academic development.<br />

Should your instructor determine your progress in one or more areas to be unsatisfactory or<br />

below normal, the instructor may require Friday attendance. If assistance is not needed, then<br />

Fridays can be used for part-time employment or a long three-day weekend.<br />

Practical Nursing, AAS Nursing, Radiologic Technologist, Limited Medical Radiography and<br />

Surgical Technology programs normally have classes or clinicals scheduled on Friday. Students<br />

enrolled in these programs are encouraged to use the remaining portion of the day for the<br />

Friday “Plus Day.” Your instructor will provide you with more information regarding these<br />

schedules.<br />

Attendance Policy<br />

All students are expected to report to class on the first day of each quarter. Attendance is<br />

recorded daily in each class and students may be dropped by their instructor for not attending<br />

class. Every Spencerian student is expected to maintain satisfactory attendance. These factors<br />

are of utmost importance in the business and professional world, and are considered important<br />

factors of your training at Spencerian. Specific regulations are published in the Student<br />

Handbook Supplement “B” furnished to all students upon entrance.<br />

Grading Scale and the Quarter System<br />

The college operates on a quarter basis of four 11-week sessions during a calendar year.<br />

Therefore, credits are given on a quarter-hour basis rather than on a semester or unit basis.<br />

Grades are assigned based on the following levels of achievement and earn quality points as<br />

indicated:<br />

Letter Quality Points<br />

Grade Definition per Credit Hour<br />

A Excellent 4.0<br />

B Above Average 3.0<br />

C Average 2.0<br />

D Below Average 1.0<br />

F Failing 0<br />

W Withdraw during Not computed in GPA<br />

1st 7 weeks<br />

WF Withdrawn failing 0<br />

after 7 weeks or<br />

dropped for absences<br />

I* Incomplete Not computed in GPA<br />

S Satisfactory Progress Not computed in GPA<br />

U Unsatisfactory Progress Not computed in GPA<br />

AU Audit Not computed in GPA<br />

T Transfer Not Computed in GPA<br />

P Bypass Exam Not Computed in GPA<br />

PA Pass (in a pass/fail course) Not Computed in GPA<br />

64<br />

* Becomes an “F” if not removed by<br />

the end of the second week of the<br />

next quarter. A student wishing to<br />

challenge a course grade must do<br />

so by the end of the fourth week of<br />

the following quarter.<br />

All attempted hours are reflected<br />

on the student transcript. Student<br />

grade point averages are reviewed<br />

at the end of each quarter.


academic inFormation<br />

Grade Point Average Computation<br />

Grade point average (GPA) is calculated by dividing the number of total quality points earned<br />

by the total number of credits taken. Quality points are determined by multiplying the number<br />

of credits for the course by the letter grade value:<br />

A=4 quality points per credit hour, so an A in a 4 credit hour class = 16 quality points<br />

B=3 quality points per credit hour, so an B in a 4 credit hour class = 12 quality points<br />

C=2 quality points per credit hour, so an C in a 3 credit hour class = 6 quality points<br />

D=1 quality points per credit hour, so an D in a 3 credit hour class = 3 quality points<br />

F=0 quality points per credit hour, so an F in a 2 credit hour class = 0 quality points<br />

Sample GPA calculation:<br />

Course Grade Credit X Quality Points Quality Points<br />

Hours Per Credit Hour Awarded College Success<br />

A 2 4 8<br />

Anatomy I B 4 3 12<br />

Health & Safety C 3 2 6<br />

English I D 4 1 4<br />

Totals 13 30<br />

GPA = 30 quality points divided by 13 credit hours attempted = 2.30<br />

Withdrawal Policy<br />

Any student withdrawing from class(es) is advised to see a school official in order to perform<br />

an exit interview. The purpose of the exit interview is to assess the academic and financial status<br />

of the student and complete a financial aid review.<br />

A student who withdraws during the first seven weeks of the quarter will receive a grade of<br />

W, which will not be calculated in the cumulative grade point average (GPA). Any student<br />

who withdraws after the seventh week of the quarter will receive a WF which will be calculated<br />

into the student’s GPA, carrying no quality points. A student’s last day of attendance<br />

(LDA) will be determined by the last day the College can determine the student participated in<br />

any academically related activity, which may include projects, clinical/practicum experience,<br />

or examinations. The date of determination for a withdrawal will be the date on which the<br />

College first became aware that a student was no longer in attendance.<br />

Any student administratively dismissed from a class or school for non-academic reasons<br />

will be withdrawn from their course(s). Withdrawal from a class at any time will affect the<br />

student’s Quantitative Academic Progress. Excessive withdrawals from classes may result in<br />

Quantitative Academic Progress probation and/or suspension.<br />

Any student in good standing withdrawing from school may apply to return to complete their<br />

program. A re-entering student will be required to adhere to the school’s new policies and<br />

curriculum if changes have occurred. A full program student who has withdrawn from all<br />

classes will be required to pay the current tuition rate for the student’s remaining classes upon<br />

re-entry.<br />

Students enrolled in quarterly/individual subject enrollment agreements will pay the current<br />

credit hour tuition rate each time a class is attempted. See the Withdrawal Refund Chart found<br />

in this catalog for the College’s refund policy.<br />

Definition of Credit Hour<br />

Academic progress at Spencerian College is measured in quarter credit hours. One quarter<br />

hour of credit in the quarter system is defined as approximately 10 net clock hours of lecture,<br />

20 net clock hours of laboratory experience, or 30 net clock hours of externship or clinical experience.<br />

A net clock hour is defined as 50 minutes.<br />

65


academic inFormation<br />

Academic Satisfactory Progress Policy<br />

All students of Spencerian College must meet the following minimum standards of academic<br />

achievement and successful course completion while enrolled. The student’s progress will be<br />

evaluated at appointed intercals to determine satisfactory academic progress (SAP).<br />

A. Qualitative Standards (Cumulative Grade Point Average)<br />

To qualify for graduation, a student must achieve a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.0.<br />

Qualitative satisfactory progress is defined as maintaining a minimum acceptable Grade Point<br />

Average on a 4.0 scale. Students must maintain the following minimum grade point average on<br />

a 4.0 scale in order to be considered making qualitative satisfactory academic progress:<br />

• A GPA of 1.50 at the end of the first quarter of attendance. A student having a GPA between<br />

0.50–1.50 will be placed on academic probation. If the GPA at the end of the first quarter of<br />

attendance is below 0.50, the student is subject to being suspended or terminated.<br />

• A 1.70 cumulative GPA at the end of the second quarter of attendance. If the student had<br />

been on probation and failed to make qualitative satisfactory progress, the student is subject to<br />

being suspended.<br />

• A 1.90 cumulative GPA at the end of the third quarter of attendance. If the student had been<br />

on probation and failed to make qualitative satisfactory progress, the student is subject to being<br />

suspended.<br />

• A 2.0 cumulative GPA for subsequent quarters.<br />

The college’s administration realizes that extenuating circumstances can cause a student’s<br />

grades to suffer. Exceptions to the above policies may be made only with the written permission<br />

of the college Director or Dean.<br />

B. Quantitative Standards<br />

Each quarter, students’ academic progress will be measured by comparing the number of credit<br />

hours attempted with the number of credit hours earned (those attempted hours where an<br />

acceptable passing grade was received). Students must earn a minimum of 2/3 (66.7% rule) of<br />

credit hours attempted in order to maintain satisfactory academic progress and remain a student<br />

in good standing. The following are considered when evaluating quantitative satisfactory<br />

academic progress (SAP):<br />

• Withdrawals, withdraw/failures, incompletes, instructor drops, and failures are considered<br />

as hours attempted but not earned.<br />

• Credit earned with a passing grade (PA) in a course attempted on a Pass/Fail basis is<br />

considered as both attempted and earned; those failed are considered as attempted only.<br />

• Courses attempted on a Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory basis are considered neither<br />

attempted nor earned.<br />

• Credit earned through bypass testing is considered as both attempted and earned in<br />

quantitative measure, but is not calculated in cumulative GPA.<br />

• Transfer credit is considered as both attempted and earned, but is not calculated in<br />

quantitative nor qualitative academic progress.<br />

• Courses audited are not considered attempted or earned and are not calculated in GPA.<br />

• Repeated courses are included in both hours attempted and earned in quantitative measure.<br />

The most recent grade received will be used in computing a student’s cumulative<br />

grade point average.<br />

• Upon the change of program, only those credits previously taken that will apply to the<br />

new program will be considered as attempted and earned for both qualitative and quantitative<br />

measures. However, students leaving one program on probation will enter the<br />

new program on probation.<br />

66


academic inFormation<br />

Example: number of credits attempted Required 66.7% earned with passing grade<br />

12 8<br />

24 16<br />

36 24<br />

48 32<br />

60 40<br />

72 48<br />

C. Maximum Time Frame<br />

Students are expected to complete their program of study once they have attempted one<br />

and one-half (1.5) or 150% of the number of credit hours required to complete their program<br />

of study. Maximum time frame is determined by using total credit hours attempted.<br />

For example, a student enrolled in the Medical Assistant Diploma program (85 credits)<br />

must complete the program once their total hours attempted equal 127 credit hours, calculated<br />

as follows: 1.5 x 85 credit hours = 127 credit hours.<br />

No student will be eligible to receive financial aid after 150% of the normal credits<br />

required for their program has been attempted. In no case can a student exceed one and<br />

one-half times the normal credits required for their program and receive the original academic<br />

credential for which the student enrolled.<br />

Academic Probation and Suspension<br />

Academic progress is reviewed for all students at the end of each quarter. Students who<br />

fail to achieve or maintain qualitative and/or quantitative satisfactory academic progress<br />

will be placed on academic probation for the next quarter of attendance. At the discretion<br />

of the Dean, a student may be restricted to a limited number of credit hours once placed<br />

on probation.<br />

Should a student be placed on probation and fail to achieve a grade point average consistent<br />

with qualitative satisfactory progress as defined in this catalog, that student may be<br />

academically suspended from the college and lose all financial aid privileges.<br />

Students who fail to meet the quantitative satisfactory academic progress standards at<br />

the appropriate review period will be placed on academic probation. Once on probation<br />

the student may continue to attend classes and receive financial aid but must successfully<br />

complete a minimum of 66.7% of classes attempted in order to demonstrate satisfactory<br />

academic progress. At the end of the probationary quarter, the student’s SAP will be<br />

reviewed for the following:<br />

• If both qualitative and quantitative standards are met, the student will be removed<br />

from probation, or<br />

• If the student meets or exceeds quarterly satisfactory academic progress but fails to<br />

achieve the minimum cumulative measure of satisfactory academic progress, the<br />

student will remain on probation.<br />

• If one or neither of the standards is met, the student is subject to being academically<br />

suspended.<br />

Students who leave or withdraw from college on probation, reenter on probation. Students<br />

who return to classes following suspension are automatically placed on probation.<br />

Financial Aid Probation/Suspension<br />

Satisfactory progress applies not only to academic probation and suspension but also to<br />

financial aid. For example, if a student fails to meet the above standards following one<br />

quarter of probation, financial aid eligibility will be suspended until the standards of<br />

satisfactory academic progress are met. Students returning after an academic suspension<br />

will not be eligible to receive federal financial aid until standards of satisfactory academic<br />

progress, as outlined above, are met. Students may not receive aid retroactively for those<br />

quarters during which they were not making satisfactory progress.<br />

67


academic inFormation<br />

Mitigating Circumstances<br />

There are times when circumstances interfere with a student’s ability to perform academically.<br />

If a student believes that certain circumstances led to their suspension, the student must submit<br />

a letter of appeal to the Dean. The student must provide evidence of extenuating, mitigating,<br />

or emergency (i.e., health, family, or catastrophe) circumstances along with the letter of appeal.<br />

If the appeal is denied, the student will remain on academic suspension for a minimum of one<br />

quarter.<br />

Academic Appeal Procedure<br />

Students have the right to appeal a grade, suspension, or termination. To do so, students must<br />

make a written appeal to the Dean within three working days of being informed of an action<br />

taken, either disciplinary or academic.<br />

Reinstatement After Suspension<br />

After the suspension period has been served, the suspended student may apply for reinstatement<br />

to the college by submitting a request in writing to the Dean of the College. The Dean<br />

or Executive Director has the discretionary authority to accept or reject a suspended student’s<br />

request for reinstatement.<br />

Upon reinstatement from suspension, the student will be placed on probation and will remain<br />

on probation until quarterly satisfactory academic progress (SAP) is being maintained. The student<br />

will remain ineligible to receive any form of Federal Title IV financial aid until quarterly<br />

satisfactory academic progress (SAP) is met by both completion rate and grade point average.<br />

Once the student has met the requirements for qualitative and quantitative SAP, the student<br />

will be removed from probation and Federal Title IV financial aid eligibility may be restored.<br />

Failure to achieve SAP while on probation following suspension may result in the student’s<br />

termination from the college.<br />

Extended Enrollment Status<br />

Students who have been suspended for not maintaining SAP may continue their program of<br />

study at the College at their own expense. Students in extended enrollment status (Probation<br />

by Appeal) must correct their academic deficiencies by re-taking failed courses or courses from<br />

which they have withdrawn. Once SAP has been re-established, a student may apply for reinstatement<br />

as a regular student by submitting a request in writing to the Dean. The Dean, in<br />

conjunction with the Registrar, Director of Financial Planning, and/or the Executive Director,<br />

will make a determination on the ability of the student to satisfactorily complete a program.<br />

Reinstatement to the College is not guaranteed.<br />

Once SAP has been achieved, the student’s eligibility for Federal Title IV funds may be reestablished.<br />

The student will remain on academic probation until quarterly SAP is maintained.<br />

Failure to achieve SAP while on probation following reinstatement may result in the student’s<br />

termination from the College.<br />

Program Changes and<br />

Spencerian Graduates Earning Additional Certificates, Diplomas, or Degrees<br />

If a student changes their major, only those credits previously taken and that will apply to the<br />

new program will be considered as credits attempted and earned and will be used in the calculation<br />

of SAP in the new program of study. However, a student leaving one program on probation<br />

will enter the new program on probation.<br />

A student graduating from one program and wishing to re-enter into a new program may have<br />

all credits relevant to the new program transfer into the new program. An evaluation of their<br />

transcript will be done using the same procedure as that for credits from another institution.<br />

