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The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Science - The Department ...

The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Science - The Department ...

The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Science - The Department

The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Science

  • Page 2 and 3: Blackwell Philosophy Guides Series
  • Page 4 and 5: Copyright © Blackwell Publishers L
  • Page 6 and 7: Contents 11 Evolution 227 Roberta L
  • Page 8 and 9: Notes on Contributors Australia bef
  • Page 10 and 11: Preface This volume was conceived b
  • Page 12 and 13: Chapter 1 A Brief Historical Introd
  • Page 14 and 15: A Brief Historical Introduction to
  • Page 16 and 17: A Brief Historical Introduction to
  • Page 18 and 19: A Brief Historical Introduction to
  • Page 20 and 21: A Brief Historical Introduction to
  • Page 22 and 23: A Brief Historical Introduction to
  • Page 24 and 25: A Brief Historical Introduction to
  • Page 26 and 27: A Brief Historical Introduction to
  • Page 28 and 29: A Brief Historical Introduction to
  • Page 30 and 31: Classic Debates, Standard Problems,
  • Page 32 and 33: Classic Debates, Standard Problems,
  • Page 34 and 35: Classic Debates, Standard Problems,
  • Page 36 and 37: e that is simply potential evidence
  • Page 38 and 39: Classic Debates, Standard Problems,
  • Page 40 and 41: Classic Debates, Standard Problems,
  • Page 42 and 43: Classic Debates, Standard Problems,
  • Page 44 and 45: Classic Debates, Standard Problems,
  • Page 46 and 47: Classic Debates, Standard Problems,
  • Page 48 and 49: Chapter 3 Explanation Jim Woodward
  • Page 50 and 51: Explanation 4 to be confirmable by
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    Explanation ment looks implausible,

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    (ii) a statement of the probability

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    Explanation of these balls casts a

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    Explanation requires, omits this in

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    Explanation exactly the same genera

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    Explanation counterfactual informat

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    Explanation 2 For example, the para

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    Chapter 4 Structures of Scientific

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    Structures of Scientific Theories R

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    Structures of Scientific Theories t

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    Structures of Scientific Theories c

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    Structures of Scientific Theories a

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    Structures of Scientific Theories T

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    Structures of Scientific Theories E

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    Structures of Scientific Theories H

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    Structures of Scientific Theories T

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    Structures of Scientific Theories t

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    Structures of Scientific Theories t

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    Structures of Scientific Theories G

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    Structures of Scientific Theories R

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    Reduction, Emergence and Explanatio

  • Page 94 and 95:

    Reduction, Emergence and Explanatio

  • Page 96 and 97:

    Reduction, Emergence and Explanatio

  • Page 98 and 99:

    Reduction, Emergence and Explanatio

  • Page 100 and 101:

    Reduction, Emergence and Explanatio

  • Page 102 and 103:

    Reduction, Emergence and Explanatio

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    fully, properly or easily represent

  • Page 106 and 107:

    Reduction, Emergence and Explanatio

  • Page 108 and 109:

    Reduction, Emergence and Explanatio

  • Page 110 and 111:

    Reduction, Emergence and Explanatio

  • Page 112 and 113:

    Reduction, Emergence and Explanatio

  • Page 114 and 115:

    Reduction, Emergence and Explanatio

  • Page 116 and 117:

    Reduction, Emergence and Explanatio

  • Page 118 and 119:

    Reduction, Emergence and Explanatio

  • Page 120 and 121:

    Models, Metaphors and Analogies can

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    Models, Metaphors and Analogies Ana

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    Models, Metaphors and Analogies and

  • Page 126 and 127:

    Models, Metaphors and Analogies bet

  • Page 128 and 129:

    Models, Metaphors and Analogies par

  • Page 130 and 131:

    Models, Metaphors and Analogies acc

  • Page 132 and 133:

    Models, Metaphors and Analogies for

  • Page 134 and 135:

    Models, Metaphors and Analogies per

  • Page 136 and 137:

    Models, Metaphors and Analogies Ack

  • Page 138 and 139:

    Models, Metaphors and Analogies Lak

  • Page 140 and 141:

    Herschel (discoverer of Uranus) dra

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    Experiment and Observation legitima

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    Experiment and Observation K2: Sema

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    Experiment and Observation 1 Releva

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    Experiment and Observation devices

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    Experiment and Observation D3 measu

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    Experiment and Observation Salience

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    Experiment and Observation example

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    Experiment and Observation 10 Surpr

  • Page 158 and 159:

    Experiment and Observation Labov, W

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    Chapter 8 Induction and Probability

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    Induction and Probability It might

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    Induction and Probability the oracl

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    Induction and Probability fectly ra

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    (for this condition is equivalent t

  • Page 170 and 171:

    cally balanced evidence. In such ci

  • Page 172 and 173:

    Induction and Probability Empiricis

  • Page 174 and 175:

    subject to a Dutch book if you do n

  • Page 176 and 177:

    Induction and Probability future ti

  • Page 178 and 179:

    Induction and Probability as codify

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    Induction and Probability Reference

  • Page 182 and 183:

    Induction and Probability Kyburg, H

  • Page 184 and 185:

