Views
5 years ago

How Ethernet, RPR, and MPLS Work Together: The ... - Light Reading

How Ethernet, RPR, and MPLS Work Together: The ... - Light Reading

How Ethernet, RPR, and MPLS Work Together: The ... - Light

#126 TECHNOLOGY WHITE PAPER How Ethernet, RPR, and MPLS Work Together: The Unified Future of Metro Area Networking Page: 1 of 19 ABSTRACT Over the last year, three new and particularly promising technologies have emerged at the forefront of Metro networking. The three are Multi-protocol Label Switching (MPLS), 10-Gigabit Ethernet, and Resilient Packet Ring (RPR). Today, as the standards slowly settle into hardware, each is finally reaching the stage beyond speculation, and into network deployment. Pundits and vendors have pinned exceptional hopes on each of these technologies, particularly for effecting a long-awaited transformation of Metro Area Networking. The Metro remains the last geographical section of the network still largely dependent on late 1980s and early 1990s technology (low to mid-capacity SONET rings), and is clearly in need of data-focused improvements. Each of the three discussed technologies, on their own, add features to Metro Area Networks that are currently lacking. Yet little attention has been focused on the question of how these technologies are meant to work together. There is no question that they will occupy the same geographical space and need to interoperate with each other as well as legacy technologies. But there exists an unfortunate tendency to describe each as the one "magic bullet" that will relieve all service provider concerns. The goal of this paper is to present a unified, if tentative, vision of how MPLS, RPR, and Ethernet should be deployed together in the Metro Networks of the near-future. To counter any existing misunderstandings, we want to make as clear as possible where these technologies are appropriately deployed (and where not), and for what. The goal is to isolate the particular strengths of that technology, and its appropriate role in a Metro deployment. We have also made every effort to portray reasonable migration from existing deployments; the suggested network improves upon and co-exists with current networking equipment, rather than fully replacing it. In short, the goal is to suggest "best practices" for the Metro technology deployments of the future. To this end, we begin by presenting the overview of the network, and then provide a brief description of each technology, with a focus on the particular strengths and weaknesses of each technology for Metro networking.

Adding RPR and MPLS to Existing SONET using ... - Light Reading
Transport MPLS (T-MPLS): The Technology for All ... - Light Reading
State Market RepoRt of the Ethernet Expo Americas - Light Reading
MPLS/VPLS Evolution: A Riverstone Perspective - Light Reading
Multi-Service Integration in Metro Networks - Light Reading
MPLS / VPLS Evolution: A Riverstone Perspective - Light Reading
SANOG 12 - MPLS-based Metro Ethernet Networks
The Metro Ethernet Forum Certification Program - Light Reading
APRICOT 2011 - MPLS-based Metro Ethernet Networks v1.0
Ethernet Service Provider of the Year, Europe – Best ... - Light Reading
An Introduction to Resilient Packet Ring Technology - Light Reading
How MEF Carrier Ethernet 2.0 Certified Packet Optical ... - Tellabs
Deploying IP/MPLS in Mobile Networks Strategic White Paper
Ethernet Expo Awards Entry Form Preview - Light Reading
Carrier Grade Metro Ethernet Networks - IEEE Xplore
OTN Emerges for Metro Transport Networking - Light Reading
Building Next Generation DSL Networks with the ... - Light Reading
Next-Generation VoIP Network Architecture - Light Reading
Carrier Ethernet Solution for Service Provider ... - Juniper Networks
Making High Bandwidth But Low Revenue Per Bit ... - Light Reading
New Rules for a New Game: Optical Layer ... - Light Reading
Improving Service Availability of IP Networks - Light Reading
E2E 100G OAM: Basis for Commercial 100G ... - Light Reading