Any equivalent courses will be transferred into the new program and the student’s program<br />

length will be adjusted accordingly. Credits that transfer into the new program will be counted<br />

as hours attempted and earned and will be calculated into the student’s completion rate and<br />

grade point average.<br />

68


academic inFormation<br />

Re-Entering Students<br />

Students re-entering Spencerian College will have their academic records reviewed and a<br />

determination made on qualification for re-entry. Any student re-entering the College from a<br />

probation or suspension status will automatically be placed on academic probation until SAP as<br />

previously outlined has been met.<br />

Leave 0f Absence<br />

A leave of absence may be granted to a student if:<br />

1) The student submits the request for leave of absence in writing.<br />

2) The leave does not exceed 60 days, unless:<br />

a. The next period of enrollment begins more than 60 days after the first day of the leave of<br />

absence, or;<br />

b The leave of absence is based upon a medical condition supported by a written statement<br />

from a physician.<br />

Only one leave of absence may be granted to a student in any 12-month period. If a student is<br />

on a medical leave of absence, the student must present a statement from their physician permitting<br />

their return to school after being hospitalized or from treatment for the medical condition.<br />

Requirements for Graduation<br />

To qualify for graduation, students must attain an overall cumulative grade point average<br />

(GPA) of 2.0 (C) or higher, and must have received a 2.0 (C) or higher in all required courses<br />

listed in the catalog under their program of study, and finish within maximum time frame.<br />

Spencerian College awards certificates, diplomas and Associate of Applied Science degrees. Each<br />

program description page in the catalog designates certificate, diploma, or associate degree.<br />

Graduate Seminars<br />

A must for all potential Spencerian graduates. These seminars are the “first step” in the graduation<br />

process and include valuable job search assistance and important graduation information.<br />

Graduation<br />

Cap and gown graduations are held semi-annually for all graduates. The graduation ceremony<br />

includes guest speakers, presentations of awards, and the conferring of degrees, diplomas, and<br />

certificates.<br />

Non-Academic Student Grievance Procedure<br />

Spencerian College will always attempt to provide the best college atmosphere possible. However,<br />

if students have questions or complaints, they should follow the guidelines set forth below to seek a<br />

resolution.<br />

1. Spencerian is committed to open and frequent communication. This open-door policy means<br />

that students should first have a conference with the person whom you have your original<br />

complaint (teacher, financial planning office, registrar’s office, etc.).<br />

2. If a satisfactory solution is not achieved, you should then have a conference with that department’s<br />

director.<br />

3. If a satisfactory solution is not achieved, you should meet with the Dean of the College.<br />

4. If a satisfactory solution is not achieved, you may then seek resolution by arranging a meeting<br />

with the College’s Executive Director.<br />

5. If further action is deemed necessary, you may file a written complaint with the College<br />

President or contact the Accrediting Council for Independent Colleges and Schools by mailing<br />

it to:<br />

President Accrediting Council for Independent<br />

<strong>Sullivan</strong> <strong>University</strong> System Colleges and Schools<br />

3101 Bardstown Road 750 First Street, NE, Suite 980<br />

Louisville, KY 40205 Washington, DC 20002-4241<br />

Telephone: 202-336-6780<br />

69


academic inFormation<br />

Supplemental Information<br />

Current tuition, fees, housing, and faculty information can be found in a separate sheet, Supplement A.<br />

Additional general academic guidelines and school information can be found in the student handbook,<br />

Supplement B.<br />

Additional specific programmatic information and requirements can be found in the program<br />

handbooks, Supplement C.<br />

Board of Directors<br />

Dr. A.R. <strong>Sullivan</strong> Glenn <strong>Sullivan</strong> Patricia Schrenk Hank Wagner<br />

Dr. Jerry Clanton Dr. Jerry Miller Stephen Beimdiek<br />

Legal Status<br />

Spencerian College is a private corporation owned by a Kentucky corporation, The <strong>Sullivan</strong><br />

<strong>University</strong> System, Inc.<br />

The corporate officers are:<br />

A. R. <strong>Sullivan</strong>, Chancellor Jim Crick, Vice President of Enrollment Management<br />

Glenn D. <strong>Sullivan</strong>, President Shelton Bridges, Jr., Vice President of Finance<br />

Bill Noel, Executive Vice President Robert Metry, Vice President of Legal Services<br />

Thomas F. Davisson, Senior Vice President<br />

Spencerian College retains the right to revise programs of study, hours of classes, the school<br />

calendar and/or any other material listed in this publication without prior notice.<br />

Although the editors of this catalog have made every reasonable effort to attain factual accuracy<br />

herein, no responsibility is assumed for editorial, clerical, or printing errors or errors occasioned by<br />

mistakes. The editors have attempted to present information which, at the time of preparation for<br />

printing, most accurately describes the course offerings, faculty listing, policies, procedures, regulations,<br />

and requirements of the college. However, it does not establish contractual relationships. The<br />

College reserves the right to alter or change any statement contained herein without prior notice.<br />

Spencerian College can add, remove, or revise courses and subjects, change textbooks, and make<br />

policy alterations which improve the College. It is the attitude toward worthwhile change that keeps<br />

the College at peak efficiency. Spencerian College, therefore, reserves the right to change policies,<br />

regulations, requirements, courses, tuition, and fees without prior notice.<br />

Published December 2010<br />

70


course descriptions<br />

Course numbers are arbitrarily assigned and do not have a direct correlation to the course<br />

difficulty. The acronyms preceding the numeric portion of the course numbers identify the academic<br />

discipline.<br />

Business Administration and General Education<br />

100 ACCOUNTING FOR THE BUSINESS OFFICE (3 credits) This course acquaints the<br />

student with accounting principles and practices. Students demonstrate knowledge of the<br />

bookkeeping cycle, general journal, general ledger, financial statements, and cash control.<br />

Prerequisite: none<br />

101 ACCOUNTING I (6 credits) This course acquaints the student with accounting principles<br />

and practices. Students demonstrate knowledge of the complete accounting cycle, a merchandising<br />

business, and special journals. This course is available in the Evening Division only.<br />

Prerequisite: none<br />

102 ACCOUNTING II (3 credits) This course is a continuation of Accounting I. Students demonstrate<br />

knowledge of cash receivables, temporary investments, merchandise inventory, plant<br />

assets, payroll, and accounting concepts. This course is available in the Evening Division only.<br />

Prerequisite: 101<br />

103 ACCOUNTING III (6 credits) Students learn the concepts and principles of partnerships<br />

and corporations, including organization, operations, equity, long and short-term liabilities,<br />

cash flow statements, and managerial concepts. This course is available in the Evening Division<br />

only. Prerequisite: 102<br />

110A <strong>COLLEGE</strong> SUCCESS STRATEGIES (2 credits) This course is designed to assist new<br />

students in developing strategies for a successful college experience, as well as strategies for<br />

achieving career goals. Students will develop oral communication skills, learn time management<br />

strategies, and improve study skills necessary to be successful in the college environment<br />

and the work place. Prerequisite: none<br />

111 CUS<strong>TO</strong>MER SERVICE (4 credits) This course introduces the student to the concept of<br />

anticipating and meeting the needs of the customer. Role-play, group work, and analyzation of<br />

case studies reinforce the thought and behavior patterns required in successfully dealing with<br />

the public. This course will help the student to recognize the important role personal qualities<br />

play in the work environment and to develop the success attitudes, interpersonal skills, and<br />

values that are in demand by employers. Prerequisite: none<br />

115 COMPUTER SPREADSHEET APPLICATIONS I (3 credits) This course is designed to<br />

familiarize the student with spreadsheet concepts and file management. It will give the students<br />

hands-on experience with applications necessary for business. Prerequisite: 130<br />

121 ENGLISH I (4 credits) This composition course focuses on developing and applying<br />

writing skills to essays and a research paper. The use of proper grammar, punctuation, correct<br />

sentence structure, and coherent paragraph style will be covered in the course and expected on<br />

all written material. Research skills will also be developed. Prerequisite: none<br />

122 ENGLISH II (4 credits) This course is a continuation of English 121 stressing critical thinking<br />

and writing strategies. Students will continue developing such written processes as those<br />

pertaining to invention, revision, organization, editing, and collaborative writing. Special<br />

emphasis will be focused on the skills of research. Prerequisite: 121<br />

130 KEYBOARDING (5 credits) This course is designed for students with little or no<br />

previous keyboarding experience. Correct keyboarding techniques and special drill assignments<br />

are practiced to develop speed and accuracy. Basic word processing techniques and<br />

document formatting are introduced. Prerequisite: none<br />

71


course descriptions<br />

150 GENERAL MATHEMATICS (4 credits) This course is a review of mathematic concepts,<br />

including whole numbers, primes and multiples, fractions and mixed numbers, decimals, ratio<br />

and proportion, percents, measurement and geometry. It also provides an algebraic preview.<br />

Prerequisite: none<br />

151 <strong>COLLEGE</strong> MATHEMATICS (4 credits) A mathematics course for the business, accounting,<br />

or medical worker, covering fractions, decimals, linear equations, inequalities, and exponential<br />

numbers. Prerequisite: none<br />

163 BUSINESS OFFICE PROCEDURES (3 credits) This capstone course is a business simulation<br />

designed to help the advanced student reinforce and build software skills (including<br />

Word, Excel, Access, Power Point, and desktop publishing) and improve internet skills. Time<br />

management, prioritizing tasks, and independent critical thinking skills are emphasized.<br />

Prerequisites: 281, 115 Co-requisite: 215<br />

164 FILING/RECORDS MANAGEMENT (3 credits) This course studies four filing systems:<br />

alphabetic, subject, numeric, and geographic. These concepts are reinforced by producing correctly<br />

filed simulated business documents. Accuracy, speed, and critical thinking are emphasized.<br />

Prerequisite: none<br />

201 INTERMEDIATE ACCOUNTING (3 credits) This course presents the management<br />

approach to accounting as it relates to cost behavior, budgeting, variances, decentralization,<br />

product pricing, and capital investment. This course is available in the Evening Division only.<br />

Prerequisite: 103<br />

202 PAYROLL ACCOUNTING (3 credits) This course takes the student through a step-by-step<br />

procedure of payroll computation and taxation, which includes payroll records, computing<br />

wages and salaries, social security taxes, federal and state unemployment taxes, and federal,<br />

state, and municipal income taxes. This course is available in the Evening Division only.<br />

Prerequisite: Accounting 101<br />

203 COST ACCOUNTING (3 credits) This course applies the elements of production cost.<br />

Students learn how to apply concepts of materials, labor, and overhead, using process, job<br />

order, and standard cost systems. This course is available in the Evening Division only.<br />

Prerequisite: 102<br />

205 INCOME TAX ACCOUNTING (6 credits) This course prepares the student to complete<br />

federal income tax forms for individuals, emphasizing the actual preparation of tax forms and<br />

study of tax law. This course is available in the Evening Division only. Prerequisite: 102<br />

215 COMPUTER DATABASE APPLICATION I (3 credits) Students are introduced to<br />

database concepts by creating electronic databases, indexing its records, and preparing useful<br />

reports. Students also learn the common database command in SQL (Structured Query<br />

Language), which is common to all database applications. Prerequisite: none<br />

223 BUSINESS CORRESPONDENCE (4 credits) This course concentrates on effective word<br />

usage in composing various types of business correspondence. Emphasis is placed on letters<br />

and memos that are effective, grammatically correct, and properly punctuated. Prerequisites:<br />

122, 280<br />

241 BUSINESS LAW (4 credits) This course is designed to introduce the student to law and the<br />

judicial system followed by a study of contracts, warranties, and product liability, consumer<br />

protection, real property, landlord and tenant, agency and employment, partnerships, and corporations.<br />

Prerequisite: none<br />

245A CAREER DEVELOPMENT (2 credits) This course is designed to instruct the student in<br />

job search skills and how to be an effective employee. The student will gain the skills to evalu-<br />

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course descriptions<br />

ate their capabilities, prepare a summary of those capabilities, write a resume, develop a job<br />

search plan, interview effectively, adjust to a new job and the work environment, and learn<br />

acceptable professional behavior. The student will learn to communicate with the employer<br />

and coworkers. Workplace values, goals and ethics will be emphasized. Prerequisite: none<br />

272 BUSINESS TRANSCRIPTION (2 credits) This course is an introduction to transcription.<br />

Students demonstrate development of transcription skills such as spelling, punctuation, and<br />

placement. Emphasis is placed on production of rough drafts and the quality of finished work.<br />

Prerequisites: 122, 280<br />

280 WORD PROCESSING I (3 credits) This is an introduction to basic word processing<br />

applications. The student will learn various commands and operations and then will produce<br />

numerous documents. Prerequisite: 130<br />

281 WORD PROCESSING II (3 credits) This is an upper-level word processing course where<br />

students prepare documents and reports using advanced word processing functions.<br />

Prerequisite: 280<br />

293 PERSONAL PSYCHOLOGY (4 credits) A broad overview of the major individuals and<br />

their particular contributions to the field of psychology are presented. Basic psychological<br />

information and its relevance to the study of psychology are presented. Major divisions of psychology<br />

and their unique contributions to the understanding of human mental and behavioral<br />

processes constitute the major portion of this course. Prerequisite: none<br />

299 MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES (4 credits) In this introductory course, the student learns<br />

the interrelationship of office functions, services, facilities, office communications, problemsolving,<br />

and successful human relationships, with emphasis on first-line supervision duties.<br />

Prerequisite: none<br />

305 ADVANCED INCOME TAX (3 credits) This course prepares the student to complete<br />

federal income tax forms for businesses, emphasizing the actual preparation of tax forms and<br />

study of tax laws. This course is available in the Evening Division only. Prerequisite: 205<br />

315 COMPUTER ACCOUNTING APPLICATIONS (6 credits) This course uses an advanced<br />

accounting software package to allow the student to apply fundamental accounting principles<br />

in a computerized environment. Learning to apply technology with an understanding of<br />

accounting is an important part of developing academic skills. This course is available in the<br />

