08-24-1938 - Village of Pinckney

pinckneylocalhistory.org

08-24-1938 - Village of Pinckney

*? %•'

flBSBI

Wt MOTTO l*i «AtL THE

H1W8 THAT'S Ftf TO PRINT

• * . • * , • • * ' •• ••*)?•%

Michigan State Fair Is

August 27 to Sept

T. •. Bl«i« »a B*t« ThL £».-« Thi. Y«r M.n, F«».u.

WiJL. «. LUtrf « W.II « U.»tock ami Agr.«»ltuiw

Exhibit*

The/ 1988 Michigan 'State Fairis not only going to be bigger and

tttVtittn the state has ever enjoyed, but, it is the edition of Frank

^rSeneral Manager, to make* the Nation'. Greatest StateJair.

Ttorslogan^rhaa been adopted and, every member of the exre

staff is bending all effort**

this week. In the county there ar

no contests on the Democrat ticket

On the R.-pt;blican ticket tin- prin

eipi. contes ^ are for rejire^-- -n 1 c T

The

;.i

ive where ('has. 1*. Adams am' Tl/'*-

! lie th

N'e'A'tol: ot

] A : URREN

OMMEN

"By Y* Editor"

widely heralded meeting of

the conservative Democrats opposed

to President Roosevelt and Governor

Murphy took place in Detroit last

week with a total attendance of about

W. There were 35 men and 8

women. Ex- Gov. Com stock was the

high light of the meeting and of the

.'Jo men present practically everyone

held a political appointment under

Coi stock during the time he was

governor. Notwithstanding the poor

attendance this meeting expects to

put up a full ticket making the nomitions

by convention. No person in

the world had a stranger political

career than former Governor Comstock.

At leading forlorn hopei and

heading the Democrat state ticket

when he had no chance of election

he was superb. For years he kept

the party together, men in 1982

Democrat chances began to look

up and he emerged the victor over

W'llbjr Frucker. ' Comstotfcfc bi|f

mor 'ht had arrived. Somu how hi

did nut seem able to get th* tno&t

out of it. He inaugerated and put

into effect the sales tax extremely

an popular at thc time but since ad*

nitted by both friends and enemite

A> be a most excellent piece of legslation.

All the time he was subjected

to a terrific bombardment by

he stati' press which was then as

iow, Republican, conrolled. Tbay je-

"erred to thc swiles tax as (The Pen-

•iy «for Comstock Law) and then

>rinted stories about a $20,000 hpme

ie was supposed to be building. This

• roved to he a falsehood. Comstocls"

vas interested in the oil business in

he Mt. 1'leasant section und then

jecai -c acquainted with one Isiah

eDove, a forme! New York lawyer

a.id to have had underworld conic'lions.

DeP.ove helped finance his

•anipnign. After the election the

"Hciidship continued and Comstock

appointed I/


« . - • $

• !

n

CLASSIFIED

DEPARTMENT

BUG FUMIGATING

Guaranteed destruction to »11 Dedbags loaches.

eta.. Including tbelr eggs-

fcheasaadsof tnonmnnii or am buildings taings throu i We haTftumlcHteJI _

eluding homos, public institutions

throntbour,

Government

Michigan In

boau, eic Write or phone - Ualrealty MOW.

CtAMDs US CO, 14*24 ~

MISCELLANEOUS

Host realistic Marbeiite Jeans Bleeding

Heart Statuette In 8 Inch Shrine. White or

colored. 6" Virgin Mary Statuette Included.

SI. Spaaglers, aterekandise Mart, Chicage.

REMEDY

Iff A If-If L WU7 M* 20 YEARS OF

B«\%&!BBRB4 CONTINUED SUCCESS

For Liver-Bile 11U, Gall Bladder. Oall Stone

Pains. Indigestion, Gas Bloating. Headache*,

•Pry It when all else fails. Users are boosters.

Consult your favorite druggist today or write

.-KlZMZ, 1410 B)ari4agaeM, Detrett, '"

TRAILER PARTS

TBA1LEK PART8—World's largest supply

of trailer parts. Illustrated 42 page catalog

10c. MARVEL TRAILER PARTS CO..

WIS Celestine Aveaae. Oetrelt. Mica.

. Peasant Motifs Add

Smartness to Linens

Pattern 1743.

The peasant note spells smartness

in linens today. These figures

in simple stitches will add

color to accessories and offer

pleasant hours in their embroidering.

Pattern 1743 contains a

transfer pattern of 4 motifs 7Vt

by 9V» inches, 4 motifs 3 by 3¾

inches, 4 motifs 2 by 2*4 inches;

illustrations of stitches; materials

required; color schemes.

Send 15 cents in stamps or coins

(coins preferred) for this pattern

to The Sewing Circle, Needlecraft

Dept., 82 Eighth Ave., New York,

N. Y. ^

Overburdened

Money and time are the heaviest

burdens of life, and the unhappiest

of all mortals are those who

have more of either than they

know how to use—Johnson.

Here's a selection which com well screw

os fit guide lot 70¾ The otocer knows

insect kfflers. He has nosy dhxeront

nfonos to choose (rank Do os BO yiocoi

DWTN m your home to UO.

- yea egg us* It in your gar*

den. tea tor many plant insecm. Buy a

ess todcry from your cjrocex. drnoj, bord»

wore ot depuiuBent store.

SAIBWDJ LASOIATMOS. me.

f) Ben Ames William*.

SYNOPSIS

Barbara Sentry, seeking to sober up her

escort, Johnnie Boyd, on the way home

from a party, slaps aim, end attracts the

attention of a policeman, whom the boy

knocks down. As he arrests him, Professor

Brace of Harvard comes to the rescue and

drives Barbara home. On the way they see

Barbara's father driving from the direction

of his office.

CHAPTER I—Continued

"I'll have to admit," Brace said,

"that you played the game! But if

you're going to be so loyal, shouldn't

you be specially careful in choosing

your friends? Loyalty misplaced is

pretty treacherous.'*

''Johnny always has behaved himself

before. I don't care much for

cocktails and wild parties; but there

are certain, things you do when

you're on the deb list, you know.

Mother wanted me to have one season

of it," replied Barbara.

"Big dance at the Somerset, stag

lines, all that sort of thing?" His

tone was derisive.

"No, I just had a luncheon at

home. Father's and mother's

friends, and their families. Last

March."

