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5 years ago

UC Surgeon-Scientist Receives $1.5 Million Grant to Study Heart ...

UC Surgeon-Scientist Receives $1.5 Million Grant to Study Heart ...

UC Surgeon-Scientist Receives $1.5 Million Grant to Study Heart

Winter 2005-2006 UC Surgeon-Scientist Receives $1.5 Million Grant to Study Heart Enlargement/Failure Surgeons at the University of Cincinnati College of Medicine have received $1.5 million to study the link between heart enlargement and heart failure. Shahab Akhter, M.D., Assistant Professor of Surgery in the Division of Cardiac Surgery, is principal investigator for the five-year study funded by the National Institutes of Health, National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute, and the Thoracic Surgery Foundation for Research & Education. Dr. Akhter believes that protein kinase C, a molecule that is activated when the heart becomes enlarged, “turns on” a specific enzyme that limits the heart’s ability to respond to stress and pump efficiently. This can lead to poor heart function and, ultimately, heart failure. Dr. Akhter and his team will study the interaction between these signaling molecules in multiple lines of genetically engineered mice, each designed to express a specific kinase or kinase inhibitor, in order to identify new ways [see inside - “Akhter”] Dr. Shahab Akhter and Dr. Karyn Butler in their labs at the Cardiovascular Research Center. Trauma Surgeon Continues Innovative Cardiac Research Karyn Butler, M.D., F.A.C.S., F.C.C.M., Associate Professor of Surgery, Division of Trauma and Critical Care, continues her research on hypertrophied hearts with support from a National Institutes of Health, Mentored Clinical Scientist (K08) Award. Cardiac chamber remodeling following myocardial infarction or in response to hypertension may lead to left ventricular hypertrophy and cardiac failure. Preconditioning, or ischemic adaptation, repre- sents the intrinsic capacity of the heart to protect itself from ischemic injury. The molecular basis of this phenomenon remains to be further characterized. Clinical and experimental studies indicate that hypertrophied hearts are more vulnerable to ischemic insult compared to nonhypertrophied hearts. In non-hypertrophied myocardium, cardiac preconditioning can attenuate ischemia/reperfusion induced contractile [see inside - “Butler”]

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