Evening Division only. Prerequisite: 101<br />

450 INTRODUCTION <strong>TO</strong> SALES & MARKETING (4 credits) This course introduces<br />

the student to the methods of designing and executing a marketing plan for ideas, goods, and<br />

services for both the external and internal customers of an organization. Students will study<br />

the market, sales, promotion, and the distribution channels. Topics include product planning,<br />

pricing, promotion, branding, packaging, and labeling, along with “hands-on” experience in<br />

packaging intangibles. Prerequisite: none<br />

498 SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT (4 credits) This course provides a real-world<br />

picture of how small business managers conduct day-to-day operations. Its practical focus<br />

addresses how and why businesses operate the way they do. Topics include creation, modification,<br />

and implementation of a general business plan, including marketing, financial, and<br />

operational plans. In addition, students are introduced to assessment of the management of<br />

production/products/service and personnel. Prerequisite: none<br />

499 HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (4 credits) Topics of study in this course include<br />

job analysis, administration, testing and selection of employees, motivation, supervision, promotion<br />

and employee relations. Prerequisite: 299<br />

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course descriptions<br />

C106 DESK<strong>TO</strong>P PUBLISHING (3 credits) This course introduces the student to a desktop<br />

publishing software package to produce camera-ready documents for commercial printing use.<br />

The student will learn layout and graphic design techniques. Prerequisite: 280<br />

C109 INTEGRATED COMPUTER APPLICATIONS PROJECT (2 credits) This is a project<br />

course in which students work independently, integrating advanced applications.<br />

Prerequisites: 280, 115, 215<br />

Medical Non Nursing Courses<br />

165 ELECTRONIC RECORDS MANAGEMENT (3 credits) The course will provide students<br />

with a comprehensive overview of electronic health records management. The course will<br />

provide the student with the basic knowledge required to utilize health information system<br />

software to maintain patient health records. Offered day and blended only. Prerequisites: 176,<br />

171, 130, 172, 173<br />

171 MEDICAL LAW & ETHICS (4 credits) Since the allied health professional is an important<br />

member of the medical team and their awareness of multiple legal and ethical issues are critical<br />

in today’s health care environment, this course explores the information relating to medical<br />

law and/or ethics to assist the health care professional in better understanding the legal and<br />

ethical obligations to patients, healthcare providers and healthcare employers. Topics in medical<br />

law, medical ethics, and bioethics are discussed. Scope of practice, state and federal legislation,<br />

and state and federal licensing and certification requirements are covered in this course.<br />

Prerequisite: none<br />

172 ANA<strong>TO</strong>MY & PHYSIOLOGY I (4 credits) Students are introduced to the general plan<br />

of the human body, cells, tissues, organs, the musculoskeletal, neuro-sensory, and endocrine<br />

systems. Furthermore, concepts of the disease processes and disease-producing organisms are<br />

introduced. Prerequisite: none<br />

173 ANA<strong>TO</strong>MY & PHYSIOLOGY II (4 credits) This is a continuation of course 172 with<br />

emphasis on the circulatory system, body defenses and immunity, urinary, respiratory, digestive,<br />

and reproductive systems. Further discussion of disease processes will be included.<br />

Prerequisite: 172<br />

176 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY (4 credits) Students learn the prefixes, roots, and suffixes<br />

used in medical terminology. Medical specialties, operative terms, and medical records terms<br />

complete the instruction. Prerequisite: none<br />

177 PHARMACOLOGY/LABORA<strong>TO</strong>RY TERMINOLOGY (4 credits) This course introduces<br />

the principles of pharmacology, drug action, and therapy based on body systems and disease.<br />

A review of clinical laboratory procedures, indications for testing, and interpretation of results<br />

gives the student an understanding of pharmacology and laboratory terminology.<br />

Prerequisites: 172, 176<br />

178 MEDICAL INSURANCE (3 credits) This course familiarizes the student with health insurance<br />

and managed care, medical professional fees, and reimbursement through claim<br />

processing, billing, and collections. Prerequisite: 270<br />

179 COMPLIANCE ISSUES (4 credits) This course will introduce the coding/healthcare reimbursement<br />

student to issues of medical billing compliance. Topics such as fraud and abuse,<br />

compliance plan elements, penalties, and OIG (Office of Inspector General) will be addressed.<br />

In addition, the student will learn comprehensive chart auditing techniques, which include<br />

documentation standards, third party requirements, and risk management. Prerequisites: 290<br />

Co-requisite: 178 (may be taken previously)<br />

209 ADVANCED TERMINOLOGY FOR MEDICAL CODING (4 credits) In this course the<br />

coding student will gain additional knowledge of advanced medical terms pertaining to diagnoses,<br />

diseases, anatomy & physiology, and treatment modalities, and procedures to enhance<br />

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course descriptions<br />

the process of abstracting data from medical records to facilitate coding. Prerequisite: 176<br />

Co-requisite: 277 (may be taken previously)<br />

211 HEALTH & SAFETY TECHNIQUES (3 credits) Students become certified CPR basic<br />

rescuers (American Heart Association Healthcare Provider with AED). Medical asepsis and<br />

infection control are discussed. Training in vital signs and first aid procedures complete this<br />

course. Prerequisite: none<br />

212 MEDICAL LABORA<strong>TO</strong>RY PROCEDURES (6 credits) Students are trained in patient<br />

instruction, quality control, blood collection, and laboratory procedures. These procedures<br />

include hematology, immunology, microbiology, chemistry, urinalysis, venipuncture, capillary<br />

sticks, and the care and use of the microscope. Prerequisites: 173, 176<br />

213 ADVANCED CLINICAL SKILLS (3 credits) The main focus of this course is<br />

pharmacology and the preparation and administration of medications. Also covered are radiation<br />

preparation and safety issues. Prerequisites: 173, 176<br />

214 PHLEBO<strong>TO</strong>MY TECHNIQUES (6 credits) In this course, students gain theoretical and<br />

practical skills necessary for preparation, collection, and processing biological specimens for<br />

laboratory testing. Prerequisite: 172<br />

270 MEDICAL ADMINISTRATIVE TECHNIQUES (3 credits) This course covers the various<br />

administrative front office duties in a medical setting including patient communications, record<br />

keeping/health information management, appointment scheduling, patient reception, financial<br />

management of patient accounts, and general facility environment issues. Prerequisite: none<br />

271 MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION I (2 credits) This course introduces the skills of transcribing<br />

(typing) medical reports from machine transcribers, cassette tapes and/or CDs using computers.<br />

Prerequisites: 173, 176, 280<br />

274 MEDICAL ASSISTING TECHNIQUES (3 credits) The theory and principles of the<br />

clinical side of medical assisting are introduced, while providing the student with hands-on<br />

practice to perfect the technique. Procedures covered include charting, height and weight, the<br />

physical exam, and minor office surgery. Proper electrocardiogram techniques complete this<br />

course. Prerequisites: 173, 176<br />

276 MEDICAL TRANSCRIPTION II (6 credits) This course covers extensive transcription<br />

of medical reports with more in-depth coverage of medical terminology, body structure, and<br />

advanced document formatting. Prerequisite: 271<br />

277 INTRODUCTION <strong>TO</strong> MEDICAL CODING (3 credits) This course is an introduction to<br />

the history and basic concepts of medical coding. Students learn how to use CPT and ICD-9-<br />

CM coding manuals. They will perform CPT coding in areas of Evaluation and Management,<br />

Anesthesia, Surgery, Radiology, Pathology, Laboratory, and Medicine as well as basic ICD-9<br />

coding including V & E codes. Prerequisite: 172, 176<br />

278 CLINICAL ASSISTANT PRACTICUM (3 credits) In cooperation with physicians, hospitals,<br />

and allied health agencies, the advanced student is assigned to a specific location and<br />

serves 96 hours practicing clinical assistant procedures. No payment for services is received.<br />

Prerequisite: All other courses in the curriculum<br />

279 PHLEBO<strong>TO</strong>MY EXTERNSHIP (4 credits) In cooperation with physicians, hospitals, and<br />

allied health agencies, the advanced student is assigned to a specific location and serves 120<br />

hours practicing Phlebotomy procedures including all types of specimen collection and processing.<br />

The student must complete 100 successful venipunctures by a combination of vacutainer,<br />

syringe, and butterfly technique as well as, 25 successful capillary punctures. No payment for<br />

service is received. Prerequisite: All other courses in the curriculum<br />

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course descriptions<br />

284 MEDICAL CORRESPONDENCE (3 credits) This course concentrates on effective word<br />

usage in composing various medical insurance correspondence. Emphasis is placed on letters<br />

and memos that are effective, grammatically correct, and properly punctuated.<br />

Prerequisites: 280<br />

289 MEDICAL CODING II (3 credits) This course will expand the student’s coding<br />

knowledge into more advanced coding training in CPT and ICD-9. The student will also be<br />

introduced to Level II HCPCS codes, Documentation Guidelines, and Third Party<br />

Reimbursement Issues. Students will learn and perform coding of various medical services<br />

from source documents (chart notes, written summaries, operative notes) and research employment<br />

opportunities in coding. Prerequisite: 173, 277<br />

290 MEDICAL CODING III (3 credits) This course will further expand the student’s coding<br />

skills in abstracting full data from medical records and combining the coding systems (CPT,<br />

ICD-9, and HCPCS) to insure accurate linkage of procedure to diagnosis. The student will also<br />

be introduced to ICD-9, Volume 3 and DRG’s for hospital inpatient and outpatient coding. The<br />

student will also gain knowledge of certification avenues through research and mock examination.<br />

Prerequisite: 209, 289<br />

291 ADVANCED CPT CODING (3 credits) This course will further expand the advanced<br />

coder’s knowledge of coding (inpatient and outpatient) and provide more challenging coding<br />

scenarios and case studies. The student will gain knowledge of how to troubleshoot coding<br />

problems in the medical setting as well as more advanced issues of coding for maximum reimbursement<br />

and compliance. Prerequisite: 209 and 289. Co-requisite: 290 (may be taken previously)<br />

292 MEDICAL BILLING & HEALTH CLAIMS REVIEW (4 credits) This course provides<br />

training and application in medical claims follow-up, troubleshooting, problem claims, reimbursement<br />

issues, and claims appeal. Prerequisite: 178, 115, 291<br />

296 MEDICAL ADMINISTRATIVE PRACTICUM (2 credits) In cooperation with physicians,<br />

hospitals, and allied health agencies, the advanced student is assigned to a specific location<br />

and serves 64 hours practicing medical administrative assistant procedures. No payment for<br />

services is received. Prerequisite: All other courses in the curriculum and keyboarding speed<br />

verification for speed requirement of each program<br />

297 HEALTH UNIT COORDINA<strong>TO</strong>R PROCEDURES (6 credits) This course explores the role<br />

of the health unit coordinator and covers the knowledge and tasks required of a health unit<br />

coordinator as compiled by the National Association of Health Unit Coordinators. (course currently<br />

available in online format only). Prerequisites: 172 and 176<br />

298 MEDICAL CODING EXTERNSHIP (5 credits) In cooperation with physicians, hospitals,<br />

and allied health agencies, the advanced student is assigned to a specific location for 160 hours,<br />

practicing medical coding. No payment for services is received. Prerequisites: All other courses<br />

in the curriculum and keyboarding speed verification for speed requirement of each program.<br />

300 EFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT OF CODING SERVICES (4 credits) This course will be<br />

a continuation of management principles with special emphasis on management issues specific<br />

to coding/healthcare reimbursement services, or other related health information areas.<br />

The student will be introduced to various topics, including scope of service, structure, and<br />

organization of coding services, management of coding/HIM personnel, HIM statistics, physician<br />

credentialing, contract negotiations, establishment of fee schedules, and quality control.<br />

Prerequisites: 299, 151, 291, 178<br />

312 ADVANCED CLINICAL LABORA<strong>TO</strong>RY PROCEDURES (4 credits) Students gain<br />

advanced training in laboratory techniques, documentation, and laboratory management pro-<br />

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course descriptions<br />

cedures. Procedures covered include review of automated technologies, quality control, record<br />

keeping, and CLIA and COLA applications and regulations. Offered in blended format only.<br />

Prerequisite: 212<br />

313 MEDICAL OFFICE MANAGER TECHNIQUES (2 credits) This course explores the role<br />

of the medical office manager and their vast diverse duties. Medical personnel, business, and<br />

financial management are discussed. Prerequisites: 178, 212, 213, 274, 499. Corequisite: 312<br />

(may be taken previously)<br />

Clinical Laboratory Assistant<br />

CLA101 SPECIAL COLLECTIONS & PROCESSING (6 credits) This course focuses on special<br />

collection procedures related to blood donor collection. In addition, the course will cover the<br />

entire donor collection processing procedure. General specimen processing and preparation of<br />

reagents, calibrators, and standards for common laboratory function is covered in this course.<br />

Other special specimen collections will be addressed in this course. Prerequisites: MLT101, 214<br />

Invasive Cardiovascular Technology<br />

CVT100 INTRODUCTION <strong>TO</strong> INVASIVE CARDIOLOGY (4 credits) This course is designed<br />

to provide an introduction to the invasive cardiovascular environment. It includes medical<br />

terminology, confidentiality, professionalism, medical ethics, standard precautions, and communication<br />

skills required in cardiology. Introduction to heart catheters, c-arm fluoroscopy<br />

equipment and sterile technique. Prerequisite: 151, 172, 176<br />

CVT200 CARDIOVASCULAR ANA<strong>TO</strong>MY & PHYSIOLOGY (4 credits) This course is a study<br />

of the anatomy, physiology, and structural relationship of the human heart and vascular system.<br />

Focus is on cardiac anatomy and the innervations of the heart. Prerequisites: CVT100, 173<br />

CVT201 CARDIAC PHARMACOLOGY & DISEASE (4 credits) This course examines the<br />

drugs routinely used for the cardiac patient, those used in the coronary care unit, and those<br />

utilized in diagnostic and interventional cardiac catheterization procedures. Drugs are evaluated<br />

in terms of their actions, prescribed usage in routine and emergency situations, alternative<br />

nomenclature (generic and trade names), dosages, common routes of administration and side<br />

effects. Etiology, pathophysiology, and clinical findings of common cardiovascular disease processes<br />

will be discussed. Prerequisites: 151, 173, 176, CVT200, CVT204<br />

CVT202 RADIATION PHYSICS, BIOLOGY & PROTECTION (4 credits) This course will<br />

identify the sources and nature of ionizing radiation, describe units to measure radiation<br />

exposure, and ways ionizing radiation interacts with matter. Students will evaluate permissible<br />

limits of exposure for occupational and non-occupational radiation, and discuss methods<br />

of protection from ionizing radiation and the bodies’ response to radiation limits. This course<br />

includes an explanation of radiation physics associated with the radiographic equipment and<br />

cardiovascular technology. Prerequisites: 151, CVT100<br />

CVT203 ADVANCED PATIENT CARE & ASSESSMENT (4 credits) This course provides<br />

instruction in delivery of safe patient care in potentially unstable or unpredictable situations.<br />