"Well, there's some sense to

that."

She laughed faintly. "Oh, we're

really a pretty sensible family," she

assured him. "Perfectly respectable,

honestly." There was amusement

in her tones. "Of course we're

in trade. Father and his father

and grandfather before him. Fruit

and things. Oranges from Florida

and all that. I suppose you professors

think business is a pity; but

at least we're wholesale. That's

something, isn't it?"

He chuckled. "Everything, I

should say." And she exclaimed triumphantly,

"There, I knew you

could laugh if you tried!"

"But it seems such a waste of

time for a girl to chase around to

drunken parties—"

"Oh, don't be so worthy! Besides,

it wasn't a drunken party. Johnny's

foot slipped, that's all."

He said thoughtfully: "I know his

kind; see them in class right along.

But I don't know the girls they run

around with. You're a—new breed

to me." He looked at her directly.

"I come from a small mid-Western

town," he explained. "Folks were

church people. We didn't drink, or

—dance much, or play cards. Of

course, I know the standards I

learned as a youngster are old-fashioned

now. But—what have you put

in place of them? What are you

like? Girls your age, I mean? Yourself,

and the girls you know?"

"We're a pretty decent lot," she

assured him. "The people ten years

older than us did run wild; but the

girls I know don't drink too much,

and they're level-headed and responsible.

My older sister works

every day in the hospital. She's going

to marry a doctor and be a medical

missionary. Mother does a lot

of club work, things like that. We're

the sort of family that doesn't get

into the society columns very much.

We don't telephone the editor every

time we have people to dinner. But

we're all right. Doing our jobs, behaving

ourselves."

She hesitated, laughed a little. "I

don't know why I'm telling you the

story of my. life—except that I sort

of want you to—well, to not be so

sure I'm just a crazy kid."

He said: "I don't! I did at first,

naturally; but I can see you're—not

as bad as I thought." He smiled. "I

suppose yours is what we think of

as a 'fine old Boston family.' Your

father's turning at the next comer.

Shall I follow him?"

"Let him go," Barbara directed.

"We'll take the next turn. Yes, I

suppose we are. I never thought

much about it. My sister and I do

the usual things. Of course my

brother's in Yale instead of Harvard,

but the Sentrys have been

Yale for a good many generations.

And mother and father—"

"By the way," the professor suggested,

"why not tell your father

about this scrape tonight? I expect

he'd like to feel that he had your

confidence."

"No, he'd just disapprove and be

stern," she said. "He's always been

pretty strict with himself, and with

us too. He keeps telling me how

girls behaved when he was young!"

"It wasn't a bad way to behave!"

She laughed. "I'll bet as many

girls were kissed in buggies then as

in automobiles now. Turn here. Our

house is two blocks ahead." And

then she exclaimed: "That must be

father just turning into our drive!

He drove awfully slowly, didn't

he? Switch off your lights. Stop in

the street, and we'll wait till he has

gone to bed."

They stopped in front of the

house, hidden behind a high hedge,

and Professor Brace stilled the engine.

In the sudden silence they

heard steps on gravel.

"He's coming back from the garage,"

she whispered; and a moment

later: "There! He's opened

the front door!" Light shone out,

then was dark as the door closed

The Pinckncy Dispatch, Wednesday, August 24, 1938

again. "We'll wait till he's gone upstairs,"

she directed. "Do you

mind?"

He did not mind. He asked where

Johnny lived, how to get clothes to

take him for his appearance in court

in the morning. She gave him the

number of Johnny's dormitory

room. "But probably one of his

room-mates will do it," she suggested.

Then an upstairs light came

on.

"There!" she said. "Father's undressing.

He must have gone to the

kitchen for something before he

went upstairs." And when presently

the light went out, "Now he's in

bed!" She opened the car door.

"You've really been awfully kind.

Thanks a lot." She extended her

hand.

He said: "See here, Miss Sentry.

May I drop in, one of these days?

I'd like to know you better."

Her eyes twinkled. "Then you

don't think I'm hopeless?"

He chuckled. "Maybe I can reform

you!"

"Do come. Sunday evening?"

"Thanks. Count on me. Goodnight!"

Their hands clasped. He started

the car and drove away; and Barbara,

walking for silence's sake on

By BEfl HIT1ES lUlllltilil

tioned again between them. But the

forgiveness, naturally was only on

the surface. Yet they continued to

preserve the outward forms, even

to sleep in beds side by side, so

that not even the servants ever

knew . . . Mrs. Sentry thought

this morning that her ancient tolerance

had been repaid. Their lives

had always been outwardly serene;

were serene as they grew older

now . . .

She rose, leaving Arthur abed;

but while she was dressing, she

heard him stirring, and called,

"Thought you might want to sleep."

He said, "No," rather curtly.

"Do well last night? Have a good

game?"

"Didn't hold any cards." The

Thursday night bridge was in the

nature of a tournament, four rubbers

being played after dinner. He

referred to this as he explained

now: "They finished us off by half

past ten. I hung around for a few

minutes, and then came along

home." He added: "And I forgot

your package from Butler's, Ellen.

They delivered it about four o'clock,

but I left it on my desk at the

office."

"It doesn't matter," she said.

"Today will do." She repeated, "It

doesn't matter at all," and she won-

«uiuilU(J{

"You Find So Many Objectionable Things Abont Me Lately, Mother!"

the turf beside the gravel drive,

went toward the house.

She wondered why her father had

been downtown so late tonight; wondered

what time it was; looked at

her watch.

It was quarter of one.

Mrs. Sentry, Barbara's mother,

roused when her husband turned on

the light in their bedroom and got

into his bed beside hers. She did

not fully wake; just asked drowsily,

"Everything all right, Arthur?"

"Of course! Perfect!"

"What time is it?"

"Quarter past eleven," he said,

and she heard the rustling of the

paper as he began to re id. She

thought sleepily that he was home

early. He always dined at the Club

on Thursday evenings, with bridge

before and after dinner; but usually

he was later than that in coming

home. He was still reading when

she drifted back to sleep.