    Chapter 9 Philosophy of Space-Time

  • Page 186 and 187:

    Philosophy of Space-Time Physics me

  • Page 188 and 189:

    Philosophy of Space-Time Physics De

  • Page 190 and 191:

    Philosophy of Space-Time Physics ou

  • Page 192 and 193:

    Philosophy of Space-Time Physics em

  • Page 194 and 195:

    Philosophy of Space-Time Physics Ma

  • Page 196 and 197:

    Philosophy of Space-Time Physics Bl

  • Page 198 and 199:

    Philosophy of Space-Time Physics ne

  • Page 200 and 201:

    Philosophy of Space-Time Physics cu

  • Page 202 and 203:

    Philosophy of Space-Time Physics th

  • Page 204 and 205:

    Philosophy of Space-Time Physics fa

  • Page 206 and 207:

    Philosophy of Space-Time Physics Ac

  • Page 208 and 209:

    Philosophy of Space-Time Physics Ho

  • Page 210 and 211:

    Chapter 10 Interpreting Quantum The

  • Page 212 and 213:

    Interpreting Quantum Theories with

  • Page 214 and 215:

    fraught names (“determinism,”

  • Page 216 and 217:

    Â(D) with regions of space-time D.

  • Page 218 and 219:

    is also an eigenbasis for Î sˆ x

  • Page 220 and 221:

    described. To obtain the post-measu

  • Page 222 and 223:

    ecorded (Albert (1992, ch. 5) prese

  • Page 224 and 225:

    On the picture enchanting Bell, the

  • Page 226 and 227:

    pointer eigenbasis fails to furnish

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    Interpreting Quantum Theories also

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    The state |0 > such that âk|0 >=0

  • Page 232 and 233:

    Interpreting Quantum Theories Curve

  • Page 234 and 235:

    Interpreting Quantum Theories 13 Ma

  • Page 236 and 237:

    Interpreting Quantum Theories Evere

  • Page 238 and 239:

    Chapter 11 Evolution Roberta L. Mil

  • Page 240 and 241:

    Evolution usually interpreted as be

  • Page 242 and 243:

    Evolution Gould and Lewontin charge

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    Evolution the questions we pose for

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    Evolution Each of the ways of talki

  • Page 248 and 249:

    Evolution the populations (Mayr, 19

  • Page 250 and 251:

    Evolution ment, the critics’ char

  • Page 252 and 253:

    Evolution individual. Nonetheless,

  • Page 254 and 255:

    Evolution Brandon’s account relie

  • Page 256 and 257:

    Evolution and other germinal works

  • Page 258 and 259:

    Evolution Dover, G. (1997a): “Neu

  • Page 260 and 261:

    Evolution Lloyd, E. A. and Gould, S

  • Page 262 and 263:

    Evolution Sterelny, K. and Kitcher,

  • Page 264 and 265:

    Molecular and Developmental Biology

  • Page 266 and 267:

    Molecular and Developmental Biology

  • Page 268 and 269:

    Molecular and Developmental Biology

  • Page 270 and 271:

    Molecular and Developmental Biology

  • Page 272 and 273:

    Molecular and Developmental Biology

  • Page 274 and 275:

    Molecular and Developmental Biology

  • Page 276 and 277:

    Molecular and Developmental Biology

  • Page 278 and 279:

    Molecular and Developmental Biology

  • Page 280 and 281:

    Molecular and Developmental Biology

  • Page 282 and 283:

    Molecular and Developmental Biology

  • Page 284 and 285:

    Cognitive Science the nature of the

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    Cognitive Science The cognitive rev

  • Page 288 and 289:

    Cognitive Science a vector as input

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    Cognitive Science related, though t

  • Page 292 and 293:

    Cognitive Science was selected for

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    Cognitive Science to the clearly vi

  • Page 296 and 297:

    Cognitive Science at night. All of

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    Cognitive Science their content - t

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    Cognitive Science Skinner, B. F. (1

  • Page 302 and 303:

    Social Sciences in ways they do not

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    Social Sciences 4 Another persuasiv

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    Social Sciences So the naturalism d

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    Social Sciences being equal, supply

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    Social Sciences standing of the sit

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    Social Sciences (Papineau, 1991; Ea

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    Social Sciences literature as well

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    This suggests making the connection

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    Social Sciences • The legitimacy

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    Social Sciences Earman, J. and Robe

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    Social Sciences Skorupski, J. (1976

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    Feminist Philosophy of Science rese

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    Feminist Philosophy of Science sust

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    Feminist Philosophy of Science At t

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    Feminist Philosophy of Science from

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    Feminist Philosophy of Science conc

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    Feminist Philosophy of Science redu

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    Feminist Philosophy of Science femi

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    Feminist Philosophy of Science the

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    Feminist Philosophy of Science Flax

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    Feminist Philosophy of Science Sign

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    axioms of coordination 180, 184 see

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    counterfactual account of causation

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    causal-mechanical (CM) model of 44-

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    induction 22, 149 dogmatic response

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    see also interpretations of quantum

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    algebraic 220 Bohr, Niels 14, 97 Bo

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    sex differences 315 sexual dimorphi

  • Page 358:

    see also quantum mechanics Weber, M

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