Instruction is given on initiating intravenous access, pulse oximetry and monitoring. A section<br />

covers the purpose and significance of a variety of tubes, lines, and specialized equipment. An<br />

overview of the cardiovascular field and professional standards is included. Prerequisites: 171,<br />

173, 176, 211, CVT200, CVT204, CVT301, CVT302<br />

CVT204 CHEMISTRY & SPECIAL <strong>TO</strong>PICS IN INVASIVE CARDIOVASCULAR SCIENCE<br />

(4 credits) This course will introduce the student to the basic concepts of general chemistry as<br />

it relates to the health sciences. Emphasis is placed on chemistry rather than on the physiology<br />

aspects of the human body. Students will progress from basic concepts, such as matter and<br />

energy, to more complex discussions of protein and oxygen metabolism. Prerequisites: 173,<br />

CVT100<br />

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course descriptions<br />

CVT300 ECG INTERPRETATION & PACEMAKERS (4 credits) Studies the electrocardiographic<br />

theory and principles necessary to recognize and evaluate ECG data from a real-time<br />

monitor and 12-lead electrocardiogram. This course presents a detailed examination of cellular<br />

mechanisms, conduction pathology and the disease processes responsible for irregularities of<br />

the heart rhythm. A systematic approach is utilized to introduce the types and severity of cardiac<br />

arrhythmias, symptoms and treatment. Prerequisite: CVT100, 173<br />

CVT301 CARDIOVASCULAR DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES I (3 credits) Introduction to the<br />

diagnostic procedures used in the Cardiac Catheterization Laboratory. Instruction in cardiac<br />

physiology and medical instrumentation is applied to cardiac laboratory procedures including<br />

patient preparation and monitoring, equipment setup, and the coronary angiography procedures<br />

itself. This course will also examine catheters, guide wires, needles, and patient closure<br />

devices related to invasive cardiovascular procedures. Prerequisite: CVT100, 173<br />

CVT302 IMAGING SYSTEMS & ANGIOGRAPHY (3 credits) This course discusses the radiology<br />

imaging system and its relationship to radiation production, x-ray beam characteristics<br />

and imaging system performance. It examines injection techniques related to cardiovascular<br />

imaging. This course includes detailed discussion on angiographic procedures and imaging in<br />

invasive cardiovascular technology. Prerequisite: CVT100, 173<br />

CVT303 HEMODYNAMIC DATA & MONI<strong>TO</strong>RING (4 credits) This course consists of<br />

instruction in primary hemodynamic formulas. This course will examine in detail hemodynamic<br />

waveforms, hemodynamic calculations and arrhythmia recognition. Prerequisite: CVT200,<br />

CVT204, CVT302, 151<br />

CVT304 CARDIOVASCULAR CLINICAL I (3 credits) This clinical course is designed to allow<br />

the student to gradually gain experience in assisting the cardiologist to perform diagnostic<br />

cardiac catheterization procedures and hemodynamic calculations. Focus is on the beginning<br />

Invasive Cardiovascular Laboratory clinical experience. Prerequisites: CVT200, CVT301, clinical<br />

site acceptance, CVT302, 211<br />

CVT400 CARDIOVASCULAR DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES II (4 credits) This course is a<br />

continuation of Cardiovascular Diagnostic Techniques I, with emphasis on advanced cardiovascular<br />

diagnostic and interventional procedures including percutaneous transluminal coronary<br />

angioplasty and stents. Prerequisites: CVT300, CVT301, CVT302, CVT303, CVT304<br />

CVT403 HEMODYNAMICS & CARDIOVASCULAR <strong>TO</strong>PICS (4 credits) This is a continuation<br />

of hemodynamics & data monitoring. This course includes further development in hemodynamic<br />

monitoring in left ventricular function and ejection fraction. Emphasis is on hemodynamic<br />

monitoring formulas. Prerequisites: CVT201, CVT203, CVT301, CVT303, CVT304<br />

CVT405 CARDIOVASCULAR CLINICAL II (8 credits) A continuation of Cardiovascular<br />

Clinical I, with emphasis on areas of cardiovascular aseptic techniques. The student will be<br />

expected to prepare an operative site, identify and pass instruments to the cardiologist performing<br />

both diagnostic and interventional catheterization procedures, and perform physiological<br />

monitoring within the cardiac catheterization laboratory. In addition, the student may be<br />

required to maintain hemostasis, and apply proper surgical dressings post care. Prerequisites:<br />

CVT201, CVT202, CVT300, CVT303, CVT304<br />

CVT500 CARDIOVASCULAR SPECIAL <strong>TO</strong>PICS & REVIEW (4 credits) Topics include<br />

current events, skills, knowledge, and/or attitudes and behavior pertinent to cardiovascular<br />

technology and/or occupation and relevant to the professional development of the student.<br />

Students will evaluate and review certification requirements; mock review will be administered<br />

within this class. Prerequisites: All courses in the program Co-requisite is CVT605<br />

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course descriptions<br />

CVT505 CARDIOVASCULAR CLINICAL III (12 credits) A continuation of Cardiovascular<br />

Clinical II, students will continue to develop skills by active participation in a cardiac<br />

catheterization laboratory. This clinical prepares the student for the full-range of duties expected<br />

of the cardiac catheterization technologist and includes cardiac catheterization, pacemakers,<br />

coronary angioplasty and stents, computers and calculations. Prerequisites: CVT405, CVT403,<br />

CVT303<br />

CVT605 ADVANCED CARDIOVASCULAR CLINICAL I (12 credits) A continuation of<br />

Cardiovascular Clinical III, students will continue to develop skills by active participation in a<br />

cardiac catheterization laboratory. This clinical prepares the student for the full-range of duties<br />

expected of the cardiac catheterization technologist with emphasis on cardiac catheterization,<br />

interventional coronary angioplasty and stents. This also includes exposure to electropysiology<br />

studies and pacemaker insertions. Prerequisites: All courses in the program. Co-requisite is<br />

CVT500<br />

Limited Medical Radiography<br />

LMR201 RADIOGRAPHIC IMAGING (4 credits) This course provides the student with the<br />

principles of radiographic quality, distortion, and exposure factors to include specific equipment<br />

needed to produce the radiographic images. The student will acquire general knowledge<br />

of scattered radiation, radiographic film, inverse-square law, and the relationship between MAS<br />

and KvP. This course involves the use of radiographic mathematical principles used to produce<br />

radiographs. Prerequisites: RAD100 Co-requisite: RAD102 (may be taken previously)<br />

LMR300 LMR CLINICAL I (3 credits) This course is designed to provide the student with the<br />

opportunity to perform radiographic examinations in a clinical setting. Competency evaluations<br />

will be performed on specific examinations to determine the students’ ability to produce quality<br />

radiographs according to the standards of the program and state law. Clinical rotation will be<br />

determined for each student based on examination availability and student needs. Prerequisites:<br />

RAD200, 211,173, LMR201 Corequisites: 171 and RAD300 (may be taken previously)<br />

LMR301 LMR CLINICAL II (9 credits) This course is a continuation of LMR300. This course<br />

utilizes supervised experience with clinical affiliates that enable the student to become familiar<br />

with departmental policies, office in-procedures, body mechanics, and radiographic procedures.<br />

The student develops and refines skills in patient management, equipment manipulation and<br />

film evaluation. Co-requisite: LMR300<br />

LMR400 LIMITED MEDICAL RADIOGRAPHY CERTIFICATION REVIEW (3 credits)<br />

This course provides the student with a review of basic radiographic topics. Topics will include<br />

principles of radiographic positioning and procedures, physics and equipment of radiographic<br />

imaging, radiographic anatomy and physiology, radiation protection, and the theories and principles<br />

of test preparation and testing. This course will assess the student’s understanding of the<br />

major subject areas in radiologic technology, recognize deficient areas of knowledge and prepare<br />

for Kentucky’s Limited Scope of Practice examination in Radiography. Co-requisite: LMR301<br />

Massage Therapy<br />

MST100 INTRODUCTION <strong>TO</strong> MASSAGE THERAPY (2 credits) This course is designed to<br />

allow students to explore the profession of Massage Therapy. Topics include massage therapy’s<br />

history, laws, practice settings, range of modalities, professional affiliations, professional boundaries,<br />

career benefits and pitfalls, and the benefits of massage therapy as a wellness modality.<br />

Prerequisite: none<br />

MST101 CORE MASSAGE I (5 credits) Basic massage techniques, routines, and body mechanics<br />

will be established by the student in this course. Basic draping techniques, client interviews<br />

and simple documentation will be explained and practiced. Students will be exposed to various<br />

types of equipment and supplies. Prerequisite: none<br />

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course descriptions<br />

MST102 CORE MASSAGE II (6 credits) Adapting massage therapy to client needs will<br />

be emphasized in this course. The student will learn principles and practice techniques in<br />

advanced massage modalities and hydrotherapy. Prerequisite: MST100A and MST101A<br />

MST103 MASSAGE PRACTICE LAB (1 credit) This lab provides supervised practice in<br />

clinical massage therapy. The student will be assigned massage therapy sessions in the student<br />

clinic, and demonstrate client management from greeting and intakes to re-booking and<br />

treatment plan design. Students will manage clinic tasks between sessions. The student will<br />

receive consultation from the instructor on all aspects of clinic performance. Emphasis will be<br />

on customizing treatments for the client while integrating techniques learned in Core 1 and 2<br />

into a Swedish massage. Teamwork and professionalism will also be developed. Prerequisite:<br />

MST101 Co-requisite: MST102<br />

MST104 CORE MASSAGE III (6 credits) Students will study and practice additional massage<br />

and bodywork modalities. The student will be given greater responsibility in the development<br />

of treatment plans and documentation. They will focus on integrating all techniques to develop<br />

cohesiveness and fluency in massage therapy sessions. A research survey and case studies will<br />

be presented. Prerequisite: MST102A<br />

MST110 HOLISTIC THERAPIES (2 credits) This course is designed for the students to<br />

explore holistic wellness modalities for both personal use and client referral. Prerequisite: none<br />

MST113 MYOLOGY (4 credits) This is an in-depth study of the anatomy of muscles. Students<br />

will learn attachments, actions, innervations, and group muscles according to function and<br />

accommodations. Prerequisite: 172<br />

MST114 KINESIOLOGY (3 credits) This course introduces the massage therapist to principles<br />

of body movement with emphasis on basic anatomy as it relates to proper form in daily movements,<br />

common injury and correction of form. The relationship between structure and function<br />

of the skeletal and muscular systems and their support structures is also covered. Prerequisites:<br />

172 Co-requisite: MST115A (may be taken previously)<br />

MST116 MASSAGE PATHOLOGY (4 credits) This course will address specific human illnesses<br />

such as fibromyalgia, sciatica, and chronic fatigue as they relate to massage therapy. Medical<br />

indications and contraindications of massage therapy will be presented. Precautions for commonly<br />

prescribed medications will be discussed. Prerequisite: 172, MST101A<br />

MST118 NATIONAL CERTIFICATION EXAM REVIEW (2 credits) This course provides the<br />

student with a review of basic massage therapy topics and assesses students’ understanding in<br />

major subject areas of anatomy and physiology, massage therapy techniques and skills, business<br />

practices and legal and ethical requirements. Co-requisite: MST104A (may be taken previously)<br />

MST121 BUSINESS FOR SOMATIC PRACTICES (4 credits) Management principles and<br />

techniques relevant to the business of somatic practitioners will be presented. Students will<br />

develop a business plan, develop marketing strategies and public speaking skills, discuss site<br />

selection, develop a budget, learn how to use software designed for the massage or personal<br />

training practice, compare advertising strategies and discuss how to hire and work with an<br />

accountant. Business structures and employee issues will be discussed. Client screening, safety<br />

and perception issues will be reviewed. Prerequisite: MST100 or PT100<br />

MST130 MASSAGE THERAPY EXTERNSHIP (4 credits) Students will use information from<br />

all previous courses in the practice of massage therapy in business and promotional settings.<br />

The student serves 100 hours practicing massage therapy procedures, techniques, documentation,<br />

and client retention. No payment for services is received. Prerequisite: current CPR certification<br />

(AHAHP) Co-requisite: MST104 (may be taken previously)<br />

MST214 NEUROLOGY (4 credits) This course will expand the massage therapist’s knowledge<br />

of the human nerve system. Classroom instruction will give the student a greater ability to<br />

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course descriptions<br />

understand the role of the nerve system in tissue dysfunction, wellness and therapeutic interventions.<br />

Prerequisite: 172, MST114<br />

MST216 NEUROMUSCULAR SKELETAL ASSESSMENT (3 credits) This course will instruct<br />

the massage therapist in the knowledge, skills and abilities of how to assess dysfunction of<br />

the neuromuscular and skeletal systems. Classroom and hands-on instruction is used to help<br />

students understand and perform orthopedic and other types of testing for common physical<br />

conditions related to injury and overuse. Prerequisite: 172, MST114<br />

MST230 MEDICAL MASSAGE (6 credits) This course covers elements of working safely and<br />

effectively on clients as part of a medical team versus independent orthopedic or wellness<br />

applications of massage therapy. Prerequisite: MST104, MST113<br />

Medical Laboratory Technician<br />

BIO101 BIOLOGY (6 credits) This course highlights key concepts, current understandings,<br />

and research trends for major fields of biology. Structure and function of several organisms are<br />

discussed in this course. The laboratory component of this course is used to enhance the students’<br />

comprehension of biological processes through hands on instruction. Prerequisite: none<br />

BIO201 MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY (6 credits) This course is designed for nursing and<br />

other allied health persons and is intended to introduce the student to the basic concepts and<br />

practices of microbiology, especially with regard to health and human disease. Lecture portions<br />

of the course will address basic biology of micro-organisms, pathogenic mechanisms, host<br />

defense and immunity, and human diseases. This course is taken with a laboratory component.<br />