When Nellie knocked on the door

at seven next morning, Mrs. Sentry

had been some time awake, planning

her day. The seamstress in

the forenoon, lunch at Mrs. Furness'

to hear Miss Glen speak, dinner

at home this evening. Mr. Sentry

did not rouse at Nellie's knock;

and Mrs. Sentry saw that he lay on

his side, his back toward her; and

she noticed with a faint jealous resentment

of his continued youthfulness

that his tumbled dark hair was

not yet thin even on the top of his

head. They had been married almost

thirty years. The children,

babies so short a time ago, were

young men and women now. Mary,

so like Mrs. Sentry herself, absorbed

in her work at the Hospital,

taking it with a severe seriousness.

Phil, a Junior at New Haven,

closer to Mrs. Sentry than either of

his sisters, apt to tease tier about

her pride, her high head. Barbara

. . . Mrs. Sentry reflected now that

Barbara, the youngest, was almost

like a stranger in the family. Only

between Barb and Phil, both with a

gift for laughter, was there close

abiding sympathy. Mrs. Sentry

wondered—lying half asleep—what

their other children would have been

like if there had been others. But

of course there could not be. She

had, so far as outward appearances

were concerned, forgiven Arthur

that old offense readily enough. "At

least," she told him icily, that day a

few weeks before Barbara was born

when he came to her in contrite confession,

"there has been no scandal.

I could not forgive a scandal So,

since no one knows—unless she—"

And the matter was never m£E-

dered why she went to such pains

to reassure him, realized that there

was something like apprehension in

his tone, as though he were afraid

what she would say. She asked hurriedly,

"Who did you play with?"

"Dean Hare," he said. "Against

Carl Bettle and Bob Flood."

She came into his dressing-room,

herself ready for the day, and

watched him knot his tie, brush his

hair, trim his mustache. "What a

time you have with that, don't

you?" she said, amused at his intensity

as he leaned close to the

mirror, his jaw depressed to draw

his upper lip taut, holding his mustache

flat with one finger while with

many grimaces he trimmed its ragged

edges.

He nodded, and put on coat and

vest, stowed odds and ends in his

pockets, said, "Well, ready?"

She felt tautness in him, a need

for reassurance. "You look about

twenty-five," she told him dutifully.

"Not a day older than Mary. You

make me feel as though I had four

children instead of three!" He

smiled; and she thought she had

succeeded in putting him in better

humor for the day. She had always

administered praise to him like a

medicine, skillfully.

The house was old, of brick, foursquare,

with a French roof, the

slopes broken by fables that admitted

light to the servants' quarters

and storage rooms on the upper

floor. It had been built by Arthur's

grandfather, in what was

at that time open country; but now

it was crowded among others, most

of them of a later period, and retained

only a narrow area of lawn

and garden, with room for a tennis

court beside the garage in the rear.

A sluggish stream meandered behind

the garage at an angle across

the rear of the lot; and there was a

pergola of brick and stone behind

the tennis-court, built by Arthur's

father, on the bank above the water

where ducks came to feed. Rhododendrons

ten or twelve feet high

screened the house from the street

in front, and there were hedges

along the lot line on either side. Outside,

the house was as it had been

built, save for the English ivy which

cloaked the walls; but inside there

were changes. Arthur's mother,

when she was mistress here, had

torn out walls, intalled bathrooms,

dressing-rooms, closets; redecorated

again and again.

Mary was at the table when Mr.

and Mrs. Sentry entered the diningroom;

rose punctiliously to greet

them. She was a tall, lovely girL

her cheeks a little hollowed so that

her cheekbones and the line of her

jaw showed firmly; and her eyes

were apt to be grave, even when

she smiled. She wore this morning

a suit of blue-gray homespun, and

her father, seeing this, commented:

"Loeks as though you're dressed

for business."

She nodded. "Yes," she agreed.

"I'm going to the hospital." She

spent part of every day there as a

volunteer, tending convalescent patients,

learning something of nursing

and medicine in the process.

The hospital was Mrs. Sentry's pet

charity; but Neil Ray, rather than

her mother, was responsible for the

fact that Mary's interests were thus

directed. Neil was studying medicine,

planning to follow his father

as a medical missionary in China;

and he wanted Mary to marry him.

"I told him," she confessed to

her mother the night he proposed to

her, "that I was no kind of wife for

any kind of missionary!" Yet she

had thereafter plunged into this

work, as though thus she might deserve

him. That was months ago.

Mrs. Sentry had spoken her mind

to Mary, with the frankness upon

which she prided herself. "Ridiculous!"

she said. "To go way off to

China! And preposterous for him to

let you humble yourself! You've lost

your head over this young man."

But the only result of her advice

had been to awaken in Mary a defensive

and antagonistic attitude,

make her increasingly critical toward

them all. Thus she said to

Mr. Sentry now:

"And speaking of hospitals, you

look as though you ought to be in

one, father. Been burning the candle

at both ends?"

"Had a bad night," he explained.

"Lay awake, fighting to get to sleep,

for hours."

"You don't look sleepy," Mary

commented, in a dry, professional

tone. "You look as though—well,

as though your nerves were all

shot." She smiled. "Probably liverish,"

she suggested. "Stick out

your tongue!"

Mrs. Sentry said in a dry tone,

"Mary, I'm beginning to object to

this clinical atmosphere in the

home."

"You find so many objectionable

things about me lately, mother!"

(TO BE CONTINUED)

Peasants of Poland Like Their Colors;

Women Wear Mixtures of Bright Shades

In JK> corner of the world has

modern fashion in dress made less

headway than in the Polish countryside.

The spinning wheel and the

loom still hold their place of honor,

and homespun still is the garb ot 75

per cent of the peasants.

There are four main groups of

peasant costumes in Poland. The

two most striking are in and around

Lowicz, and on the southeastern

border of Poland among the Huculs.

The others are to be found among

the Gorals in the Zakopane district

and in Upper Silesia, notes a writer

in the Detroit News.

Lowicz skirts are made from the

famous rainbow wool, showing wide

stripes of orange and canary yellow,

alternating with narrow strips

of blacks and browns, violet and

amaranth, rich chocolate hues, deep

purples, green and rose. But yellow

seems to prevail, a yellow as radiant

as the California poppy. The

fashion comes straight from the

native soil, for the women weave

just what they see through their

door: long, narrow fields which at

a distance look like vari-colored

stripes on the landscape.

These women wear close fitting

vests with horizontal stripes end

their white linen blouses have loose

sleeves, sometimes gayly embroidered.

The Huculs run to bright colors,

which would be considered somber

if compared with those of Lowicz.

