Creativity

iam.colum.edu

Creativity

Game Idea Development

36-1500 – Summer 2007

Creativity

and… flow …


Creativity

• The generation of new ideas or

concepts…


Creativity

• The generation of new ideas or

concepts…

• …or new associations between

existing ideas or concept.


Creativity

• The generation of new ideas or

concepts…

• …or new associations between

existing ideas or concepts.

• There is no single, authoritative

perspective or definition of creativity,

or even standard of measurement.


Creativity

• Some claim it is an inborn trait or

ability. (You either got it or you

don’t.)


Creativity

• Some claim it is an inborn trait or

ability. (You either got it or your

don’t.)

• Some claim it can be taught.


Creativity

• Some claim it is an inborn trait or

ability. (You either got it or your

don’t.)

• Some claim it can be taught.

– Or at the very least you can be taught to

unlock what you have.


Creativity

• Some claim it is an inborn trait or

ability.

• Some claim it can be taught.

• No one fully understands it, and

clearly everyone is different and

everyone’s creativity is different.


Stages of the Creative Process

• Graham Wallas (Art of Thought,

1926)


Stages of the Creative Process

• Graham Wallas (Art of Thought,

1926)

– Preparation (preparatory, focusing work)


Stages of the Creative Process

• Graham Wallas (Art of Thought,

1926)

– Preparation (preparatory, focusing work)

– Incubation (internalization of the problem)


Stages of the Creative Process

• Graham Wallas (Art of Thought,

1926)

– Preparation (preparatory, focusing work)

– Incubation (internalization of the problem)

–Intimation (sense of creative development)


Stages of the Creative Process

• Graham Wallas (Art of Thought,

1926)

– Preparation (preparatory, focusing work)

– Incubation (internalization of the problem)

–Intimation (sense of creative development)

– Illumination (revelation of the idea)


Stages of the Creative Process

• Graham Wallas (Art of Thought,

1926)

–Preparation (preparatory, focusing work)

– Incubation (internalization of the problem)

–Intimation (sense of creative development)

– Illumination (revelation of the idea)

– Verification (verified, elaborated, applied)


Creative Process

• Wallas’ process is very structured.

• Creative spark can come from…


Creative Process

• Wallas’ process is very structured.

• Creative spark can come from…

– Direct Association


Creative Process

• Wallas’ process is very structured.

• Creative spark can come from…

– Direct Association

– Indirect Association


Creative Process

• Wallas’ process is very structured.

• Creative spark can come from…

– Direct Association

– Indirect Association

– Experimentation (Play)


Creative Process

• Wallas’ process is very structured.

• Creative spark can come from…

– Direct Association

– Indirect Association

– Experimentation (Play)

– God Knows Where (Inspiration)


Flow of Creativity

• The best ideas seem to come when

we are “at one” with the process, and

immune to distractions.

• This is “flow”.


Flow of Creativity

• The best ideas seem to come when

we are “at one” with the process, and

immune to distractions.

• This is “flow”.

• Flow itself is a state of creation…

…and a state of participation.


…flow…

• Flow is a mental state of operation in

which the person is fully immersed in what

he or she is doing, characterized by a

feeling of energized focus, full involvement,

and success in the process of the activity.


…flow…

• Flow is a mental state of operation in

which the person is fully immersed in what

he or she is doing, characterized by a

feeling of energized focus, full involvement,

and success in the process of the activity.

• It has distinct analogies in Eastern thought,

but was refined for Western thought by

Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi (CHICK-sent-me-highee)

at the University of Chicago


…parts of flow…

1. Clear goals (expectations and rules are

discernable).


…parts of flow…

1. Clear goals (expectations and rules are

discernable).

2. Concentrating and focusing, a high degree

of concentration on a limited field of attention

(a person engaged in the activity will have the

opportunity to focus and to delve deeply into

it).


…part of flow…

1. Clear goals (expectations and rules are

discernable).

2. Concentrating and focusing, a high degree

of concentration on a limited field of attention

(a person engaged in the activity will have the

opportunity to focus and to delve deeply into

it).

3. A loss of the feeling of self-consciousness,

the merging of action and awareness.


…part of flow…

1. Clear goals (expectations and rules are

discernable).

2. Concentrating and focusing, a high degree

of concentration on a limited field of attention

(a person engaged in the activity will have the

opportunity to focus and to delve deeply into

it).

3. A loss of the feeling of self-consciousness,

the merging of action and awareness.

4. Distorted sense of time - our subjective

experience of time is altered.


…parts of flow…

5. Feedback, direct and immediate (successes

and failures in the course of the activity are

apparent, so that behavior can be adjusted as

needed).


…parts of flow…

5. Feedback, direct and immediate (successes

and failures in the course of the activity are

apparent, so that behavior can be adjusted as

needed).

6. Balance between ability level and

challenge (the activity is neither too easy nor

too difficult).


…parts of flow…

5. Feedback, direct and immediate (successes

and failures in the course of the activity are

apparent, so that behavior can be adjusted as

needed).

6. Balance between ability level and

challenge (the activity is neither too easy nor

too difficult).

7. A sense of personal control over the

situation or activity.


…parts of flow…

5. Feedback, direct and immediate (successes

and failures in the course of the activity are

apparent, so that behavior can be adjusted as

needed).

6. Balance between ability level and

challenge (the activity is neither too easy nor

too difficult).

7. A sense of personal control over the

situation or activity.

8. The activity is intrinsically rewarding, so

there is an effortlessness of action.


What is this?


What is this?

• Clear Goals

• Concentration and

Focus

•Loss of Self-

Consciousness

• Distorted Sense of

Time

•Feedback

• Balance between

Ability and

Challenge

• Sense of Personal

Control

• Intrinsic Rewards


Game Design Goals/Processes

• Clear Goals

• Concentration and

Focus

•Loss of Self-

Consciousness

• Distorted Sense of

Time

•Feedback

• Balance between

Ability and

Challenge

• Sense of Personal

Control

• Intrinsic Rewards


Expression of Ideas

• Ideas are powerful, valued things… but

the expression of ideas in a “professional”

environment can be … challenging.


Expression of Ideas

• Ideas are powerful, valued things… but

the expression of ideas in a “professional”

environment can be… challenging.

• Free, creative thinking is important, but

so is the ability to critically view not only

the ideas of others, but one’s own ideas.


Expression of Ideas

• Ideas are powerful, valued things… but

the expression of ideas in a “professional”

environment can be … challenging.

• Free, creative thinking is important, but

so is the ability to critically view not only

the ideas of others, but one’s own ideas.

• The trick is not becoming too self-critical

and therefore reluctant to speak, while at

the same time not bombarding others

with ill-formed ideas.


Expression of Ideas

• There are times when any ideas are

appropriate (brainstorming, blue-sky

sessions, etc.)


Expression of Ideas

• There are times when any ideas are

appropriate (brainstorming, blue-sky

sessions, etc.)

• Other times, ideas should be considered…

– They don’t have to be right (or even good),

but they should have a good reason for

being wrong.

– Interjecting ideas just to be heard is bad.


Expression of Ideas

• There are times when any ideas are

appropriate (brainstorming, blue-sky

sessions, etc.)

• Other times, ideas should be considered…

– They don’t have to be right (or even good),

but they should have a good reason for

being wrong.

– Interjecting ideas just to be heard is bad.

• Suggest “concepts” over “specifics” –

– “Flying and Freedom of Movement” rather

than… “Cool Bat Wings” (for example). (The

former being the why for the latter.)


~fin~

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