Prerequisites for MLT students: 172 and 176<br />

CHE101 CHEMISTRY I (INORGANIC) (6 credits) In this course, students are introduced to<br />

the basic principles of inorganic chemistry. Students will gain a working knowledge of the<br />

Periodic Table, matter, energy, basic chemical reactions, reaction rates, and acid/base theory<br />

and application. This course will be taken with a laboratory component. Prerequisite: none<br />

CHE201 CHEMISTRY II (ORGANIC) (6 credits) Students in this course will apply the basic<br />

chemistry knowledge established in previous course work to understanding organic chemistry.<br />

This course concentrates on the classes of organic compounds and the reactions which have<br />

physiological activity of one sort or another and have biological importance. Prerequisite:<br />

CHE101<br />

SOC214 INTRODUCTION <strong>TO</strong> SOCIOLOGY (4 credits) This course examines basic sociological<br />

terms and concepts with an eye toward the practical and personal applications that sociology<br />

has to offer the student. The differences between the complementary natures of psychology<br />

and sociology are outlined, enabling the student to understand the uniqueness of the two<br />

fields. Prerequisite: None<br />

PSY274 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (4 credits) A study of the principles of growth<br />

and development covering the life span from infancy to late adulthood. The course focuses on<br />

the physical, social, and intellectual development of the individual. Prerequisite: None<br />

MLT101 INTRODUCTION <strong>TO</strong> MEDICAL LABORA<strong>TO</strong>RY (6 credits) This introductory<br />

course discusses the principles of microscopy, laboratory math, reagent preparation, laboratory<br />

safety, quality control, and common laboratory equipment usage. Information is presented to<br />

increase the students’ general knowledge of the medical laboratory. This course includes a laboratory<br />

portion so that students may perform various laboratory techniques. Prerequisite: none<br />

MLT200 CLINICAL CHEMISTRY (6 credits) This course covers general laboratory chemistry<br />

principles. Specimen collection and transport requirements, quality control procedures, and<br />

routine chemical analysis of blood and body fluids are discussed. Interpretation and application<br />

of laboratory data is used in defining diagnoses and detecting unknown diseases. This<br />

course contains a laboratory component. Prerequisite: MLT101, CHE201<br />

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course descriptions<br />

MLT201 HEMA<strong>TO</strong>LOGY (6 credits) This course focuses on the origins, morphology, biochemistry<br />

and function of blood cells. The laboratory evaluation and importance is discussed in<br />

relation to diagnosis and treatment of hematological disorders. This course contains a laboratory<br />

component to help students develop the skills necessary for the performance of diagnostic<br />

tests. Prerequisite: MLT101<br />

MLT202 COAGULATION (6 credits) This course discusses the clinical symptoms and appropriate<br />

laboratory evaluation necessary for diagnosis and treatment of hemostatic disorders.<br />

The laboratory component of this course is used for students to develop the skills necessary for<br />

performance of diagnostic tests in this area of the medical laboratory. Prerequisite: MLT201<br />

MLT203 IMMUNOLOGY/IMMUNOHEMA<strong>TO</strong>LOGY (6 credits) In this course, the immune<br />

system as it relates to the human body’s defense against foreign substances is covered. It<br />

includes an overview of antigen-antibody test procedures including those clinical applications<br />

in blood group serology. Students are provided with a simulated laboratory setting in which to<br />

complete both basic immunology testing, as well as to develop skills necessary to function in a<br />

modern clinical immunohematology laboratory. Prerequisite: MLT201<br />

MLT204 BODY FLUIDS (6 credits) Body fluid analysis in relationship to diagnosis and treatment<br />

of various diseases is emphasized in this course. Spinal fluid, pleural fluid, synovial fluid,<br />

effusions, and urine are all discussed in the lecture portion of this course. Renal function and<br />

urinalysis are discussed in detail. The laboratory component of this course is designed to allow<br />

the student to demonstrate proficiency of analysis of all body fluids. Co-requisite: MLT201<br />

MLT300 MEDICAL LABORA<strong>TO</strong>RY CLINICAL I (11 credits) The student will perform a clinical<br />

rotation at an accredited medical laboratory. The 11-week rotation will include practical<br />

performance of all skills in the Clinical Chemistry, Hematology, and Coagulation departments<br />

of laboratory. Prerequisite: All courses in MLT curriculum<br />

MLT301 MEDICAL LABORA<strong>TO</strong>RY CLINICAL II (11 credits) The student will complete the<br />

clinical portion of the program in an accredited medical laboratory. This 11-week rotation will<br />

include performance of all skills in the microbiology, immunology, immunohematology, and<br />

urinalysis departments of the laboratory. Prerequisite: MLT300<br />

NURSING<br />

Associate in Applied Science<br />

NS500 PN <strong>TO</strong> RN BRIDGE (7 credits) This course will facilitate the transition from the PN to<br />

the RN role and the different responsibilities of each. It will include PN to RN role comparison,<br />

contrast, and transitions. Students will reflect on their own present and future roles associated<br />

with nursing. Areas of study will include: Gordon’s functional health patterns across the life<br />

span, the nursing process, introduction to the teaching/learning process, ethical/legal considerations<br />

of client care, documentation, confidentiality, accountability, autonomy, benevolence,<br />

and communication skills. Head-to-toe physical assessment with a focus on normal versus<br />

abnormal findings will be included. Prerequisite: none<br />

NS501 HEALTH PROMOTION & DISEASE PREVENTION (10 credits) This course is an<br />

introduction to public health, health promotion, and injury/disease prevention throughout<br />

the life span. The teaching/learning process as the foundation of health education and health<br />

promotion will be taught, incorporating Gordon’s functional health patterns. Biopsychosocial,<br />

spiritual, environmental, and cultural dimensions in health will be explored. The course<br />

discussion will focus on nursing interventions for the individual, family, and small groups.<br />

Traditional complementary and alternate therapies will be included with a special focus on<br />

pharmacology and nutrition. Prerequisite: NS500<br />

NS600 HEALTH DEVIATIONS I (10 credits) This course is designed to assist practitioners<br />

in building on previously learned skills, to develop more complex physical assessment tech-<br />

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course descriptions<br />

niques, and therapeutic interventions. Written communication and the medical record will be<br />

explored. Gordon’s functional health patterns will form the reference point for health assessment,<br />

restorative care, and health deviations. Life span development and cultural aspects of<br />

care will be integrated. Health deviations will focus on the body fluid, immune and lymphatic<br />

system, vision, and hearing. Pain management, abuse of therapeutic medications, and end of<br />

life issues will also be included. Clinical assignments will reflect concepts related to theory sessions.<br />

Prerequisite: NS500, BIO103, MTH101<br />

NS700 HEALTH DEVIATIONS II (10 credits) A continuation of Health Deviations I, focusing<br />

on life span development and cultural aspects of care, related individuals and families with<br />

common and complex health needs. Gordon’s functional health patterns will form the reference<br />

point for individual and care of families with changes/deviations related to reproduction,<br />

endocrine, gastrointestinal (upper and lower), renal and cardiovascular systems. Clinical<br />

assignments reflect concepts related to the theory sessions. Prerequisite: BIO201, NS500<br />

NS800 HEALTH DEVIATIONS III (16 credits) The completion course in Health Deviations<br />

focusing on life span development and cultural aspects of care related to mental health/illness;<br />

musculoskeletal, neurological and integumentary systems and health deviations. Gordon’s<br />

functional health patterns will form the reference point for assessment and delivery of care<br />

from onset of illness through rehabilitation. Special emphasis will be utilization of therapeutic<br />

communication techniques in the mental health setting. Clinical assignments will reflect concepts<br />

related to the theory sessions. Prerequisite: NS500, NS600, NS700, NS501<br />

NS801 SEMINAR IN MANAGEMENT & PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT (3 credits)<br />

This course provides a didactic opportunity for the student to apply theories of leadership and<br />

management. Methods of managing human, physical, financial, and technological resources<br />

in providing customer service will be discussed. Regulatory and accrediting standards/agencies<br />

will be reviewed. Theories of unit management, patient assignments, staff scheduling, and<br />

delegations to unlicensed personnel will be explored. Kentucky nursing law will be referenced.<br />

CQI project will be completed. Transition from student to practicing nurse and member of the<br />

multidisciplinary healthcare team will be achieved. Prerequisite: NS500, NS501, NS600, NS700<br />

ENG101 COMPOSITION I (4 credits) (class taught at <strong>Sullivan</strong> <strong>University</strong>) This is a composition<br />

course with a focus on informative essays containing strong thesis statements. Students<br />

produce university-level essays utilizing drafting and redrafting, plus some research strategies.<br />

Work with commas and multi-clause sentences are included. Prerequisite: none<br />

ENG102 COMPOSITION II (4 credits) (<strong>Sullivan</strong> <strong>University</strong>) The focus of this course is on<br />

persuasive essays, plus a research paper with multiple sources. Care is taken to avoid logical<br />

fallacies in persuasion. Prerequisite: ENG101<br />

MTH101 <strong>COLLEGE</strong> MATHEMATICS (4 credits) (<strong>Sullivan</strong> <strong>University</strong>) This course provides<br />

students with experience working with real numbers, solving and graphing linear equations,<br />

solving inequalities and exponential functions. Prerequisite: none<br />

BIO103 HUMAN ANA<strong>TO</strong>MY & PHYSIOLOGY (6 credits) (<strong>Sullivan</strong> <strong>University</strong>) An introduction<br />

to the major concepts of human anatomy and physiology. Provides an overall account of<br />

the interrelationships of structure and function of the human body. Four hours lecture and four<br />

hours laboratory per week. Prerequisite: none<br />

BIO201 MEDICAL MICROBIOLOGY (6 credits) (<strong>Sullivan</strong> <strong>University</strong>) This course is designed<br />

for nursing and other allied health persons and is intended to introduce the student to the<br />

basic concepts and practices of microbiology, especially with regard to health and human disease.<br />

Lecture portions of the course will address basic biology of microorganisms, pathogenic<br />

mechan-isms, host defense and immunity, and human diseases. This course is taken with a<br />

laboratory component. Prerequisite: none<br />

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course descriptions<br />

PSY214 INTRODUCTION <strong>TO</strong> PSYCHOLOGY (4 credits) (<strong>Sullivan</strong> <strong>University</strong>) A broad overview<br />

of the major individuals and their particular contributions to the field of psychology are<br />

presented. Basic physiological information and its relevance to the study of psychology are<br />

presented. Major divisions of psychology and their unique contribution to the understanding<br />

of human mental and behavioral processes constitute the major portion of this course.<br />

Prerequisite: none.<br />

PSY274 DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY (4 credits) (<strong>Sullivan</strong> <strong>University</strong>) A study of the<br />

principles of growth and development covering the life span from infancy to late adulthood.<br />

The course focuses on the physical, social, and intellectual development of the individual.<br />

Prerequisite: none<br />

SOC214 INTRODUCTION <strong>TO</strong> SOCIOLOGY (4 credits) (<strong>Sullivan</strong> <strong>University</strong>) This course<br />

examines basic sociological terms and concepts with an eye toward the practical and personal<br />

applications that sociology has to offer the student. The differences between the complementary<br />

natures of psychology and sociology are outlined, enabling the student to understand the<br />

uniqueness of the two fields. Prerequisite: none<br />

Practical Nursing Diploma Level I<br />

PN100 ANA<strong>TO</strong>MY & PHYSIOLOGY (7 credits) An overview of the systems of the body, its<br />

basic structure and function. Prerequisite: none<br />

PN101 PERSONAL & VOCATIONAL RELATIONSHIPS (2 credits) Study skills, fundamentals<br />

of self-understanding, beginning communications skills, human relations (civic, ethical,<br />

social, vocational, and legal) as related to practical nursing. Prerequisite: none<br />

PN102 MATH CONCEPTS FOR PHARMACOLOGY (2 credits) This course provides a systematic<br />

review of the principles of mathematics. The student is introduced to metric and apothecary<br />

equivalences in drug measurements. The student is introduced to drug dosage calculation<br />

and basic general principles of medication administration. Prerequisite: none<br />

PN103 INTRODUCTION <strong>TO</strong> NURSING & HEALTH CARE (6 credits) Historical overview<br />

of current health care including medical economics, ethical and legal parameters, roles and<br />

responsibilities of healthcare team members with an emphasis on nursing and the role of the<br />

practical nurse. Medical terminology, concepts of health, health assessment, self-care, and functional<br />

health patterns across the life span are explored. Prerequisite: none<br />

PN104 DEVELOPMENT OF CAREGIVER ROLE (10 credits) Introduction to nursing and the<br />

nursing process as related to promoting healthy functional health patterns across the life span;<br />

opportunity to develop and practice psychomotor skills related to health assessment, promotion,<br />

maintenance, and illness prevention. Prerequisite: none<br />

Practical Nursing Diploma Level II (all courses in Level I are prerequisites)<br />

PN200 INTRODUCTION <strong>TO</strong> HEALTH DEVIATIONS (7 credits) Application of the nursing<br />

process for selected adult clients experiencing common functional health deviations interfering<br />

with activities of daily living. Emphasis is on nurse as provider of care. Prerequisite: level I<br />

courses Co-requisite: PN201<br />

PN201 PHARMACOLOGY (3 credits) Study of common drugs by classification and their<br />

effects with emphasis on legal responsibility, accountability, and application of the nursing process<br />

to drug therapy. Prerequisite: level I courses<br />

PN202 MENTAL HEALTH CONCEPTS (7 credits) Applies nursing process to clients experiencing<br />

common mental health problems. Explores chemical dependency, violence, and other<br />

stress and developmental problems related to mental health. Prerequisite: level I courses<br />

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course descriptions<br />

PN302 MANAGEMENT OF GERIATRIC CLIENT (4 credits) Exploration and application of<br />

geriatric client management principles in long-term care settings. Prerequisite: level I courses<br />

Co-requisite: PN201<br />

Practical Nursing Diploma Level III (all courses in Level II are prerequisites)<br />