A unique feature is that the women

wear aprons instead of skirts-one

apron fore and another aft The result

is a close fitting garment with'

plenty of looseness for riding and

mountain climbing. And this is being

considered by stylists for sports

wear as a variation on the coulettes

that have recently been the rage.

The sleeveless lambskin coats

worn by these women also are

adapted for winter sports. They

usually are made with the fur side

in, and the outer skin embroidered

in gay colors. They give plenty of

free arm play and keep the torso

toasty warm. Hucul women wear

them all winter in the icy mountain

blasts.

Ohio's State House

The state house at Columbus,

Ohio, was completed in 1859. It

took 20 years to build it In 1898

an annex was built on the east side

of the main structure, and in 1939

an office building erected on the)

banks of the Scioto river* doneied by

the city of Columbus, -

Smart Dresses for

Now and Later On

mz 1541

.»>

ERE are two perfectly charm­

H ing fashions that will fill a

definite place in your life if you

make them up immediately in

pretty cotton or cool silk. And they

are so perfectly in key with future

fashions that you should by

all means repeat them later in

fall and winter materials. You'll

be surprised, when you study the

detailed sew chart included in each

pattern, how quickly and easily

you can finish them. You don't,

need experience. Even beginners

enjoy working with these simple

patterns.

Tailored Dress of Pique.

If your daytime wardrobe needs

replenishing for the remaining

weeks of summer, make this nice

tailored dress of pique or gingham,

and see how refreshed and comfortable

you'll feel. Later on,

wear it for fall in challis, jersey,

or flat crepe. The short sleeves,

easy waistline and action pleats,

in the skirt make this dress very

easy to work in—and the deeply

notched collar and patch pockets

give it finish enough so that it is

appropriate for street wear, too.

Tiny-Walsted Afternoon Dress.

Here's the type of dress that all

important fashion sources show

for fall! The shaped, rather high

square neckline, the short sleeves,

puffed at the top, the gathers that

give you flattering bust fullness

and the very, very small waist—

these are all new notes. Just five

steps, too, in the sew chart. For

immediate wear, make it up,in

dotted Swiss or voile. Your fall

version should be thin wool, crepe

de chine or rayon jersey.

The Patterns.

No. 1462 is designed for sizes 34.

36, 38, 40, 42, 44 and 4«. Size 36requires

4V4 yards of 39-inch material.

No. 1561 is designed for sizes 12,

14, 16, 18 and 20. Size 14 requires

4½ yards of 39-inch material; 1%

yards ribbon for belt.

Send your order to The Sewing

Circle Pattern Dept., Room 1020,.

211 W. Wacker Dr., Chicago, 111.

Price of patterns, 15 cents (in

coins) each.

© Bell Syndicate. — WNU Service.

E

NERVOUS?

Do you (eel to nervous you want to scream? < ,

Are you cross and irritable? Do you scold

those dearest to you?

If your nerves are on edfs and you feel ,

ou need a food general system tonic, try

.ydia E. Pinkham's Vegetable Compound, „ .

mads especially for

For over 60 years one woman has told an- >

other how to go "smiling thru" with reliable

Pinkham's Compound. It helps nature build 4

up more physical resiitasce and th,us helps

calm quivering nerves and lessen diseomfbns

from annoying symptoms which often accompany

fsmsle functional disorders.

why not give it a ehanee to help YOU?

Over one million women have written In

reporting wonderful benefits from Pinkham's

Compound.

WNU—O 34—38

Wary of Choices

Look out for choices. They run

into habit, character, destiny.—

Maltbie W. Babcock. ' "' .

HELP KIDNEYS

To Get Rid of Add

and Poisonous Waste

Tear kidneys help to keep yut, weS'

by constantly filtering waste matter

from the blood. If your kidneys get

functionally disordered sad fall to

remove excess imparities, there may be

pojsoaing of^


'&

m i i

rw—r

Taxpayers

/ u::

TTte second installment of taxes Jor

the years of 1933-34-35 and the

| fourth installment of 1932 and prior

A

years taxes are now due and should

be payed before September 1. 1938

Only a two percent collection {ee

bi collected ii paid be\ore Sept.

•51 i : v

wi ui

Mrs. Jennie Eastman

LIVINGSTON COUNTY TREAS.

Electrical Contracting

'FIXTURES SUPPLIES

ELECTRICAL WIRING AND REPAIRING

REASONABLE PRICES

ESTIMATES CHEERFULLY GIVEN

ALL WORK GUARANTEED

' C. Jack Sheldon

Phone 19F12 Electrical Contractor

' ThePinckney Sanitarium"

RAY M DUF1FY M. D.

Pinckn«y, Michigan

Office Jftouii—- ••» .

2:00 to 4:00" P. M.

7:00 to 9:0» P. M.

DR. G. R, McCLUSKEY

DENTIST

112¼ N. Michigan ^

Phones

Office, 220 Res. 123J

Evenings by appointment

I Howell, Michigan

i JAY P. SWEENEY

Attorney at Law

Howell, Michigan

PERCY ELLIS

AUCTIONEER

Farm Sales a Specialty

Phone Pinckney 19-F11

MARTIN J. LAVAN

Attorney at Law

Phone 13 ^ighton,

GUS R1SSMAN

PLUMBING and HEATING

Will be glad to give estimates

»n the following inataltations:

* Stoker

•Plumbing

'Steam or hot air heating

* Electric pumpe m ,

•Water systetna

XM1 burners

ever 20 years experience

611 E. Grand River, Moweli

Phone Howell 610

Chobbs Corners

Mr. and Mrs. Albert Dinkel and

son, Allen, shopped in Lansing; on

Saturday.

Miss Virginia Hoisel Is spending

two weeks in northern Michigan.

Mr. and—Mrs. Parkins or Crosse

Pointe visited at the Roberts home

Sunday. * •, .

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew uampbell

and family and Mr. Chris Kingsley

spent Sunday at the L. D. Coffee

home in Fowlerville.

Alberta Dinkel spent last week in \

Howell with Betty Smith,

Mr. Lathers of Garden City spent

Monday with hfs son, Cyrus.

Donna Jean Coffee is spending a

few days with Susan Campbell.

Mr. Steel is painting the Roy A.

Smollett home.

Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Bennett

tod chjldrto of Ctmdta «n 19194-

i (.«;*. ~x,

P»nckney

Office Phone No. 7 Res. Phone No.7

Dr.H. G. Porter

OSTEOPATHIC

PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON

Genera] rTacti»« end Obftetrici

Offic, H^urs

l to 5 P. M. and 7 to 9 P. M, "*

Mornings by Appointment

510 E. Main St. Pinckney, Mich.l

C. M. TH1BAULT

Carpenter and Builder

Hi«Land Lake

Pinckney Mich., R2

/

NORMAN REASON

REAL ESTATE BROKER

Farm residential property and

Lake Frontage a Specialty. 1

Also Have City Property iq

Trade. i±SXJ

Claude Sheldon

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR

Phone 19F12 Pinckiwy, Mich,

DON W. VANWINKLE

Attorney at Law

Office over

First Skate Savings Bank

Howell, Michigan

LEF LAVEY

GENERAL INSURANCE

Phone 59-F3

Pinckney, Michigan

ing a few days at the home of Mr.

and Mrs. Chris Kingsley.

Mesdamcs Mark Alison Wm.

Mercer, Nora Reason, Clayton Musand

Albert Dinkel attended a

ler party at Mrs. Kirk VanWinkeT

< of Lansing Fiiday.

Miss LaVerna Lake and Betty

Smith of Howell with Mr. and Mrs.

Albert Dinkel and family spent last

Sunday in Detroit at the home of

E. L. Kew. Miss Shirley Kew came

home with them to spend the week

with Alberta.

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Wagoner spent

the la3t of last week in Fort Wayne,

Indiana visiting his brothers.

Mr. and Mrs. Chris Kingsley u

company-\vi;.h Willard Dennett an;

family spsnt Tuesday in New

Lolhrop.

Mr. and Mrs. 'Wm. Brown an'

family spent Sunday with Mr. and

Mr* Perry Brown.

The Pinckney, Dispatch Wednesday, August 24,1938

Notes of 50 Years Ago

John J. Raftery, artistic tailor of

Chelsea will be here every two weeks

10 take orders tor clothing.

Mann Broa. have white plug hats

for both Cleveland and Harrison

supporters. J

The Republican senatorial com- 1 ,

mittee convention will be held at.

Flint on Sept. 7th. The committee

is John J. Carton, C. G. Jewett and

Giles Lee.

The Misses Hattie Haze, Joie Clin

ton, Jessie Green and Franc Burch

lire attending tho teachers institute

at Howell.

Mrs. Kate Swurthout and children

of Williamston are visiting her mother,

Mrs. Patrick Smith.

M. Ayers of Anderson advertises

to break colts and ugly horses.

H. B. Johnson landlord of the

a

Monitor House has given it up and

j>;one to Howell.Benj. Allen, the owner,

will now operate the hotel.

The Pinckney school opens Monday

with the following teachers. Wm

Sprout^ prin., C. E. Coste, Hattie

Haze, intermediate, Joie Clinton, in

the primary.

The Republican had a grand

pole raising and rally Saturday. The

pole was 30 feet long and the banner

GO feet long. It was stretched

trom the pole to Mann Bros, store.

Hon. Burton Parker of Monroe spoke

at the town hall at night.

The following are the list of qual

ified teachers who live in Pinckney.

foie Clinton, P. G. Kelly, M. T. Kelly,

J. W. Monks, Lyle Younglove,

John Stackable^ Mrs. V. C. Bennett,

Belle Kennedy, Hattie Haze, C E.

rostc, John C:irr( Rosa Bland, Kate

'{oche, Lucy Harris, Jessie Green,

Woltha Green, Franc Burch, G. L,

.Markey, Mary Ruen, W. H. Hadley,

Flota Hallt Thomas Harris, Nellie

Tlinton.

Alden G. Carpenter of Chilsori has

"seen granted a pension.

While blasting with giant powder

tear Chelsea recently Frank Staffan

md Perry Dcpew were badly hurt.

Staffan had to have one of his finrers

amputated and Depew sUjffered

nternal injuries when a piece of I

if stone hit him in the abdomen.

Billy .Doyle entertained a large

-roup at a warming of his new*e*

"riday night. Dancing and plenty of

.'ood and drink.

James Marble attended the Demicrut

convention at Pontiac last week'

hirh nominated 0. W. Burnes for

Congress. \ \ f,"\W\

The Anderson feed mill has been

•>Id to Brighton parties and will be

"loved there.

Floyd Collins, 5 year old son of

'Ii. and Mrs. W lis Collins died on

Vcdnrvday. The funr;al wa f Friday

vith burial in Gilkt ,• cemp^ery.

MARRIAGE LICENSES

Jay P. Sweeney, 40, Howell, Edth

Hi'len Grant, 32, Howell; George

VkClure, 22, Howell, Thelma Diet-

.Tic, 22, Howell; George Wild 31,

Brighton Mae Savage, 39, Brighton

isiting friends hero.

The sheriff at Howell confiscated

:68 bottles of liquor at the Ann Aroor

freight house there. It had been

hinned without the necessary labels

;o conform to the law.

E.. E. Hoyt, village treas., is coloctirver

taxes.

Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs.

Robert Kelly^ were Mrs. Wedman

and daughter of Ann Arbor, Mr.

and Mrs. James Tredway arid child*

on and Mrs. Myers 2nd her neice,

>:•:. Heath of Indiana.

Q t. Mary's p.rriu.il picni? held last

Vdnrsday in Jackr.on'a grove was

• gland xucceas. Frank Sh«e!ds actd

aa toastma«tcr and speeches were

mm W I,- J'J. ,,'IPW

... these new cost figures

mau ckcuuje q&uSi mind!

How much do you think it costs to cook on an electric

range? The latest figures just released may surprise

you. A survey has been made of actual cooking costs

in families of 3, 4 and 5 people, covering a period of

one year's time. Results of the survey are as follows:

Average cost for a family of three — $1.55 a month;

family of four - $1.73 a month; family of five - $1.93

a month. These are AVERAGE figures, at the rate of

2¼ cents (net) per kwhr.

To obtain these cost figures, 5 well-known makes and

9 different models of electric ranges were included.

The ranges were used by women cooking meals

daily, in ordinary kitchens and under everyday working

conditions. The tests prove conclusively that

electric cooking on today's modern ranges is NOT

expensive!

Why not enjoy the cloanliness, convenience and

comfort of an ele&tric range in your kitchen this summer?