PN203 NURSING & CHILDBEARING FAMILY (7 credits) Application of the nursing process<br />

with healthy childbearing families focusing on common growth and development processes<br />

associated with parenting. Reproductive health and pregnancy, child health, and common<br />

childhood health problems are explored. Prerequisite: level II courses<br />

PN300 HEALTH DEVIATIONS I (14 credits) Application of the nursing process for selected<br />

child/adult clients experiencing common health deviations that impose limitations on functional<br />

health patterns. Emphasis is on the nurse as provider of care. Prerequisite: level II<br />

courses<br />

PN301 NURSING TRENDS & ISSUES (2 credits) Builds on PN101 with emphasis on current<br />

events in healthcare systems and nursing practice in preparation of the role transition from student<br />

to competent employee. Prerequisite: level II courses<br />

Practical Nursing Diploma Level IV (all courses in Level III are prerequisites)<br />

PN400 HEALTH DEVIATIONS II (16 credits) Application of the nursing process for selected<br />

child/adult clients experiencing selected health deviations that impose limitations on multiple<br />

functional health patterns. Emphasis is on the nurse as provider of care. Prerequisite: level III<br />

courses<br />

Ophthalmic Assistant Certificate Program<br />

OPH100 OPHTHALMIC ASSISTING TECHNIQUES (6 credits) This course will introduce<br />

the student to the various administrative and clinical duties performed by an entry level<br />

Ophthalmic Assistant in an eye care medical setting. Topics covered include but are not limited<br />

to history taking, medical documentation, patient triage, basic ophthalmic science, clinical<br />

practices, ophthalmic surgery, special procedures, and the role of the Ophthalmic Assistant in<br />

eye care. Day Division only. Prerequisite: none<br />

OPH200 OPHTHALMIC ASSISTANT EXTERNSHIP (4 credits) In cooperation with physician<br />

offices, the advanced student is assigned to a specific location and serves 120 hours practicing<br />

ophthalmic assistant procedures. No payment for services is received. Prerequisite: All<br />

other courses in the curriculum<br />

Patient Care Assistant<br />

PCA100 NURSE ASSISTANT SKILLS (5 credits) This 4-week course provides knowledge and<br />

skills for nurse aides to assume the role and responsibility required in a long-term care setting.<br />

The focus is communication, infection control, safety, resident/patient rights, and basic nursing<br />

skills. This training prepares the student to sit for the State Registered Nurse Assistant (SRNA)<br />

credential. Prerequisites: 172, 211 Class time will extend beyond normal class schedule<br />

PCA102 MENTAL HEALTH, RES<strong>TO</strong>RATIVE AIDE, & HOME HEALTH (8 credits) This<br />

7-week course exposes the student to the healthcare environment in which they may be working,<br />

including the areas of mental health, home health, and restorative health. The course<br />

focuses on patient needs and situations that may be encountered in these environments and<br />

skills required in these situations. Prerequisite: PCA100 or PCA101 Class time will extend<br />

beyond normal class schedule<br />

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course descriptions<br />

Personal Trainer Diploma<br />

PT100 INTRODUCTION <strong>TO</strong> PERSONAL TRAINING (2 credits): This course provides the<br />

student with a survey of career opportunities and some basic skills in personal training. Basic<br />

concepts and components of physical fitness will be presented, as well as an overview of ethics,<br />

public speaking, customer service and professionalism. Class will require outside assignments<br />

in gyms to familiarize with types of equipment. Prerequisite: none<br />

PT101 SOFTWARE MANAGEMENT FOR PERSONAL TRAINERS (3 credits): This course<br />

provides instruction and practice in using software for personal training. The student will<br />

manipulate software to simulate business tasks including marketing, scheduling trainers and<br />

facilities, invoicing, accounting, generating workouts, tracking progress, client education for<br />

retention, and providing clients with access to follow-up self-service. Secure management of<br />

client information will be presented. Prerequisite: Spencerian current HIPAA certificate<br />

PT102 PERSONAL TRAINING I (6 credits): This course introduces the student to the major<br />

components of health and fitness analysis, basic exercise program design, and the skills necessary<br />

for teaching individual activities in and out of the gym. Components of exercise physiology<br />

and safety are included throughout. Corequisites: PT100, 172<br />

PT103 PERSONAL TRAINING II (6 credits): This course explores advanced components of<br />

fitness analysis, functional training program design, and the skills necessary for teaching group<br />

activities. Components of exercise physiology and safety are included throughout. Prerequisite:<br />

PT101, PT102<br />

PT104 TRAINING PROGRAM DESIGN (2 credits): This lab provides the student with a<br />

clinical opportunity to design simple training programs for healthy clients with an experienced<br />

personal trainer. Class may require off-campus work in gyms to evaluate clients and begin<br />

planning with their trainer, as well as on-campus preparation and review with instructor.<br />

Prerequisite: PT101, PT102<br />

PT105 NUTRITION FOR WEIGHT MANAGEMENT & PHYSICAL ACTIVITY (4 credits):<br />

This course provides a deeper look at nutritional needs for weight loss, health, and athletic performance.<br />

Students will learn basic evaluation for individualized nutritional needs and study<br />

topics including carbohydrate loading, fad diets, supplements, energy drinks and hydration.<br />

Prerequisite: none<br />

PT106 EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY (4 credits): Human physiology in various levels of exercise<br />

and types of training will be studied across a number of body systems. Emphasis on adaptations<br />

to environment, aging, body composition, and current health and fitness is provided.<br />

Energy expenditures, storage and transfer will be studied. The importance of accessing and<br />

evaluating new research will be developed in the class. Prerequisite: 172<br />

PT107 EXERCISE PSYCHOLGY (2 credits): This course will include a survey of studies on the<br />

relationships between exercise and the mind. Students will learn psychological and mental benefits<br />

of exercise as well as to recognize overtraining and exercise addiction. Prerequisite: none<br />

PT108 SPECIAL POPULATIONS (4 credits): Development of training programs for special<br />

populations will be studied. Populations to be examined include obesity, diabetes, asthma,<br />

orthopedic conditions, pregnancy, elderly and aging. Pharmacology for common conditions<br />

will be presented. Prerequisites: PT103<br />

PT109 PERSONAL TRAINER EXAM REVIEW (4 Credits): This class offers course review and<br />

a study of testing-taking methods in preparation for national exams. Corequisites: PT103, PT106<br />

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course descriptions<br />

PT110 PERSONAL TRAINING INTERNSHIP (3 credits): This course is the final component<br />

of the personal trainer curriculum that serves to integrate all materials learned in a practical setting.<br />

Students will be placed at various training facilities providing direct application of business<br />

and personal training techniques and methodologies. No payment for services is received.<br />

Prerequisite: PT103 Other requirements: Instructor approval and current CPR certificate<br />

Radiologic Technologist<br />

RAD100 INTRODUCTION <strong>TO</strong> RADIOGRAPHY (4 credits) This course introduces the student<br />

to the basic concepts associated with radiographic imaging. The students are oriented to<br />

basic concepts of radiation physics, beginning with the theory of atomic structure and continuing<br />

through the principles of electricity and magnetism. Students will learn the technical<br />

aspects of radiographic imaging such as production of radiation, imaging equipment, film<br />

exposure and film processing. Student will determine methods for radiographic image evaluation<br />

and explore topics associated with radiation protection and radiation detection and monitoring.<br />

Limited to students in the LMR and/or RT programs.<br />

RAD102 INTRODUCTION <strong>TO</strong> RADIOGRAPHIC CLINICAL <strong>TO</strong>PICS I (3 credits). This<br />

course orients the student to basic concepts that enable them to become familiar with medical<br />

setting departmental policies, office procedures, body mechanics, patient care, radiation protection,<br />

and radiographic procedures, preparing the student for clinicals. Students will broaden<br />

their knowledge of bony anatomy and correlate the appearance of bony parts on radiographs.<br />

Prerequisite: Acceptance into Limited Medical Radiology or Radiologic Technologist program<br />

RAD200 RADIOGRAPHIC POSITIONING I (9 credits) This course provides the student<br />

with the basic knowledge and skill, as well as the anatomy and the anatomical relationship<br />

necessary to perform standard radiographic procedures of the upper and lower extremities,<br />

chest, spinal column, and pelvis. Optimal radiographic production, application of critical<br />

thinking skills, and system anatomy identification are reviewed. Laboratory demonstrations<br />

will be used to complement the lecture portion of this course. Prerequisites: RAD100, RAD102,<br />

172 Co-requisite: LMR201 (may be taken previously)<br />

RT201 ADVANCED RADIOGRAPHIC POSITIONING I (3 credits) This course provides the<br />

student with the basic knowledge and skill, as well as the anatomy and anatomical relationship<br />

necessary to perform general radiographic fluoroscopy procedures. This will include urinary<br />

system, biliary systems, and gastrointestinal system to include discussion on the use of contrast<br />

media for each system. Optimal radiographic production, application of critical thinking skills,<br />

contrast administration and system anatomy identification are reviewed. Laboratory demonstrations<br />

will be used to complement the lecture portion of this course. Prerequisites: RAD200,<br />

RT202, 173<br />

RT202 RADIOGRAPHIC CLINICAL II (3 credits) This course is the second in a series that<br />

provides the student with exposure to the practice of radiography. This clinical education<br />

course takes place in various radiology departments (clinical affiliates). The student develops<br />

and refines skills in patient management, equipment manipulation, positioning, technique<br />

manipulation, and film evaluation. Rotating shifts and assignments. Prerequisites: 211<br />

Corequisites: RAD200, 171 and 176 (may be taken previously)<br />

RAD300 RADIOGRAPHIC POSITIONING II (4 credits) This course provides the student<br />

with the basic knowledge and skills, as well as the anatomy and the anatomical relationship<br />

necessary to perform standard radiographic procedures of the cranium, abdomen, facial bones,<br />

and sinus exams. This will also include basic knowledge of advanced imaging procedures,<br />

such as portable, trauma, and pediatric radiography. Optimal radiographic production, application<br />

of critical thinking skills, and system anatomy identification are reviewed. Prerequisites:<br />

173, RAD200, (RT202 for RT students)<br />

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course descriptions<br />

RT301 RADIOGRAPHIC IMAGING I (4 credits) This course provides the student with the<br />

basic concepts of radiation production, principles of radiographic quality, distortion, and<br />

exposure factors to include specific equipment needed to produce the radiographic images.<br />

The student will acquire basic knowledge of the x-ray generating equipment, x-ray production<br />

and interaction, scattered radiation, inverse-square law and the relationship between MAS<br />

and KvP. The student also acquires the knowledge of the darkroom, processing and materials,<br />

radiographic film, including its storage, handling, characteristics, and possible artifacts are<br />

discussed. This course involves the use of the mathematical principles used to produce radiographs.<br />

Prerequisite: RAD300, RT202<br />

RT302 RADIOGRAPHIC CLINICAL III (3 credits) This course is the third in a series that provides<br />

the student with exposure to the practice of radiography. This clinical education course<br />

takes place in various radiology departments (clinical affiliates). The student develops and<br />

refines skills in patient management, equipment manipulation, positioning, technique manipulation,<br />

and film evaluation. Rotating shifts and assignments. Prerequisite: 171, RAD200, RT202<br />

RT402 RADIOGRAPHIC CLINICAL IV (3 credits) This course is the fourth in a series that<br />

provides the student with exposure to the practice of radiography. This clinical education<br />

course takes place in various radiology departments (clinical affiliates). The student develops<br />

and refines skills in patient management, equipment manipulation, positioning, technique<br />

manipulation, and film evaluation. Rotating shifts and assignments. Prerequisite: RT302<br />

RT404 PATIENT CARE & EDUCATION (4 credits) This course focuses on advanced patient<br />

care techniques, such as cardiac monitoring, venipuncture, and trauma situations. This will<br />

include basic knowledge of communication, patient assessment and patient education within<br />

the radiology department. An overview of the field of radiology and professional standards will<br />

conclude this course. Prerequisite: RT302 Co-requisite: 177 (may be taken previously)<br />

RT501 RADIOGRAPHIC IMAGING II (4 credits) This course provides the student with the<br />

basic concepts of radiographic techniques. The student will learn to analyze the effects of any<br />

change in exposure conditions on the four radiographic qualities of density, contrast, recorded<br />

detail, and distortion. This course will include basic knowledge of single-phase, three-phase,<br />

automatic exposure control, and photo timing equipment. The principles of radiographic exposure<br />

variables and processing, analysis of the radiographic image, problem-solving approach<br />

to practical application of principles will be included. This course involves the use of the mathematical<br />

principles used to produce radiographs. Prerequisite: RT301, RT402, RT404<br />

RT502 RADIOGRAPHIC CLINICAL V (9 credits) This course is the fifth in a series that provides<br />

the student with exposure to the practice of radiography. This clinical education course<br />

takes place in various radiology departments (clinical affiliates). The student develops and<br />

refines skills in patient management, equipment manipulation, positioning, technique manipulation,<br />

and film evaluations. Rotating shifts and assignments Prerequisite: RT301, RT402, RT404<br />

RT503 RADIATION PHYSICS (4 credits) This course provides the student with the basic<br />

concepts of radiation and the fundamentals of physics. This will include x-ray production and<br />

interaction, x-ray emission, and units of measurements. Prerequisite: RT301, RT402, 151<br />

RT504 RADIATION PROTECTION & BIOLOGY (4 credits) This course provides the student<br />

with an overview of the principles of radiation protection with strong emphasis on how to use<br />

ionizing radiation in a safe and prudent manner. Principles of radiation interaction in cells and<br />

the effect and factors affecting cell response to radiation, acute and chronic effects of radiation,<br />

maximum permissible dose and regulatory involvement will be discussed. Also included are<br />

discussions on radiation exposure standards and radiation monitoring. Prerequisites: RT301,<br />

RT402, RT404<br />

RT601 RADIOGRAPHIC SPECIAL PROCEDURES & PATHOPHYSIOLOGY (3 credits)<br />

This course discusses general disease processes, such as infection, in terms of pathophysiol-<br />

88


course descriptions<br />

ogy, manifestations, potential complications, and general treatment measures. It will examine<br />

conditions that may alter patient’s health status including “normal” changes such as aging,<br />

as well as the effects of problems such as pain and stress. This course will provide the student<br />

with the basic knowledge and skill as well as the anatomical relationship necessary to perform<br />

specialized procedures. Prerequisite: RT501, RT502, RT503<br />

RT602 ADVANCED RADIOGRAPHIC CLINICAL I (10 credits) This course is the first in a<br />

series of four which provides the student with advanced competencies and clinical experience<br />

in radiography. This clinical education course takes place in various radiology departments<br />

(clinical affiliates). The student develops and refines skills in patient management, equipment<br />

manipulation, positioning, technique manipulation, and film evaluation. Rotating shifts and<br />

assignments. Prerequisite: RT501, RT502, RT503, RT504<br />

RT603 ADVANCED RADIOGRAPHIC <strong>TO</strong>PICS/QUALITY ASSURANCE (4 credits) This<br />

course provides the student with advanced knowledge of the OR environment and will<br />

include the basic knowledge of quality assurance procedures within radiology. It will provide<br />

the student with the theory necessary to function as an entry-level radiologic technician in<br />

surgery. This course involves the usage of mathematic principles associated with producing<br />

radiographs, as well as discussing such topics as reject analysis, processing, control and maintenance,<br />

equipment listing, preventative maintenance, and record keeping as they relate to the<br />

OR and the radiology department. Prerequisites: RT501, RT502, RT503, RT504<br />

RT700 RADIOGRAPHIC PATHOLOGY & FILM CRITIQUE (4 credits) This course provides<br />

the student with an introduction to the concepts of disease. Pathology as it relates to various<br />

radiographic procedures is discussed. Critical analysis of radiographic examinations with reference<br />

to exposure factors, positioning and patient care techniques is included with a review<br />

and correlation of previous radiographic subjects. Prerequisites: RT601, RT602, RT603<br />

RT702 ADVANCED RADIOGRAPHIC CLINICAL II (10 credits) This course is the second in<br />

a series of four that provides the student with advanced competencies and clinical experience<br />

in radiography. This clinical education course takes place in various radiology departments<br />

(clinical affiliates). The student develops and refines skills in patient management, equipment<br />

manipulation, positioning, technique manipulation, and film evaluation. Rotating shifts and<br />

assignments. Prerequisite: RT602 Corequisites: RT601 and RT603 (may be taken previously)<br />

RT801 SPECIAL <strong>TO</strong>PICS IN RADIOGRAPHY & COMPUTERS (4 credits) This course<br />

provides the student with the basic knowledge of advanced radiographic procedures, such as<br />

computerized axial tomography, mammography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound,<br />

nuclear medicine, radiation therapy, and cardiac catheterization. This course will include computer<br />

technology and its role in medicine, with emphasis on the area of imaging. Prerequisites:<br />

RT700, RT702<br />

RT802 ADVANCED RADIOGRAPHIC CLINICAL III (10 credits) This course is the third in a<br />

series of four which provides the student with advanced competencies and clinical experience<br />

in radiography. This clinical education course takes place in various radiology departments<br />

(clinical affiliates). The student develops and refines skills in patient management, equipment<br />

manipulation, positioning, technique manipulation, and film evaluation. Rotating shifts and<br />

assignments. Prerequisites: RT702 Co-requisite: RT700 (may be taken previously)<br />

RT900 RADIOGRAPHIC REGISTRY REVIEW (4 credits) This course provides the student<br />

with a review of basic radiographic topics. Principles of radiographic positioning and procedures,<br />

physics and equipment of radiographic imaging, anatomy and physiology (radiographic),<br />

radiation protection, and the theories and principles of test preparation and testing.<br />

This course will assess the student’s understanding of the major subject areas in radiology<br />

technology, recognize deficient areas of knowledge and prepare for the American Registry<br />

Examination for Radiologic Technologists (A.R.R.T.). Prerequisites: All radiology courses in<br />

curriculum through 800 level Co-requisite: RT902<br />

89


course descriptions<br />

RT902 ADVANCED RADIOGRAPHIC CLINICAL IV (8 credits) This course is the last<br />

course in a series of four which provides the student with advanced competencies and clinical<br />

experience in radiography. This clinical education course takes place in various radiology<br />

departments (clinical affiliates). The student develops and refines skills in patient management,<br />

equipment manipulation, positioning, technique manipulation, and film evaluation. Rotating<br />

shifts and assignments. Prerequisite: All radiology courses in curriculum through 800 level<br />

Co-requisite: RT900<br />

Respiratory Therapy<br />

BIO100 FUNDAMENTALS OF SCIENCE (4 credits) This course is intended to provide the<br />

student with a basic introduction to principles in biology, chemistry, and physics. Students will<br />

explore fundamental elements of each of these basic areas of science and learn the practical<br />

applications for these sciences in this course. The course contains no laboratory component.<br />

Prerequisite: none<br />

RES100 INTRODUCTION <strong>TO</strong> CLINICAL ASSESSMENT (4 credits) This course will prepare<br />

the respiratory therapy student to develop a professional bedside manner. As a respiratory<br />

therapist students must understand their role regarding patient assessment and the different<br />

stages of patient-clinician interaction. Students will learn some of the basic techniques and skills<br />

used by clinicians to approach, communicate with, and evaluate patients professionally and<br />

with concern. These skills will include, but are not limited to, obtaining the medical history and<br />

vital signs, physical examination, sampling arterial blood gases, ECG tracing, patient monitoring,<br />

and assessing common symptoms associated with cardiopulmonary disease. Prerequisite:<br />

none Co-requisite: 176<br />

RES200 RESPIRA<strong>TO</strong>RY FUNDAMENTALS I (3 credits): Respiratory Care is a health care discipline<br />

specializing in the promotion of cardiopulmonary (heart and lung) function and health.<br />

The respiratory therapist is involved in the assessment, treatment, management, and care of<br />

patients diagnosed with cardiopulmonary system deficiencies and abnormalities. This course<br />

is designed to help the student understand the clinical applications and therapeutic applications<br />

of respiratory care and the pathologic conditions treated by the respiratory therapist. This<br />

course has a lab component. Prerequisites: 172, 176, BIO100 Co-requisite:RES100<br />

RES305 RESPIRA<strong>TO</strong>RY CLINICAL I (4 credits) This course is the first in a series that provides<br />

the student with exposure to the practice of respiratory therapy. This clinical education course<br />

takes place in various respiratory departments (clinical affiliates). The student develops and<br />

refines skills in communication, patient management, equipment use, and clinical assessment.<br />

Rotating shifts and assignments. Prerequisites: RES100, RES200, 211<br />

RES300 RESPIRA<strong>TO</strong>RY FUNDAMENTALS II (3 credits): This course will expand on<br />

Respiratory Care Fundamentals I and broaden the student’s knowledge and skill base in the<br />

assessment, management, care, and treatment of patients with respiratory deficiencies and<br />

abnormalities. Students will be instructed in airway management, bronchial hygiene therapies,<br />

invasive and non-invasive ventilation, management of mechanical ventilation, and assessment<br />

of arterial blood gases. This course has a lab component. Prerequisites: RES200, 173<br />

RES405 RESPIRA<strong>TO</strong>RY CLINICAL II (4 credits) This course is the second in a series that provides<br />

the student with exposure to the practice of respiratory therapy. This clinical education<br />

course takes place in various respiratory departments (clinical affiliates). The student develops<br />

and refines skills in communication, patient management, equipment use, and clinical assessment.<br />

This rotation introduces the student to the intensive care unit environment. Rotating<br />

shifts and assignments. Prerequisites: RES305, RES300<br />

90


course descriptions<br />

RES400 RESPIRA<strong>TO</strong>RY FUNDAMENTALS III (3 credits) This is the last course of respiratory<br />

fundamentals which emphasizes advanced critical thinking skills in regards to the intensive<br />

care unit patient. This course discusses the ventilator management of life threatening diseases<br />

and conditions related to the cardiopulmonary system. Cardiopulmonary diagnostic testing<br />

procedures will also be reviewed. This course has a lab component. Prerequisites: RES300<br />

Co-rerequisite:RES402<br />

RES402 CARDIOPULMONARY PATHOPHYSIOLOGY (4 credits) Pathophysiology studies<br />

changes or disturbances in the functioning of an organ that can be attributed to disease. In this<br />

course, students will study what changes and disturbances affect the lungs, thoracic wall, and<br />

respiratory airways and muscles. These form a highly effective defense system that protects<br />

them from pathogenic (disease causing) organisms which can lead to respiratory distress and<br />

respiratory failure. Caring for the patient who has respiratory disease requires the respiratory<br />

therapist to identify specific problems to assist in the diagnosis of the underlying disorder.<br />

Prerequisites: RES300 Co-requisite:RES400<br />

RES505 RESPIRA<strong>TO</strong>RY CLINICAL III (4 credits) This course is the third in a series that provides<br />

the student with exposure to the practice of respiratory therapy. This clinical education<br />

course takes place in various respiratory departments (clinical affiliates). The student develops<br />

and refines skills in communication, patient management, equipment use, and clinical<br />

assessment. This course will introduce high tech respiratory equipment including ventilators.<br />

Rotating shifts and assignments. Prerequisites: RES405, RES400<br />

RES500 RESPIRA<strong>TO</strong>RY PHARMACOLOGY (4 credits) Respiratory Care Pharmacology studies<br />

the application of pharmacology (the study of drugs and chemicals) to the treatment of pulmonary<br />

disorders and critical care. This course will focus on the principles of drug action from<br />

dose administration to effect and clearance from the body as well as drug therapies that affect<br />

the respiratory system. Prerequisite: RES400, RES402<br />

RES600 NEONATAL & PEDIATRIC RESPIRA<strong>TO</strong>RY THERAPY (3 credits) This course will<br />

instruct the student in the evaluation and management of the newborn and child with respiratory<br />

disease or with some other disorder that compromises the respiratory system, focusing<br />

on conditions most often seen by the pediatric respiratory care practitioner. Respiratory care<br />

of the newborn and child begins with a discussion of the development of the fetus and of the<br />

transition from fetal to neonatal life, which forms the basis for understanding the problems that<br />

may arise in the newborn period. Evaluation of the newborn is addressed from several aspects<br />

such as those that occur prenatally, assessment techniques vital to the care of the newborn, and<br />

non-invasive monitoring techniques. Students will learn about changes that have taken place<br />

in the practice of respiratory care for newborns, including new research findings, treatment<br />

approaches, and specialized equipment for assessment and care. This course has a lab component.<br />

Prerequisites: RES400, RES402<br />

RES605 RESPIRA<strong>TO</strong>RY CLINICAL IV (4 credits) This course is the fourth in a series that provides<br />

the student with exposure to the practice of respiratory therapy. This clinical education<br />

course takes place in various respiratory departments (clinical affiliates). The student develops<br />

and refines skills in communication, patient management, equipment use, and clinical assessment.<br />

Students will be introduced to rotations in the NICU (Neonatal Intensive Care Unit) and<br />

PICU (Pediatric Intensive Care Unit). Rotating shifts and assignments. Prerequisites: RES505<br />

Co-requisite: RES600<br />

RES701 RESPIRA<strong>TO</strong>RY THERAPY SEMINAR (2 credits) This course will expand the knowledge<br />

base of Respiratory Therapy to the non-hospitalized patient. This course will also cover<br />

professionalism, cultural diversity, insurance claims, medical reimbursement, diagnosis related<br />

groups (DRG’s), and healthcare management. The student will also write a professional paper<br />

on a respiratory pathology of their choice. Prerequisites: 122, RES400, RES402, RES500, RES600<br />

91


course descriptions<br />

RES705 RESPIRA<strong>TO</strong>RY CLINICAL V (4 credits) This course is fifth in a series that provides<br />

the student with exposure to the practice of respiratory therapy. This clinical education course<br />

takes place in various respiratory departments (clinical affiliates). The student develops and<br />

refines skills in communication, patient management, equipment use, and clinical assessment.<br />

Students will rotate mainly through intensive care units with emphasis on ventilator management<br />

skills. Students will be introduced to alternate site care. Rotating shifts and assignments.<br />

Prerequisites: RES605<br />

RES801 RESPIRA<strong>TO</strong>RY THERAPY REGISTRY REVIEW (4 credits) This course will prepare<br />

the respiratory therapy student to sit for the National Board for Respiratory Care (NBRC)<br />

Registry and Clinical Simulation Examination. Prerequisites: Completion of all RES classes<br />

through 700<br />

RES805 RESPIRA<strong>TO</strong>RY CLINICAL VI (8 credits) This course is last in a series that provides<br />

the student with exposure to the practice of respiratory therapy. This clinical education course<br />

takes place in various respiratory departments (clinical affiliates). The student develops and<br />

refines skills in communication, patient management, equipment use, and clinical assessment.<br />

Students will rotate mainly through intensive care units with emphasis on ventilator management<br />

skills. Rotating shifts and assignments. Prerequisites: RES705<br />

Surgical Technology<br />

SUR100 INTRODUCTION <strong>TO</strong> SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY (6 credits) This course is<br />

designed to provide the student with the theory necessary to function as an entry-level surgical<br />

technologist. This course provides the foundation for practice. Contents of this course address<br />

professional responsibilities and duties, legal, ethical, and moral responsibilities, medical terminology,<br />

relationships and communication skills, environment, equipment and sanitation, aseptic<br />

technique, scrubbing, gowning and gloving, safety, sterilization and disinfection, microbiology,<br />

infectious processes, immune response, wound healing, and patient transfers. Corequisites: 172,<br />

176, SUR199<br />

SUR174 SURGICAL ANA<strong>TO</strong>MY & PHYSIOLOGY (4 credits) This course is an advanced<br />

anatomy and physiology course for surgical technology students that studies each body system<br />

and emphasizes specific knowledge required of the surgical technologist. It identifies the instrumentation<br />

used relative to the specific body system. Prerequisite: 173 Corequisites: SUR200,<br />

SUR178<br />

SUR178 SURGICAL PHARMACOLOGY (4 credits) This course is designed to provide the<br />

surgical technology student with an in-depth study of anesthesia medications and dosages. The<br />

protocol related to medication in the operating room is presented. In addition, the realities of<br />

drug abuse are discussed—both those related to a user patient under anesthesia and the potential<br />

dangers presented to a worker in the field. Prerequisite: 177 Corequisite: SUR200, SUR174<br />

SUR199 MICROBIOLOGY FOR SURGICAL TECHNOLOGISTS (6 credits) This course is<br />

designed to provide the surgical technology student with the concepts and practices of microbiology<br />

relative to the treatment of disease-causing organisms that may present with a surgical<br />

patient pre-, intra-, or develop post-operative as an acquired infection. Lecture portions of the<br />

course will include introduction to microbiology and microorganisms, identification of specific<br />

bacteria, pathogens of body fluids and systems, virology, parasitology, and mycology. Key to<br />

the course will be enabling the learner to relate the infectious process to surgical practice, correlate<br />

the impact of microbiology in relationship to the practice of sterile technique and infection<br />

control in the operative setting. This course is taken with a laboratory component. Co-requisite:<br />