Sixty thousand families in and around Detroit

have chosen this up-io-date cooking method. Ten

thousand of your neighbors switched to electric

cooking last year. Once you have discovered the

many advantages of an electric range, you will wish

you had installed one in your kitchen long ago.

Sec the-now electric ranges on display at department stores, electric*!

dealers or at Detroit Edison oifices.

DEADLINE FOR

HALF-YEAR PLATES NEAR ua

Use df the black and white half-

Lake band furnished music The lull, TIK- HiHmvt Inn. formerly the

game between Pinckney and ( I-M- I>"v-!, li-n en Giaml li.vrr n-.ar Is-

•oar auto li'-onse plates will be ill—

sea was won by Pi:u-kr,ey 11 tf half year plates beyond August

51, 1938, the time limit having been

established by statute.

The Serretary ol State estimates

hat approximately 450 000 Michigan

motorists are still operating their

ars on half year plates.

NOTES cf 25 YEARo 4G0

Srhool comri.c'n es here {-ept. 1.

Miss Belle Kennedy started Tuc?

lay to California where she will resume

her duties as teacher at L«ng

leach, California.

1 L:ik " l,unu ' ,i ' , '' A VV.-.i^-sday

Datteries for Pinckney wt-re Loy »";! '"'.ruin- with an estimated Ios, of

Roche McClear; for Chelsea were *1">,000. Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Me-

Fred Meyers and George Kratssmil-; VuU . * no OWIHJIV were in Hamilton,

ler. The proceeds of the day were Ontario, Harry Odell and Miss Helen

$600 Cook had closed the; place at 3:00

The Misses Mae Kennedy and Joie a. m. The fire wii; discover.: d at -1.C0

Devereaux are spending the week at^- l ^> or an hour later. ]

Niagara Falls. | T hp Spardsli War Veterans of

Pinickny will play the Chelsea Livingston County have formed an

team at the Dexter Labor Day pic- auxiliary live officers of whi"h wil'

nic this year. he installer! on Sunday, Sept. 4 at

Caspar Vollmer and wife and MissjSt. Joseph's Hall .Howell.

Lucy Harris spent Sunday with Mr.} Urijrhton town-hip board has voand

Mrs. Stephen Scully in Webster, j ted to license junk yards and it will

The Misses Lelia Monks, Edna! be unlawful to operate one without

Tiplady Joie, Sadie and Lucy Har- a license.

vis were entertained Sundry at the Mrs. Gertrude Hoff Mumingham

home of D. M. Monks.

of Howell hes sold her beauty shop

there to Mrs.. Lewis Eager.

NEIGHBORING NOTES Tuesday, Augrs^ !», nine young

If Supervisor Gilbert Madden of

girls, ages 11 to :•'>, members of the

Dexter township has his way thei National Hostel .Wn stopped at

• Dexter enroute from Saiino to Pat,f

voters of Washtenaw county will not,

John Dinkel brought a tomato to vote on a bond issue for a new|£» on Lak ^ Thr« girls, seven from

his office Monday weighing i lb. court houae on Sept. 13. The bo^d ' Cnica *°> Til " and two f ron Kalama-

Wm Hall of St. Paul, Minn., is I of supervisors recently voted to put Z0! > r * re touriri -ggggy^^gg

es., plus any insurance which mafl

b« paid between the date of this

notice and the date of late, and at*

.-o an attorney fee of thirty-fhre dol«

lat-3 ($85.00) as provided for in

said mortgage, and no rait cr pro*

ccedings at law or in equity having

been instituted to recover the deM

secured by said mortgage or any

part thereof. NOW, THEREFORE,

hy virtue of the power of sale eon*

taincd in srid mortgage, and in puN

suance of the statute in such cisej

mane and provided, notice is hereby?

given that on Mondov, uie 19lh di||

of September, \. U. 1038, at "Utk

(10:00) o'clock In the forenoon

Eastern Standard Time, said mort*

gage will be foreclosed by sale aH

public vendue to the highest biddeB

at the south door of the court hottiej

in the City of HoweR, Livingtton

County, Mic.igan, which preiftitef

are described as followi, to-wit:

Township of Green Oak, Livingston

County, Michigan:- The Noftt«

• e-t one fourth of the Northwee#

one fourth of Section 24, in Town

* M.r.ngan, stopping

at the T«utho»teed Hrftol

1 North, Range 6 East, MkJrtpBathe

proposition on the ballot. Mad- J£ " l ' : "^"'"wii nrftoi Camps.

den claims two thirds of the board ^ . ^ ^ ^ r ^ ^ Z l T l J .

did not vote for it as required and

furthermore that the courthouse is

not needed. He will start court action

to prevent the vote.

J. D. Appleton, veteran Brighton

mail carrier, died at his home there

August 16th, aged 71 years.

Brighton high school in order to

get in three weeks practise before

thfeir opening f\>otball gamef will

start practice on Sept. 1st. This is

in intcrschoolastic rule.

The city of Brighton now hires

\ truck to pick up rubbish every

other Friday.

A gasoline war is on at Brighton

bor August lr.th and will leave from e or l ^*'

there by boat for Chicago. Dex. Lead. Date^: June 16, 1938.

Oscar L TuthiU A Lora P,

Ttithill, MORTGAGEE*

KINNEY AND ADAM3 v NOTICE OF MORTACE SALE

Default having been n. aoe tor. .

< .,

more than thirty for Mortffagtef, I.

davs in tie condit- ,^°^

.-M'

Pontiac. Michigan. * *" ^

6 ^ « v Mjl

ions of a certain mortage executed " L ^ ! ? . J ? ? *

by Maurice C. Drtvis and "Lfrlia F. _

Davis, hu.-band and wife, to Oscar! „ , ' ' AJ ' * . . _ '

L. Tuthlll and Lom P. TutWIl. tod'., .^ re ** ^ . ^ S , B , t o l 5*S

May !•>, 2D, 10,5 1035 and recorded corded May 29, 20. ^ ^J ^ ' ' I*° ^ * ^ . " J . " ? ^ ^

1935

T ^ % "JS-TT?

in Liber 138 of Mortagea^age SL T*JFtt*^jF

3:)0 Lndngston County Register of ^ " ^ 1 , ^ ¾ ^ ¾ ^ *

)eeds Office, on v,h»ch mortage there Team. Add ^ ^ ^

•4 new c\nx.y. to be due the turn of photog df nouj^t]

if fourteen hundred dollars,(11400) of Clark it an actitT Thai

^ade by W. E. Robb of Howell Mid and „ gas . can now . _ be bought at 81 rincipal, one hundred ten dolla**' in attraotivi

:ug.ne ferry of Dttwut, Jh§ Kfft^ |BH«U IN ft WW^^I.