SUR100<br />

92


course descriptions<br />

SUR200 SURGICAL TECHNIQUES (6 credits) This course is designed to build on the students’<br />

fundamentals and concepts of aseptic technique while focusing on principles of safe<br />

patient care, division of duties, positioning, prepping and draping, the identification, selection,<br />

and use of equipment and supplies in the operating room, such as instrumentation, sutures<br />

and needles, sponges, dressings, packings, syringes, hypodermic needles, drainage systems<br />

and tubes. Pharmacology and anesthesia are covered in relation to the surgical technologist and<br />

the surgical environment. Also addressed are perioperative patient care, special needs patients<br />

(pediatrics, geriatrics), as well as the supplies, instruments, and equipment needed to effectively<br />

perform surgery. Prerequisites: SUR100, 172, 176, SUR199 Corequisite: SUR174, SUR178<br />

SUR201 SURGICAL PROCEDURES I (14 credits)This course is designed to provide the<br />

student with direct guidelines and supervision necessary for the course and orientation from<br />

laboratory course work to the clinical site as an entry-level surgical technologist. Prerequisite:<br />

SUR200, 211, 173, 177<br />

SUR202 SURGICAL PROCEDURES II (14 credits) This course is a continuation of Surgical<br />

Procedures I. The student will learn to become the primary scrub person on selected procedures.<br />

The student will relate relevant anatomy and physiology to surgical procedures.<br />

Prerequisite: SUR201<br />

SUR301 PROFESSIONAL ISSUES (2 credits) This course reinforces academic knowledge,<br />

professional accountability, independent decision-making, and the critical nature of self-assessment.<br />

Students will explore alternate career options for the Surgical Technologist. Emphasis<br />

will be placed on professional development of the individual. A mock certification exam is a<br />

required part of the course. The course provides surgical technology students with the needed<br />

preparation to complete the certification exam process. An in-depth view of the Surgical<br />

Technology professional organization is given. Prerequisite: SUR202<br />

93


administration and staFF<br />

Jan Gordon .............................................Executive Director<br />

Linda Blair .................................................................Dean<br />

Shelia Barbour .............. Associate Dean - Evening Division<br />

Alice Phillips ................ Associate Dean - Student Services<br />

Cheryl Eaton ......... Accreditation and Regulatory Specialist<br />

Peg Luttmann<br />

........... Business Department Director/Special Projects<br />

Mary Kaye Griffin................ Radiology Department Director<br />

Vicki Lemaster<br />

........... Cardiovascular Technology Department Director<br />

Tina Lewis ........................ Medical Department Co-Director<br />

Lori Woodward ................. Medical Department Co-Director<br />

Sarah Patsfield ... Surgical Technology Department Director<br />

Denise Logsdon ...... Massage Therapy Department Director<br />

Sherry Terry ......... Respiratory Therapy Department Director<br />

Marilyn Musacchio ....................Dean of Nursing Education<br />

Dale Charles ..........................Nursing Department Director<br />

Nicole Barmore ..... Nursing Department Associate Director<br />

Meredith Austin ................................. Career Services, Director<br />

Vickie Miller ................................Career Services, Specialist<br />

Natosha LaMaster ........................Career Services Assistant<br />

Beverley Gooselaw<br />

....... Human Resources Coordinator/Executive Assistant<br />

Paula O’Leary ...................................................... Registrar<br />

Rob Sukala ................... Assistant Registrar (Day Students)<br />

April Watkins ........... Assistant Registrar (Evening Students)<br />

Janice Flaherty ... Student Services Administrative Assistant<br />

Novanna Nally.......Administrative Assistant to the Registrar<br />

Brenda Gargano<br />

.........Student Accounts Auditor/Retention Coordinator<br />

Jill Schuler ............ Financial Planning Department Director<br />

Tracy Hutchinson ................ Financial Planning Department<br />

Assistant Director/Coordinator<br />

Autumn Lewis .....................Financial Planning Coordinator<br />

Kathie Tracy ........................Financial Planning Coordinator<br />

Lisa Whitenack ........................Financial Planning Assistant<br />

Tracy Smith ..........................Student Accounts Coordinator<br />

Laura Diener ................. Learning Resource Center Director<br />

Melinda MacCall ..........Learning Resource Center Assistant<br />

Kathleen Belanger ............Admissions Department Director<br />

Karen Swinney ...............Admissions Relations Coordinator<br />

Connie Steele .........Associate Director of Adult Admissions<br />

94<br />

Diane Isdith .......................................... Admissions Officer<br />

Julie Middleton ..................................... Admissions Officer<br />

Fran Phillips .......................................... Admissions Officer<br />

Erin Weis ............................................... Admissions Officer<br />

Amy Spanyer ......................................... Admissions Officer<br />

Janet Tinsley ......................................... Admissions Officer<br />

Chuck Weber ......................................... Admissions Officer<br />

Michael Hellard ..................High School Admissions Officer<br />

Brittany Hoffman ................High School Admissions Officer<br />

Charles Lawson ..................High School Admissions Officer<br />

Lynda Reynolds..................................Re-Entry Coordinator<br />

Joey Miller ..................................................IT Administrator<br />

Carol Wigginton ....................................Bookstore Manager<br />

Marge Dues .........................................Bookstore Assistant<br />

Delma Rush ......................Nursing Administrative Assistant<br />

Brandy Holland .................Nursing Administrative Assistant<br />

Debbie Jenkins ........ Nursing Department Day Receptionist<br />

Dana Scott ........Nursing Department Evening Receptionist<br />

Melanie Marville ........... Academic Administrative Assistant<br />

Kay Woodrick .................Academic Assistant for Instructors<br />

Angel Graves ...............Admissions Administrative Assistant<br />

Brittany Rafferty ..........Admissions Administrative Assistant<br />

Kristi Marquardt ..........Admissions Administrative Assistant<br />

Catherine Lozitskiy ..........................................Receptionist<br />

Steve Ricketts .................................................... Van Driver<br />

Buddy Marr ....................................................Maintenance<br />

Tony Wooldridge .............................................Maintenance<br />

<strong>Sullivan</strong> <strong>University</strong> System E-Learning<br />

Michael Johnson .....................................Executive Director<br />

Nina Martinez ................................. Director of Admissions<br />

Krista Lyons ..........................Student Services Coordinator<br />

<strong>Sullivan</strong> <strong>University</strong> System<br />

Corporate Officers<br />

A. R. <strong>Sullivan</strong>......................................................Chancellor<br />

Jim Crick ........... Vice President of Enrollment Management<br />

Glenn D. <strong>Sullivan</strong> ................................................ President<br />

Shelton Bridges Jr. ......................Vice President of Finance<br />

Bill Noel ........................................Executive Vice President<br />

Thomas F. Davisson ........................... Senior Vice President


indeX<br />

Academic Calendar ................................................................................ 6<br />

Academic Advisement and Counseling .................................................... 9<br />

Academic Facilities ................................................................................. 8<br />

Academic Information ....................................................................64-70<br />

Academic Probation and Suspension ...................................................67<br />

Academic Programs .......................................................................32, 38<br />

Accounting and Management Associate Degree ...................................36<br />

Accounting Diploma ............................................................................34<br />

Accommodations for Students with Disabilities ..................................... 8<br />

Accreditations and Approvals .............................................................4-5<br />

Activities Board.....................................................................................10<br />

ADA Grievance Policy .............................................................................. 8<br />

Administration and Staff .......................................................................94<br />

Administrative Offices ............................................................................. 8<br />

Admission of International Students ...............................................24-25<br />

Admission to the College ................................................................12-25<br />

Affirmative Action Policy ........................................................................23<br />

Affording Spencerian College ................................................................29<br />

Appeal Procedure, Academic ...............................................................68<br />

Application Procedure .........................................................................12<br />

Attendance Policy .................................................................................64<br />

Board of Directors ................................................................................70<br />

Books and Supplies ..............................................................................28<br />

Bookstore ........................................................................................10-11<br />

Business Office Management Associate Degree ....................................37<br />

Career Services ....................................................................................... 7<br />

Cancellation Policy ...............................................................................26<br />

Class Schedule and the Friday “Plus” Day ............................................64<br />

CLEP Policy ...........................................................................................24<br />

Clinical Assistant Program ....................................................................43<br />

Clinical Assistant with Limited Medical Radiography Diploma ..............44<br />

Clinical Laboratory Assistant Diploma ...................................................45<br />

College Interruption ..............................................................................28<br />

Comprehensive Fees .............................................................................26<br />

Computer Usage Policy .........................................................................11<br />

Course Descriptions.........................................................................71-93<br />

Definition of Credit Hour .......................................................................65<br />

Distance Education Admissions ............................................................22<br />

Dress Code ...........................................................................................11<br />

Executive Assistant Diploma .................................................................35<br />

Extended Enrollment Status .................................................................68<br />

Experiential Learning ............................................................................24<br />

Faculty Listings ...................................................................Supplement A<br />

Financial Aid Probation/Suspension ...............................................31, 67<br />

Financial Aid Information and Planning ...........................................26-31<br />

General Fees ........................................................................................26<br />

General Regulations and Policies ....................................... Supplement B<br />

Grade Point Average Computation ........................................................65<br />

Grading Scale and the Quarter System.................................................64<br />

Graduation Requirements .....................................................................69<br />

Grievance Procedure, Non-Academic ...................................................69<br />

Guaranteed Answer Suggestion Box ......................................................10<br />

Healthcare Reimbursement Specialist Associate Degree ......................57<br />

Health Unit Coordinator Certificate.......................................................39<br />

95<br />

HIPAA ....................................................................................................21<br />

History of the College ............................................................................. 3<br />

Home Schooled Applicants ...................................................................12<br />

Invasive Cardiovascular Technology Associate Degree ...........................60<br />

Jump Start Program .............................................................................12<br />

Learning Resource Center ....................................................................... 9<br />

Leave of Absence ..................................................................................69<br />

Legal Status .........................................................................................70<br />

Limited Medical Radiography Diploma .................................................48<br />

Louisville – A Diverse Place to Live and Study ........................................ 6<br />

Kentucky Refund Policy ........................................................................26<br />

Massage Therapy Diploma ....................................................................46<br />

Medical Administrative Assistant Diploma ............................................47<br />

Medical Administrative Management Associate Degree ........................58<br />

Medical Assistant Diploma ...................................................................49<br />

Medical Clinical Specialties Associate Degree ......................................59<br />

Medical Coding Specialist Diploma ......................................................50<br />

Medical Laboratory Technician Associate Degree ..................................61<br />

Medical Massage Therapy Associate Degree .........................................54<br />

Medical Transcriptionist Diploma .........................................................51<br />

Newsletters ..........................................................................................10<br />

Nursing Associate Degree .....................................................................63<br />

Office Professional Diploma .................................................................33<br />

Orientation ..........................................................................................10<br />

Ophthalmic Assistant Certificate ...........................................................40<br />

Options for Payment .............................................................................28<br />

Parking and Transportation ...................................................................11<br />

Patient Care Assistant Certificate ..........................................................41<br />

Personal Trainer Diploma ......................................................................52<br />

Philosophy and Mission .......................................................................... 2<br />

Phlebotomy Certificate .........................................................................42<br />

PLA<strong>TO</strong> Learning ....................................................................................... 9<br />

Practical Nursing Diploma ....................................................................53<br />

Program Changes ...........................................................................25, 69<br />

Programmatic Policies ....................................................... Supplement C<br />

Radiologic Technologist Associate Degree .............................................62<br />

Re-entering Requirements ..............................................................25, 69<br />

Refund Policy for Title IV Funds ............................................................26<br />

Reinstatement After Suspension ...........................................................68<br />

Respiratory Therapy Associate Degree ...................................................55<br />

Satisfactory Progress: Qualitative & Quantitative ..............................66-67<br />

Scholarships .........................................................................................30<br />

Student Housing ...................................................................................11<br />

Student Life ............................................................................................ 9<br />

Student Lounge ...................................................................................... 8<br />

Student Portal ......................................................................................11<br />

Student Organizations and Activities .................................................9-10<br />

Student Services..................................................................................... 9<br />

Surgical Technology Associate Degree...................................................56<br />

Transfer Credit from Spencerian ...........................................................23<br />

Transfer Credit to Spencerian ..........................................................23-24<br />

Tuition and Fees ....................................................(pg 26) Supplement A<br />

Withdrawal Policy .....................................................................25-28, 65<br />

Publication Date: December 2010


Five steps For Your success<br />

As an innovator in career education, Spencerian College has adopted “Five Steps for Your<br />

Success,” a unique way of offering its students the quality education they seek.<br />

1. The Four-Day School Week. Many certificate, diploma and associate degree students attend<br />

classes Monday through Thursday.<br />

2. Friday - The “Plus” Day. Friday mornings provide an important “plus” to both students and<br />

faculty. All facilities and equipment are available for individual study and practice, and faculty<br />

members are ready to schedule personal conferences and give special assistance. If extra study<br />

is not required, the 3-day weekend is extra time for personal and/or academic development.<br />

Programs requiring Friday classes offer additional assistance at other times.<br />

3. A Career-First Curriculum. Job-readiness is the key. In most majors, Spencerian College<br />

students concentrate exclusively in areas of career education during a 6-12 month certificate<br />

or diploma program. Then, if a student decides to continue toward the associate degree,<br />

advanced courses are taken during the final few months or quarters of each degree program.<br />

4. A Certificate or Diploma in a Year or Less; An Associate Degree in Less Than Two Years.<br />

That’s right... in only 6-12 months you can be job-ready with a certificate or diploma from one<br />

of Spencerian College’s fast-paced, career-track programs. And, an associate degree program<br />

can be completed in only 18-27 months of study.<br />

5. Lifetime, Nationwide Employment Services. Spencerian College graduates automatically<br />

receive nationwide, lifetime, employment services and lifetime review privileges. Our Career<br />

Services Office gives graduates the opportunity for career advancement and prospective new<br />

jobs at no additional cost.<br />

Spencerian College’s campus is located at 4627 Dixie Highway,<br />

just 1/2 mile South of the Watterson Expressway, I-264.<br />

96

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