'»^

r

•Sf

&


.'SitAsi?*

m>y

-v..

m.

•M-

p — ^ <

Howell Theatre

Thurt., Fri.

A Stirring Dr

Com«dy,

NEW HOWELL THEATRE Aug 24, 25

of Real Folks It Could Happen in Your Family

"WHITE BANNERS

With

CLAUDE RAIN, FAY BAJNTER

\

NEWS

BONITA GRANVILLE, JACKIE COOPER

Sat. Aug. 27th DOUBLE BILL Mat. 2 p. in. 10c 20c

"Mr. Motto Takes

a Chance I!

with

ROCHELLE HUDSON

PETER LORRE

The Picture You've

Been Waiting For

GENE AUTRY

"Goldmine in the Sky"

with

SMILEY BURNETTE

CAROLE HUGHES

CRAIG REYNOLDS

OSWP.M Ci rtoon

S«n. Mon. Tue«. Wed. 4_- DAYSJ-4 Mat. Sun. 2 p. *n. Cont.

Aug, 28th, 29th, 30th, 31st SHIRLEY TEMPLE Attend Mfct.

"Little Miss Broadway"

GEORGE MURPHY, JIMMY DURANTE, PHYLLIS BROOKS

EDNA MAE OLIVER, CHARLIE McCARTHY, NEWS, MUSICAL

NOVELTY, COMEDY

T!|ur»., and Fri. MARTHA RAYE

in

^¾¾^ %L&*' J ^ ****- WJH *«J Huston of

i^M^S^-^ 4 ^ •»


*$

T

,• Club neer liri^htonl^

SPECIAL!!

Every Friday Sor the

. Next Four Weeks

lit i - .

WE WILL GIVE AWA Y FREE WITH EVERY

Snow White Soda

A BEAUTIFUL GLASS WITH

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs

HCTURES ON THE GLASS

ONLY ONE A DA* A WEEK EVERY FRIDAY

r OR FOUR WEEKS

When You Buy Seal Test Arctic Ice Cream You

Buy th«

« • • •

ennetiysDrugStore

'. i..:va: y'l Curlett was homo

11« :u'd Jiead lias enrolled a.> a i-Yam-i.- Shehan spent part of last

• • f ,^-^ the week end- J,

IU !•,•:;.• i;. .,n), JJ^ A n h u r Mickens of

• wnv hurt. The car \venLJ 1! ' U! hlrth,I:i >' with a Urinr1 ' rua>t Detn^i were Sunday guests of Mr.

t'-u fool (nd)aaknient. j ^ K; "' h ^--^- 1, V/e-la. • day > veiling. 4 .;ruj ,.,. yL K RiUcr aner 14th. Mrs. Peck suggests that we

:ommit Bible verses to memory in

preparation for a contest using

fMummHiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiHimw^^^ wiiiuin!«iimnniu,iimniniiiiiiiiiii

I a°r Reason & Sons DXtt

fi

born, Michigan.

Eugene Mann suffered a severe |S

nervous breakdown last week and re {E

hose beginning with all the letters j ^ ^ tQ Dctrojt whh his h:.olhcr i-

>f the alphabet. Forewarned, f° re ^Knvin Fridav 3

ll,mcd ' I Miss Justine Ledwi-.l-re of D.^.-oitjS

Wc were grateful to our guest t thft week fml with h(.r molhcr!fi

•.ingers last Sunday who ably assist- Mrs Eleanop Ledwi(1?e, =

HI in the music for the church ser- Mr aJ,d Mrg 0na Can-llhc.u anf,|.

/ices. The Young People's, or What- (^^httr> Lc0T1a Kuth to.jk a t.,., t|

IMV, NOVEMBER, 30TH, 1938, at 10:00 j 50-Ever so-Ever Class will furnish a special tllroUffh ,nor1horn Michi-an vith,5

o'clock in the (orenoon, Eastern Standard * number « next • Sunday ~ » for «...«__ the Church of northeast quarter 1¼) flection »1.

-southeast quarter (¼) of thr- r«ri»r:«ojt

quarter fVo flection 10 and southwest

quarter (¼) of southwest quarter (Vfc)

fleetion 28, Town Two North, Range 8U

Bast, Mtentgsm, ka«


A

J* 3 J

THE I'ACI HAS ui:;;.\ :

»

The Pinckney Dispatch Wednesday. August 24,¾ 938

antine

Livi&igston County

,oT \;:LiSi!El> THAT DOGS AFFECTED WITH AN INFECTIOUS AND

COMAiL'MCALLE J'l^i.A:.:

L k..u\YN AS THE 'TiAUiES HAVE RECENTLY BEEN AT LARGE

IN THE TuV\.\S..Ii'.; L-' j^iGhTON, Gi:EEN UAK, HAMBURG, MARION AND OCEOLA IN

LIVINGS'! u.\ L J L : , U . .d LCiiLviAJ-i, A.\D Ai... KNOWN TO HAVE BITTEN PERSONS AND

ANI.UALS A;:D MAI' ^ A\ E Lu.\iK I.N CON TACT WITH DOGS YET UNKNOWN.

NOTICE IS HEREBY (, i VEX THAT A£Y DOG WHICH IS OWNED, Kl-iPT OR HARBORED

WTTiHN LI\ lAiiSi'uv (OeMi, .MICHIGAN, SHALL HE SECURELY CHAINED OR SECURE­

LY (JUi\FlNLi> i .,Ui-Al LuNiTiuL OF THE OW XEll OR CUSTODIAN OF SUCH DOG TO PRE­

VENT TiiE .'..'..:..: .^i) IM.H, ;• K:>A Ai'iACK i.\'ij ANY OTHER ANhuAL OK ANY' PERSON.

NO SLCH IKA. ^iiAivL i.i. AEi.OwT.D IU KLN AT LARGE DURING THE'PERIOD OF THIS

• QLAK.i.wEs-^. v?

Uie aliLiiin,ii oi ail c,

following

dLllicL Oi UilS .-t'.;

Uny u*ii,i' cjMa0.

amulet ,-.iUi. i>w . ~

tennt/ ui su.1: ;. ^

111 LiiC LISUK l ..;.

it Uiul .iui;:' tji.i.i

of tins uA .-l:..li i.

A' 1

the I'ulu', i'' v/.'i .'.i'..

oi .A^i'icuilai (.•; i......

\ l t l U . I i l l ! . . " . - • .

than JIHJ huaai^.l dui

J

i.'l

.!'..• e'l' )\..C|'CJCJ Ui

• v 1.,., . ' V u. i i.L.

dogs iu tiie above named teniioiy is hereby called lo

k

lating lo Uie ,'iur.au u. ^..uaul Bidusuy winch pro

,tL" ui- U-i aiiu iLutl UJ ..0..0..^:

to UOL-IUV ;t,iu t.iioree- a quarantine on do^s in any

01 iabiL., ho;; cxioleru, houj ana mouui Uisease,ur

Uie li\estui:i. ,wiivi may oiati 1 .:.. (. i. Lilvu.. lii.-i'u.-'C aiaui;^

U;Ui all dogs ui said

'- : " h ^ l -" c/i;i(.i\. ,: uv_ eo.i- iiuc-d.Aiiy di' ."'-'•, < on- . i.U/M ,. a..d 'Hiiii* u.iiii:*. i; a: jiolKX' otlicei.- to sec to

•'• : ' -.-J (.;.j.../i(. a. ^'.ny uiiic'jV Kntilig U Uoy ijiuauaiii to tne pi'Ovu^uiu

n S iiuiJiJity liiercior.

•vi-'Uiiin^, ti..-i'.;^.a\lai;4 ur evudin^ any of the pio\ it>iom; of this act,or any of

'•»' ' ' i' laiXi-Luiiij ul the Coinni.irioni r of Animal Industry,(Conian^ionei'

• ; -.:^t;», .I..LJ, L.. (.„ tf.aeu lo be ^uiJly oi a nnsdeaieanor and upo;: ^rn-

1 ' '•• . • oil by a fine oi not loss than ten dollars nor more

LL : ' ,;ii ' i),J il,: j - i-"aed in Uie county jail for a peiiod of not more than nin-

cty da.\c- oi- Go;ii . ,,:.

oU'en.-c uj.oa cuj

than Uve Jic;nai(.-d vioii.n

niontlis or IJV buui . iu:i

tion, ui - ••"•' '-.(j.! i. uj.a.cal wathm the di.-cieuoii of the court.and for each subsequent

L,i y

"

pumped by a fine of not less than fifty dollars nor more

1 1 ! M

"' ' ' ""^-'U m the county jail for a period of not more tnan six

t'oaimon i. i:

'^' •'^•i

to comply \,Kij Lh. r. ^,,:,

-'^i i:iVii UJU:K:H in the discretion of the court. Any person, corpora-

"-i ^- ;• •J.^^^IM^iJ 'gp^

II

0

0

1

3

0

1

2

0

0

1

0

2

1

1

0

0

0

9

0

0

0

1

0

PO

1

0

0

7

1

4

0

0

0

0

2

3

6

0

0

1

0

0

1

3

0

0

0

A

c

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

1

[CAMP ROBINSON TAKES

! PINCKNEY AGAIN

Canip Robinson made it two

straight when they won irom Pinck-ney

last Friday 8 to 1. Jordan vl,

pitched for them is said to be one

of the best pitchers in Toledo. The

Finckuey boys only got two hit-'

OJ'F him, rh.glcs by D;uk(>l i:nd Pau'

Singer. Singer pit'Jed for Pincltney

and was a littie \vild with tiie

.csalt ho was 3 and 2 on many o

iho batters, 'l hey usuaily hit the

i .-i'ipple. Pinckney':.; lone run c: nic

in the Glh when Cliff Miller walked

w{ nt to third on a wild throw to

firs;, ivd scored on M-eaborTs sma !;

t;o third, Meabon beiiifr out at first

on a close play. This will probably

abs'it f-nd the soft ba)l ^ames •'

i rots dark pretty early now.

| Pine!* ney

AH R II

Oarrow, 3b 3 0 0

Dinkol, rf, rs 2 0 1

P. Singer, j) 2 0 1

Read, cf 2 0 0

15. Van, c 2 0 0

r

avoy, 2b " 2 0 0

Mnyer, rs, rf. .. 2 0 0

Ledwidge^ lb 2 0 0

Miller, If! 1 1 0

Meabon, Is 2 0 0

PO A

1 2

Commis;ionc-r of Agriculture


: , ^ <

•if***. * -..•»•

m*m •V

WHO'S

NEWS

THIS

WEEK

By LEMUEL F. PARTON

EW JfpRK.—When Sir Walter

N pitWSt^an waB here in 1937, it

tfome Talent

Far Opera

QQ Bargain

ficiency in music.

It was going to

discover and nurture

native talent.

That hasn't quite

vCJMne off, and there have been the

usual, number of importations. It

will be interesting if it brings in not

y>nly a European manager, but one

who ia its sharpest critic.

.< Among music lovers of this writer's

acquaintance, there seems to

be great indifference about where

the .stagers come from as long as

they are good. They insist that music,

above all, must be free from

the sharply nationalistic trends of

the day.

As a lad, Tullio Serafin laid

down a shepherd's crook lor a

, baton. Tending the sheep aear

.Cavarsere on the Venetian

mainland, he used to walk several

miles to town oa Saturday

•' night, at the age of tea, to conduct

the village band. He attended

the conservatory at Mi*

' Ian and was a fuD-fledf ed conductor

ia his early youth.

't^AttLa 6cal*7 in Milan, he was

it conductor ' under Gatti-

He became one of the

*ttodaf widely known and popular coni

doctors in Europe.

' A stanch supporter of the Fascist

regime from its outset, he has been

conductor of the Royal Opera at

Acme since hit departure from New

York. Hj^waa replaced here by

MM»e Paniixa.

*


\^-*

N

'I

fc

CiA. •

V

I

3W- B/

Get Set for Fall and

Winter Radio Programs

World Series, Foot Ball Games

and Election Results

• * $

"&

IV'ZT,

s:=ff;

&*J

pi»

P RADIOS

U 5-?•

$14

and

Ask Sor Demonstration

LAVEY HARDWARE

The Pinckney Dispatch Wednesday, August 24,1938

»#«^

More magazines by this user
Similar magazines